Tag Archives: VR

IDEA launches to create specs for next-gen immersive media

The Immersive Digital Experiences Alliance (IDEA) will launch at the NAB 2019 with the goal of creating a suite of royalty-free specifications that address all immersive media formats, including emerging light field technology.

Founding members — including CableLabs, Light Field Lab, Otoy and Visby — created IDEA to serve as an alliance of like-minded technology, infrastructure and creative innovators working to facilitate the development of an end-to-end ecosystem for the capture, distribution and display of immersive media.

Such a unified ecosystem must support all displays, including highly anticipated light field panels. Recognizing that the essential launch point would be to create a common media format specification that can be deployed on commercial networks, IDEA has already begun work on the new Immersive Technology Media Format (ITMF).

ITMF will serve as an interchange and distribution format that will enable high-quality conveyance of complex image scenes, including six-degrees-of-freedom (6DoF), to an immersive display for viewing. Moreover, ITMF will enable the support of immersive experience applications including gaming, VR and AR, on top of commercial networks.

Recognized for its potential to deliver an immersive true-to-life experience, light field media can be regarded as the richest and most dense form of visual media, thereby setting the highest bar for features that the ITMF will need to support and the new media-aware processing capabilities that commercial networks must deliver.

Jon Karafin, CEO/co-founder of Light Field Lab, explains that “a light field is a representation describing light rays flowing in every direction through a point in space. New technologies are now enabling the capture and display of this effect, heralding new opportunities for entertainment programming, sports coverage and education. However, until now, there has been no common media format for the storage, editing, transmission or archiving of these immersive images.”

“We’re working on specifications and tools for a variety of immersive displays — AR, VR, stereoscopic 3D and light field technology, with light field being the pinnacle of immersive experiences,” says Dr. Arianne Hinds, Immersive Media Strategist at CableLabs. “As a display-agnostic format, ITMF will provide near-term benefits for today’s screen technology, including VR and AR headsets and stereoscopic displays, with even greater benefits when light field panels hit the market. If light field technology works half as well as early testing suggests, it will be a game-changer, and the cable industry will be there to help support distribution of light field images with the 10G platform.”

Starting with Otoy’s ORBX scene graph format, a well-established data structure widely used in advanced computer animation and computer games, IDEA will provide extensions to expand the capabilities of ORBX for light field photographic camera arrays, live events and other applications. Further specifications will include network streaming for ITMF and transcoding of ITMF for specific displays, archiving, and other applications. IDEA will preserve backwards-compatibility on the existing ORBX format.

IDEA anticipates releasing an initial draft of the ITMF specification in 2019. The alliance also is planning an educational seminar to explain more about the requirements for immersive media and the benefits of the ITMF approach. The seminar will take place in Los Angeles this summer.

Photo Credit: All Rights Reserved: Light Field Lab. Future Vision concept art of room-scale holographic display from Light Field Lab, Inc.

Behind the Title: Light Sail VR MD/EP Robert Watts

This creative knew as early as middle school that he wanted to tell stories. Now he gets to immerse people in those stories.

NAME: Robert Watts

COMPANY: LA-based Light Sail VR (@lightsailvr)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re an immersive media production company. We craft projects end-to-end in the VR360, VR180 and interactive content space, which starts from bespoke creative development all the way through post and distribution. We produce both commercial work and our own original IP — our first of which is called Speak of the Devil VR, which is an interactive, live-action horror experience where you’re a main character in your own horror movie.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Managing Partner and Executive Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
A ton. As a startup, we wear many hats. I oversee all production elements, acting as producer. I run operations, business development and the financials for the company. Then Matt Celia, my business partner and creative director, collaborates on the overall creative for each project to ensure the quality of the experience, as well as making sure it works natively (i.e.: is the best in) the immersive medium.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m very hands-on on set, almost to a fault. So I’ve ended up with some weird (fake) credits, such as fog team, stand-in, underwater videographer, sometimes even assistant director. I do whatever it takes to get the job done — that’s a producer’s job.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Excluding all the VR headsets and tech, on the producing side Google Drive and Dropbox are a producer’s lifeblood, as well as Showbiz Budgeting from Media Services.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love being on set watching the days and weeks of pre-production and development coalesce. There’s an energy on set that’s both fun and professional, and that truly shows the crew’s dedication and focus to get the job done. As the exec producer, it’s nice being able to strike a balance between being on set and being in the office.

