Tag Archives: VFX

Storage for VFX Studios

By Karen Moltenbrey

Visual effects are dazzling — inviting eye candy, if you will. But when you mention the term “storage,” the wide eyes may turn into a stifled yawn from viewers of the amazing content. Not so for the makers of that content.

They know that the key to a successful project rests within the reliability of their storage solutions. Here, we look at two visual effects studios — both top players in television and feature film effects — as they discuss how data storage enables them to excel at their craft.

Zoic Studios
A Culver City-based visual effects facility, with shops in Vancouver and New York, Zoic Studios has been crafting visual effects for a host of television series since its founding in 2002, starting with Firefly. In addition to a full plate of episodics, Zoic also counts numerous feature films and spots to its credits.

Saker Klippsten

According to Saker Klippsten, CTO, the facility has used a range of storage solutions over the past 16 years from BlueArc (before it was acquired by Hitachi), DataDirect Networks and others, but now uses Dell EMC’s Isilon cluster file storage system for its current needs. “We’ve been a fan of theirs for quite a long time now. I think we were customer number two,” he says, “back when they were trying to break into the media and entertainment sector.”

Locally, the studio uses Intel and NVMe drives for its workstations. NVMe, or non-volatile memory express, is an open logical device interface specification for accessing all-flash storage media attached via PCI Express (PCIe) bus. Previously, Zoic had been using Samsung SSD drives, with Samsung 1TB and 2TB EVO drives, but in the past year and a half, began migrating to NVMe on the local workstations.

Zoic transitioned to the Isilon system in 2004-2005 because of the heavy usage its renderfarm was getting. “Renderfarms work 24/7 and don’t take breaks. Our storage was getting really beat up, and people were starting to complain that it was slow accessing the file system and affecting playback of their footage and media,” explains Klippsten. “We needed to find something that could scale out horizontally.”

At the time, however, file-level storage was pretty much all that was available — “you were limited to this sort of vertical pool of storage,” says Klippsten. “You might have a lot of storage behind it, but you were still limited at the spigot, at the top end. You couldn’t get the data out fast enough.” But Isilon broke through that barrier by creating a cluster storage system that allotted the scale horizontally, “so we could balance our load, our render nodes and our artists across a number of machines, and access and update in parallel at the same time,” he adds.

Klippsten believes that solution was a big breakthrough for a lot of users; nevertheless, it took some time for others to get onboard. “In the media and entertainment industry, everyone seemed to be locked into BlueArc or NetApp,” he notes. Not so with Zoic.

Fairly recently, some new players have come onto the market, including Qumulo, touted as a “next-generation NAS company” built around advanced, distributed software running on commodity hardware. “That’s another storage platform that we have looked at and tested,” says Klippsten, adding that Zoic even has a number of nodes from the vendor.

There are other open-source options out there as well. Recently, Red Hat began offering Gluster Storage, an open, software-defined storage platform for physical, virtual and cloud environments. “And now with NVMe, it’s eliminating a lot of these problems as well,” Klippsten says.

Back when Zoic selected Isilon, there were a number of major issues that affected the studio’s decision making. As Klippsten notes, they had just opened the Vancouver office and were transferring data back and forth. “How do we back up that data? How do we protect it? Storage snapshot technology didn’t really exist at the time,” he says. But, Isilon had a number of features that the studio liked, including SyncIQ, software for asynchronous replication of data. “It could push data between different Isilon clusters from a block level, in a more automated fashion. It was very convenient. It offered a lot of parameters, such as moving data by time of day and access frequency.”

SyncIQ enabled the studio to archive the data. And for dealing with interim changes, such as a mistakenly deleted file, Zoic found Isilon’s SnapshotIQ ideal for fast data recovery. Moreover, Isilon was one of the first to support Aspera, right on the Isilon cluster. “You didn’t have to run it on a separate machine. It was a huge benefit because we transfer a lot of secure, encrypted data between us and a lot of our clients,” notes Klippsten.

Netflix’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Within the pipeline, Zoic’s storage system sits at the core. It is used immediately as the studio ingests the media, whether it is downloaded or transferred from hard drives – terabytes upon terabytes of data. The data is then cleaned up and distributed to project folders for tasks assigned to the various artists. In essence, it acts as a holding tank for the main production storage as an artist begins working on those specific shots, Klippsten explains.

