Tag Archives: SSD

Storage Trends for M&E

By Tom Coughlin

Media and entertainment content is growing in size due to higher resolution, higher frame rates and more bits per pixel. In addition, the amount of digital content is growing as increasing numbers of creators provide unique content for online streaming channels and as the number of cameras used in a given project increases for applications such as sports 360-degree immersive video projects.

Projections on the growth of local (direct attached), local network and cloud storage for post apps from 2018 out to 2024.

More and larger content will require increasing amounts of digital storage and higher bandwidths to support modern workflows. In addition, in order to control the costs of video workflows, these projects must be cost-effective and make the most efficient use of physical and human resources possible. As a consequence of these opportunities and constraints, M&E workflows are using all types of storage technology to balance performance versus cost.

Hard disk drives (HDD), solid state drives (SSD), optical discs and magnetic tape technologies are increasing in storage capacity and performance and decreasing in the cost. This makes it easier to capture and store content, keep data available in a modern workflow and, when used in a private or public cloud data center, to provide readily available content for delivery and monetization. The NVMe interface for SSDs and NVMe over Fabrics (NVMe-oF) for storage systems is enabling very high-performance storage that can handle multi-stream 4K to 8K+ video projects with high frame rates, enabling more immersive video experiences.

Industry pros are turning to object-based digital storage to enable collaborative workflows and are using online cloud services for rendering, transcoding and other operations. This is becoming increasingly common because much content is now distributed online. Both small and large media houses are also moving toward private or public cloud archiving to help access and monetize valuable historical content.

Growth in Object Storage for various M&E applications over time.

Various artificial intelligence (AI) tools, such as machine learning (ML), are being used in M&E to extract metadata that allows more rapid search and use of media content. Increasingly, AI tools are also being used for media and storage management applications.

Let’s dig a little deeper…

Storage Device Evolution
HDDs and SSDs are currently the dominant storage technologies used in media and entertainment workflows. HDDs provide the best value per terabyte compared to SSDs, but NAND flash-based SSDs provide much greater performance, and Optane-based SSDs from Intel — and similar soon to be released 3D XPoint SSDs from Micron — can provide 1,000 times the performance of NAND flash. Optical discs and magnetic tape are often used in library systems and therefore have much longer latency from when data is requested to when it is delivered than HDDs. As a consequence, these technologies are primarily used for cold storage and archive applications.

The highest capacity HDDs shipping in volume have capacities up to 16TB and are available from Western Digital, Seagate and Toshiba. However, Western Digital announced that it is sampling nine-disk, 3.5-inch form factor, helium-sealed 18TB drives using some form of energy-assisted magnetic recording and that a 20TB drive will also be available that shingles recorded tracks on top of each other, resulting in higher effective track — and thus areal density — on the disks

Recently Introduced Western Digital 18TB and 20TB HDDs.

Seagate has also indicated that it would ship 20TB HDDs by 2020 using energy-assisted magnetic recording. These high-capacity drives are geared for enterprise applications, particularly in large (cloud) data centers. These drives should bring the price of HDD storage down to less than $0.02 per GB ($20/TB) when they are available in volume.

Both Sony and Panasonic are promoting the use of write-once Blu-ray optical discs for archival applications. These products are used for media archiving by some users, who are often attracted by the physical longevity of the inorganic optical storage media. The companies’ storage architectures for an optical library system differ, but they have worked together on standards for the underlying optical recording media.

According to Coughlin Associates’ 2019 Digital Storage for Media Professionals Survey, hard disk drives and magnetic tape are the most popular digital storage media. The most popular magnetic tape format in the industry is the LTO format.

Solid state drives using NAND flash — and, more recently, Intel Optane — are increasingly being used in modern media workflows. In post, there is a move to use SSDs for primary storage, particularly for facilities dealing with multiple streams of the highest resolution and frame-rate content. These SSDs are available in a wide range of storage capacities and form factors; interface options are traditional SATA, SAS, or the higher-performance Nonvolatile Memory Express (NVMe).

Samsung SSD form factors

Modern NAND flash SSDs use 3D flash memory in which memory storage cells are stacked on top of each other up to 96 layers today, while 128 or more memory cell layers will be available in 2020. Research has shown than 500-plus layers of NAND flash cells might be possible, and, as Figure 10 shows, the major NAND flash manufacturers will be introducing ever higher NAND flash layer devices (as well as more bits per cell) over the next few years.