Light Sail VR partners (L-R): Matt Celia and Robert Watts

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Tech hurdles. They always seem to pop up. We’re a production company working on the edge of the latest technology, so something always breaks, and there’s not always a YouTube tutorial on how to fix it. It can really set back one’s day.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
We do “Light Sail Sandwich Club” at lunch and cater a smorgasbord of sandwich fixings and crafty services for our teams, contractors and interns. It’s great to take a break from the day and sit down and connect with our colleagues in a personal way. It’s relaxed and fun, and I really enjoy it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I love what I do, but I also like giving back. I think I’d be using my project management skills in a way that would be a force for good, perhaps at an NGO or entity working on tackling climate change.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Middle school. My family watched a lot of television and films. I wanted to be an archaeologist after watching Indiana Jones, a paleontologist after Jurassic Park, a submarine commander after Crimson Tide and I fancied being a doctor after watching ER. I got into theater and video productions in high school, and I realized I could be in entertainment and make all those stories I loved as a kid.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
At the tail end of 2018, we produced 10 360-degree episodes for Refinery29 (Sweet Digs 360), 10 VR180 episodes (Get Glam, Hauliday) and VR180 spots for Bon Appetit and Glamour. We also wrapped on a music video that’s releasing this year.

On top of it all, we’ve been hard at work developing our next original, which we will reveal more details about soon. We’ve been busy! I’m extremely thankful for the wonderful teams that helped us make it all happen.

Now Your Turn

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am very proud of the diversity project we did with Google, Google: Immerse, as well as our first original, Speak of the Devil. But I think our first original series Now Your Turn is the one I’m going to pick. It’s a five-episode VR180 series that features Geek & Sundry talent showcasing some amazing board games. It’s silly and fun, and we put in a number of easter eggs that make it even better when you’re watching in a headset. I’m proud of it because it’s an example of where the VR medium is going — series that folks tune into week to week.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Mac for work and music — I’m constantly listening to music while I work. My Xbox One is where I watch all my content and, lastly, my VIVE set up at home. I like to check out all the latest in VR, from experiences to gaming, and I even work out with it playing BoxVR or Beat Saber.

WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU LISTEN TO AT WORK?
My taste spans from classic rock to techno/EDM to Spanish guitar.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I try to have a work-life balance. I don’t set my email notifications to “push.” Instead, I make the choice of when I check my emails. I do it frequently enough I don’t ever feel I’m out of the loop, but that small choice helps me feel in control of all the hundreds of things that happen on a day-to-day basis.

I make time every night and on the weekends to spend time with my lovely wife, Jessica. When we’re not watching stuff, we’re seeing friends and playing board games — we’re big nerds. It’s important to have fun!

Sony’s RX0 II ultra-compact, rugged camera with 4K, flip-up screen

Sony has added to its camera lineup with the launch of the light and compact RX0 II — what some might call a “GoPro on steroids,” with a higher price tag of approximately $700. It will ship in April. Building upon the waterproof, dustproof, shockproof, crushproof and ultra-compact qualities of the original RX0, the new model offers internal 4K recording, an adjustable LCD screen that tilts upward 180 degrees and downward 90 degrees and the ability to work underwater, as well as new image stabilization solutions for video recording.

At the heart of the RX0 II sits a 1.0-type stacked 15.3-megapixel Exmor RS CMOS image sensor and an advanced Bionz X image processing engine that offer enhanced color reproduction. It has been optimized for both stills and movie shooting across a wide sensitivity range of ISO 80-12800. The Zeiss Tessar T 24mm F4 fixed wide-angle lens has a shortened minimum focusing distance of 20cm.

Measuring 59mm x 40.5mm x 35mm and weighing 132g, the RX0 II fits easily into a pocket. It is waterproof up to 10 meters deep, it’s dustproof, shockproof up to two meters and crushproof up to 200KG force.

The RX0 II offers 4K 30p internal movie recording with full pixel readout and no pixel binning, which allows it to collect approximately 1.7 times the amount of data required for 4K video. By oversampling this data, the appearance of moiré and jaggies is reduced to deliver smooth, high-quality 4K footage with detail and depth. Using the recently introduced Sony Imaging Edge mobile application, this footage can be transferred to a smartphone, edited and shared easily across social networks.

The RX0 II introduces in-body electronic stabilization for steady footage, even when shot handheld. This can be enhanced even further when footage is exported to a smartphone or tablet running the Movie Edit add-on, where the additional information captured during filming can be processed to produce a video with gimbal-like smoothness.

An additional new feature that can also be accessed via the Sony Movie Edit add-on is Intelligent Framing, where the selected subject is kept in the center of the frame and image distortion is corrected in a final edit. Depending on where the video will be shared, a variety of aspect ratios can then be selected.

Additional movie features of the RX0 II include super-slow-motion recording at up to 1,000fps, uncompressed 4K HDMI output and simultaneous proxy movie recording. Users can use Picture Profile, S-Log 2 and Timecode/User Bit functions to make sure their final result exactly matches their creative vision.

The RX0 II can also be used as a multi-camera option. Up to five RX0 II cameras can be controlled wirelessly using Sony Imaging Edge Mobile application and between five and 50 cameras can be controlled via an access point (scheduled for summer 2019). The RX0 II is also compatible with the Camera Control Box CCB-WD1, which enables up to 100 cameras to be connected and controlled in a wired multi-camera setup.

