Tag Archives: VFX

MPC Film provides VFX for new Predator movie

From outer space to suburban streets, the hunt comes to Earth in director Shane Black’s reinvention of the Predator series. Now, the universe’s most lethal hunters are stronger, smarter and deadlier than ever before, having genetically upgraded themselves with DNA from other species.

When a young boy accidentally triggers their return to Earth, only a crew of ex-soldiers and an evolutionary biology professor can prevent the end of the human race.

 

MPC Film’s team was led by VFX supervisors Richard Little and Arundi Asregadoo, creating 500 shots for this new Predator movie. The majority of the work required hero animation for the Upgrade Predator and additional work included the Predator dogs, FX effects and a CG swamp environment.

MPC Film’s character lab department modeled, sculpted and textured the Upgrade and Predator dogs to a high level of detail, allowing the director to have flexibility to view closeups, if needed. The technical animation department applied movement to the muscle system and added the flowing motion to the dreadlocks on all of the film’s hero alien characters, an integral part of the Predator’s aesthetic in the franchise.

MPC’s artists also created photorealistic Predator One and digital double mercenary characters for the film. Sixty-four other assets were created, ranging from stones and sticks for the swamp floor to grenades, a grenade launcher and bombs.

MPC’s artists also worked on the scene where we first meet the Upgrade’s dogs who are sent out to hunt the Predator. The sequence was shot on a bluescreen stage on location. The digital environments team built a 360-degree baseball field matching the location shoot from reference photography. Creating simple geometry and re-projecting the textures helped create a realistic environment.

Once the Upgrade tracks down the “fugitive” Predator the fight begins. To create the scene, MPC used a mixture of the live-action Predator intercut with its full CG Predator. The battle culminates with the Upgrade ripping the head and spine away from the body of the fugitive. This shot was a big challenge for the FX and tech animation team, who also added green Predator blood into the mix, amplifying the gore factor.

In the hunt scene, the misfit heroes trap the Upgrade and set the ultimate hunter alight. This sequence was technically challenging for the animation, lighting and FX team, which worked very closely to create a convincing Upgrade that appeared to be on fire.

For the final battle, MPC Film’s digital environments artists created a full CG swamp where the Upgrade’s ship crash-lands. The team was tasked with matching the set and creating a 360-degree CG set extension with water effects.

A big challenge was how to ensure the Upgrade Predator interacted realistically with the actors and set. The animation, tech animation and FX teams worked hard to make the Upgrade Predator fit seamlessly into this environment.

London design, animation studio Golden Wolf sets up shop in NYC

Animation studio Golden Wolf, headquartered in London, has launched its first stateside location in New York City. The expansion comes on the heels of an alliance with animation/VFX/live-action studio Psyop, a minority investor in the company. Golden Wolf now occupies studio space in SoHo adjacent to Psyop and its sister company Blacklist, which formerly represented Golden Wolf stateside and was instrumental to the relationship.

Among the year’s highlights from Golden Wolf are an integrated campaign for Nike FA18 Phantom (client direct), a spot for the adidas x Parley Run for the Oceans initiative (TBWA Amsterdam) in collaboration with Psyop, and Marshmello’s Fly music video for Disney. Golden Wolf also received an Emmy nomination for its main title sequence for Disney’s Ducktales reboot.

Heading up Golden Wolf’s New York office are two transplants from the London studio, executive producer Dotti Sinnott and art director Sammy Moore. Both joined Golden Wolf in 2015, Sinnott from motion design studio Bigstar, where she was a senior producer, and Moore after a run as a freelance illustrator/designer in London’s agency scene.

Sinnott comments: “Building on the strength of our London team, the Golden Wolf brand will continue to grow and evolve with the fresh perspective of our New York creatives. Our presence on either side of the Atlantic not only brings us closer to existing clients, but also positions us perfectly to build new relationships with New York-based agencies and brands. On top of this, we’re able to use the time difference to our advantage to work on faster turnarounds and across a range of budgets.”