Aside from using the storage at the floor level, the studio also employs it at the archive level, for data recovery as well as material that might not be accessed for weeks. “We have sort of a tiered level of storage — high-performance and deep-archival storage,” he says.

And the system is invaluable, as Zoic is handling 400 to 500 shots a week. If you multiply that by the number of revisions and versions that take place during that time frame, it adds up to hundreds of terabytes weekly. “Per day, we transfer between LA, Vancouver and New York somewhere around 20TB to 30TB,” he estimates. “That number increases quite a bit because we do a lot of cloud rendering. So, we’re pushing a lot of data up to Google and back for cloud rendering, and all of that hits our Isilon storage.”

When Zoic was founded, it originally saw itself as a visual effects company, but at the end of the day, Klippsten says they’re really a technology company that makes pretty pictures. “We push data and move it around to its limits. We’re constantly coming up with new, creative ideas, trying to find partners that can help provide solutions collaboratively if we cannot create them ourselves. The shot cost is constantly being squeezed by studios, which want these shots done faster and cheaper. So, we have to make sure our artists are working faster, too.”

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

Recently, Zoic has been working on a TV project involving a good deal of water simulations and other sims in general — which rapidly generate a tremendous amount of data. Then the data is transferred between the LA and Vancouver facilities. Having storage capable of handling that was unheard of three years ago, Klippsten says. However, Zoic has managed to do so using Isilon along with some off-the-shelf Supermicro storage with NVMe drives, enabling its dynamics department to tackle this and other projects. “When doing full simulation, you need to get that sim in front of the clients as soon as possible so they can comment on it. Simulations take a long time — we’re doing 26GB/sec, which is crazy. It’s close to something in the high-performance computing realm.”

With all that considered, it is hardly surprising to hear Klippsten say that Zoic could not function without a solid storage solution. “It’s funny. When people talk about storage, they are always saying they don’t have enough of it. Even when you have a lot of storage, it’s always running at 99 percent full, and they wonder why you can’t just go out to Best Buy and purchase another hard drive. It doesn’t work that way!”

Milk VFX
Founded just five years ago, Milk VFX is an independent visual effects facility in the UK with locations in London and Cardiff, Wales. While Milk VFX may be young, it was founded by experienced and award-winning VFX supervisors and producers. And the awards have continued, including an Oscar (Ex-Machina), an Emmy (Sherlock) and three BAFTAs, as the studio creates innovative and complex work for high-end television and feature films.

Benoit Leveau

With so much precious data, and a lot of it, the studio has to ensure that its work is secure and the storage system is keeping pace with the staff using it. When the studio was set up, it installed Pixit Media’s PixStor, a parallel file system with limitless storage, for its central storage solution. And, it has been growing with the company ever since. (Milk uses almost no local storage, except for media playback.)

“It was a carefully chosen solution due to its enterprise-level performance,” says Benoit Leveau, head of pipeline at Milk, about the decision to select PixStor. “It allowed us to expand when setting up our second studio in Cardiff and our rendering solutions in the cloud.”

When Milk was shopping for a storage offering while opening the studio, four things were forefront in their minds: speed, scalability, performance and reliability. Those were the functions the group wanted from its storage system — exactly the same four demands that the projects at the studios required.

“A final image requires gigabytes, sometimes terabytes, of data in the form of detailed models, high-resolution textures, animation files, particles and effects caches and so forth,” says Leveau. “We need to be able to review 4K image sequences in real time, so it’s really essential for daily operation.”

This year alone, Milk has completed a number of high-end visual effects sequences for feature films such as Adrift, serving as the principal vendor on this true story about a young couple lost at sea during one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in recorded history. The Milk team created all the major water and storm sequences, including bespoke 100-foot waves, all of which were rendered entirely in the cloud.

As Leveau points out, one of the shots in the film was more than 60TB, as it required complex ocean simulations. “We computed the ocean simulations on our local renderfarm, but the rendering was done in the cloud, and with this setup, we were able to access the data from everywhere almost transparently for the artists,” he explains.