Behind the Title: Gentleman Scholar MD/EP Jo Arghiris

LA-based Jo Arghiris embraces the creativity of the job and enjoys “pulling treatments together with our directors. It’s always such a fun, collaborative process.” Find out more…

Name: Jo Arghiris

Company: Gentleman Scholar (@gentscholar)

Can You Describe Your Company?
Gentleman Scholar is a creative production studio, drawn together by a love of design and an eagerness to push boundaries.  Since launching in Los Angeles in 2010, and expanding to New York in 2016, we have evolved within the disciplines of live-action production, digital exploration, print and VR. At our very core, we are a band of passionate artists and fearless makers.

The biggest thing that struck me when I joined Scholar was everyone’s willingness to roll up their sleeves and give it a go. There are so many creative people working across both our studios, it’s quite amazing what we can achieve when we put our collective minds to it. In fact, it’s really hard to put us in a category or to define what we do on a day-to-day basis. But if I had to sum it up in just one word, our company feels like “home”; there’s no place quite like it.

What’s Your Job Title?
Managing Director/EP Los Angeles

What Does That Entail?
Truth be told, it’s evolving all the time. In its purest form, my job entails having top-line involvement on everything going on in the LA studio, both from operational and new business POVs. I face inwards and outwards. I mentor and I project. I lead and I follow. But the main thing I want to mention is that I couldn’t do my job without all these incredible people by my side. It really does take a village, every single day.

What Would Surprise People the Most About What Falls Under That Title?
Not so much “surprising” but certainly different from other roles, is that my job is never done (or at least it shouldn’t be). I never go home with all my to-do’s ticked off. The deck is constantly shuffled and re-dealt. This fluidity can be off-putting to some people who like to have a clear idea of what they need to achieve on any given day. But I really like to work that way, as it keeps my mind nimble and fresh.

What’s Your Favorite Part of the Job?
Learning new things and expanding my mind. I like to see our teams push themselves in this way, too. It’s incredibly satisfying watching folks overcome challenges and grow into their roles. Also, I obviously love winning work, especially if it’s an intense pitch process. I’m a creative person and I really enjoy pulling treatments together with our directors. It’s always such a fun, collaborative process.

What’s Your Least Favorite?
Well, I guess the 24/7 availability thing that we’ve all become accustomed to and are all guilty of. It’s so, so important for us to have boundaries. If I’m emailing the team late at night or on the weekend, I will write in the subject line, “For the Morning” or “For Monday.” I sometimes need to get stuff set up in advance, but I absolutely do not expect a response at 10pm on a Sunday night. To do your best work, it’s essential that you have a healthy work/life balance.

What is Your Favorite Time of the Day?
As clichéd as it may sound, I love to get up before anyone else and sit, in silence, with a cup of coffee. I’m a one-a-day kind of girl, so it’s pretty sacred to me. Weekdays or weekends, I have so much going on, I need to set my day up in these few solitary moments. I am not a night person at all and can usually be found fast asleep on the sofa sometime around 9pm each night. Equally favorite is when my kids get up and we do “huggle” time together, before the day takes us away on our separate journeys.

Bleacher Report

Can you Name Some Recent Projects?
Gentleman Scholar worked on a big Acura TLX campaign, which is probably one of my all-time favorites. Other fun projects include Legends Club for Timberland, Upwork “Hey World!” campaign from Duncan Channon, the Sponsor Reel for the 2018 AICP Show and Bleacher Report’s Sports Alphabet.

If You Didn’t Have This Job, What Would You be Doing Instead?
I love photography, writing and traveling. So if I could do it all again, I’d be some kind of travel writer/photographer combo or a journalist or something. My brother actually does just that, and I’m super-proud of his choices. To stand behind your own creative point of view takes skill and dedication.

How Did You Know This Would Be Your Path?
The road has been long, and it has carried me from London to New York to Los Angeles. I originally started in post production and VFX, where I got a taste for creative problem-solving. The jump from this world to a creative production studio like Scholar was perfectly timed and I relished the learning curve that came with it. I think it’s quite hard to have a defined “path” these days.

My advice to anyone getting into our industry right now would be to understand that knowledge and education are powerful tools, so go out of your way to harness them. And never stand still; always keep pushing yourself.

Name Three Pieces of Technology You Can’t Live Without.
My Ear Pods — so happy to not have that charging/listening conflict with my iPhone anymore; all the apps that allow me to streamline my life and get shit done any time of day no matter what, no matter where; I think my electric toothbrush is pretty high up there too. Can I have one more? Not “tech” per se, but my super-cute mini-hair straightener, which make my bangs look on point, even after working out!