Founded in 2013 by Ingi Erlingsson, the studio’s executive creative director, Golden Wolf is known for youth-oriented work — especially content for social media, entertainment and sports — that blurs the lines of irreverent humor, dynamic action and psychedelia. Erlingsson was once a prolific graffiti artist and, later, illustrator/designer and creative director at U.K.-based design agency ilovedust. Today he inspires Golden Wolf’s creative culture and disruptive style fed in part by a wave of next-gen animation talent coming out of schools such as Gobelins in France and The Animation Workshop in Denmark.

“I’m excited about our affiliation with Psyop, which enjoys an incredible legacy producing industry-leading animated advertising content,” Erlingsson says. “Golden Wolf is the new kid on the block, with bags of enthusiasm and an aim to disrupt the industry with new ideas. The combination of the two studios means that we are able to tackle any challenge, regardless of format or technical approach, with the support of some of the world’s best artists and directors. The relationship allows brands and agencies to have complete confidence in our ability to solve even the biggest challenges.”

Golden Wolf’s initial work out of its New York studio includes spots for Supercell (client direct) and Bulleit Bourbon (Barton F. Graf). Golden Wolf is represented in the US market by Hunky Dory for the East Coast, Baer Brown for the Midwest and In House Reps for the West Coast. Stink represents the studio for Europe.

Main Photo: (L-R) Dotti Sinnott, Ingi Erlingsson and Sammy Moore.

Our SIGGRAPH 2018 video coverage

SIGGRAPH is always a great place to wander around and learn about new and future technology. You can get see amazing visual effects reels and learn how the work was created by the artists themselves. You can get demos of new products, and you can immerse yourself in a completely digital environment. In short, SIGGRAPH is educational and fun.

If you weren’t able to make it this year, or attended but couldn’t see it all, we would like to invite you to watch our video coverage from the show.

SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective has announced the winners of our Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver. Seeking to recognize debut products with real-world applications, the postPerspective Impact Awards are voted on by an anonymous judging body made up of respected industry artists and professionals. It’s working pros who are going to be using new tools — so we let them make the call.

The awards honor innovative products and technologies for the visual effects, post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. They celebrate companies that push the boundaries of technology to produce tools that accelerate artistry and actually make users’ working lives easier.

While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR, AI and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production, which makes these SIGGRAPH Impact Awards doubly interesting.

The winners are as follows:

postPerspective Impact Award — SIGGRAPH 2018 MVP Winner:

They generated a lot of buzz at the show, as well as a lot of votes from our team of judges, so our MVP Impact Award goes to Nvidia for its Quadro RTX raytracing GPU.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Winners:

  • Maxon for its Cinema 4D R20 3D design and animation software.
  • StarVR for its StarVR One headset with integrated eye tracking.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Horizon Winners:

This year we have started a new Imapct Award category. Our Horizon Award celebrates the next wave of impactful products being previewed at a particular show. At SIGGRAPH, the winners were:

  • Allegorithmic for its Substance Alchemist tool powered by AI.
  • OTOY and Epic Games for their OctaneRender 2019 integration with UnrealEngine 4.

And while these products and companies didn’t win enough votes for an award, our voters believe they do deserve a mention and your attention: Wrnch, Google Lightfields, Microsoft Mixed Reality Capture and Microsoft Cognitive Services integration with PixStor.

 

Artifex provides VFX limb removal for Facebook Watch’s Sacred Lies

Vancouver-based VFX house Artifex Studios created CG amputation effects for the lead character in Blumhouse Productions’ new series for Facebook Watch, Sacred Lies. In the show, the lead character, Minnow Bly (Elena Kampouris), emerges after 12 years in the Kevinian cult missing both of her hands. Artifex was called on to remove the actress’ limbs.

VFX supervisor Rob Geddes led Artifex’s team who created the hand/stump transposition, which encompassed 165 shots across the series. This involved detailed paint work to remove the real hands, while Artifex 3D artists simultaneously performed tracking and match move in SynthEyes to align the CG stump assets to the actress’ forearm.