In 2018, NAND flash SSDs were expensive because of the shortage of NAND flash. In 2019, NAND flash memory is widely available due to additional production capacity. As a result, SSDs have been dropping in price, with a consequent reduction in their cost per gigabyte. Lower prices have increased demand for SSDs.

Modern Storage Systems
Modern storage systems used for post are usually file-oriented (with either a NAS or SAN architecture), although object storage (sometimes in the cloud) is beginning to find some uses. Let’s look at some examples using HDDs and SATA/SAS SSDs, as well as storage systems using NVMe SSDs and network storage using NVMe over Fabrics.

Avid Nexis E2 all-flash array

The latest generation of the Avid Nexis storage platform includes HDD as well as larger SSD all-flash storage array configurations. Nexis is Avid’s software-defined storage for storage virtualization in media applications. It can be integrated into Avid and third-party workflows as well as across Avid MediaCentral and scale from 9.6TB up to 6.4PB. It allows on-demand access to a shared pool of centralized storage. The product allows the use of up to 38.4TB of NAND flash SSD storage in its E2 SSD engine to accelerate 4K through 8K mastering workflows.

The E5 nearline storage engine is another option that can be used by itself or integrated with other enterprise-class Avid Nexis engines.

Facilis Hub

At IBC in September, ATTO announced a partnership with Facilis to integrate ATTO ThunderLink NS 3252 Thunderbolt to 24GbE within the Facilis Hub shared storage platform. The storage solution provides flexible, scalable, high-bandwidth connectivity for Apple’s new Mac Pro, iMac Pro and Mac mini. Facilis’ Hub shared storage platform uses ATTO Celerity 32Gb and 16Gb Fibre Channel HBAs and Fastframe 25GB Ethernet NICs. Facilis Hub represents the evolution of the Facilis shared file system with block-level virtualization and multi-connectivity built for demanding media production workflows.

In addition, Facilis servers include ATTO 12Gb ExpressSAS HBAs. These technologies allow Facilis to create powerful solutions that fulfill a diverse set of customer connectivity needs and workflow demands.

With a new infusion of funding and the addition of many new managers, Editshare has a new next-generation file system and management console, the EFS 2020. The new EFS is designed to support collaborative workflows with up to a 20% performance improvement and with an easy-to-use user interface that also provides administrators and technicians with useful media management tools.

The EFS 2020 also has File Auditing, which offers a realtime, purpose-built content auditing platform for the entire production workflow. File Auditing tracks all content movement on the server, including a deliberately obscured change. According to Editshare, EFS 2020 File Auditing provides a complete, user-friendly activity report with a detailed trail back to the instigator.

EditShare EFS

Promise introduced its Pegasus32 series storage systems. It used Intel’s latest Titan Ridge Thunderbolt 3 chip and can power hosts up to 85W and offers up to 112TB of raw capacity with an eight-drive system. It supports Thunderbolt at up to 40Gbps or USB 3.2 at 10Gbps. It includes HW RAID-5 protection with hot-swappable 7,200 RPM HDDs and dual Thunderbolt 3 ports that allow daisy-chaining of peripheral devices.

Although Serial AT Attached (SATA) and Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) HDDs and SSDs are widely used, these older interfaces — which were based upon the needs of HDDs when they were developed — can restrict the data rate and latency that SSDs would be capable of. This has led to the wide use of an interface that brings more of the internal performance of the SSD to the computers it’s connected to. This new interface is called NVMe, which can be extended over various fabric networks such as InfiniBand, Fibre Channel and, more recently, Ethernet.

NVMe SSDs are finding increased use as primary storage for many applications, including media post projects, since they can provide the performance that large high-data-rate projects require. NVMe SSDs also provide lower latency to content than HDDs, which is important for media pros. With the lower price of SSD storage, their total cost of ownership has declined, making them even more attractive for high-performance applications, such as post production and VFX.

At IBC 2019, Dell EMC was showing its new PowerMax storage system. This included dual-port Intel Optane SSDs as persistent storage and NVMe-oF using 32Gb Fibre Channel I/O modules, directors and 32Gb NVMe host adapters using Dell EMC PowerPath multipathing software.

Dell PowerMax 2000 storage system.

