Tag Archives: Wylie Stateman

Wylie Stateman on Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood‘s Oscar nod for sound

By Beth Marchant

To director Quentin Tarantino, sound and music are primal forces in the creation of his idiosyncratic films. Often using his personal music collection to jumpstart his initial writing process and later to set a film’s tone in the opening credits, Tarantino always gives his images a deep, multi-sensory well to swim in. According to his music supervisor Mary Ramos, his bold use of music is as much a character as each film’s set of quirky protagonists.

Wylie Stateman

Less showy than those memorable and often nostalgic set-piece songs, the sound design that holds them together is just as critically important to Tarantino’s aesthetic. In Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood it even replaces the traditional composed score. That’s one of many reasons why the film’s supervising sound editor Wylie Stateman, a long-time Tarantino collaborator, relished his latest Oscar-nominated project with the director (he previously received nominations for Django Unchained and Inglourious Basterds and has a lifetime total of nine Oscar nominations).

Before joining team Tarantino, Stateman sound designed some of the most iconic films of the ‘80s and ‘90s, including Tron, Footloose, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (among 15 films he made with John Hughes), Born on the Fourth of July and Jerry Maguire. He also worked for many years with Oliver Stone, winning a BAFTA for his sound work on JFK. He went on to cofound the Topanga, California-based sound studio Twentyfourseven.

We talked to Stateman about how he interpreted Tarantino’s sound vision for his latest film — about a star having trouble evolving to new rolls in Hollywood and his stuntman — revealing just how closely the soundtrack is connected to every camera move and cut.

How does Tarantino’s style as a director influence the way you approach the sound design?
I believe that sound is a very important department within the process of making any film. And so, when I met Quentin many years ago, I was meeting him under the guise that he wanted help and he wanted somebody who could focus their time, experience and attention on this very specific department called sound.

I’ve been very fortunate, especially on Quentin’s films, to also have a great production sound mixer and great rerecording mixers. We have both sides of the process in really tremendously skilled hands and tremendously experienced hands. Mark Ulano, our production sound mixer, won an Oscar for Titanic. He knows how to deal with dialogue. He knows how to deal with a complex set, a set where there’s a lot of moving parts.

On the other side of that, we have Mike Minkler doing the final re-recording mixing. Mike, who I worked with on JFK, is tremendously skilled with multiple Oscars to his credit. He’s just an amazing creative in terms of re-recording mixing.

So the role that I like to play is, as supervising sound editor and designer, is how to speak to the filmmaker in terms of sound. For this film, we realized we could drive the soundtrack without a composer by using the chosen songs, and KHJ radio, and select these bits and pieces from the shows of infamous DJ “Humble Harve,” or from the clips of all the other DJs on KHJ radio who really defined 1969 in Los Angeles.

And as the film shows, most people heard them over the car radio in car-centric LA.
The DJs were powerful messengers of popular culture. They were powerful messengers of what was happening in the minds and in the streets and in popular culture of that time. That was Quentin’s idea. When he wrote the script, he had written into it all of the KHJ radio segments, and he listens a lot, and he’s a real student of the filmmaking process and a real master.

On the student side, he’s constantly learning and he’s constantly looking and he’s constantly listening. On the master side, he then applies that to the characters that he wants to develop and those situations that he’s looking to be at the base and basis of his story. So, basically, Quentin comes to me for a better understanding of his intention in terms of sound, and he has a tremendous understanding to begin with. That’s what makes it so exciting.

When talking to Quentin and his editor Fred Raskin, who are both really deeply knowledgeable filmmakers, it can be quite challenging to stay in front of them and/or to chase behind them. It’s usually a combination of the two. But Quentin is a very generous collaborator, meaning he knows what he wants, but then he’s able to stop, listen, and evaluate other ideas.

How did you find all of the clips we hear on the various radios?
Quentin went through hundreds of hours of archival material. And he has a tremendous working knowledge of music to begin with, and he’s also a real student of that period.

Can you talk about how you approached the other elements of specific, Tarantino-esque sound, like Cliff crunching on a celery stick in that bar scene?
Quentin’s movies are bold in the sense of some of the subject matter that he tackles, but they’re highly detailed and also very much inside his actors’ heads. So when you talk about crunching on a piece of celery, I interpret everything that Quentin imparts on his characters as having some kind of potential vocabulary in terms of sound. And that vocabulary… it applies to the camera. If the camera hides behind something and then comes out and reveals something or if the camera’s looking at a big, long shot — like Cliff Booth’s walk to George Spahn’s house down that open area in the Spahn ranch — every one of those moves has a potential sound component and every editorial cut could have a vocabulary of sound to accompany it.