This was followed up with some custom texture and lighting work in Autodesk Maya and Chaos V-Ray to dial in the specific degree of scarring or level of healing on the stumps, depending on each scene’s context in the story. While the main focus of Artifex’s work was on hand removal, the team also created a pair of severed hands for the first episode after rubber prosthetics didn’t pass the eye test. VFX work was run through Side Effects Houdini and composited in Foundry’s Nuke.

“The biggest hurdle for the team during this assignment was working with the actress’ movements and complex performance demands, especially the high level of interaction with her environment, clothing or hair,” says Adam Stern, founder of Artifex. “In one visceral sequence, Rob and his team created the actual severed hands. These were originally shot practically with prosthetics, however the consensus was that the practical hands weren’t working. We fully replaced these with CG hands, which allowed us to dial in the level of decomposition, dirt, blood and torn skin around the cuts. We couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Geddes adds, “One interesting thing we discovered when wrangling the stumps, is that the logical and accurate placement of the wrist bone of the stumps didn’t necessarily feel correct when the hands weren’t there. There was quite a bit of experimentation to keep the ‘hand-less’ arms from looking unnaturally long, or thin.”

Artifex also added a scene involving absolute devastation in a burnt forest in Episode 101, involving matte painting and set extension of extensive fire damage that couldn’t safely be achieved on set. Artifex fell back on their experience in environmental VFX creation, using matte painting and projections tied together with ample rotoscope work.

Approximately 20 Artifex artists took part in Sacred Lies across 3D, compositing, matte painting, I/O and production staff.

Watch Artifex founder Adam Stern talk about the show from the floor of SIGGRAPH 2018:

Sony Pictures Post adds three theater-style studios

Sony Pictures Post Production Services has added three theater-style studios inside the Stage 6 facility on the Sony Pictures Studios lot in Culver City. All studios feature mid-size theater environments and include digital projectors and projection screens.

Theater 1 is setup for sound design and mixing with two Avid S6 consoles and immersive Dolby Atmos capabilities, while Theater 3 is geared toward sound design with a single S6. Theater 2 is designed for remote visual effects and color grading review, allowing filmmakers to monitor ongoing post work at other sites without leaving the lot. Additionally, centralized reception and client services facilities have been established to better serve studio sound clients.

Mix Stage 6 and Mix Stage 7 within the sound facility have been upgraded, each featuring two S6 mixing consoles, six Pro Tools digital audio workstations, Christie digital cinema projectors, 24 X 13 projection screens and a variety of support gear. The stages will be used to mix features and high-end television projects. The new resources add capacity and versatility to the studio’s sound operations.

Sony Pictures Post Production Services now has 11 traditional mix stages, the largest being the Cary Grant Theater, which seats 344. It also has mix stages dedicated to IMAX and home entertainment formats. The department features four sound design suites, 60 sound editorial rooms, three ADR recording studios and three Foley stages. Its Barbra Streisand Scoring Stage is among the largest in the world and can accommodate a full orchestra and choir.

Patrick Ferguson joins MPC LA as VFX supervisor

MPC’s Los Angeles studio has added Patrick Ferguson to its staff as visual effects supervisor. He brings with him experience working in both commercials and feature films.

Ferguson started out in New York and moved to Los Angeles in 2002, and he has since worked at a range of visual effect houses along the West Coast, including The Mission, where he was VFX supervisor, and Method, where he was head of 2D. “No matter where I am in the world or what I’m working on, one thing has remained consistent since I started working in the industry: I still love what I do. I think that’s the most important thing.”

Ferguson has collaborated with directors such as Stacy Wall, Mark Romanek, Melina Matsoukas, Brian Billow and Carl Rinsch, and has worked on campaigns for big global brands, including Nike, Apple, Audi, HP and ESPN.

He has also worked on high-profile films, including Pirates of the Caribbean and Alice in Wonderland, and he was a member of the Academy Award-winning team for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

“In this new role at MPC, I hope to bring my varied experience of working on large scale feature films as well as on commercials that have a much quicker turnaround time,” he says. “It’s all about knowing what the correct tools are for the particular job at hand, as every project is unique.”

