Tag Archives: sound mixing

Creating the soundscape for Hulu’s Normal People

By Patrick Birk

Normal People, a new Hulu series based on Sally Rooney’s 2018 novel of the same name, details the intense yet strained romance between Marianne Sheridan (Daisy Edgar-Jones) and Connell Waldron (Paul Mescal). The athletic and popular Connell and the witty and socially outcast Marianne attend the same high school in County Sligo, Ireland. When the wealthy Marianne reveals her feelings for Connell — whose mother works as housekeeper for Marianne’s family — he begins a relationship with her on the condition of it being a secret. After a turbulent final year in their hometown, the two reconnect at Trinity College Dublin, where the tables have turned socially.

Steve Fanagan

The series was written by Rooney, Alice Birch and Mark O’Rowe and directed by Lenny Abrahamson and Hettie Macdonald. (You can see our interview with director/EP Abrahamson about the series here.)

I had the pleasure of chatting with Steve Fanagan (Game of Thrones, Room), who was the supervising sound editor, sound designer and re-recording mixer on the series. Fanagan also contributed to the source music on Normal People, which seamlessly interacts with both the design and a phenomenal licensed soundtrack. From Ireland but now based in London, Fanagan had a lot of knowledge to share on building the soundscape of this world.

Fanagan began his process working on the sound design and editorial at his studio in London before heading to Dublin to mix at picture and sound house Outer Limits, which is owned by Abrahamson’s longtime colorist Gary Curran. Fanagan finds that coordinating with the picture editors prior to the shoot is often helpful. In the case of Normal People, second director Macdonald worked with her editor, Stephen O’Connell, in London. Abrahamson worked with his editor, Nathan Nugent, in Dublin at Outer Limits. O’Connell assembled at Outer Limits then came over to London for the fine cutting.

Let’s find out more from Fanagan, how he works with the picture editors and his workflow on the series.

Let’s talk about working with picture editors. In Episode 5, there’s a shot where the music stops with a sudden cut to Jamie cracking a pool ball with his cue, right on the transient. I’ve met a few sound designers that use transients on cuts as a technique.
It’s a funny thing there. I have to put my hands up and say all credit goes to Nathan Nugent, who cut that episode. That was very much his design. In editorial and then in the mix, we worked on enhancing and expanding on that idea. One of the lovely things about working with a film editor like Nathan is that he is really sophisticated with sound and music.

The way I tend to work is to get my hands on the script at the beginning of the process, which always happens on Lenny’s projects. I then build a library of stuff I think will be useful. I might start mocking up some tonal, more abstract sound design, but I’m also thinking about all the fundamentals: room tone, wind or whatever environmental material they might need. I always make sure to give that to the editor in advance. Then, as the cutting begins, there is a library to pull from rather than the editor having to go search for things. Hopefully, in doing that, we’ve begun a bit of a conversation, and, hopefully, it means the editor is using stuff that I think is useful.

There’s something about a guide track that can become very loved because it’s working as they assemble a cut. It’s also a good way around copyright issues with temp effects while supplying the cutting room with high-quality material. I also always try to go and record material specifically for the show. For this series, I spent four days at the locations and got access to all the different houses, to the school, to parts of Trinity College.

A lot of the extras are actual Trinity students?
Yes, absolutely. They had about 130 extras, and from what I know, a bunch of those were actual Trinity students. That meant that I got some really good crowd material with that specific crowd, but I also got to just wander around the campus freely with my recording equipment, which you wouldn’t ordinarily be allowed to do.

On Connell’s first day in Trinity, he comes off Dame Street, which is a busy front road. He walks through the front arch into the front square, and there is something quite magical about leaving this busy city street. As you go through the front arch, it’s an echo-y space, and there’s quite a lovely acoustic to that. There’s always life in it. And when you come into the front square, a lot of the city disappears. Those three locations have such different acoustic properties to them. To be able to record a whole lot of options for those and build a piece that hopefully does that experience justice felt like a real gift.

I noticed a lot of character in the reverbs on each of the voices. Did you take impulse responses of the spaces?
I did. We started to do that with Lenny on his last film, The Little Stranger, and it worked really well. For Normal People, I captured an impulse response from every location I went to. Sometimes they work brilliantly, and sometimes they give you a really good idea of the kind of reverb you’re looking for. So reverb on this series is very much a mixture of Altiverb and those impulse responses, plus Exponential Audio PhoenixVerb for interiors. I’d also used Slapper from The Cargo Cult for exteriors and Avid’s ReVibe as another option on the buss. I try not to be purist about anything.

When you get to hang out in the places where they’re shooting, you have a bit of a feel for how they sound. And you remember that if you were speaking at that level in that space, there would be a kind of this size reverb on it. If I’m quieter or louder, that changes.

How else do you prepare for a project, apart from building that ambience library?
I love building a session template with plugins that I think will be appropriate for the show. With this, it was like, what do I think will be useful to us across all 12 episodes? For the noise reduction, dialogue/ADR supervisor Niall Brady is an iZotope RX wiz, and he used a lot of that on the dialogue track. I tend to use a mixture of Cedar and Waves WNS. I really love FabFilter Pro-Q 3 as an EQ. I love the versatility of it. If I want to put an extra notch or something in there, I can just keep adding to it. I also love their de-esser.

I always have some sort of compression available, but I don’t have it turned on as a default. In this case, I was using Avid Pro Compressor and more often than not, that’s turned off. I love the idea of trying to figure out the simplest approach to the cleanup and to the EQ end of things, and then trying to figure out what I can do with volume automation. After that, it’s just about figuring out if there’s a little bit of extra polish that’s needed through compression.

I always have multi-band compression available to me. On my dialogue auxes, I’ll have some extra compression or de-essing and limiting available if I need it. The one thing that I might leave on the buss is a limiter, but it’s doing almost nothing except managing the peaks. I keep all of my plugins and inserts bypassed and only enable them as I feel I need them.