What Social Media Channels Do You Follow?
Well, I like Instagram mostly. Do you count Pinterest? I love a Pinterest board. I have many of those. And I read Twitter, but I don’t Tweet too much. To be honest, I’m pretty lame on social media, and all my accounts are private. But I realize they are such important tools in our industry so I use them on an as-needed basis. Also, it’s something I need to consider soon for my kids, who are obsessed with watching random, “how-to” videos online and periodically ask me, “Are you going to put that on YouTube?” So I need to keep on top of it, not just for work, but also for them. It will be their world very soon.

Do You Listen to Music While You Work? Care to Share Your Favorite Music to Work to?
Yes, I have a Sonos set up in my office. I listen to a lot of playlists — found ones and the random ones that your streaming services build for you. Earlier this morning I had an album called Smino by blkswn playing. Right now I’m listening to a band called Pronoun. They were on a playlist Nylon Studios released called, “All the Brooklyn Bands You Should Be Listening To.”

My drive home is all about the podcast. I’m trying to educate myself more on American history at the moment. I’m also tempted to get into Babel and learn French. With all the hours I spend in the car, I’m pretty sure I would be fluent in no time!

What Do You Do to De-stress From it All?
So many things! I literally never stop. Hot yoga, spinning, hiking, mountain biking, cooking and thinking of new projects for my house. Road tripping, camping and exploring new places with my family and friends. Taking photographs and doing art projects with my kids. My all-time favorite thing to do is hit the beach for the day, winter and summer. I find it one of the most restorative places on Earth. I’m so happy to call LA my home. It suits me down to the ground!

Lucid and Eys3D partner on VR180 depth camera module

EYS3D Microelectronics Technology, the company behind embedded camera modules in some top-tier AR/VR headsets, has partnered with that AI startup Lucid. Lucid will power their next-generation depth-sensing camera module, Axis. This means that a single, small, handheld device can capture accurate 3D depth maps with up to a 180-degree field of view at high resolution, allowing content creators to scan, reconstruct and output precise 3D point clouds.

This new camera module, which was demoed for the first time at CES, will allow developers, animators and game designers a way to transform the physical world into a virtual one, ramping up content for 3D, VR and AR all with superior performance in resolution and field of view at a lower cost than some technologies currently available.

A device capturing the environment exactly as you perceive it, but enhanced with capabilities of precise depth, distance and understanding could help eliminate the boundaries between what you see in the real world and what you can create in the VR and AR world. This is what the Lucid-powered EYS3D’s Axis camera module aims to bring to content creators, as they gain the “super power” of transforming anything in their vision into a 3D object or scene which others can experience, interact with and walk in.

What was only previously possible with eight to 16 high-end DSLR cameras, and expensive software or depth sensors is now combined into one tiny camera module with stereo lenses paired with IR sensors. Axis will cover up to a 180-degree field of view while providing millimeter-accurate 3D in point cloud or depth map format. This device provides a simple plug-and-play experience through USB 3.1 Gen1/2 and supported Windows and Linux software suites, allowing users to further develop their own depth applications such as 3D reconstructing an entire scene, scanning faces into 3D models or just determining how far away an object is.

Lucid’s AI-enhanced 3D/depth solution, known as 3D Fusion Technology, is currently deployed in many devices, such as 3D cameras, robots and mobile phones, including the Red Hydrogen One, which just launched through AT&T and Verizon nationwide.

EYS3D’s new depth camera module powered by Lucid will be available in Q3 2019.

HPA releases 2019 Tech Retreat program, includes eSports

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has set its schedule for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat, set for February 11-15. The Tech Retreat, which is celebrating its 25th year, takes place over the course of a week at the JW Marriott Resort & Spa in Palm Desert, California.

The HPA Tech Retreat spans five days of sessions, technology demonstrations and events. During this week, important aspects of production, broadcast, post, distribution and related M&E trends are explored. One of the key differentiators of the Tech Retreat is its strict adherence to a non-commercial focus: marketing-oriented presentations are prohibited except at breakfast roundtables.

“Once again, we’ve received many more submissions than we could use,” says Mark Schubin, the Program Maestro of the HPA Tech Retreat. “To say this year’s were ‘compelling’ is an understatement. We could have programmed a few more days. Rejecting terrific submissions is always the hardest thing we have to do. I’m really looking forward to learning the latest on HDR, using artificial intelligence to restore old movies and machine learning to deal with grunt work, the Academy’s new software foundation, location-based entertainment with altered reality and much more.”

This year’s program is as follows:

Monday February 11: TR-X
eSports: Dropping the Mic on Center Stage
Separate registration required
A half day of targeted panels, speakers and interaction, TR-X will focus on the rapidly growing arena of eSports, with a keynote from Yvette Martinez, CEO – North America of eSports organizer and production company ESL North America.
Tuesday February 12: Supersession
Next-Gen Workflows and Infrastructure: From the Set to the Consumer

Tuesday February 12: Supersession
Next-Gen Workflows and Infrastructure: From the Set to the Consumer

Wednesday February 13: Main Program Highlights
• Mark Schubin’s Technology Year in Review
• Washington Update (Jim Burger, Thompson Coburn LLP)
The highly anticipated review of legislation and its impact on our business from a leading Washington attorney.