According to Dell EMC, this end-to-end NVMe and Intel Optane architecture provides customers with a faster, more efficient storage system that delivers the following performance improvements:
• Up to 15 million I/Os
• Up to 350GB/sec bandwidth
• Up to 50% better response times
• Sub-100µs read response times
The built-in machine learning engine uses predictive analytics and pattern recognition to automatically place data on the correct media type (Optane or Flash memory) based upon its I/O profile. It can analyze and forecast 40 million data sets in real time, driving 6 billion decisions per day. PowerMax works with several plugins for virtualization and container storage, as well as Ansible modules. It can also be part of a multi-cloud storage architecture with Dell EMC Cloud Storage Services.

Quantum introduced its F-Series NVMe storage system to help media professionals power their modern post workflows.

Quantum F2000 NVMe storage array

It features SSD storage capacities up to 184TB. High uptime is ensured by dual-ported SSDs, dual-node servers and redundant power supplies. The NVMe SSDs allow performance of about one million random reads per second, with latencies of under 20 microseconds. Quantum found that NVMe storage can deliver more than 10 times the read and write throughput performance with a single client compared with NFS and SMB attached clients.

The NVMe SSDs support a huge amount of parallel processing. The F-Series array uses Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) networking technology to provide direct access between workstations and the NVMe storage devices. The F-Series array was designed for video data. It is made to handle the performance requirements of multiple streams of 4K+, high-frame-rate data as well as other types of unstructured data.

These capabilities enable editors in several rooms to work on multiple streams of 4K and even 8K video using one storage volume. The higher performance of NVMe SSDs avoids the over-provisioning of storage often required with HDD-based storage systems.

Private and Public Cloud for M&E
Digital media workflows are increasingly using either on-premises or remote cloud storage (shared data center storage) of various types for project collaboration or for access to online services and tools, such as rendering and content delivery services. Below are a few recent developments in public and private cloud storage.

Avid’s Cloudspaces allows projects and back-up media in the cloud, freeing up on-site Avid Nexis workspaces. Avid’s preferred cloud-hosting platform is Microsoft Azure, which has been making major inroads for cloud storage for the M&E industry by providing valuable partnerships and services for the industry.

The Facilis Object Cloud virtualizes cloud and LTO storage into a cache volume on the server, available on the client desktops through the Facilis shared file system and providing a highly scalable object storage cache. Facilis also announced that it had partnered with Wasabi for cloud storage.

Cloudian HyperStore Xtreme

Cloudian makes private cloud storage for the M&E industry, and at IBC it announced its HyperStore Xtreme. HyperStore Xtreme is said to provide ready access to video content whenever and wherever needed and unlock its full value through AI and other analytics applications.

The Cloudian HyperStore Xtreme is built on an ultra-dense Seagate server platform. The solution enables users to store and manage over 55,000 hours of 4K video (UAVC-4K, Ultra HD format) within just 12U of rack space. The company says that this represents a 75% space savings over what it would take to achieve the same capacity with an LTO-8 tape library.

Scality’s Ring 8 is a software-defined system that handles large-scale, on-prem storage of unstructured data. It is useful for petabyte-scale storage and beyond, and it works across multiple clouds as well as core and edge environments. The Extended Data Management (XDM) also allows integrating cloud data orchestration into the ring. The new version adds stringent security, multi-tenancy and cloud-native application support.

Summing Up
Media and entertainment storage and bandwidth demands are driving the use of more storage and new storage products, such as NVMe SSDs and NVMe-oF. While the use of NAND flash and other SSDs is growing, so is demand for HDDs for colder storage and the use of tape or cloud storage (which can be HDD or tape in the data center) for archiving. Cloud storage is growing to support collaborative work, cloud-based service providers and content distribution through online channels. Various types of AI tools are being used to generate metadata and even to manage storage and data resources, expanding upon standard media asset management tools.


Tom Coughlin, president of Coughlin Associates, is a digital storage analyst and business and technology consultant. He has over 37 years in the data storage industry, with engineering and management positions at several companies.

Review: Sonnet Fusion PCIe 1TB and G-Drive Mobile Pro 500GB

By Brady Betzel

There are a lot of external Thunderbolt 3 SSD drives out in the wild these days, and they aren’t cheap. However, with a high price comes blazingly fast speeds. I was asked to review two very similar Thunderbolt 3 external SSD drives, so why not pit them against each other? Surprisingly (at least surprising to me), there are a couple of questions that you will want the answers to: Is there thermal throttling that will lower the read/write speeds when transferring large files for a sustained amount of time? Does it run so hot that it may burn you when touched?