How did you handle metering?
What’s interesting with the BBC spec is that they don’t just want, for example in our case, a -23 LUFS with a -3 dB true peak. They also want to make sure that the internal dynamic of that spec isn’t too broad for broadcast television — to make sure that at no point are you really hammering music at a very high level or allowing the quiet scenes to be so quiet that people volume surf. We worked hard to keep a good dynamic within that spec. I use VisLM to do those measurements because I quite like the Nugen interfaces. I also use their LMCorrect.

Dynamic range was used to great effect in Normal People. In a show like this where so much of the drama is unspoken, when explosions happen — like Marianne’s brother becoming physically abusive happened — they rocked me.
I think it’s that beautiful idea in sound — quiet and loud are always relative. If something needs to feel loud, then if you can have near-silence before it, you’ll get more of that jump in the moment when the loud bit happens.

It’s also true with the quiet stuff. An example of this in the series is their first kiss in Episode 1. It begins as a normal scene, wherein we’re hearing the ambience outside and inside Marianne’s house. The room tones and that environment are all very live and present, but as the actors lean into each other, it feels natural to start to pull that material away to create some space. This allows us to focus on their breathing and tiny movements because, if you were in that situation, you’re not going to be thinking about the birds outside. I can’t really overstate how much of a joy it was to work on this because all of that material is there. You’re working with this beautiful source material and the book — these beautifully realized scripts — and with directors who’ve really thought that space out. And they’re working with these actors, Paul and Daisy, who just are those characters.

There’s a beautiful moment, the morning after Marianne meets Connell at Trinity. She’s in her boyfriend’s flat and he gets up and asks her if there’s coffee. The look she gives him, you know he’s a dead man walking. It’s just that idea of being allowed to sit in people’s space, being trusted in a lot of ways as an audience member to observe and to infer rather than sort of being hammered over the head with exposition.

The screeners I received for this interview were not finalized in terms of picture or sound. As a sound designer I was grateful, because I could see behind the curtain and get insight into your process. It was like hearing a song you can already tell is good before the final mix. Apart from building ambience banks and templates at first, how do you whittle down a project to its final, most polished form?
What you’re always trying to do is to be open to the project that’s in front of you. Obviously, the sound work is always a team effort, so Niall Brady, our dialogue and ADR supervisor, is very involved in this as well.

I really love sound but also cinema and storytelling. The work that we get to do as sound designers is an amazing alchemy of all of those things. As you approach the work, you’re just trying to find the way into a scene or a character. If you can find small sounds that help you begin that process, some simple building blocks, then hopefully you can go on a journey with the sound work that will help your director realize the vision that he or she has for the work.

A lot of the time, that can be about really subtle stuff. At times it’s adding things like breath and very close-up breath and nonverbal utterances. The impetus for this in Normal People is intimacy — the idea that these characters are so close together and so inhabiting each other’s space that you’d hear those kinds of noises. A really lovely thing about sound is that it’s a very subconscious experience in a funny way.

Often, the moments where we become aware of sound in film is when it’s not working. So you’re trying to find the things that feel natural, honest and true to what you’re watching. Here, that began with trying to figure out what the environments might sound like. You’ve got this lovely contrast that is a real feature of the book and the series, which is that these two people have quite different backgrounds and quite different home lives.

The Foley crew that worked on this was Caoimhe Doyle and Jonathan Reynolds, and their work is incredibly specific in that way as well. From trying to pick the right shoes for a character to the right surface to miking techniques, all so that the right acoustic is on that sound.

This exploration is also facilitated by the collaboration that you have with the entire production. In this case, the collaboration is very much led and directed by Lenny, who has an amazing insight into everything that we’re working on, and his editor Nathan Nugent, who always has a really clear sound and music pass done on an episode. We always have a very interesting place to start. A lot of the time, rather than doing formal spotting sessions, we’ll have conversations. Lenny likes to talk to us in preproduction. I was in touch with the location sound mixer Niall O’Sullivan, who also worked on Lenny’s film Frank, to get ahead of any challenging shoot locations.

Then, what begins to happen is that Lenny and Nathan will share some of the picture with us, whether it’s some scenes that they’ve assembled or full episodes that are work in progress, and we tend to just start working on them. We’ll send some dialogue, music and effects bounces to them, so we’re starting to build the track a little bit. I’m always mixing as I cut because I feel like it’s the best way for me to present the work and figure out what it is. So we’re developing the mix from the beginning of editorial through to the end of the final mix. Sometimes you’re having conversations with them about what they liked or didn’t like, and sometimes you’re getting the next version of the cut back, and you can see from their AAF what they’ve used or haven’t used.

Also, as you’re watching the cuts, you’re looking for those notes from them that may appear on a card or a subtitle on the screen. So it’s a really helpful way to work.


Patrick Birk is a musician, sound engineer and post pro at Silver Sound, a boutique sound house based in New York City.

Talking with 1917’s Oscar-nominated sound editing team

By Patrick Birk

Sam Mendes’ 1917 tells the harrowing story of Lance Corporals Will Schofield and Tom Blake, following the two young British soldiers on their perilous trek across no man’s land to deliver lifesaving orders to the Second Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment.

Oliver Tarney

The story is based on accounts of World War I by the director’s grandfather, Alfred Mendes. The production went to great lengths to create an immersive experience, placing the viewer alongside the protagonists in a painstakingly recreated world, woven together seamlessly, with no obvious cuts. The film’s sound department had to rise to the challenge of bringing this rarely portrayed sonic world to life.

We checked in with supervising sound editor Oliver Tarney and ADR/dialogue supervisor Rachael Tate, who worked out of London’s Twickenham Studios. Both Tarney and Tate are Oscar-nominated in the Sound Editing category. Their work was instrumental in transporting audiences to a largely forgotten time, helping to further humanize the monochrome faces of the trenches. I know that I will keep their techniques — from worldizing to recording more ambient Foley — in mind on the next project I work on.