We also use those [combinations] to alter time, whether it’s to jump forward or jump back or just crash in. He does a lot of very explosive editing moves and all of that has an audio vocabulary. It’s been quite interesting to work with a filmmaker that sees picture and sound as sort of a romance and a dance. And the sound could lead the picture, or it could lag the picture. The sound can establish a mood, or it can justify a mood or an action. So it’s this constant push-pull.

Robert Bresson, the father of the French New Wave, basically said, “When the ear leads the eye, the eye becomes impatient. When the eye leads the ear, the ear becomes impatient. Use those impatiences.” So what I’m saying is that sound and pictures are this wonderful choreographed dance. Stimulate peoples’ ears and their eye is looking for something, stimulate their eye and their ears are looking for something, and using those together is a really intimate and very powerful tool that Quentin, I think, is a master at.

How does the sound design help define the characters of Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt)?
This is essentially a buddy movie. Rick Dalton is the insecure actor who’s watching a certain period — where they had great success and comfort — transition into a new period. You’re going from the John Wayne/True Grit way of making movies to Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid or Easy Rider, and Rick is not really that comfortable making this transition. His character is full of that kind of anxiety.

The Cliff Booth character is a very internally disturbed character. He’s an unsuccessful crafts/below-the-line person who’s got personal issues and is kind of typical of a character that’s pretty well-known in the filmmaking process. Rick Dalton’s anxious world is about heightened senses. But when he forgets his line during the bar scene in the Lancer set, the world doesn’t become noisy. The world becomes quiet. We go to silence because that’s what’s inside his head. He can’t remember the line and it’s completely silent. But you could play that same scene 180 degrees in the opposite direction and make him confused in a world of noise.

The year 1969 was very important in the history of filmmaking, and that’s another key to Rick’s and Cliff’s characters. If you look at 1969, it was the turning point in Hollywood when indie filmmaking was introduced. It was also the end of a great era of traditional studio fair and traditional acting, and was more defined by the looser, run-and-gun style of Easy Rider. In a way, the Peter Fonda/Dennis Hopper dynamic of Hopper’s film is somewhat similar to that of Rick Dalton and Cliff Booth.

I saw Easy Rider again recently and the ending hit me like a ton of bricks. The cultural panic, and the violence it invokes, is so palpable because you realize that clash of cultures never really went away; it’s still with us all these years later. Tarantino definitely taps into that tension in this film.
It’s funny that you say that because my wife and I went to the Cannes Film Festival with the team, and they were playing Easy Rider on the beach on a giant screen with a thousand seats in the sand. We walked up on it and we stood there for literally an hour and a half transfixed, just watching it. I hadn’t seen it in years.

What a great use of music and location photography! And then, of course, the story and the ending, it’s like, wow. It’s such a huge departure from True Grit and that generation that made that film. That’s what I love about Quentin, because he plays off the tension between those generations in so many ways in the film. We start out with Al Pacino and they’re drinking whiskey sours and then we go all the way through the gambit of what 1969 really felt like to the counterculture.

Was there anything unusual that you did in the edit to manipulate sound to make a scene work?
Sound design a real design-level responsibility. We invent sound. We go to the libraries and we go to great lengths to record things in nature or wherever we can find it. In this case, we recorded all the cars. We apply a very methodical approach to sound.

Sound design, for me, is the art of shaping noise to suit the picture and to enhance the story and great sound lives somewhere between the science of audio and the subjectivity of storytelling. The science part is really well-known, and it’s been perfected over many, many years with lots of talented artists and artisans. But the story part is what excites me and it’s what excites Quentin. So it becomes what we don’t do that’s so interesting, like using silence instead of noise, or creating a soundtrack without a composer. I don’t think you miss having score music. When we couldn’t figure out a song, we made sound design elements. So, yeah, we would make tension sounds.

Shaping noise is not something I could explain to you with an “an eye of newt plus a tail of yak” secret recipe. It’s a feeling. It’s just working with audio, shaping sound effects and noise to become imperceptibly conjoined with music. You can’t tell where the sound design is beginning and ending and where it transfers into more traditional song or music. That is the beauty of Quentin’s films. In terms of sound, the audio has shapes that are very musical.