I’ll answer these questions and a few others over the next few paragraphs, but in the end would I recommend buying a Thunderbolt 3 SSD? Yes, they are very, very fast. Especially when working with higher resolution multimedia files in apps like Premiere, Resolve, Pro Tools and many other data-intensive applications.

Sonnet Fusion Thunderbolt 3 PCIe Flash Drive
Up first (only because I received it first) is the Sonnet Fusion external SSD. I was sent the drive in a non-retail box, so I can’t attest to how it will arrive when you buy it in a retail setting, but the drive itself feels great. Like many other Sonnet products, the Fusion drive is hefty — and not in an overweight way. It feels like you are getting your money’s worth. Unlike the rubberized exterior of the popular LaCie Rugged drives, the Sonnet Fusion is essentially an aluminum heat sink wrapped around a powerful 1TB, Gen 3 M.2 PCIe, Toshiba RVD400-M22280 solid state drive. It’s sturdy and feels like you could drop it without receiving more damage than a little dent.

Attached to the drive is Sonnet’s “captive” Thunderbolt 3 cable, which I assume means the cable is attached to the external drive casing but can be removed without disassembling the case. I think more cable integrations should be called captive, it’s a great description. Anyway… the Thunderbolt 3 cable can be replaced/removed by removing the small four screws underneath the Fusion. It’s attached to a female Thunderbolt 3 port inside of the casing. I really wish Sonnet had integrated the wrapping of the cable around the drive, much like the LaCie Rugged drives in addition to the “captive” attachment. This would really help with transporting the drive and not worrying about the cable. It’s only a small annoyance, but since I’ve been spoiled by nice cable attachment I kind of expect it, especially with drives with a price tag like this. The Sonnet Fusion retails for $899 through stores like B&H, although I found it on Amazon.com for $799. Not cheap for an external drive, but in my opinion it is worth it.

The Sonnet Fusion is fast, like really fast, as in the fastest external drive I have tested. Sonnet claims a read speed of up to 2600MB/s and a write speed of up to 1600MB/s. The only caveat is that you must make sure your computer’s Thunderbolt 3 port is running x4 PCIe Gen 3 (four PCIe lanes) as opposed to x2 PCIe Gen 3 (only two PCIe lanes). If this is the case, your speed will be limited to around 1400MB/s as opposed to the proposed 1600MB/s write speed. You can find out more tech specs on Sonnet’s site. In addition you can find out if your computer has the PCIe lanes to run the Fusion at full speed here.

When testing the Sonnet Fusion I was lucky enough to have a few systems at my disposal: a 2018 iMac Pro, a 2018 Intel i9 MacBook Pro and an Intel i9 Puget Systems Genesis I with Thunderbolt 3 ports. All the systems provided similar results, which was nice to see. Using the AJA System Test, I adjusted the settings to 3840×2160, 4GB and ProRes 4444. I used one reading for an example image for this review, but they were generally the same every time I ran the test. I was getting around 1372MB/s write speed and 2200MB/s read speed. When transferring files on the Finder level I was consistently getting about 1GB/s write speeds, but it’s possible I was being limited by the write speed from the internal SSD! Incredible. For real-world numbers, I was able to transfer about 750GBs in under five minutes. Again, incredible speeds.

The key to the Sonnet Fusion SSD and what makes it a step above the competition is its enclosure acting as a heat sink in its 2.8×4.1×1.25-inch form factor. While this means there are no fans to increase the volume, it does mean that the drive can get extremely hot to touch, which can be an issue if you need to pack it up and go, or if you put it in your pocket (be careful!). This also means that with great heat dissipation comes less thermal throttling, which can slow down transfer speeds when using the drive over longer periods of time. This can be a real problem in some drives. Also keep in mind that this drive is bus powered and Sonnet’s instruction manual specifically states that it will not work with a Thunderbolt 2 adapter. The Sonnet Fusion comes with a one-year warranty that you can read about at this link.

G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD 500GB
Like the Sonnet Fusion, the G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is a Thunderbolt 3 connected external hard drive that touts very high sustained transfer speeds of up to 2800MB/s (read speed). The G-Drive is physically lighter than the Sonnet, and is cheaper coming in at about 79 cents per GB or 68 cents if you purchase the 1TB version of the G-Drive — as compared to the Sonnet Fusion’s 88 cents per GB. So is this a “get what you pay for” scenario? I think so. The 500GB version costs $399.95 while the 1TB version retails for $699.95. A full $100 cheaper than the Sonnet Fusion.

