Tag Archives: Western Digital

Western Digital intros WD Gold NVMe SSDs  

Western Digital has introduced its new enterprise-class WD Gold NVMe SSDs designed to help small- and medium-sized companies transition to NVMe storage. The SSDs offer power loss protection and high performance with low latency.

The WD Gold NVMe SSDs will be available in four capacities — .96TB, 1.92TB, 3.84TB and 7.68TB — in early Q2 of this year. The WD Gold NVMe SSD is designed to be, according to the company, “the primary storage in servers delivering significantly improved application responsiveness, higher throughput and greater scale than existing SATA devices for enterprise applications.”

These new NVMe SSDs complement the recently launched WD Gold HDDs by providing a high-performance storage tier for applications and data sets that require low latency or high throughput.

The WD Gold NVMe SSDs are designed using Western Digital’s silicon-to-system technology, from its 3D TLC NAND SSD media to its purpose-built firmware and own integrated controller. The drives give users peace of mind knowing they’re protected against power loss and that data paths are safe. Secure boot and secure erase provide users with additional data-management protections, and the devices come with an extended five-year limited warranty.

Quantum to acquire Western Digital’s ActiveScale business  

Quantum has entered into an agreement with Western Digital Technologies, a subsidiary of Western Digital Corp., to acquire its ActiveScale object storage business. The addition of the ActiveScale product line and engineers brings object storage software and erasure coding technology to Quantum’s portfolio and helps the company to expand in the object storage market.

The acquisition will extend the company’s role in storing and managing video and unstructured data using a software-defined approach. The transaction is expected to close by March 31, 2020. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

What are the benefits of object storage software?
• Scalability: Allows users to store, manage and analyze billions of objects and exabytes of capacity.
• Durable: ActiveScale object storage offers up to 19 nines of data durability using patented erasure coding protection technologies.
• Easy to Manage at Scale: Because object storage has a flat namespace (compared to a hierarchical file system structure), managing billions of objects and hundreds of petabytes of capacity is easier than using traditional network attached storage. This, according to Quantum, reduces operational expenses.

Quantum has been offering object storage and selling and supporting the ActiveScale product line for over five years. Object storage can be used as an active-archive tier of storage — where StorNext file storage is used for high-performance ingest and processing of data, object storage acts as lower cost online content repository, and tape acts as the lowest cost cold storage tier.

For M&E, object storage is used as a long-term content repository for video content, in movie and TV production, in sports video, and even for large corporate video departments. Those working in movie and TV production require very high performance ingest, edit, processing, rendering of their video files, which typically is done with a file system like StorNext. Once content is finished, it is preserved in an object store, with StorNext data management handling the data movement between file and object tiers.

“Object storage software is an obvious fit with our strategy, our go-to-market focus and within our technology portfolio,” says Jamie Lerner, president/CEO of Quantum. “We are committed to the product, and to making ActiveScale customers successful, and we look forward to engaging with them to solve their most pressing business challenges around storing and managing unstructured data. With the addition of the engineers and scientists that developed the erasure-coded object store software, we can deliver on a robust technical roadmap, including new solutions like an object store built on a combination of disk and tape.”

Review: Western Digital’s Blue SN500 NVMe SSD

By Brady Betzel

Since we began the transfer of power from the old standard SATA 3.5-inch hard drives to SSD drives, multimedia-based computer users have seen a dramatic uptick in read and write speeds. The only issue has been price. You can still find a 3.5-inch brick drive, ranging in size from 2TB to 4TB, for under $200 (maybe closer to $100), but if you upgraded to an SSD drive over the past five years, you were looking at a huge jump in price. Hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. These days you are looking at just a couple of hundred for 1TB and even less for 256GB or 512GB SSD.

Western Digital hopes you’ll think of NVMe SSD drives as more of an automatic purchase than a luxury with the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe M.2 2280 line of SSD drives.

Before you get started, you will need a somewhat modern computer with an NVMe M.2-compatible motherboard (also referred to as a PCIe Gen 3 interface). This NVMe SSD is a “B+M key” configuration, so you will need to make sure you are compatible. Once you confirm that your motherboard is compatible, you can start shopping around. The Western Digital Blue series has always been the budget-friendly level of hard drives. Western Digital also offers the next level up: the Black series. In terms of NVMe SSD M.2 drives, the Western Digital Blue series drives will be budget-friendly, but they also use two fewer PCIe lanes, which results in a slower read/write speed. The Black series uses up to four PCIe lanes, as well as has a heat sink to dissipate the heat. But for this review, I am focusing on the Blue series and how it performs.