Adrift

The studio also recently completed work on the blockbuster Fantastic Beasts sequel, The Crimes of Grindelwald.

For television, the studio created visual effects for an episode of the Netflix Altered Carbon sci-fi series, where people can live forever, as they digitally store their consciousness (stacks) and then download themselves into new bodies (sleeves). For the episode, the Milk crew created forest fires and the aftermath, as well as an alien planet and escape ship. For Origin, an action-thriller, the team generated 926 VFX shots in 4K for the 10-part series, spanning a wide range of work. Milk is also serving as the VFX vendor for Good Omens, a six-part horror/fantasy/drama series.

“For Origin, all the data had to be online for the duration of the four-month project. At the same time, we commenced work as the sole VFX vendor on the BBC/Amazon Good Omens series, which is now rapidly filling up our PixStor, hence the importance of scalability!” says Leveau.

Main Image: Origin via Milk VFX


Karen Moltenbrey is a veteran VFX and post writer.

Shotgun 8: cloud-based Shotgun Create for studio artists, new UI, more

Autodesk Shotgun 8 is the newest version of the company’s cloud-based review and production tracking software. Targeted to busy creative teams, Shotgun 8 aims to improve the artist and reviewer experience with updates that reduce interruptions to creative flow and facilitate the feedback loop.

Shotgun 8 includes the first public version of Shotgun Create, a new part of Shotgun geared specifically toward creatives working at studios. As a cloud-connected desktop experience, Shotgun Create makes it easier for artists and reviewers to see tasks demanding their attention while providing a collaborative environment to review media and exchange feedback. Linked to the same updated information stored in Shotgun, artists are able to work with high-resolution, locally stored shots in addition to media streamed from the cloud. Also included in this first version of Shotgun Create are built-in annotation tools, new prioritized task views, a centralized view of task history, and tighter integration with creative tools.

Shotgun 8 also has a new web interface for greater clarity and consistency. For individuals who work predominantly in a dark environment, this release also makes it easier to switch between light and dark themes with a new button in the header.

Shotgun 8 is currently available and priced at $30 per account/per month with support or $50 per account/per month with advanced support.

A VFX pro on avoiding the storage ‘space trap’

By Adam Stern

Twenty years is an eternity in any technology-dependent industry. Over the course of two-plus decades of visual effects facility ownership, changing standards, demands, capability upgrades and staff expansion have seen my company, Vancouver-based Artifex Studios, usher in several distinct eras of storage, each with its own challenges. As we’ve migrated to bigger and better systems, one lesson we’ve learned has proven critical to all aspects of our workflow.

Adam Stern

In the early days, Artifex used off-the-shelf hard drives and primitive RAIDs for our storage needs, which brought with it slow transfer speeds and far too much downtime when loading gigabytes of data on and off the system. We barely had any centralized storage, and depended on what was essentially a shared network of workstations — which our then-small VFX house could get away with. Even considering where we were then, which was sub-terabyte, this was a messy problem that needed solving.

We took our first steps into multi-TB NAS using off-the-shelf solutions from companies like Buffalo. This helped our looming storage space crunch but brought new issues, including frequent breakdowns that cost us vital time and lost iterations — even with plenty of space. I recall a particular feature film project we had to deliver right before Christmas. It almost killed us. Our NAS crashed and wouldn’t allow us to pull final shots, while throwing endless error messages our way. I found myself frantically hot-wiring spare drives to enable us to deliver to our client. We made it, but barely.

At that point it was clear a change was needed. We started using a solution that Annex Pro — a Vancouver-based VAR we’d been working with for years — helped put into place. That company was bought and then went away completely.

Our senior FX TD, Stanislav Enilenis, who was also handling IT for us back then, worked with Annex to install the new system. According to Stan, “the switch allowed bandwidth for expansion. However, when we would be in high-production mode, bandwidth became an issue. While the system was an overall improvement from our first multi-terabyte NAS, we had issues. The company was bought out, so getting drives became problematic, parts became harder to source and there were system failures. When we hit top capacity with the-then 20-plus staff all grinding, the system would slow to a crawl and our artists spent more time waiting than working.”

Artifex machine room.