The G-Drive Mobile Pro has a slender profile that matches what you think an external hard drive would look like. It measures 4.41x 3.15x.67 inches and weighs just .45 lbs. The exterior is attractive — the drive is surrounded by a blackish/dark grey rubberized plastic with silver plastic end caps. There are slits in the top and bottom of the case to dissipate heat, or maybe just to show off the internal electric blue aluminum heatsink. The Thunderbolt 3 connection is on the rear of the housing for easy connection with a status LED on the front. The cord is not attached to the drive, so there is a large chance of being misplaced. Again, I really wish manufacturers would think about cable storage and placement on these drives — LaCie Rugged drives have this nailed, and I hope others follow suite.

Included with the G-Drive Mobile Pro is .5 meter Thunderbolt 3 cable. It comes with a five-year limited warranty described on the included pamphlet that just may feature the tiniest font possible. The warranty ensures that the product is free from defects in materials and workmanship, with some exclusions including non-commercial use. In addition, the retail box shows off a couple of key specifics including “durable, shock resistant SSD” while the G-Technology website boasts of three-meter drop protection (on a carpeted concrete floor), as well as 1,000-pound crush-proof rating. Not sure if this is covered by the warranty or not, but since there really aren’t moving parts in an SSD, I don’t see why this wouldn’t hold up. An additional proclamation is that you can edit multi-stream 8K footage at full frame rate. This may technically be true in a read-only state but you would need a super-computer with multiple high-end GPUs to actually work with this size media. So take that with a grain of salt — not just on this drive but with any.

So on to the actual nuts and bolts of the G-Drive Mobile Pro SSD. The drive looks good on the outside and is immediately recognized by any Mac OS with direct Thunderbolt 3 connection (like all bus-powered drives). If you are using Windows you will have to format the drive before you can use it. G-Technology has an app to make that easy.

When doing real-world file transfers I was getting around the 1GB/s transfer speed consistently. So, theG-Drive Mobile Pro SSD is blazing fast. I was transferring 200GB of files in under two minutes.

Summing Up
In the end, if you haven’t seen the speed difference coming from a USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt 2 drive, you must try Thunderbolt 3. If you have Thunderbolt 3 ports and are using old Thunderbolt 2 drives, now is the time to upgrade. Not only can you use either of these drives like an internal drive, but if you are a Resolve colorist or a Premiere editor you can use these as your render cache or render drive. Not only will this speed up your coloring and editing, but you may even start to notice less errors and crashes since the pipes are open.

Personally, I love the Sonnet Fusion drive and the G-Drive Mobile Pro. If price is your main focus then obviously the G-Drive Mobile Pro is where you need to look. However, if a high-end look with some heft is your main interest, I think the Sonnet Fusion is an art piece you can have on your desktop.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Sony intros extended-life SSDs for 4K or higher-bitrate recording 

Sony is expanding its media lineup with the introduction of two new G Series professional solid-state drives in 960GB (SV-GS96) and 480GB (SV-GS48) capacities. Sony says that these SSDs were designed to meet the growing need for external video recording devices docked to camcorders or high-performance DSLRs.

The new SSDs are an option for respective video recorders, offering videographers stable high-speed capabilities, a sense of security and lower cost of ownership due to their longer life. Using Sony’s Error Correction Code technology, the 960GB G Series SSD achieves up to 2400TBW (Terabytes Written), while the 460GB drive can reach 1200TBW, resulting in less frequent replacement and increased ROI. 2400TBW translates to about 10 years of use for the SV-GS96, if data is fully written to the drive an average of five times per week.

According to Sony, the drives are also designed for ultra-fast, stable data writing. Sony G Series SSDs feature built-in technology preventing sudden speed decreases, while ensuring stable recording of high-bitrate 4K video without frame dropping. For example, used with an Atomos Shogun Inferno, G Series SSDs are able to record video at 4K 60p (ProRes 422 HQ) mode stably.

When paired with the necessary connection cables, the new G Series drives can be effortlessly removed from a recorder and connected to a computer for file downloading, making editing easier and faster with read speeds up to 550MB/s.

G Series SSDs also offer data protection technology that keeps content secure and intact, even if a sudden power failure occurs. To add to the drive’s stability, it features a durable connector which withstands extreme repeated insertion and removal up to 3,000 times — or six times more tolerance than standard SATA connectors — even in harsh conditions.