For Ferguson, there is no substitute for being on set: “Being on set is vital, as that’s when key relationships are forged between the director, the crew, the agency and the entire team. Those shared experiences go a long way in creating a trust that is carried all the way through to end of the project and beyond.”

Breathing life into The Walking Dead with VFX

By Karen Moltenbrey

Zombies used to have a short life span, awakening sometime during October, just in time for Halloween, before once again stumbling back into obscurity for another year. But thanks to the hit series The Walking Dead and its spin-off Fear the Walking Dead, the popularity of these monsters is infectious, turning them — and the shows — into cult phenomenon.

The Walking Dead’s rise in popularity started almost immediately with the series’ US debut, on October 31, 2010, on AMC. The storyline began when Rick Grimes, a sheriff deputy, awakens from a coma to find the world overrun by zombies. He and other survivors in the Atlanta area then band together to fight off these so-called “walkers,” as well as other tribes of survivors intent on ensuring their own survival in this post-apocalyptic world, no matter the cost.

In mid-2015, the show gave rise to the companion series Fear the Walking Dead. Fear, a prequel to The Walking Dead, takes place at the start of the zombie apocalypse and follows a different set of characters as they struggle to survive on the West Coast.

And the series’ visual effects are, well, to die for. Literally.

Burbank’s Picture Shop began creating the effects for Walk starting last season and is now in the midst of Season 9 (The studio splits the lion’s share of the work on the show with Goodbye Kansas Studios). Picture Shop provides visual effects for Fear, as well (Season 4, Episodes 1 through 8).

According to Christian Cardona, senior visual effects supervisor at Picture Shop, the crux of the work for both series includes character “kill” effects and environment augmentations. “We do a lot of what we call ‘walker kills.’ What that usually requires is weapon extensions, whereby the weapon gets inserted into the walkers, and then the ensuing wounds. We have to track the wounds onto the practical walkers and then also do blood sims during those kills,” he explains. “That accounts for probably 50 to 60 percent of the work.”

The only way to kill a walker is to damage its brain or destroy its body. Therefore, each episode contains its fair share of bodily damage to the zombies (and, sometimes, to the humans trying to keep them and the adversarial tribes at bay).

Cardona notes that it took the group a few episodes to nail down the blood aesthetic the producers were looking for — the look of the blood as well as how it should flow from a walker’s mouth. “Throughout the season, we’ve definitely zeroed in on that and have really gotten a good system down, where now it takes us just a fraction of the time,” he says.

Nevertheless, the work has to be exact. “The client wants everything to be photoreal; they don’t want it to look like anything was added. With that said, they scrutinize every shot, frame by frame and pixel by pixel, so we definitely have to do our due diligence and make sure our work adheres to their standard,” Cardona says. “And they will art direct every drop of blood. They know what they want, and we make sure we deliver that.”

The Walking Dead

There is indeed consistency in the overall look of the blood and wounds, as well as the walkers themselves in each of the shows, although there was one scene in Walk whereby the walkers were stuck in a toxic sludge. As a result, their skin was more pale and saggy. “It was a unique scenario where we could change their appearance and the look of the blood for that episode to illustrate that these walkers were different,” recalls Cardona.

The Walking Dead
In Walk, the majority of the hero walkers — either individuals or those in small groups – are actors with prosthetic makeup, or in some cases, practical models. But when there are more than two dozen or so walkers in a shot, they are CG creations.

Whether a practical or digital walker is used for the show often depends on the action in the scene. Walker kills are prevalent throughout the series, as it is in Fear, and often this involves a decapitation or a scalping, “because in order to kill the walkers, they have to be either shot in the head or stabbed,” Cardona points out. “Oftentimes when that happens, we have to cut from the person with the makeup and prosthetics and replace the entire head digitally before chopping it off for the scene.”

Season 8 Episode 14 featured a practical walker with a broken body strapped to a dolly cart, its head locked in position on the cart. As a form of torture, the cart was wheeled close enough for the walker to bite a victim. Initially, the walker was practical, but Picture Shop artists ended up replacing it with a CG model.