As we transitioned from SD to HD, and then to 4K, our delivery requirements increased along with our rendering demands, causing severe bottlenecks in the established setup. We needed a better solution but options were limited. We were potentially looking at a six-figure investment, in a system not geared to M&E.

In 2014, Artifex was working on the TV series Continuum, which had fairly massive 3D requirements on an incredibly tight turnaround. It was time to make a change. After a number of discussions with Annex, we made the decision to move to an offering from a new company called Qumulo, which provided above-and-beyond service, training and setup. When we expanded into our new facility, Qumulo helped properly move the tech. Our new 48TB pipeline flowed freely and offered features we didn’t previously have, and Qumulo were constantly adding new and requested updates.

Laila Arshid, our current IS manager, has found this to be particularly valuable. “In Qumulo’s dashboard I can see realtime analytics of everything in the system. If we have a slowdown, I can track it to specific workstations and address any issues. We can shut that workstation or render-node down or reroute files so the system stays fast.”

The main lesson we’ve learned throughout every storage system change or upgrade is this: It isn’t just about having a lot of space. That’s an easy trap to fall into, especially today when we’re seeing skyrocketing demands from 4K+ workflows. You can have unlimited storage, but If you can’t utilize it efficiently and at speed, your storage space becomes irrelevant.

In our industry, the number of iterations we can produce has a dramatic impact on the quality of work we’re able to provide, especially with today’s accelerated schedules. One less pass can mean work with less polish, which isn’t acceptable.

Artifex provided VFX for Faster Than Light

Looking forward, we’re researching extended storage on the cloud: an ever-expanding storage pool with the advantages of fast local infrastructure. We currently use GCP for burst rendering with Zync, along with nearline storage, which has been fantastic — but the next step will be integrating these services with our daily production processes. That brings a number of new challenges, including how to combine local and cloud-based rendering and storage in ways that are seamless to our team.

Constantly expanding storage requirements, along with maintaining the best possible speed and efficiency to allow for artist iterations, are the principal drivers for every infrastructure decision at our company — and should be a prime consideration for everyone in our industry.


Adam Stern is the founder of Vancouver, British Columbia’s Artifex. He says the studio’s main goal is to heighten the VFX experience, both artistically and technically, and collaborate globally with filmmakers to tell great stories.

Post production in the cloud

By Adrian Pennington

After being talked about for years, the capacity to use the cloud for the full arsenal of post workflows is possible today with huge ramifications for the facilities business.

Rendering frames for visual effects requires an extraordinary amount of compute power for which VFX studios have historically assigned whole rooms full of servers to act as their renderfarm. As visual quality has escalated, most vendors have either had to limit the scope of their projects or buy or rent new machines on-premises to cope with the extra rendering needed. In recent times this has been upended as cloud networking has enabled VFX shops to relieve internal bottlenecks to scale, and then contract, at will.

The cloud rendering process has become so established that even this once groundbreaking capability has evolved to encompass a whole host of post workflows from previz to transcoding. In doing so, the conventional business model for post is being uprooted and reimagined.

“Early on, global facility powerhouses first recognized how access to unlimited compute and remote storage could empower the creative process to reach new heights,” explains Chuck Parker, CEO of Sohonet. “Despite spending millions of dollars on hardware, the demands of working on multiple, increasingly complex projects simultaneously, combined with decreasing timeframes, stretched on-premise facilities to their limits.”

Chuck Parker

Public cloud providers (Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure) changed the game by solving space, time and capacity problems for resource-intensive tasks. “Sohonet Fastlane and Google Compute Engine, for example, enabled MPC to complete The Jungle Book on time and to Oscar-winning standards, thanks to being able to run millions of Core hours in the cloud,” notes Parker.

Small- to mid-sized companies followed suit. “They lacked the financial resources and the physical space of larger competitors, and initially found themselves priced out of major studio projects,” says Parker. “But by accessing renderfarms in the cloud they can eliminate the cost and logistics of installing and configuring physical machines. Flexible pricing and the option of preemptible instances mean only paying for the compute power used, further minimizing costs and expanding the scope of possible projects.”

Milk VFX did just this when rendering the complex sequences on Adrift. Without the extra horsepower, the London-based house could not have bid on the project in the first place.