Sony’s SSD G Series is expected to be available May 2017 at the suggested retail prices of $539 for SV-GS96 and $287 for SV-GS48.

IBC 2016: VR and 8K will drive M&E storage demand

By Tom Coughlin

While attending the 2016 IBC show, I noticed some interesting trends, cool demos and new offerings. For example, while flying drones were missing, VR goggles were everywhere; IBM was showing 8K video editing using flash memory and magnetic tape; the IBC itself featured a fully IP-based video studio showing the path to future media production using lower-cost commodity hardware with software management; and, it became clear that digital technology is driving new entertainment experiences and will dictate the next generation of content distribution, including the growing trend to OTT channels.

In general, IBC 2016 featured the move to higher resolution and more immersive content. On display throughout the show was 360-degree video for virtual reality, as well as 4K and 8K workflows. Virtual reality and 8K are driving new levels of performance and storage demand, and these are just some of the ways that media and entertainment pros are future-zone-2increasing the size of video files. Nokia’s Ozo was just one of several multi-camera content capture devices on display for 360-degree video.

Besides multi-camera capture technology and VR editing, the Future Tech Zone at IBC included even larger 360-degree video display spheres than at the 2015 event. These were from Puffer Fish (pictured right). The smaller-sized spherical display was touch-sensitive so you could move your hand across the surface and cause the display to move (sadly, I didn’t get to try the big sphere).

IBM had a demonstration of a 4K/8K video editing workflow using the IBM FlashSystem and IBM Enterprise tape storage technology, which was a collaboration between the IBM Tokyo Laboratory and IBM’s Storage Systems division. This work was done to support the move to 4K/8K broadcasts in Japan by 2018, with a broadcast satellite and delivery of 8K video streams of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. The combination of flash memory storage for working content and tape for inactive content is referred to as FLAPE (flash and tAPE).

The graphic below shows a schematic of the 8K video workflow demonstration.

The argument for FLAPE appears to be that flash performance is needed for editing 8K content and the magnetic tape provides low-cost storage the 8K content, which may require greater than 18TB for an hour of raw content (depending upon the sampling and frame rate). Note that magnetic tape is often used for archiving of video content, so this is a rather unusual application. The IBM demonstration, plus discussions with media and entertainment professionals at IBC indicate that with the declining costs of flash memory and the performance demands of 8K, 8K workflows may finally drive increased demand for flash memory for post production.

Avid was promoting their Nexis file system, the successor to ISIS. The company uses SSDs for metadata, but generally flash isn’t used for actual editing yet. They agreed that as flash costs drop, flash could find a role for higher resolution and richer media. Avid has embraced open source for their code and provides free APIs for their storage. The company sees a hybrid of on-site and cloud storage for many media and entertainment applications.

EditShare announced a significant update to its XStream EFS Shared Storage Platform (our main image). The update provides non-disruptive scaling to over 5PB with millions of assets in a single namespace. The system provides a distributed file system with multiple levels of hardware redundancy and reduced downtime. An EFS cluster can be configured with a mix of capacity and performance with SSDs for high data rate content and SATA HDD for cost-efficient higher-performance storage — 8TB HDDs have been qualified for the system. The latest release expands optimization support for file-per-frame media.

The IBC IP Interoperability Zone was showing a complete IP-based studio (pictured right) was done with the cooperation of AIMS and the IABM. The zone brings to life the work of the JT-NM (the Joint Task Force on Networked Media, a combined initiative of AMWA, EBU, SMPTE and VSF) and the AES on a common roadmap for IP interoperability. Central to the IBC Feature Area was a live production studio, based on the technologies of the JT-NM roadmap that Belgian broadcaster VRT has been using daily on-air all this summer as part of the LiveIP Project, which is a collaboration between VRT, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and LiveIP’s 12 technology partners.

Summing Up
IBC 2016 showed some clear trends to more immersive, richer content with the numerous displays of 360-degree and VR content and many demonstrations of 4K and even 8K workflows. Clearly, the trend is for higher-capacity, higher-performance workflows and storage systems that support this workflow. This is leading to a gradual move to use flash memory to support these workflows as the costs for flash go down. At the same time, the move to IP-based equipment will lead to lower-cost commodity hardware with software control.

Storage analyst Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates. He has over 30 years in the data storage industry and is the author of Digital Storage in Consumer Electronics: The Essential Guide. He also  publishes the Digital Storage Technology Newsletter, the Digital Storage in Media and Entertainment Report.