“The client wasn’t really happy with the practical version on set. It looked rubbery, like an animatronic walker, which it was. It needed to be fleshier, a little more real,” says Cardona. “The blood and wounds felt too dry, and the muscles had to contract.”

Fear the Walking Dead

In fact, Cardona describes that sequence as one of the more challenging from Season 8. “It was close to the camera and had to be photoreal. It wasn’t just one shot, either; there were over a dozen shots in the scene, with multiple angles and long takes.”

The team used the practical cart walker’s head in the shots but replaced the body and arms, which also had been locked to the cart, requiring intricate match-moving. “We had to be spot on and tight, so there was a lot of soft tracking as well, since the camera was moving everywhere,” recalls Cardona. “And then we had to get that walker to look photoreal.”

Compounding this scene even more was the fact that the main character shoots the cart walker, requiring the addition of bullet hits and resulting wounds.

Zombie Nation
For the upcoming Season 9 (premiering October 7), Picture Shop began using a new system for generating large crowds of walkers. According to Cardona, the animators introduced Golaem’s population tool into the pipeline to help with the mass crowd simulations for the walker herds that will appear during the season. Previously, the artists used the particle system in Autodesk’s Maya for this task, “but we needed something that was more robust, something created specifically to do this kind of effect, especially on a TV schedule and with a TV pipeline and workflow,” he adds.

During this past off-season, the artists began establishing a system that would source the walker assets the group had created for Season 8 and in the off-season to prepare for Season 9. “We were modeling walkers and using some of the walkers from Season 8, and standardizing them all with the same T-pose so we could easily swap out rigs and customize and create a lot of variations with textures, changing their clothes, skin color and hair,” explains Cardona. “So when we have to create walker herds, we can easily get five or six variations from a single walker. We end up with a lot of variations in our herd sims without having to create a brand-new walker every time.”

And make no mistake, there will be more herds of walkers in Season 9 than viewers have seen in previous seasons.

The Walking Dead

Other VFX
On average, Picture Shop created 40 to 50 VFX shots per episode during Season 8 of The Walking Dead, with a typical turnaround time of two to three weeks. In addition to the kills and their associated effects, the group also built set extensions. For instance, most of Season 8 (and 7) revolved around what is called “the Sanctuary,” an old factory that is now home to The Saviors, with whom Grimes and his group must interact. The first two floors were practically built, and then Picture Shop extended the structure digitally by another 12 stories. At one point, a gun fight ensues, which called for the CG artists to break out all the windows — another visual effect.

“The group didn’t move far from their location in Season 8, so the need for additional set extensions wasn’t as high as it had been in earlier seasons,” adds Cardona.

Episode 8 of Walk — which has the tribes fighting each other more so than the walkers — did start off with a bang, however. In the first episode of the season, Daryl, Grimes’ trusted lieutenant, shoots a box of explosives, ripping a CG walker in half — work that Cardona describes as “challenging.” In another shot, an RPG blows up another tribe member; in it, the actor had to be swapped out for a digital double that had been projection modeled.

Cardona has seen an evolution in the effects Picture Shop is providing for Walk in particular. Some of the more interesting effects will be coming in Season 9, he teases. “We’ve been working on some of the stuff over the summer and have spent time in R&D on one effect in particular — something new that the audience hasn’t seen before,” he says.

In the upcoming season, nature is taking over, and there will be overgrown vegetation on all the buildings and structures. “With that said, we are doing an effect whereby we take a murder of crows and have them swarm similar to the murmuration of starlings, which wheel and dart through the sky in tight, fluid formations,” says Cardona. “This is something you will see through the course of the season.”

 

The Walking Dead

For this work, the artists built and rigged a crow in Maya and generated various animation cycles, which were cached out and used as a particle simulation within Side Effects’ Houdini.

While creating this effect was not nearly as time-consuming as setting up the crowd simulation in Golaem, “it was something unique, and we had to figure out an approach that gave us the flexibility to art direct and change [the results] quickly,” Cardona notes. “And, it’s an effect that has nothing to do with walkers, but it tells a big part of the story of what is happening to the world around them.”