Rachael Tate

A lot of the film is made up of quiet, intimate moments punctuated by extremely traumatic events. How did you decide on the most key sounds for those quiet moments?
Oliver Tarney: When Sam described how it was going to be filmed, it was expected that people would comment on how it was made from a technical perspective. But for Sam, it’s a story about the friendship between these two men and the courage and sacrifice that they show. Because of this, it was important to have those quieter moments when you aren’t just engaged in full-tilt action the whole time.

The other factor is that the film had no edits — or certainly no obvious edits (which actually meant many edits) — and was incredibly well-rehearsed. It would have been a dangerous thing to have had everything playing aggressively the whole way through. I think it would have been very fatiguing for the audience to watch something like that.

Rachael Tate: Also, you can’t rely on a cut in the normal way to inform pace and energy, so you are using things like music and sound to sort of ebb and flow the energy levels. So after the plane crash, for example, you’ll notice it goes very quiet, and also with the mine collapse, there’s a huge section of very little sound, and that’s on purpose so your ears can reacclimatize.

Absolutely, and I feel like that’s a good way to go — not to oversaturate the audience with the extreme end of the sound design. In other interviews, you said that you didn’t want it to seem overly processed.
Tarney: Well, we didn’t want the weapons to sound heroic in any way. We didn’t want it to seem like they were enjoying what they were doing. It’s very realistic; it’s brutal and harsh. Certainly, Schofield does shoot at people, but it’s out of necessity rather than enjoying his role there. In terms of dynamics, we broke the film up into a series of arcs, and we worked out that some would be five minutes, some would be nine minutes and so on.

In terms of the guns, we went more naturalistic in our recordings. We wanted the audience to feel everything from their perspective — that’s what Sam wanted with the entire film. Rather than having very direct recordings, we split our energies between that and very ambient recordings in natural spaces to make it feel more realistic. The distance that enemy fire was coming from is much more realistic than you would normally play in a film, and the same goes for the biplane recordings. We had microphones all across airfields to get that lovely phase-y kind of sound. For the dogfight with the planes, we sold the fact that you’re watching Blake and Schofield watching the dogfight rather than being drawn directly to the dogfight. I guess it was trying to mirror the visual, which would stick with the two leads.

Tate: We did the same with the crowd. We tried to keep it more realistic by using half actual territorial army guys, along with voice actors, rather than just being a crowdy-sounding crowd. When we put that into the mix, we also chose which bits to focus on — Sam described it as wanting it to be like a vignette, like an old photo. You have the brown edging that fades away in the corners. He wanted you to zoom in on them so much that the stuff around them is there, but at the level they would hear it. So, if there’s a crowd on the screen further back from them, in reality you wouldn’t really hear it. In most films you put something in everyone’s mouth, but we kept it pared right back so that you’re just listening to their voices and their breaths. This is similar to how it was done with the guns and effects.

You said you weren’t going for any Hollywood-type effects, but I did notice that there are some psychoacoustic cues, like when a bomb goes in the bunker, and I think a tinnitus-type effect.
Tarney: There are a few areas where you have to go with a more conventional film language. When the plane’s very close — on the bridge perhaps — once he’s being fired upon, we start going into something that’s a little more conventional, and then we set the lingo back into him. It was that thing that Sam mentioned, which was subjectivity, objectivity; you can flip between them a little bit, otherwise it becomes too linear.

Tate: It needed to pack a punch.

Foley plays a massive part in this production. Assuming you used period weaponry and vehicles?
Tarney: Sam was so passionate about this project. When you visited the sets, the detail was just beautiful. They set the bar in terms of what we had to achieve realism-wise. We had real World War I rifles and machine guns, both British and German, and biplanes. We also did wild track Foley at the first trench and the last trench: the muddy trench and then the chalk one at the end.

Tate: We even put Blakeys on the boots.

Tarney: Yes, we bought various boots with different hobnails and metal tips.

That’s what a Blakey is?
Tate: The metal things that they put in the bottom of their shoes so that they didn’t slip around.

Tarney: And we went over the various surfaces and found which worked the best. Some were real hobnail boots, and some had metal stuck into them. We still wanted each character to have a certain personality; you don’t want everything sounding the same. We also recorded them without the nails, so when we were in a quieter part of the film, it was more like a normal boot. If you’d had that clang, clang, clang all the way through the film…

Tate: It would throw your attention away from what they were saying.

Tarney: With everything we did on the Foley, it was important to keep focus on them the whole time. We would work in layers, and as we would build up to one of the bigger events, we’d start introducing the heavier, more detailed Foley and take away the more diffuse, mellow Foley.

You only hear webbing and that kind of stuff at certain times because it would be too annoying. We would start introducing that as they went into more dangerous areas. You want them to feel conspicuous, too — when they’re in no man’s land, you want the audience to think, “Wow, there are two guys, alone, with absolutely no idea what’s out there. Is there a sniper? What’s the danger?” So once you start building up that tension, you make them a little bit louder again, so you’re aware they are a target.

How much ADR did the film require? I’m sure there was a lot of crew noise in the background.
Tate: Yes, there was a lot of crew noise — there were only two lines of “technical” ADR, which is when a line needs to be redone because the original could not be used/cleaned sufficiently. My priority was to try and keep as much production as possible. Because we started a couple of weeks after shooting started, and as they were piecing it together, it was as if it was locked. It’s not the normal way.

With this, I had the time to go deep and spectrally remove all the crew feet from the mics because they had low-end thuds on their clip mics, which couldn’t be avoided. The recordist, Stuart Wilson, did a great job, giving me a few options with the clip mics, and he was always trying to get a boom in wherever he could.

He had multiple lavaliers on the actors?
Tate: Yes, he had up to three on both those guys most of the time, and we went with the one on their helmets. It was like a mini boom. But, occasionally, they would get wind on them and stuff like that. That’s when I used iZotope RX 7. It was great having the time to do it. Ordinarily people might say, “Oh no, let’s ADR all the breaths there,” but I could get the breaths out. When you hear them breathing, that’s what they were doing at the time. There’s so much performance in them, I would hate to get them standing in a studio in London, you know, in jeans, trying to recreate that feeling.