• Deep Fakes (Moderated by Debra Kaufman, ETCentric; Panelists Marc Zorn, HBO; Ed Grogan, Department of Defense; Alex Zhukov, Video Gorillas)
It might seem nice to be able to use actors long dead, but the concept of “fake news” takes a terrifying new turn with deepfakes, the term that Wikipedia describes as a portmanteau of “deep learning” and “fake.” Although people have been manipulating images for centuries – long before the creation of Adobe Photoshop – the new AI-powered tools allow the creation of very convincing fake audio and video.

• The Netflix Media Database (Rohit Puri, Netflix)
An optimized user interface, meaningful personalized recommendations, efficient streaming and a high-quality catalog of content are the principal factors that define theNetflix end-user experience. A myriad of business workflows of varying complexities come together to realize this experience. Under the covers, they use computationally expensive computer vision, audio processing and natural language-processing based media analysis algorithms. These algorithms generate temporally and spatially dynamic metadata that is shared across the various use cases. The Netflix Media DataBase (NMDB) is a multi-tenant, data system that is used to persist this deeply technical metadata about various media assets at Netflix and that enables querying the same at scale. The “shared nothing” distributed database architecture allows NMDB to store large amounts of media timeline data, thus forming the backbone for various Netflix media processing systems.

• AI Film Restoration at 12 Million Frames per Second (Alex Zhukov, Video Gorillas)

• Is More Media Made for Subways Than for TV and Cinema? (and does it Make More $$$?) (Andy Quested, BBC)

• Broadcasters Panel (Moderator: Matthew Goldman, MediaKind)

• CES Review (Peter Putman, ROAM Consulting)
Pete Putman traveled to Las Vegas to see what’s new in the world of consumer electronics and returns to share his insights with the HPA Tech Retreat audience.

• 8K: Whoa! How’d We Get There So Quickly (Peter Putman, ROAM Consulting)

• Issues with HDR Home Video Deliverables for Features (Josh Pines, Technicolor)

• HDR “Mini” Session
• HDR Intro: Seth Hallen, Pixelogic
• Ambient Light Compensation for HDR Presentation: Don Eklund, Sony Pictures Entertainment
• HDR in Anime: Haruka Miyagawa, Netflix
• Pushing the Limits of Motion Appearance in HDR: Richard Miller, Pixelworks
• Downstream Image Presentation Management for Consumer Displays:
• Moderator: Michael Chambliss, International Cinematographers Guild
• Michael Keegan, Netflix
• Annie Chang, UHD Alliance
• Steven Poster, ASC, International Cinematographers Guild
• Toshi Ogura, Sony

• Solid Cinema Screens with Front Sound: Do They Work? (Julien Berry, Delair Studios)
Direct-view displays bring high image quality in the cinema but suffer from low pixel fill factor that can lead to heavy moiré and aliasing patterns. Cinema projectors have a much better fill factor which avoids most of those issues even though some moiré effect can be produced due to the screen perforations needed for the audio. With the advent of high contrast, EDR and soon HDR image quality in cinema, screen perforations impact the perceived brightness and contrast from the same image, though the effect has never been quantified since some perforations had always been needed for cinema audio. With the advent of high-quality cinema audio system, it is possible to quantify this effect.

Thursday, February 14: Main Program Highlights

• A Study Comparing Synthetic Shutter and HFR for Judder Reduction (Ianik Beitzel and Aaron Kuder, ARRI and Stuttgart Media University (HdM))

• Using Drones and Photogrammetry Techniques to Create Detailed (High Resolution) Point Cloud Scenes (Eric Pohl, Singularity Imaging)
Drone aerial photography may be used to create multiple geotagged images that are processed to create a 3D point cloud set of a ground scene. The point cloud may be used for production previsualization or background creation for videogames or VR/AR new-media products.

• Remote and Mobile Production Panel (Moderator: Mark Chiolis, Mobile TV Group; Wolfgang Schram, PRG; Scott Rothenberg, NEP)
With a continuing appetite for content from viewers of all the major networks, as well as niche networks, streaming services, web, eGames/eSports and venue and concert-tour events, the battle is on to make it possible to watch almost every sporting and entertainment event that takes place, all live as it is happening. Key members of the remote and mobile community explore what’s new and what workflows are behind the content production and delivery in today’s fast-paced environments. Expect to hear about new REMI applications, IP workflows, AI, UHD/HDR, eGames, and eSports.