“The technology has now evolved to a point where any filmmaker with any VFX project or theatrical, TV or spot editorial can call on the cloud to operate at scale when needed — and still stay affordable,” says Parker. “Long anticipated and theorized, the ability to collaborate in realtime with teams in multiple geographic locations is a reality that is altering the post production landscape for enterprises of all sizes.”

Parker says the new post model might look like this. He uses the example of a company headquartered in Berlin — “an innovative company might employ only a dozen managers and project supervisors on its books. They can bid with confidence on jobs of any scale and any timeframe knowing that they can readily rent physical space in any location, anywhere in the world, to flexibly take advantage of tax breaks and populate it with freelance artists: 100 one week, say, 200 in week three, 300 in week five. The only hardware (rental) costs would be thin-client workstations and Wacom tablets, plus software licenses for 3D, roto, compositing and other key tools. With the job complete, the whole infrastructure can be smoothly scaled back.”

The compute costs of spinning up cloud processing and storage can be modelled into client pitches. “But building out and managing such connectivity independently may still require considerable CAPEX — one that might be cost-prohibitive if you only need the infrastructure for short periods,” notes Parker. “Cloud-compute resources are perfect for spikes in workload but, in between those spikes, paying for bandwidth you don’t need will hurt the bottom line.

Dedicated, “burstable” connectivity speeds of 100Mbit/s up to 50Gbit/s with flexibility, security and reliability are highly desirable attributes for the creative workflow. Price points, as ever, are a motivating concern. Parker’s offerings “move your data away from Internet bandwidth, removing network congestion and decreasing the time it takes to transfer your data. With a direct link to the major cloud provider of your choice, customers can be in control of how their data is routed, leading to a more consistent network experience.

“Direct links into major studios like Pinewood UK open up realtime on-set CGI rendering with live-action photography for virtual production scenarios,” adds Parker. “It is vital that your data transits straight to the cloud and never touches the Internet.”

With file sizes set to continue to increase exponentially over the next few years as 4K and HDR become standard and new immersive media like VR emerges to the mainstream, leveraging the cloud will not only be routine for the highest budget projects and largest vendors, it will become the new post production paradigm. In the cloud creative workflows are demystified and democratized.

Video editing and VFX app HitFilm gets an upgrade

FXhome has upgraded its video editing and VFX software app. The new HitFilm Version 11.0 features Surface Studio, a new VFX plugin modeled from Video Copilot’s Damage and Decay and Cinematic Titles tutorials. Based on customer requests, this new VFX tool enables users to create smooth or rough-textured metallic and vitreous surfaces on any text or in layers. By dropping a clear PNG file onto the HitFilm timeline, text titles instantly turn into weathered, rusty and worn metallic signs.

HitFilm’s Surface Studio also joins FXhome’s expanding library of VFX plugins, Ignite Pro. This set of plugins is available on Mac and PC platforms, and is compatible with 10 of the most used host software, including Adobe Creative Cloud, Apple Final Cut Pro X, Avid, DaVinci Resolve and others.

Last month, FXhome added to its product family with Imerge Pro, a non-destructive RAW image compositor with fully flexible layers and advanced keying for content creators. FXhome is also integrating a number of Imerge Pro plugins with HitFilm, including Exposure, Outer Glow, Inner Glow and Dehaze. New Imerge Pro plugins are tightly integrated with HitFilm V.11.0’s interface ensuring smooth, uninterrupted workflows.

Minimum system requirements are for Apple are: Mac OS 10.13 High Sierra, OS X 10.12 Sierra or OS X 10.11 El Capitan. And for Windows: Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 (64-bit)

HitFilm 11.0 is available immediately from the FXhome store for $299. FXhome is also celebrating this holiday season with its annual sale. Through December 4, 2018, they are offering a 33% discount when users purchase the FXhome Pro Bundle, which includes HitFilm 11.0, Action, Ignite and Imerge.

Post studio Nomad adds Tokyo location

Creative editorial/VFX/sound design company Nomad has expanded its global footprint with a space in Tokyo, adding to a network that also includes offices in New York, Los Angeles and London. It will be led by managing director Yoshinori Fujisawa and executive producer Masato Midorikawa.