So even if there’s slight artifacting, the littlest bit, you’d still go with that over ADR?
Tate: Absolutely. I would hope there’s not too much there though.

Tarney: Film editor Lee Smith and Sam have such a great working relationship; they really were on the same page putting this thing together. We had a big decision to make early on: Do we risk being really progressive and organize Foley recording sessions whilst they were still filming? Because, if everything was going according to plan, they were going to be really hungry for sound since there was no cutting once they had chosen the takes. If it didn’t go to plan, then we’d be forever swapping out seven-minute takes, which would be a nightmare to redo. We took a gamble and budgeted to spend the resources front heavy, and it worked out.

Tate: Lee Smith used to be a sound guy, which didn’t hurt.

I saw how detailed they were with the planning. The model of the town for figuring out the trajectory of the flair for lighting, for example.
Tate: They also mapped out the trenches so they were long enough to cover the amount of dialogue the actors were going to say — so the trenches went on for 500 yards. Before that, they were on theater stages with cardboard boxes to represent trenches, walking through them again and again. Everything was very well-planned.

Apart from dialogue and breaths, were there any pleasant surprises from the production audio that you were able to use in the final cut?
Tate: In the woods, toward the end of the film, Schofield stumbles out of the river and hears singing, and the singing that you hear is the guy doing it live. That’s the take. We didn’t get him in to sing and then put it on; that’s just his clip mic, heavily affected. We actually took his recording out into the New Forest, which is south of London.

A worldizing-type technique?
Tate: Yes, we found a remote part, and we played it and recorded it from different distances, and we had that woven against the original with a few plugins on it for the reverbs.

Tarney: We don’t know if Schofield is concussed and if he’s hallucinating. So we really wanted it to feel sort of ethereal, sort of wafting in and out on the wind — is he actually hearing this or not?

Tate: Yeah, we played the first few lines out of sequence, so you can’t really catch if there’s a melody. Just little bits on the breeze so that you’re not even quite sure what you’re hearing at that point, and it gradually comes to a more normal-sounding tune.

Tarney: Basically, that’s the thing with the whole film; things are revealed to the audience as they’re revealed to the lead characters.

Tate: There are no establishing shots.

Were there any elements of the sound design you wouldn’t expect to be in there that worked for one reason or another?
Tarney: No, there’s nothing… we were pretty accurate. Even the first thing you hear in the film — the backgrounds that were recorded in April.

Tate: In the field.

Tarney: Rachael and I went to Ypres in Belgium to visit the World War I museum and immerse ourselves in that world a little bit.

Tate: We didn’t really know that much about World War I. It wasn’t taught in my school, so I really didn’t know anything before I started this; we needed to educate ourselves.

Can you talk about the loop groups and dialing down to the finest details in terms of the vocabulary used?
Tate: Oh, God, I’ve got so many books, and we got military guys for that sort of flat way they operate. You can’t really explain that fresh to a voice actor and get them to do it properly. But the voice actors helped those guys perform and get out of their shells, and the military guys helped the voice actors in showing them how it’s done.

I gave them all many sheets of key words they could use, or conversation starters, so that they could improvise but stay on the right track in terms of content. Things like slang, poems from a cheap newspaper that was handed out to the soldiers. There was an officer’s manual, so I could tell them the right equipment and stuff. We didn’t want to get anything wrong.

That reminds me of this series of color photographs taken in the early 1900s in Russia. Automatically, it brings you so much closer to life at that point in time. Do you feel like you were able to achieve that via the sound design of this film?
Tarney: I think the whole project did that. When you’ve watched a film every day for six months, day in and day out, you can’t help but think about that era more, and it’s slightly embarrassing that it’s one generation past your grandparents.

How much more worldizing did you do, apart from the nice moment with the song?
Tarney: The Foley that you hear in the trench at the beginning and in the trench at the end is a combination between worldizing and sound designer Mike Fentum’s work. We both went down about three weeks before we started because Stuart Wilson gave us a heads up that they were wrapping at that location, so we spoke to the producer, and he gave us access.

So, in terms of worldizing, it’s not quite worldizing in the conventional sense of taking a recording and then playing it in a space. We actually went to the space and recorded the feet in that space, and the Foley supervisor Hugo Adams went to Salisbury Plain (the chalk trench at the end), and those were the first recordings that we edited and gave to Lee Smith. And then, we would get the two Foley artists that we had — Andrea King and Sue Harding — to top that with a performed pass against a screen. The whole film is layered between real recordings and studio Foley, and it’s the blend of natural presence and the performed studio Foley, with all the nuance and detail that you get from that.

Tate: Similarly, the crowd that we recorded out on a field in the back lot of Shepperton, with a 50 array; we did as much as we could without a screen with them just acting and going through the motions. We had an authentic World War I stretcher, which we used with hilarious consequences. We got them to run up and down carrying their friends on stretchers and things like that and passing enormous tables to each other and stuff so that we had the energy of it. There is something about recording outside and that sort of natural slap that you get off the buildings. It was embedded with production quite seamlessly really, and you can’t really get the same from a studio. We had to do the odd individual line in there, but most of it was done out in a field.

When need be, were you using things like convolution reverbs, such as Audio Ease Altiverb, in the mix?
Tarney: Absolutely. As good as the recordings were, it’s only when you put it against picture that you really understand what it is you need to achieve. So we would definitely augment with a lot — Altiverb is a favorite. Re-recording mixer Mark Taylor and I, we would use that a lot to augment and just change perspective a little bit more.

Can you talk about the Atmos mix and what it brought to the film?
Tarney: I’ve worked on many films with Atmos, and it’s a great tool for us. Sam’s very performance-orientated and would like things to be more screen-focused. The minute you have to turn around, you’ve lost that connection with the lead characters. So, in general, we kept things a little more front-loaded than we might have done with another director, but I really liked the results. It’s actually all the more shocking when you hear the biplane going overhead when they’re in no man’s land.