His deep cut versions of songs are so interesting, too. Using “California Dreaming” by the Mamas and Papas would have been way too obvious, so he uses a José Feliciano cover of it and puts the actual Mamas and Papas into the film as walk-on characters.
Yeah. I love his choice of music. From Sharon and Roman listening to “Hush” by Deep Purple in the convertible, their hair flying, to going straight into “Son of a Lovin’ Man” after they arrive at the Playboy Mansion. Talk about 1969 and setting it off! It’s not from the San Francisco catalog, it’s just this lovely way that Quentin imagines time and can relate to it as sound and music. The world as it relates to sound is very different than the world of imagery. And the type of director that Quentin is, he’s a writer, he’s a director, and he’s a producer, so he really understands the coalescing of these disciplines.

You haven’t done a lot of interviews in the past. Why not?
I don’t do what I do to call attention to either myself or my work. Over the first 35 years of my career, there’s very little record of any conversation that I had outside of my team and directly with my filmmakers. But at this point in life, when we’re at the cusp of this huge streaming technology shift and everything is becoming more politically sensitive, with deep fakes in both image and audio, I think it’s time sound should have somebody step up and point out, “Hey, we are invisible. We are transitory.” Meaning, when you stop the electricity going to the speakers, the sound disappears, which is kind of an amazing thing. You can pause the picture and you can study it. Sound only exists in real time. It’s just the vibration in the air.

And to be clear, I don’t see motion picture sound as an art form. I see it, rather, as a form of art and it takes a long time to become a sculptor in sound who can work in a very simple style. After all, it’s the simplest lines that just blow your mind!

What blew your mind about this film, either while you worked on it or when you saw the finished product?
I really love the whole look of the film. I love the costumes, and I have great respect for the team that Quentin consistently pulls together. When I work on Quentin’s films, I never turn around and find somebody that doesn’t have a great idea or deep experience in their craft. Everywhere you turn, you bump into extraordinary talent.

Dakota Fanning’s scene at the Spahn Ranch, I mean, wow! Knocks my socks off. That’s really great stuff. It’s a remarkable thing to work with a director that has that kind of love for filmmaking and that allows for really talented people to also get in the sandbox and play.


Beth Marchant is a veteran journalist focused on the production and post community and contributes to “The Envelope” section of the Los Angeles Times. Follow her on Twitter @bethmarchant.

Netflix’s Godless offers big skies and big sounds

By Jennifer Walden

One of the great storytelling advantages of non-commercial television is that content creators are not restricted by program lengths or episode numbers. The total number of episodes in a show’s season can be 13 or 10 or less. An episode can run 75 minutes or 33 minutes. This certainly was the case for writer/director/producer Scott Frank when creating his series Godless for Netflix.

Award-winning sound designer, Wylie Stateman, of Twenty Four Seven Sound explains why this worked to their advantage. “Godless at its core is a story-driven ‘big-sky’ Western. The American Western is often as environmentally beautiful as it is emotionally brutal. Scott Frank’s goal for Godless was to create a conflict between good and evil set around a town of mostly female disaster survivors and their complex and intertwined pasts. The Godless series is built like a seven and a half hour feature film.”

Without the constraints of having to squeeze everything into a two-hour film, Frank could make the most of his ensemble of characters and still include the ride-up/ride-away beauty shots that show off the landscape. “That’s where Carlos Rafael Rivera’s terrific orchestral music and elements of atmospheric sound design really came together,” explains Stateman.

Stateman has created sound for several Westerns in his prodigious career. His first was The Long Riders back in 1980. Most recently, he designed and supervised the sound on writer/director Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained (which earned a 2013 Oscar nom for sound, an MPSE nom and a BAFTA film nom for sound) and The Hateful Eight (nominated for a 2016 Association of Motion Picture Sound Award).

For Godless, Stateman, co-supervisor/re-recording mixer Eric Hoehn and their sound team have already won a 2018 MPSE Award for Sound Editing for their effects and Foley work, as well as a nomination for editing the dialogue and ADR. And don’t be surprised if you see them acknowledged with an Emmy nom this fall.

Capturing authentic sounds: L-R) Jackie Zhou, Wylie Stateman and Eric Hoehn.

Capturing Sounds On Set
Since program length wasn’t a major consideration, Godless takes time to explore the story’s setting and allows the audience to live with the characters in this space that Frank had purpose-built for the show. In New Mexico, Frank had practical sets constructed for the town of La Belle and for Alice Fletcher’s ranch. Stateman, Hoehn and sound team members Jackie Zhou and Leo Marcil camped out at the set locations for a couple weeks, capturing recordings of everything from environmental ambience to gunfire echoes to horse hooves on dirt.