The Tokyo office has three client suites, an assistant support suite, production office and machine room. The tools for post workflow include Adobe Creative Cloud (Premiere, After Effects, Photoshop), Flame, Flame Assist, Avid Pro Tools and other various support tools.

Nomad partner/editor Glenn Martin says the studio often works with creatives who regularly travel between LA and Tokyo. He says Nomad will support the new Tokyo-based group with editors and VFX artists from our other offices whenever larger teams are needed.

“The role of a post production house is quite different between the US and Japan,” says Fujisawa and Midorikawa, jointly. “Although people in Japan are starting to see the value of the Western-style post production model, it has not been properly established here yet. We are able to give our Japanese directors and creatives the ability to collaborate with Nomad’s talented editors and VFX artists, who have great skills in storytelling and satisfying the needs of brands. Nomad has a comprehensive post-production workflow that enables the company to execute global projects. It’s now time for Japan to experience this process and be a part of the future of global advertising.”

Main Image: (L-R) Yoshinori Fujisawa and Masato Midorikawa

MPC Film provides VFX for new Predator movie

From outer space to suburban streets, the hunt comes to Earth in director Shane Black’s reinvention of the Predator series. Now, the universe’s most lethal hunters are stronger, smarter and deadlier than ever before, having genetically upgraded themselves with DNA from other species.

When a young boy accidentally triggers their return to Earth, only a crew of ex-soldiers and an evolutionary biology professor can prevent the end of the human race.

 

MPC Film’s team was led by VFX supervisors Richard Little and Arundi Asregadoo, creating 500 shots for this new Predator movie. The majority of the work required hero animation for the Upgrade Predator and additional work included the Predator dogs, FX effects and a CG swamp environment.

MPC Film’s character lab department modeled, sculpted and textured the Upgrade and Predator dogs to a high level of detail, allowing the director to have flexibility to view closeups, if needed. The technical animation department applied movement to the muscle system and added the flowing motion to the dreadlocks on all of the film’s hero alien characters, an integral part of the Predator’s aesthetic in the franchise.

MPC’s artists also created photorealistic Predator One and digital double mercenary characters for the film. Sixty-four other assets were created, ranging from stones and sticks for the swamp floor to grenades, a grenade launcher and bombs.

MPC’s artists also worked on the scene where we first meet the Upgrade’s dogs who are sent out to hunt the Predator. The sequence was shot on a bluescreen stage on location. The digital environments team built a 360-degree baseball field matching the location shoot from reference photography. Creating simple geometry and re-projecting the textures helped create a realistic environment.

Once the Upgrade tracks down the “fugitive” Predator the fight begins. To create the scene, MPC used a mixture of the live-action Predator intercut with its full CG Predator. The battle culminates with the Upgrade ripping the head and spine away from the body of the fugitive. This shot was a big challenge for the FX and tech animation team, who also added green Predator blood into the mix, amplifying the gore factor.

In the hunt scene, the misfit heroes trap the Upgrade and set the ultimate hunter alight. This sequence was technically challenging for the animation, lighting and FX team, which worked very closely to create a convincing Upgrade that appeared to be on fire.

For the final battle, MPC Film’s digital environments artists created a full CG swamp where the Upgrade’s ship crash-lands. The team was tasked with matching the set and creating a 360-degree CG set extension with water effects.

A big challenge was how to ensure the Upgrade Predator interacted realistically with the actors and set. The animation, tech animation and FX teams worked hard to make the Upgrade Predator fit seamlessly into this environment.

London design, animation studio Golden Wolf sets up shop in NYC

Animation studio Golden Wolf, headquartered in London, has launched its first stateside location in New York City. The expansion comes on the heels of an alliance with animation/VFX/live-action studio Psyop, a minority investor in the company. Golden Wolf now occupies studio space in SoHo adjacent to Psyop and its sister company Blacklist, which formerly represented Golden Wolf stateside and was instrumental to the relationship.

Among the year’s highlights from Golden Wolf are an integrated campaign for Nike FA18 Phantom (client direct), a spot for the adidas x Parley Run for the Oceans initiative (TBWA Amsterdam) in collaboration with Psyop, and Marshmello’s Fly music video for Disney. Golden Wolf also received an Emmy nomination for its main title sequence for Disney’s Ducktales reboot.