Sam wanted to know all the way through, “Can I hear it in 5.1, 7.1 and Atmos?” We’d make sure that in the three mixes — other than the obvious — we had another
plane coming over from behind. There’s not a wild difference in Atmos. The low end is nicer, and the discrete surrounds play really well, but it’s not a showy kind of mix in that sense. That would not have been true to everything we were trying to achieve, which was something real.

So Sam Mendes knows sound?
Tarney: He’s incredibly hungry to understand everything, in the best way possible. He’s very good at articulating what he wants and makes it his business to understand everything. He was fantastic. We would play him a section in 5.1, 7.1 and Atmos, and he would describe what he liked and disliked about each format, and we would then try to make each format have the same value as the other ones.


Patrick Birk is a musician and sound engineer at Silver Sound, a boutique sound house based in New York City.

The gritty and realistic sounds of Joker

By Jennifer Walden

The grit of Gotham City in Warner Bros.’ Joker is painted on in layers, but not in broad strokes of sound. Distinct details are meticulously placed around the Dolby Atmos surround field, creating a soundtrack that is full but not crowded and muddy — it’s alive and clear. “It’s critical to try to create a real feeling world so Arthur (Joaquin Phoenix) is that much more real, and it puts the audience in a place with him,” says re-recording mixer Tom Ozanich, who mixed alongside Dean Zupancic at Warner Bros. Sound in Burbank on Dub Stage 9.

L-R: Tom Ozanich, Unsun Song and Dean Zupancic on Dub Stage 9. Photo: Michael Dressel.

One main focus was to make a city that was very present and oppressive. Supervising sound editor Alan Robert Murray created specific elements to enhance this feeling, while dialogue supervisor Kira Roessler created loop group crowds and callouts that Ozanich could sprinkle throughout the film. Murray received an Oscar nomination in the category of Sound Editing for his work on Joker, while Ozanich, Zupancic and Tod Maitland were nominated for their Sound Mixing work.

During the street scene near the beginning of the film, Arthur is dressed as a clown and dancing on the sidewalk, spinning a “Going Out of Business” sign. Traffic passes to the left and pedestrians walk around Arthur, who is on the right side of the screen. The Atmos mix reflects that spatiality.

“There are multiple layers of sounds, like callouts of group ADR, specific traffic sounds and various textures of air and wind,” says Zupancic. “We had so many layers that afforded us the ability to play sounds discretely, to lean the traffic a little heavier into the surrounds on the left and use layers of voices and footsteps to lean discretely to the right. We could play very specific dimensions. We just didn’t blanket a bunch of sounds in the surrounds and blanket a bunch of sounds on the front screen. It was extremely important to make Gotham seem gritty and dirty with all those layers.”

The sound effects and callouts didn’t always happen conveniently between lines of principal dialogue. Director Todd Phillips wanted the city to be conspicuous… to feel disruptive. Ozanich says, “We were deliberate with Todd about the placement of literally every sound in the movie. There are a few spots where the callouts were imposing (but not quite distracting), and they certainly weren’t pretty. They didn’t occur in places where it doesn’t matter if someone is yelling in the background. That’s not how it works in real life; we tried to make it more like real life and let these voices crowd in on our main characters.”

Every space feels unique with Gotham City filtering in to varying degrees. For example, in Arthur’s apartment, the city sounds distant and benign. It’s not as intrusive as it is in the social worker’s (Sharon Washington) office, where car horns punctuate the strained conversation. Zupancic says, “Todd was very in tune with how different things would sound in different areas of the city because he grew up in a big city.”

Arthur’s apartment was further defined by director Phillips, who shared specifics like: The bedroom window faces an alley so there are no cars, only voices, and the bathroom window looks out over a courtyard. The sound editorial team created the appropriate tracks, and then the mixers — working in Pro Tools via Avid S6 consoles — applied EQ and reverb to make the sounds feel like they were coming from those windows three stories above the street.

In the Atmos mix, the clarity of the film’s apposite reverbs and related processing simultaneously helped to define the space on-screen and pull the sound into the theater to immerse the audience in the environment. Zupancic agrees. “Tom [Ozanich] did a fabulous job with all of the reverbs and all of the room sound in this movie,” says. “His reverbs on the dialogue in this movie are just spectacular and spot on.”

For instance, Arthur is waiting in the green room before going on the Murray Franklin Show. Voices from the corridor filter through the door, and when Murray (Robert De Niro) and his stage manager open it to ask Arthur what’s with the clown makeup, the filtering changes on the voices. “I think a lot about the geography of what is happening, and then the physics of what is happening, and I factor all of those things together to decide how something should sound if I were standing right there,” explains Ozanich.

Zupancic says that Ozanich’s reverbs are actually multistep processes. “Tom’s not just slapping on a reverb preset. He’s dialing in and using multiple delays and filters. That’s the key. Sounds of things change in reality — reverbs, pitches, delays, EQ — and that is what you’re hearing in Tom’s reverbs.”

“I don’t think of reverb generically,” elaborates Ozanich, “I think of the components of it, like early reflections, as a separate thought related to the reverb. They are interrelated for sure, but that separation may be a factor of making it real.”

One reason the reverbs were so clear is because Ozanich mixed Joker’s score — composed by Hildur Guðnadóttir — wider than usual. “The score is not a part of the actual world, and my approach was to separate the abstract from the real,” explains Ozanich. “In Arthur’s world, there’s just a slight difference between the actual world, where the physical action is taking place, and Arthur’s headspace where the score plays. So that’s intended to have an ever-so-slight detachment from the real world, so that we experience that emotionally and leave the real space feeling that much more real.”

Atmos allows for discrete spatial placement, so Ozanich was able to pull the score apart, pull it into the theater (so it’s not coming from just the front wall), and then EQ each stem to enhance its defining characteristic — what Ozanich calls “tickling the ear.”