• IMSC 1.1: A Single Subtitle and Caption Format for the Entertainment Chain (Pierre-Anthony Lemieux, Sandflow Consulting (supported by MovieLabs); Dave Kneeland, Fox)
IMSC is a W3C standard for worldwide subtitles/captions, and the result of an international collaboration. The initial version of IMSC (IMSC 1) was published in 2016, and has been widely adopted, including by SMPTE, MPEG, ATSC and DVB. With the recent publication of IMSC 1.1, we now have the opportunity to converge on a single subtitle/caption format across the entire entertainment chain, from authoring to consumer devices. IMSC 1.1 improves on IMSC 1 with support for HDR, advanced Japanese language features, and stereoscopic 3D. Learn about IMSC’s history, capabilities, operational deployment, implementation experience, and roadmap — and how to get involved.

• ACESNext and the Academy Digital Source Master: Extensions, Enhancements and a Standardized Deliverable (Andy Maltz, Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences; Annie Chang, Universal Pictures)

• Mastering for Multiple Display and Surround Brightness Levels Using the Human Perceptual Model to Insure the Original Creative Intent Is Maintained (Bill Feightner, Colorfront)
Maintaining a consistent creative look across today’s many different cinema and home displays can be a big challenge, especially with the wide disparity in possible display brightness and contrast as well as the viewing environments or surrounds. Even if it was possible to have individual creative sessions, maintaining creative consistency would be very difficult at best. By using the knowledge of how the human visual system works, the perceptual model, processing source content to fit a given displays brightness and surround can be automatically applied while maintaining the original creative intent with little to no trimming.

• Cloud: Where Are We Now? (Moderator: Erik Weaver, Western Digital)

• Digitizing Workflow – Leveraging Platforms for Success (Roger Vakharia, Salesforce)
While the business of content creation hasn’t changed much over time, the technology enabling processes around production, digital supply chain and marketing resource management among other areas have become increasingly complex. Enabling an agile, platform-based workflow can help in decreasing time and complexity but cost, scale and business sponsorship are often inhibitors in driving success.

Driving efficiency at scale can be daunting but many media leaders have taken the plunge to drive agility across their business process. Join this discussion to learn best practices, integrations, workflows and techniques that successful companies have used to drive simplicity and rigor around their workflow and business process.

• Leveraging Machine Learning in Image Processing (Rich Welsh, Sundog Media Toolkit)
How to use AI (ML and DL networks) to perform “creative” tasks that are boring and humans spend time doing but don’t want to (working real world examples included)

• Leveraging AI in Post Production: Keeping Up with Growing Demands for More Content (Van Bedient, Adobe)
Expectations for more and more content continue to increase — yet staffing remains the same or only marginally bigger. How can advancements from machine learning help content creators? AI can be an incredible boon to remove repetitive tasks and tedious steps allowing humans to concentrate on the creative; ultimately AI can provide the one currency creatives yearn for more than anything else: Time.

• Deploying Component-Based Workflows: Experiences from the Front Lines (Moderator: Pierre-Anthony Lemieux, Sandflow Consulting (supported by MovieLabs))
The content landscape is shifting, with an ever-expanding essence and metadata repertoire, viewing experiences, global content platforms and automated workflows. Component-based workflows and formats, such as the Interoperable Master Format (IMF) standard, are being deployed to meet the challenges brought by this shift. Come and join us for a first-hand account from those on the front lines.

• Content Rights, Royalties and Revenue Management via Blockchain (Adam Lesh, SingularDTV)
The blockchain entertainment economy: adding transparency, disintermediating the supply chain, and empowering content creators to own, manage and monetize their IP to create sustainable, personal and connected economies. As we all know, rights and revenue (including royalties, residuals, etc.) management is a major pain point for content creators in the entertainment industry.

Friday, February 15: Main Program Highlights

• Beyond SMPTE Time Code: The TLX Project: (Peter Symes)
SMPTE Time Code, ST 12, was developed and standardized in the 1970s to support the emerging field of electronic editing. It has been, and continues to be, a robust standard; its application is almost universal in the media industry, and the standard has found use in other industries. However, ST 12 was developed using criteria and restrictions that are not appropriate today, and it has many shortcomings in today’s environment.

A new project in SMPTE, the Extensible Time Label (TLX) is gaining traction and appears to have the potential to meet a wide range of requirements. TLX is designed to be transport-agnostic and with a modern data structure.

• Blindsided: The Game-Changers We Might Not See Coming (Mark Harrison, Digital Production Partnership)
The world’s number one company for gaming revenue makes as much as Sony and Microsoft combined. It isn’t American or Japanese. Marketeers project that by 2019, video advertising on out-of-home displays will be as important as their spending on TV. Meanwhile, a single US tech giant could buy every franchise of the top five US sports leagues. From its off-shore reserves. And still have $50 billion change.

We all know consumers like OTT video. But that’s the least of it. There are trends in the digital economy that, if looked at globally, could have sudden, and profound, implications for the professional content creation industry. In this eye-widening presentation, Mark Harrison steps outside the western-centric, professional media industry perspective to join the technology, consumer and media dots and ask: what could blindside us if we don’t widen our point of view?