In terms of the other overall effects in Walk and Fear, the Picture Shop artists use primarily Autodesk’s 3ds Max, although Maya is also used, albeit mainly for the Golaem crowd work. Yet once the sim is complete, the artists cache the results and bake out all the animation within Maya, then export it into Max. Rendering is done in Chaos’ V-Ray for 3ds Max.

In addition, the artists use Pixologic’s ZBrush for a lot of the organic modeling, mostly for the walkers. For effects, the crew usually turns to Houdini.

The effects that Picture Shop delivers for The Walking Dead are unique — in terms of the blood and gore — from other shows the studio works on, such as Hawaii Five-0 and MacGyver, which call for more traditional VFX, like muzzle flashes and explosions, as well as set extensions. “It’s more hard-surface modeling stuff, whereas Walk, for the most part, is a lot more organic,” Cardona adds. “And the tone is completely different, obviously.”

Monster Mash
Picture Shop performs the same type of work for Fear as it does for Walk — mostly weapon extensions and walker kills. Cardona notes there is a cohesiveness in the effects between the two shows, especially now that the timeline of both stories is nearly the same. Fear started at the beginning of the apocalypse, when the walkers were “fresher, and the blood kills were a little bigger, because the thinking was that there would be more blood present in the walkers at that point,” he explains.

Insofar as the general walker kills are concerned, the actors never really make a physical impact with their stabbing motions, so oftentimes their hands are not in the right positions or the reaction time of the walker is off. In these instances, it is up to the VFX artists to digitally rectify the action and reaction — for instance, separating and repositioning the actor’s arm, stabilizing it, then tracking on the weapon that is placed in their hand, as well as stabilizing the walker, adding the wound, and then adding the weapon extension. This holds true for both series.

“Sometimes this can be challenging because the camera is also moving, so it requires significant roto work, and we have to deconstruct the shot and reconstruct it back again,” says Cardona. “There are plenty of these types of shots we have to do for both Walk and Fear.”

For the tracking on this and other work, the studio uses Andersson Technologies’ SynthEyes; for the planar tracking, Boris FX’s Mocha, formerly from Imagineer Systems.

According to Cardona, the overall look of the walkers has changed throughout the course of the Fear seasons. In Walk, they are more decayed, whereas in Fear, they still look like humans for the most part, not as skeletal. But, that has now changed, and with a more cohesive look between the walkers is a more cohesive look with some of the VFX, particularly the blood effects going forward.

However, there is one big difference between the two shows. Walk is still shot on film, 16mm, while Fear is shot digitally, so the graininess is quite heavy with Walk. “It affects our tracking because there is so much noise. Often we would de-grain [the footage] to do the tracking, and then add the grain back in. Also, any time we have a bluescreen shot where we have to pull keys, it’s a problem,” says Cardona.

Indeed, honing the effects on The Walking Dead gives the artists a leg up when it comes to Fear. Another advantage: Picture Shop performs the color and finishing for both shows, as well, which can result in some emergency VFX work for the crew, especially during a time crunch. In fact, the colorists at the facility created the custom 16mm grain pattern that the artists use now during the tracking process. It was generated by the colorists when the client was considering migrating Walk to digital format but then decided to retain the current structure.

Another plus: The Walking Dead executives are also located in the same building as Picture Shop, several floors up. “They just moved here, and it’s convenient for everyone. We can do spot sessions with VFX producer Jason Sax or showrunner Angela Kang (who recently took over that role from Scott Gimple).”

At Comic-Con San Diego a few weeks ago, the series was a fan favorite, and online there is talk about plans for upcoming seasons. So, it appears these walkers still have a lot of life left in them, if fans — and the digital artists — have their way.


Karen Moltenbrey is a longtime writer and editor in the CG and post industries.

Using VFX to bring the new Volkswagen Jetta to life

LA-based studio Jamm provided visual effects for the all-new 2019 Volkswagen Jetta campaign Betta Getta Jetta. Created by Deutsch and produced by ManvsMachine, the series of 12 spots bring the Jetta to life by combining Jamm’s CG design with a color palette inspired by the car’s 10-color ambient lighting system.