“When you have more directionality to the placement of sound, it pulls things wider because rather than it being an ambiguous surround space, you’re now feeling the specificity of something being 33% or 58% back off the screen,” he says.

Pulling the score away from the front and defining where it lived in the theater space gave more sonic real estate for the sounds coming from the L-C-Rs, like the distinct slap of a voice bouncing off a concrete wall or Foley sounds like the delicate rustling scratches of Arthur’s fingertips passing over a child’s paintings.

One of the most challenging scenes to mix in terms of effects was the bus ride, in which Arthur makes funny faces at a little boy, trying to make him laugh, only to be admonished by the boy’s mother. Director Phillips and picture editor Jeff Groth had very specific ideas about how that ‘70s-era bus should sound, and Zupancic wanted those sounds to play in the proper place in the space to achieve the director’s vision. “Buses of that era had an overhead rack where people could put packages and bags; we spent a lot of time getting those specific rattles where they should be placed, and where the motor should be and how it would sound from Arthur’s seat. It wasn’t a hard scene to mix; it was just complex. It took a lot of time to get all of that right. Now, the scene just goes by and you don’t pay attention to the little details; it just works,” says Zupancic.

Ozanich notes the opening was a challenging scene as well. The film begins in the clowns’ locker room. There’s a radio broadcast playing, clowns playing cards, and Arthur is sitting in front of a mirror applying his makeup. “Again, it’s not a terribly complex scene on the surface, but it’s actually one of the trickiest in the movie because there wasn’t a super clear lead instrument. There wasn’t something clearly telling you what you should be paying attention to,” says Ozanich.

The scene went through numerous iterations. One version had source music playing the whole time. Another had bits of score instead. There are multiple competing elements, like the radio broadcast and the clowns playing cards and sharing anecdotes. All those voices compete for the audience’s ear. “If it wasn’t tilted just the right way, you were paying attention to the wrong thing or you weren’t sure what you should be paying attention to, which became confusing,” says Ozanich.

In the end, the choice was made to pull out all the music and then shift the balance from the radio to the clowns as the camera passes by them. It then goes back to the radio briefly as the camera pushes in closer and closer on Arthur. “At this point, we should be focusing on Arthur because we’re so close to him. The radio is less important, but because you hear this voice it grabs your attention,” says Ozanich.

The problem was there were no production sounds for Arthur there, nothing to grab the audience’s ear. “I said, ‘He needs to make sound. It has to be subtle, but we need him to make some sound so that we connect to him and feel like he is right there.’ So Kira found some sounds of Joaquin from somewhere else in the film, and Todd did some stuff on a mic. We put the Foley in there and we cobbled together all of these things,” says Ozanich. “Now, it unquestionably sounds like there was a microphone open in front of him and we recorded that. But in reality, we had to piece it all together.”

“It’s a funny little dichotomy of what we are trying to do. There are certain things we are trying to make stick on the screen, to make you buy that the sound is happening right there with the thing that you’re looking at, and then at the same time, we want to pull sounds off of the screen to envelop the audience and put them into the space and not be separated by that plane of the screen,” observes Ozanich.

The Atmos mix on Joker is a prime example of how effective that dichotomy can be. The sound of the environments, like standing on the streets of Gotham or riding on the subway car, are distinct, dynamic, and ever-changing, and the sounds emanating from the characters are realistic and convincing. All of this serves to pull the audience into the story and get them emotionally invested in the tale of this sad, psychotic clown.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @audiojeney.

AES/SMPTE panel: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse sound

By Mel Lambert

As part of its successful series of sound showcases, a recent joint meeting of the Los Angeles Section of the Audio Engineering Society and SMPTE’s Hollywood Section focused on the soundtrack of the animated features Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which has garnered several Oscar, BAFTA, CAS and MPSE award nominations, plus a Golden Globes win.

On January 31 at Sony Pictures Studios’ Kim Novak Theater in Culver City many gathered to hear a panel discussion between the film’s sound and picture editors and re-recording mixers. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse was co-directed by Peter Ramsey, Robert Persichetti Jr. and Rodney Rothman, the creative minds behind The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street.

The panel

The Sound Showcase panel included supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey, re-recording mixer/sound designer Tony Lamberti, re-recording mixer Michael Semanick and associate picture editor Vivek Sharma. The Hollywood Reporter’s Carolyn Giardina moderated. The event concluded with a screening of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which represents a different Spider-Man Universe, since it introduces Brooklyn teen Miles Morales and the expanding possibilities of the Spider-Verse, where more than one entity can wear the arachnid mask.

Following the screening of an opening sequence from the animated feature, Rubay acknowledged that the film’s producers were looking for a different look for the Spider-Man character based on the Marvel comic books, but with a reference to previous live-action movies in the franchise. “They wanted us to make more of the period in which the new film is set,” he told the standing-room audience in the same dubbing stage where the soundtrack was re-recorded.

“[EVPs] Phil Lord and Chris Miller have a specific style of soundtrack that they’ve developed,” stated Lamberti, “and so we premixed to get that overall shape.”

“The look is unique,” conceded Semanick, “and our mix needed to match that and make it sound like a comic book. It couldn’t be too dynamic; we didn’t want to assault the audience, but still make it loud here and softer there.”

Full house

“We also kept the track to its basics,” Rubay added, “and didn’t add a sound for every little thing. If the soundtrack had been as complicated as the visuals, the audience’s heads would have exploded.”

“Yes, simpler was often better,” Lamberti confirmed, “to let the soundtrack tell the story of the visuals.”

In terms of balancing sound effects against dialog, “We did a lot of experimentation and went with what seemed the best solution,” Semanick said. “We kept molding the soundtrack until we were satisfied.” As Lamberti confirmed: “It was always a matter of balancing all the sound elements, using trial and error.”

=Nominated for a Cinema Audio Society Award in the Motion Picture — Animated category, Brian Smith, Aaron Hasson and Howard London served as original dialogue mixers on the film, with Sam Okell as scoring mixer and Randy K. Singer as Foley mixer. The crew also included sound designer John Pospisil, Foley supervisor Alec G. Rubay, SFX editors Kip Smedley, Andy Sisul, David Werntz, Christopher Aud, Ando Johnson, Benjamin Cook, Mike Reagan and Donald Flick.