• Interactive Storytelling: Choose What Happens Next (Andy Schuler, Netflix)
Looking to experiment with nonlinear storytelling, Netflix launched its first interactive episodes in 2017. Both in children’s programming, the shows encouraged even the youngest of viewers to touch or click on their screens to control the trajectory of the story (think Choose Your Own Adventure books from the 1980s). How did Netflix overcome some of the more interesting technical challenges of the project (i.e., mastering, encoding, streaming), how was SMPTE IMF used to streamline the process and why are we more formalized mastering practices needed for future projects?

• HPA Engineering Excellence Award Winners (Moderator: Joachim Zell, EFILM, Chair HPA Engineering Excellence Awards; Joe Bogacz, Canon; Paul Saccone, Blackmagic Design; Lance Maurer, Cinnafilm; Michael Flathers, IBM; Dave Norman, Telestream).

Since the HPA launched in 2008, the HPA Awards for Engineering Excellence have honored some of the most groundbreaking, innovative, and impactful technologies. Spend a bit of time with a select group of winners and their contributions to the way we work and the industry at large.

• The Navajo Strategic Digital Plan (John Willkie, Luxio)

• Adapting to a COTS Hardware World (Moderator: Stan Moote, IABM)
Transitioning to off-the-shelf hardware is one of the biggest topics on all sides of the industry, from manufacturers, software and service providers through to system integrators, facilities and users themselves. It’s also incredibly uncomfortable. Post production was an early adopter of specialized workstations (e.g. SGI), and has now embraced a further migration up the stack to COTS hardware and IP networks, whether bare metal, virtualized, hybrid or fully cloud based. As the industry deals with the global acceleration of formats, platforms and workflows, what are the limits of COTS hardware when software innovation is continually testing the limits of general-purpose CPUs, GPUs and network protocols? Covering “hidden” issues in using COTS hardware, from the point of view of users and facility operators as well as manufacturers, services and systems integrators.

• Academy Software Foundation: Enabling Cross-Industry Collaboration for Open Source Projects (David Morin, Academy Software Foundation)
In August 2018, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation launched the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF) to provide a neutral forum for open source software developers in the motion picture and broader media industries to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound. This presentation will explain why the Foundation was formed and how it plans to increase the quality and quantity of open source contributions by lowering the barrier to entry for developing and using open source software across the industry.

Panasas’ new ActiveStor Ultra targets emerging apps: AI, VR

Panasas has introduced ActiveStor Ultra, the next generation of its high-performance computing storage solution, featuring PanFS 8, a plug-and-play, portable, parallel file system. ActiveStor Ultra offers up to 75GB/s per rack on industry-standard commodity hardware.

ActiveStor Ultra comes as a fully integrated plug-and-play appliance running PanFS 8 on industry-standard hardware. PanFS 8 is the completely re-engineered Panasas parallel file system, which now runs on Linux and features intelligent data placement across three tiers of media — metadata on non-volatile memory express (NVMe), small files on SSDs and large files on HDDs — resulting in optimized performance for all data types.

ActiveStor Ultra is designed to support the complex and varied data sets associated with traditional HPC workloads and emerging applications, such as artificial intelligence (AI), autonomous driving and virtual reality (VR). ActiveStor Ultra’s modular architecture and building-block design enables enterprises to start small and scale linearly. With dock-to-data in one hour, ActiveStor Ultra offers fast data access and virtually eliminates manual intervention to deliver the lowest total cost of ownership (TCO).

ActiveStor Ultra will be available early in the second half of 2019.

Satore Tech tackles post for Philharmonia Orchestra’s latest VR film

The Philharmonia Orchestra in London debuted its latest VR experience at Royal Festival Hall alongside the opening two concerts of the Philharmonia’s new season. Satore Tech completed VR stitching for the Mahler 3: Live From London film. This is the first project completed by Satore Tech since it was launched in June of this year.

The VR experience placed users at the heart of the Orchestra during the final 10 minutes of Mahler’s Third Symphony, which was filmed live in October 2017. The stitching project was completed by creative technologist/SFX/VR expert Sergio Ochoa, who leads Satore Tech. The company used SGO Mistika technology to post the project, which Ochoa helped to develop during his time in that company — he was creative technologist and CEO of SGO’s French division.

Luke Ritchie, head of innovation and partnerships at the Philharmonia Orchestra, says, “We’ve been working with VR since 2015, it’s a fantastic technology to connect new audiences with the Orchestra in an entirely new way. VR allows you to sit at the heart of the Orchestra, and our VR experiences can transform audiences’ preconceptions of orchestral performance — whether they’re new to classical music or are a die-hard fan.”

It was a technically demanding project for Satore Tech to stitch together, as the concert was filmed live, in 360 degrees, with no retakes using Google’s latest Jump Odyssey VR camera. This meant that Ochoa was working with four to five different depth layers at any one time. The amount of fast movement also meant the resolution of the footage needed to be up-scaled from 4K to 8K to ensure it was suitable for the VR platform.