To avoid the craziness that is inherent to a production, the sound team would set up camp in a location where the camera crew was not. This allowed them to capture clean, high-quality recordings at various times of the day. “We would record at sunrise, sunset and the middle of the night — each recording geared toward capturing a range of authentic and ambient sounds,” says Stateman. “Essentially, our goal was to sonically map each location. Our field recordings were wide in terms of channel count, and broad in terms of how we captured the sound of each particular environment. We had multiple independent recording setups, each capable of recording up to eight channels of high bandwidth audio.”

Near the end of the season, there is a big shootout in the town of La Belle, so Stateman and Hoehn wanted to capture the sounds of gunfire and the resulting echoes at that location. They used live rounds, shooting the same caliber of guns used in the show. “We used live rounds to achieve the projectile sounds. A live round sounds very different than a blank round. Blanks just go pop-pop. With live rounds you can literally feel the bullet slicing through the air,” says Stateman.

Eric Hoehn

Recording on location not only supplied the team with a wealth of material to draw from back in the studio, it also gave them an intensive working knowledge of the actual environments. Says Hoehn, “It was helpful to have real-world references when building the textures of the sound design for these various locations and to know firsthand what was happening acoustically, like how the wind was interacting with those structures.”

Stateman notes how quiet and lifeless the location was, particularly at Alice’s ranch. “Part of the sound design’s purpose was to support the desolate dust bowl backdrop. Living there, eating breakfast in the quiet without anybody from the production around was really a wonderful opportunity. In fact, Scott Frank encouraged us to look deep and listen for that feel.”

From Big Skies to Big City
Sound editorial for Godless took place at Light Iron in New York, which is also where the show got its picture editing — by Michelle Tesoro, who was assisted by Hilary Peabody and Charlie Greene. There, Hoehn had a Pro Tools HDX 3 system connected to the picture department’s Avid Media Composer via the Avid Nexis. They could quickly pull in the picture editorial mix, balance out the dialog and add properly leveled sound design, sending that mix back to Tesoro.

“Because there were so many scenes and so much material to get through, we really developed a creative process that centered around rapid prototype mixing,” says Hoehn. “We wanted to get scenes from Michelle and her team as soon as possible and rapidly prototype dialogue mixing and that first layer of sound design. Through the prototyping process, we could start to understand what the really important sounds were for those scenes.”

Using this prototyping audio workflow allowed the sound team to very quickly share concepts with the other creative departments, including the music and VFX teams. This workflow was enhanced through a cloud-based film management/collaboration tool called Pix. Pix let the showrunners, VFX supervisor, composer, sound team and picture team share content and share notes.

“The notes feature in Pix was so important,” explains Hoehn. “Sometimes there were conversations between the director and editor that we could intuitively glean information from, like notes on aesthetic or pace or performance. That created a breadcrumb trail for us to follow while we were prototyping. It was important for us to get as much information as we could so we could be on the same page and have our compass pointed in the right direction when we were doing our first pass prototype.”

Often their first pass prototype was simply refined throughout the post process to become the final sound. “Rarely were we faced with the situation of having to re-cut a whole scene,” he continues. “It was very much in the spirit of the rolling mix and the rolling sound design process.”

Stateman shares an example of how the process worked. “When Michelle first cut a scene, she might cut to a beauty shot that would benefit from wind gusts and/or enhanced VFX and maybe additional dust blowing. We could then rapidly prototype that scene with leveled dialog and sound design before it went to composer Carlos Rafael Rivera. Carlos could hear where/when we were possibly leveraging high-density sound. This insight could influence his musical thinking — if he needed to come in before, on or after the sound effects. Early prototyping informed what became a highly collaborative creative process.”

The Shootout
Another example of the usefulness of Pix was shootout in La Belle in Episode 7. The people of the town position themselves in the windows and doorways of the buildings lining the street, essentially surrounding Frank Griffin (Jeff Daniels) and his gang. There is a lot of gunfire, much of it bridging action on and off camera, and that needed to be represented well through sound.

Hoehn says they found it best to approach the gun battle like a piece of music by playing with repeated rhythms. Breaking the anticipated rhythm helped to make the audience feel off-guard. They built a sound prototype for the scene and shared it via Pix, which gave the VFX department access to it.

“A lot of what we did with sound helped the visual effects team by allowing them to understand the density of what we were doing with the ambient sounds,” says Hoehn. “If we found that rhythmically it was interesting to have a wind gust go by, we would eventually see a visual effect for that wind going by.”