During picture editorial, “we lived with many versions until we got to the sound,” explained Sharma. “The premix was fantastic and worked very well. Visuals are important but sound fulfils a complementary role. Dialogue is always key; the audience needs to hear what the characters say!”

“We present ideas and judge the results until everybody is happy,” said Semanick. “[Writer/producer] Phil Lord was very good at listening to everybody; he made the final decision, but deferred to the directors. ‘Maybe we should drop the music?’ ‘Does the result still pull the audience into the music?’ We worked until the elements worked very well together.”

The lead character’s “Spidey Sense” also discussed. As co-supervisor Schulkey explained: “Our early direction was that it was an internal feeling … like a warm, fuzzy feeling. But warm and fuzzy didn’t cut through the music. In the end there was not just a single Spidey Sense — it was never the same twice. The web slings were a classic sound that we couldn’t get too far from.”

“And we used [Dolby] Atmos to spin and pan those sounds around the room,” added Lamberti, who told the audience that Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse marked Sony Animation’s first native Atmos mix. “We used the format to get the most out of it,” concluded the SFX re-recording mixer, who mixed sound effects “in the box” using an Avid S6 console/controller, while Semanick handled dialogue and music on the Kim Novak Theater’s Harrison MPC4D X-Range digital console.


Mel Lambert has been intimately involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists. 

CAS celebrates Dunkirk, GoT and more at 54th Awards show

The 54th CAS Awards took place this weekend at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel. The event, hosted by comedian Michael Kosta, was a celebration of people and projects that featured the best sound mixing as well as what the Cinema Audio Society consider the top audio products from 2017.

Re-recording mixer Anna Behlmer was honored  with the CAS Career Achievement AwardShe  is the first woman to receive the CAS Career Achievement Honor. 

The following are all the winners from the evening: 

MOTION PICTURE – LIVE ACTION

Dunkirk

Production Mixer – Mark Weingarten, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Gregg Landaker

Re-recording Mixer – Gary Rizzo, CAS

Scoring Mixer – Alan Meyerson, CAS

ADR Mixer – Thomas J. O’Connell

Foley Mixer – Scott Curtis

(The Dunkirk team is our main image.)

(Photo: Alex J. Berliner / ABImages)

The Coco team. 

MOTION PICTURE—ANIMATED

Coco

Original Dialogue Mixer – Vince Caro

Re-recording Mixer – Christopher Boyes

Re-recording Mixer – Michael Semanick

Scoring Mixer – Joel Iwataki

Foley Mixer – Blake Collins

MOTION PICTURE—DOCUMENTARY

Jane

Production Mixer – Lee Smith

Re-recording Mixer – David E. Fluhr, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Warren Shaw

Scoring Mixer – Derek Lee

ADR Mixer – Chris Navarro, CAS

Foley Mixer – Ryan Maguire

TELEVISION MOVIE or MINI-SERIES

Black Mirror: USS Callister

Production Mixer – John Rodda, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Tim Cavagin

Re-recording Mixer – Dafydd Archard

Re-recording Mixer – William Miller

ADR Mixer – Nick Baldock

Foley Mixer – Sophia Hardman

TELEVISION SERIES – 1 HOUR 

Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall

Production Mixer – Ronan Hill, CAS

Production Mixer – Richard Dyer, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Onnalee Blank, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Mathew Waters, CAS

Foley Mixer – Brett Voss, CAS

Anna Behlmer with her CAS Career Achievement Award.

TELEVISION SERIES – 1/2 HOUR

Silicon Valley: Episode 9 “Hooli-Con”

Production Mixer – Benjamin A. Patrick, CAS

Re-recording Mixer – Elmo Ponsdomenech

Re-recording Mixer – Todd Beckett

TELEVISION NON-FICTION, VARIETY or MUSIC SERIES or SPECIALS

Rolling Stone: Stories from the Edge

Production Mixer – David Hocs

Production Mixer – Tom Tierney

Re-Recording Mixer – Tom Fleischman, CAS

OUTSTANDING PRODUCT – PRODUCTION

 Sound Devices’ Mix Pre- 10T Recorder

OUTSTANDING PRODUCT – POST PRODUCTION

 iZotope’s RX 6 Advanced

STUDENT RECOGNITION AWARD

Xing  Li

Chapman University – Orange, California


All Images: Alex J. Berliner/ABImages

Eleven’s Ben Freer celebrates 10 years, Jordan Meltzer now mixer

Eleven, a Santa Monica-based audio boutique, has some mixer news. Ben Freer is celebrating his 10th year with the studio, and Jordan Meltzer has been promoted to mixer and sound designer.

A Manchester-native with a California upbringing, Freer was inspired by all things sound from a young age and was first introduced to Eleven as an intern in 2007. Mentored by Eleven founder/mixer Jeff Payne and quickly climbing the ranks to become an official staff member the same year. Freer has mixed for renowned clients in the advertising and multimedia industries, including Toyota, GMC, T-Mobile, Nike, H&R Block, The Weeknd and Lorde.

“When I started at Eleven, I didn’t know much about audio mixing, I just knew that I wanted to immerse myself in it,” says Freer. “Working with the industry’s best and eventually getting my own mix room has been an incredibly humbling experience.”

Los Angeles native Jordan Meltzer got hooked on sound and began gravitating toward the craft after seeing The Who perform at the Hollywood Bowl at age 9. He played in bands while growing up in the San Fernando Valley, eventually completing his BA in audio post production from Emerson College. After joining Eleven as an intern, similar to Freer, he climbed the ranks and took on a newfound role as assistant mixer, building his portfolio on a variety of films and commercials with clients HP, Dodge, Disney, FitBit and Sam Smith. Meltzer’s contributions led him to a recent promotion as mixer and sound designer.