“The guiding principle for Satore Tech is we aspire to constantly push the boundaries, both in terms of what we produce and the technologies we develop to achieve that vision,” explains Ochoa. “It was challenging given the issues that arise with any live recording, but the ambition and complexity is what makes it such a very suitable initial project for us.”

Satore Tech’s next project is currently in development in Mexico, using experimental volumetric capture techniques with some of the world’s most famous dancers. It is slated for release early next year.

30 Ninja’s Julina Tatlock to keynote SMPTE 2018, will focus on emerging tech

30 Ninjas CEO Julina Tatlock, an award-winning writer-producer, virtual reality director and social TV specialist, will present the keynote address at the SMPTE 2018 conference, which takes place from October 22-25 in downtown Los Angeles. The keynote by Tatlock will take place on the 23rd at 9am, immediately following the SMPTE Annual general membership meeting.

Tatlock specializes in producing and directing VR, creating social media and web-based narrative games for movies and broadcast, as well as collaborating with developers on integrating new tech intellectual property into interactive stories.

During her keynote, she will discuss the ways that content creation and entertainment production can leverage emerging technologies. Tatlock will also address topics such as how best to evaluate what might be the next popular entertainment technology and platform, as well as how to write, direct and build for technology and platforms that don’t exist yet.

Tatlock’s 30 Ninjas, is an award-winning immersive-entertainment company she founded along with director Doug Liman (Bourne Identity, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Edge of Tomorrow, American Made). 30 Ninjas creates original narratives and experiences in new technologies such as virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality and location-based entertainment for clients such as Warner Bros., USA Network, Universal Cable Productions and Harper Collins.

Tatlock also is the executive producer and director of episodes three and four of the six-part VR miniseries “Invisible,” with production partners Condé Nast Entertainment, Jaunt VR and Samsung.

Before founding 30 Ninjas, she spent eight years at Oxygen Media, where she was VP of programming strategy. In an earlier role with Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Tatlock wrote and produced more than 100 of NBC’s Martha Stewart Living morning show segments.

Registration is open for both SMPTE 2018 and for the SMPTE 2018 Symposium, an all-day session that will precede the technical conference and exhibition on Oct. 22. Pre-registration pricing is available through Oct. 13. Further details are available at smpte2018.org.

Assimilate intros media toolkit, Scratch Play Pro

Assimilate is now offering Scratch Play Pro, which includes a universal professional format player, immersive media player, look creator (with version management), transcoder and QC tool.

Play Pro is able to play back most formats, such as camera formats (including Raw), deliverable formats of any kind, as well as still frame formats. You can also show the image in full screen on a second/output display, either attached to the GPU or through SDI video-IO (AJA, Blackmagic, Bluefish444). Users also have the ability to load and play as much media as they can store in a timely manner.

Part of Play Pro is the Construct (timeline) environment, a graphical media manager that allows users to load and manage stills/shots/timelines. It runs on Windows or OS X.

As an immersive video player, Play Pro supports equirectangular 360, cubic/cubic packed 360, 180° VR, stereo, mono, side-by-side or over/under, embedded ambisonic audio and realtime mesh de-warping of 180° VR media. Playback is on screen or through immersive headsets like Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and HMDs supporting OpenVR on both Windows and Mac. In addition to playback and CDL color correction, Play Pro can directly publish your 360/180 media to Facebook 360 or YouTube 360.
As a look creator, Play Pro supports 1D and 3D LUT formats of any size for import and export. It also supports import/export of CDLs in both CDL and CC. It also allows you to combine two different LUTs and still add a display LUT on top. A CDL-based toolset, which is compatible with all other color tools, allows you to modify looks and/or create complete new looks.

It can also export LUTs in different depths and sizes to fit different LUT boxes, cameras and monitors. The ability to create looks in production or to import looks created by post production allows you to establish a consistent color pipeline from on-set to delivery. Using the Construct (timeline) environment, users can store all look versions and apply them at any time in the production process.

Play Pro reads in all formats and can transcode to ProRes, H.264 and H.265. For VR delivery, it supports H.264 rendering up to 8K, including the metadata needed for online portals, such as YouTube and Facebook. Users can add custom metadata, such as scene and take information and include it in any exported file. Or they can export it as a separate ALE-file for use further down the pipeline.

As a QC tool, Play Pro can be used on-set and in post. It supports SDI output, split-screen, A-B overlay and audio monitoring and routing. It also comes with a number of QC-tools for video measuring, like a vectorscope, waveform, curves, histogram, as well extensive annotation capabilities through its note feature.

All metadata and comments can be exported as a report in different styles, including an HDR-analysis report that calculates MaxFall and MaxCLL. Action- and title-safe guides, as well as blanking and letterboxing, can be enabled as an overlay for review.

Scratch Play Pro is available now for $19 per month, or $199 for a yearly license.