It was a back-and-forth collaboration. “There are visual rhythms and sound rhythms and the fact that we could prototype scenes early led us to a very efficient way of doing long-form,” says Stateman. “It’s funny that features used to be considered long-form but now ‘long-form’ is this new, time-unrestrained storytelling. It’s like we were making a long-form feature, but one that was seven and a half hours. That’s really the beauty of Netflix. Because the shows aren’t tethered to a theatrical release timeframe, we can make stories that linger a little bit and explore the wider eccentricities of character and the time period. It’s really a wonderful time for this particular type of filmmaking.”

While program length may be less of an issue, production schedule lengths still need to be kept in line. With the help of Pix, editorial was able to post the entire show with one team. “Everyone on our small team understood and could participate in the mission,” says Stateman. Additionally, the sound design rapid prototype mixing process allowed everyone in editorial to carry all their work forward, from day one until the last day. The Pro Tools session that they started with on day one was the same Pro Tools session that they used for print mastering seven months later.

“Our sound design process was built around convenient creative approval and continuous refinement of the complete soundtrack. At the end of the day, the thing that we heard most often was that this was a wonderful and fantastic way to work, and why would we ever do it any other way,” Stateman says.

Creating a long-form feature like Godless in an efficient manner required a fluid, collaborative process. “We enjoyed a great team effort,” says Stateman. “It’s always people over devices. What we’ve come to say is, ‘It’s not the devices. It’s people left to their own devices who will discover really novel ways to solve creative problems.’”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter at @audiojeney.

Wylie Stateman talks sound editing on ‘The Hateful Eight’

By Jennifer Walden

Quentin Tarantino’s go-to supervising sound editor Wylie Stateman, of Twenty Four Seven Sound, reveals the secret sauce of the director’s cinematic style: “He is truly an aural enthusiast and very much a sculptor of his cinema through the use of sound and music.”

That applies to dialogue as well, as Tarantino likes to cast actors with interesting voices. “Sound is a major contributor to Quentin’s films and often the secret sauce that makes the meal just gel and come together as a coherent recognizable work,” says the veteran audio pro, who has seven Oscar noms under his belt, including two for Tarantino’s Django Unchained (2012) and Inglourious Basterds (2008).

Wylie Stateman on the Telluride set for The Hateful Eight.

Stateman, who’s been working with Tarantino since Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003), feels it’s been a privilege having the opportunity to explore his vision as a filmmaker since his love for sound and music is such an integral part of his process. “Audio is very different from the other filmmaking aspects,” he explains. “You design a costume and you can hold it up, feel the material and see how it reacts to light. It’s real. Audio is very mysterious — a force that is just truly present in the moment. It’s just a vibration in the room. It’s something that the audience experiences but can’t see and can’t touch. It’s a different kind of art form, and as an audio artist I love working for Quentin because he is so particular and he values the contribution that sound makes to the experience of watching his film.”

In Tarantino’s latest film, The Hateful Eight, distributed by The Weinstein Company, eight ruthless killers become holed up in Minnie’s Haberdashery one fateful Wyoming winter’s day. Bounty hunter John ‘The Hangman’ Ruth (Kurt Russel) arrives there with his captured outlaw Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) and two other travelers — union soldier turned bounty hunter Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson) and the supposedly new sheriff of Red Rock Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins), who are trying to escape the encroaching blizzard. Instead of Minnie, they find in the Haberdashery a much shadier cast of characters. As the storm rages outside, the situation inside becomes equally intense.

The seeds for Tarantino’s western were sown during the final phase of post on Django Unchained. After the initial leaked script fiasco, a new shooting script for The Hateful Eight came together the summer of 2014, and around Christmas time that year Tarantino rounded up his troop of main department heads — costume, production design, photography and sound — and headed to Telluride, Colorado, to get geared up for the production process.

THE HATEFUL EIGHT

“I was there for Christmas and New Year’s, mainly to participate in the celebration that Quentin creates around the production side of the process. He celebrates the tools, the process and the people,” Stateman says. Minnie’s Haberdashery was being built in the mountains above Telluride, and the finishing touches were being added to the sets.

“It’s an important part of his filming process. Lots of creative decisions are taking shape during those final weeks of pre-production,” says Stateman, who likens the process to the construction of the Rose Bowl parade floats. “People show up the month before the parade to participate in building the floats, and then there are the people who come out on New Year’s Day to watch. I enjoy the float building process.”