On paper the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is available in either 250GB or 500GB sizes, measures approximately 80mm long and uses the M.2 2280 form factor for the PCIe Gen 3 interface in up to two lanes. Technically, the 500GB drive can achieve up to 1,700MB/s read and 1450MB/s write speeds, and the 250GB can achieve up to 1700MB/s read and 1300MB/s write speeds.

As of this review, the 250GB version sells for $53.99, while the 500GB version sells for $75.99. You can find specs on the Western Digital website and learn more about the Black series as well.

One of the coolest things about these NVMe drives is that they come standard with a five-year limited warranty (or max endurance limit). The max endurance (aka TBW — terabytes written) for the 250GB SSD is 150TB, while the max endurance for the 500GB version is 300TB. Both versions have a MTTF (mean time to failure) of 1.75 million hours.

In addition, the drive uses an in-house controller and 3D NAND logic. Now those words might sound like nonsense, but the in-house controller is what tells the NVMe what to do and when to do it (it’s essentially a dedicated processor), while3D NAND is a way of cramming more memory into smaller spaces. Instead of hard drive manufacturers adding more memory on the same platform in an x- or y-axis, they achieve more storage space by stacking layers vertically on top — or on the z-axis.

Testing Read and Write Speeds
Keep in mind that I ran these tests on a Windows-based PC. Doing a straight file transfer, I was getting about 1GB/s. When using Crystal Disk Mark, I would get a burst of speed at the top, slow down a little and then mellow out. Using a 4GB sample, my speeds were:
“Seq Q32T” – Read: 1749.5 MB/s – Write: 1456.6 MB/s
“4KiB Q8T8” – Read: 1020.4 MB/s – Write: 1039.9 MB/s
“4KiB Q32T1” – Read: 732.5 MB/s – Write: 676.5 MB/s
“4KiB Q1T1” – Read: 35.77 MB/s – Write: 185.5 MB/s

If you would like to read exactly what these types of tests entail, check out the Crystal Disk Mark info page. In the AJA System Test I had a little drop off, but with a 4GB test file size, I got an initial read speed of 1457MB/s and a write speed of 1210MB/s, which seems to fall more in line with what Western Digital is touting. The second time I ran the AJA System Test, I got a read speed of 1458MB/s and write speed of 883MB/s. I wanted a third opinion, so I ran the Blackmagic Design Disk Speed Test (you’ll have to install drivers for a Blackmagic card, like the Ultrastudio 4K). On my first run, I got a read speed of 1359.6MB/s and write speed of 1305.8MB/s. On my second run, I got a read speed of 1340.5MB/s and write speed of 968.3MB/s. My read numbers were generally above 1300MB/s, and my write numbers varied between 800 and 1000MB/s. Not terrible for a sub-$100 hard drive.

Summing Up
In the end, the Western Digital Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is an amazing value at under $100, and hopefully we will get expanded sizes in the future. The drive is a B+M key configuration, so when you are looking at compatibility, make sure to check which key your PCIe card, external drive case or motherboard supports. It is typically M or B+M key, but I found a PCI card that supported both. If you need more space and speed than the WD Blue series can offer, check out Western Digital’s Black series of NVMe SSDs.

The sticker price starts to go up significantly when you hit the 1TB or 2TB marks — $279.99 and $529.99, respectively (with the heat sink attachment). If you stick to the 500GB version, you are looking at a more modest price tag.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Western Digital adds NVMe to its WD Blue solid state drive

Western Digital has added an NVMe model to its WD Blue solid state drive (SSD) portfolio. The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD offers three times the performance of its SATA counterpart and is optimized for multitasking and resource-heavy applications, providing near-instant access to files and programs.

Using the scalable in-house SSD architecture of the WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD, the new WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is also built on Western Digital’s 3D NAND technology, firmware and controller, and delivers sequential read and write speeds up to 1,700MB/s and 1,450MB/s respectively (for 500GB model) with efficient power consumption as low as 2.7W.

Targeting evolving workflows, the WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD features high sustained write performance over SATA, as well as other emerging technologies on the market today, to give that performance edge.

“Content transitioning from 4K and 8K means it’s a perfect time for video and photo editors, content creators, heavy data users and PC enthusiasts to transition from SATA to NVMe,” says Eyal Bek, VP, data center and client computing, Western Digital. “The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD will enable customers to build high-performance laptops and PCs with fast speeds and enough capacity in a reliable, rugged and slim form factor.”

The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD will be available in 250GB and 500GB capacities in a single-sided M.2 2280 PCIe Gen3 x2 form factor. Pricing is $54.99 USD for 250GB (model WDS250G1B0C) and $77.99 USD for 500GB (model WDS500G1B0C).