Heading up Golden Wolf’s New York office are two transplants from the London studio, executive producer Dotti Sinnott and art director Sammy Moore. Both joined Golden Wolf in 2015, Sinnott from motion design studio Bigstar, where she was a senior producer, and Moore after a run as a freelance illustrator/designer in London’s agency scene.

Sinnott comments: “Building on the strength of our London team, the Golden Wolf brand will continue to grow and evolve with the fresh perspective of our New York creatives. Our presence on either side of the Atlantic not only brings us closer to existing clients, but also positions us perfectly to build new relationships with New York-based agencies and brands. On top of this, we’re able to use the time difference to our advantage to work on faster turnarounds and across a range of budgets.”

Founded in 2013 by Ingi Erlingsson, the studio’s executive creative director, Golden Wolf is known for youth-oriented work — especially content for social media, entertainment and sports — that blurs the lines of irreverent humor, dynamic action and psychedelia. Erlingsson was once a prolific graffiti artist and, later, illustrator/designer and creative director at U.K.-based design agency ilovedust. Today he inspires Golden Wolf’s creative culture and disruptive style fed in part by a wave of next-gen animation talent coming out of schools such as Gobelins in France and The Animation Workshop in Denmark.

“I’m excited about our affiliation with Psyop, which enjoys an incredible legacy producing industry-leading animated advertising content,” Erlingsson says. “Golden Wolf is the new kid on the block, with bags of enthusiasm and an aim to disrupt the industry with new ideas. The combination of the two studios means that we are able to tackle any challenge, regardless of format or technical approach, with the support of some of the world’s best artists and directors. The relationship allows brands and agencies to have complete confidence in our ability to solve even the biggest challenges.”

Golden Wolf’s initial work out of its New York studio includes spots for Supercell (client direct) and Bulleit Bourbon (Barton F. Graf). Golden Wolf is represented in the US market by Hunky Dory for the East Coast, Baer Brown for the Midwest and In House Reps for the West Coast. Stink represents the studio for Europe.

Main Photo: (L-R) Dotti Sinnott, Ingi Erlingsson and Sammy Moore.

Our SIGGRAPH 2018 video coverage

SIGGRAPH is always a great place to wander around and learn about new and future technology. You can get see amazing visual effects reels and learn how the work was created by the artists themselves. You can get demos of new products, and you can immerse yourself in a completely digital environment. In short, SIGGRAPH is educational and fun.

If you weren’t able to make it this year, or attended but couldn’t see it all, we would like to invite you to watch our video coverage from the show.

SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective has announced the winners of our Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver. Seeking to recognize debut products with real-world applications, the postPerspective Impact Awards are voted on by an anonymous judging body made up of respected industry artists and professionals. It’s working pros who are going to be using new tools — so we let them make the call.

The awards honor innovative products and technologies for the visual effects, post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. They celebrate companies that push the boundaries of technology to produce tools that accelerate artistry and actually make users’ working lives easier.

While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR, AI and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production, which makes these SIGGRAPH Impact Awards doubly interesting.

The winners are as follows:

postPerspective Impact Award — SIGGRAPH 2018 MVP Winner:

They generated a lot of buzz at the show, as well as a lot of votes from our team of judges, so our MVP Impact Award goes to Nvidia for its Quadro RTX raytracing GPU.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Winners:

  • Maxon for its Cinema 4D R20 3D design and animation software.
  • StarVR for its StarVR One headset with integrated eye tracking.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Horizon Winners:

This year we have started a new Imapct Award category. Our Horizon Award celebrates the next wave of impactful products being previewed at a particular show. At SIGGRAPH, the winners were:

  • Allegorithmic for its Substance Alchemist tool powered by AI.
  • OTOY and Epic Games for their OctaneRender 2019 integration with UnrealEngine 4.

And while these products and companies didn’t win enough votes for an award, our voters believe they do deserve a mention and your attention: Wrnch, Google Lightfields, Microsoft Mixed Reality Capture and Microsoft Cognitive Services integration with PixStor.