“The VW campaign offered up some incredibly fun and intricate challenges. Most notably was the volume of work to complete in a limited amount of time — 12 full-CG spots in just nine weeks, each one unique with its own personality,” says VFX supervisor Andy Boyd.

Collaboration was key to delivering so many spots in such a short span of time. Jamm worked closely with ManvsMachine on every shot. “The team had a very strong creative vision which is crucial in the full 3D world where anything is possible,” explains Boyd.

Jamm employed a variety of techniques for the music-centric campaign, which highlights updated features such as ambient lighting and Beats Audio. The series includes spots titled  Remix, Bumper-to-Bumper, Turb-Whoa, Moods, Bass, Rings, Puzzle and App Magnet, along with 15-second teasers, all of which aired on various broadcast, digital and social channels during the World Cup.

For “Remix,” Jamm brought both a 1985 and a 2019 Jetta to life, along with a hybrid mix of the two, adding a cool layer of turntablist VFX, whereas for “Puzzle,” they cut up the car procedurally in Houdini​, which allowed the team to change around the slices as needed.

For Bass, Jamm helped bring personality to the car while keeping its movements grounded in reality. Animation supervisor Stew Burris pushed the car’s performance and dialed in the choreography of the dance with ManvsMachine as the Jetta discovered the beat, adding exciting life to the car as it bounced to the bassline and hit the switches on a little three-wheel motion.

We reached out to Jamm’s Boyd to find out more.

How early did Jamm get involved?
We got involved as soon as agency boards were client approved. We worked hand in hand with ManvMachine to previs each of the spots in order to lay the foundation for our CG team to execute both agency and directors’ vision.

What were the challenges of working on so many spots at once.
The biggest challenge was for editorial to keep up with the volume of previs options we gave them to present to agency.

Other than Houdini, what tools did they use?
Flame, Nuke and Maya were used as well.

What was your favorite spot of the 12 and why?
Puzzle was our favorite to work on. It was the last of the bunch delivered to Deutsch which we treated with a more technical approach, slicing up the car like a Rubix’s Cube.

 

2nd-gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors

At the SIGGRAPH show, AMD announced the availability of its 2nd-generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX processor with 32 cores and 64 threads. These new AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are built using 12nm “Zen+” x86 processor architecture. Second-gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors support the most I/O and are compatible with existing AMD X399 chipset motherboards via a simple BIOS update, offering builders a broad choice for designing the ultimate high-end desktop or workstation PC.

The 32-core/64-thread Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and the 24-core/48-thread Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX are purpose-built for prosumers who crave raw computational compute power to dispatch the heaviest workloads. The 2nd-gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX offers up to 53 percent faster multithread performance and up to 47 percent more rendering performance for creators than the core i9-7980XE.

This new AMD Ryzen Threadripper X series comes with a higher base and boost clocks for users who need high performance. The 16 cores and 32 threads in the 2950X model offer up to 41 percent more multithreaded performance than the Core i9-7900X.

Additional performance and value come from:
• AMD StoreMI technology: All X399 platform users will now have free access to AMD StoreMI technology, enabling configured PCs to load files, games and applications from a high-capacity hard drive at SSD-like read speeds.
• Ryzen Master Utility: Like all AMD Ryzen processors, the 2nd-generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are fully unlocked. With the updated AMD Ryzen Master Utility, AMD has added new features, such as fast core detection both on die and per CCX; advanced hardware controls; and simple, one-click workload optimizations.
• Precision Boost Overdrive (PBO): A new performance-enhancing feature that allows multithreaded boost limits to be raised by tapping into extra power delivery headroom in premium motherboards.

With a simple BIOS update, all 2nd-generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are supported by a full ecosystem of new motherboards and all existing X399 platforms. Designs are available from top motherboard manufacturers, including ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte and MSI.

The 32-core, 64-thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX is available now from global retailers and system integrators. The 16-core, 32-thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X processor is expected to launch on August 31, and the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX and 2920X models are slated for launch in October.