Challenges of Location Sound
In addition to shooting in Colorado where weather was often a challenge, Tarantino filmed interior shots at Red Studios in California, in a giant freezer to mimic the cold conditions. That environment added compressor hum to the production track. Also, considering the characters were wearing heavy clothing that obstructed the lav mics, Stateman says they did a substantial amount of work to make the dialogue tracks sound consistent.

“Quentin likes the performances that he works to acquire during production and he wants to use those in the final mix. He doesn’t like to replace the dialogue and so despite all the challenges that the production sound team faces, the post sound team has a mission and a mandate to basically work with and around any of the production issues.”

THE HATEFUL EIGHT

Foley
All that dialogue cleaning and EQing didn’t just smooth things out. It resulted in pulling the life out of the track as well. Stateman used Foley to add it back in, spending roughly 200 hours recording Foley at Sony Studios with Foley artist Gary Hecker and his Foley mixer Nerses Gezalyan. “We want to really emphasize the micro details that Quentin goes after with his film editing style and his photography style,” explains Stateman. “In a Quentin Tarantino movie, when somebody flexes a muscle or puts a hand on a weapon, there’s a hyper-reality to the sound and that is acquired by having a really beautifully performed and recorded Foley track.”

From the characters’ unique clothing and boots to their hats, holsters and guns, everything was represented in Foley. Stateman and his team acquired Foley props from far and wide, like hand-forged bits of old metal, old creaky wood, and cast iron pots and metal for the stove. “I’m a very committed Foley enthusiast. I really like to spend time and effort to produce sounds that blend entirely into the film. When Foley is done well, it’s invisible. It just adds this third dimension to the dialogue track. It adds depth and texture. We really beat up the dialogue track to get rid of all the noise and make each line match the line before and after. The Foley brought that three-dimensional feel back to the production dialogue.”

Pristine Foley allowed Stateman to go hyper-real with the soundtrack at any time without bringing in unwanted noise. He could add fine detail, like a sound to highlight an eye blink, without obstructing the dialogue. “And Quentin’s films really benefit from having the ability to just go hyper-real.”

Director Quentin Tarantino: He wanted to use the blizzard as one of the film's voices.The Blizzard
Seeing as how Tarantino likes to cast characters with interesting voices it’s only fitting that the ninth adversary in the film, the blizzard, should have an interesting voice too. Stateman and co-supervising sound editor Harry Cohen called on sound designer Sylvain Lasseur to help craft the storm sounds. “The wind and weather are a very important part of the background texture of the film. Weather plays a very important role, but it’s not always a role that you want to call attention to. It has a progression and it puts pressure on the actors because they can’t leave the Haberdashery,” explains Stateman.

Lasseur brought along his Kyma by Symbolic Sound, an independent sound design workstation that uses its own dedicated processor called a Pacarana. Using a continuum fingerboard to control the Kyma, Lasseur was able to manipulate and morph layers of wind sounds. “We created the weather literally one wind gust, wind whistle and wind wisp at a time. We built the wind to flatter the dialogue and the film edit in a very unique way with the Kyma sampler,” explains Stateman, who explains that the beauty of the Kyma is that it creates interesting instruments out of sound samples.IMG_1995IMG_2021_WS_Tellruide_recording

First they created a guide track around the dialogue, using the pitch and velocity features in Kyma. Then they could model other sounds in and around the guide track. “So let’s say we have a base sound of a blizzard, we could then, very selectively, model wind wisps or rumbles or anything else against it. The Kyma would shape the other samples in time relative to the control track. Once we have them all modeled against each other we can start to pull them apart a little bit so that each element can have its own dynamic moment. It becomes more like a parade and you hear the low, the mid and the high — not on top of each other but offset from each other. The artistry comes in turning samples into instruments.”

Lasseur spent four months creating wind instruments in Kyma and another four months hand shaping the wind around the dialogue and visual action. “We pushed really hard to crack this one particular problem of wind for the film.”

Stateman and his team worked out of the Twenty Four Seven Sound studio located in Topanga Canyon, California, which features a full Dolby Atmos design studio. The Hateful Eight’s 70mm version, known as “the roadshow version” was their primary focus, as that is how Tarantino intended audiences to experience the film.

“The multiplex version is a somewhat downscaled version of the film,” explains Stateman. The final 5.1 mix was handled at Sony Pictures Post in Culver City by re-recording mixers Mike Minkler and Christian Minkler in the Cary Grant Theater.

Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based writer and audio engineer.