“Climbing the Eleven ladder has been fulfilling, satisfying and challenging,” says Meltzer. “I remember sitting in the studio as an intern with Ben and Jeff, trying to learn and absorb it all. I always saw myself sitting in the chair, and it’s truly an honor to now be recognized as a mixer at such a warm, supportive and creative company.”

Main Image: L-R: Ben Freer and Jordan Meltzer

Quick Chat: Monkeyland Audio’s Trip Brock

By Dayna McCallum

Monkeyland Audio recently expanded its facility, including a new Dolby Atmos equipped mixing stage. The Glendale-based Monkeyland Audio, where fluorescent lights are not allowed and creative expression is always encouraged, now offers three mixing stages, an ADR/Foley stage and six editorial suites.

Trip Brock, the owner of Monkeyland, opened the facility over 10 years ago, but the MPSE Golden Reel Award-winning supervising sound editor and mixer (All the Wilderness), started out in the business more than 23 years ago. We reached out to Brock to find out more about the expansion and where the name Monkeyland came from in the first place…

monkeyland audioOne of your two new stages is Dolby Atmos certified. Why was that important for your business?
We really believe in the Dolby Atmos format and feel it has a lot of growth potential in both the theatrical and television markets. We purpose-built our Atmos stage looking towards the future, giving our independent and studio clients a less expensive, yet completely state-of-the-art alternative to the Atmos stages found on the studio lots.

Can you talk specifically about the gear you are using on the new stages?
All of our stages are running the latest Avid Pro Tools HD 12 software across multiple Mac Pros with Avid HDX hardware. Our 7.1 mixing stage, Reposado, is based around an Avid Icon D-Control console, and Anejo, our Atmos stage, is equipped with dual 24-fader Avid S6 M40 consoles. Monitoring on Anejo is based on a 3-way JBL theatrical system, with 30 channels of discrete Crown DCi amplification, BSS processing and the DAD AX32 front end.

You’ve been in this business for over 23 years. How does that experience color the way you run your shop?
I stumbled into the post sound business coming from a music background, and immediately fell in love with the entire process. After all these years, having worked with and learned so much from so many talented clients and colleagues, I still love what I do and look forward to every day at the office. That’s what I look for and try to cultivate in my creative team — the passion for what we do. There are so many aspects and nuances in the audio post world, and I try to express that to my team — explore all the different areas of our profession, find which role really speaks to you and then embrace it!

You’ve got 10 artists on staff. Why is it important to you to employ a full team of talent, and how do you see that benefiting your clients?
I started Monkeyland as primarily a sound editorial company. Back in the day, this was much more common than the all-inclusive, independent post sound outfits offering ADR, Foley and mixing, which are more common today. The sound editorial crew always worked together in house as a team, which is a theme I’ve always felt was important to maintain as our company made the switch into full service. To us, keeping the team intact and working together at the same location allows for a lot more creative collaboration and synergy than say a set of editors all working by themselves remotely. Having staff in house also allows us flexibility when last minute changes are thrown our way. We are better able to work and communicate as a team, which leads to a superior end product for our clients.

Monkeyland AudioCan you name some of the projects you are working on and what you are doing for them?
We are currently mixing a film called The King’s Daughter, starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt. We also recently completed full sound design and editorial, as well as the native Atmos mix, on a new post-apocalyptic feature we are really proud of called The Worthy. Other recent editorial and mixing projects include the latest feature from Director Alan Rudolph, Ray Meets Helen, the 10-episode series Junior for director Zoe Cassavetes, and Three Days To Live, a new eight-episode true-crime series for NBC/Universal.

Most of your stage names are related to tequila… Why is that?
Haha — this is kind of a take-off from the naming of the company itself. When I was looking for a company name, I knew I didn’t want it to include the word “digital” or have any hint toward technology, which seemed to be the norm at the time. A friend in college used to tease me about my “unique” major in audio production, saying stuff like, “What kind of a degree is that? A monkey could be trained to do that.” Thus Monkeyland was born!

Same theory applied to our stage names. When we built the new stages and needed to name them, I knew I didn’t want to go with the traditional stage “A, B, C” or “1, 2, 3,” so we decided on tequila types — Anejo, Reposado, Plata, even Mezcal. It seems to fit our personality better, and who doesn’t like a good margarita after a great mix!

Behind the Title: Sound mixer/sound designer Rob DiFondi

Name: Rob DiFondi

Company: New York City’s Sound Lounge

Can you describe your company?
Sound Lounge is an audio post company that provides creative services for TV and radio commercials, feature films, television series, digital campaigns, gaming and other emerging media. Artist-owned and operated, we’re made up of an incredibly diverse, talented and caring group of people who all love the advertising and film worlds.

We recently celebrated Sound Lounge’s 18th birthday. I’m proud to say I’ve been a part of the SL family for over 13 years now, and I couldn’t ask for a better group of friends to hang out with every day.

What’s your job title?
Senior Mixer/Sound Designer

What does that entail?
I have actors in my booth all day recording VO (voiceover) for different commercials. My clients (usually brands, ad agencies, production companies, or editorials) hang in my room, and together we get the best possible read from the actor while they’re in the booth. I then craft sound design for the spot by either pulling sound effects from my library or recreating the necessary sounds myself (a.k.a. “Foley”). Once that’s set, I’ll take the lines the actor recorded, the sound effects I created, and any music, and then mix them all together so the spot sounds perfect (and is legal for TV broadcast)!

Being a mixer in the advertising post world isn’t easy. I also have to be able to provide a solid lunch recommendation — I always need to make sure I know where my clients can get the best sushi in the Flatiron district!

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
That most of us are musicians who wanted to be rock stars but thought better of it. Maybe that isn’t so surprising though.

Sound Lounge

What’s your favorite part of the job?
The people, and the social part of the advertising industry. This business is filled with so many kind, funny and talented people, and it’s so nice to have them be a part of your life. And how can you beat partying every year at the MOMA for the AICP Gala?

What’s your least favorite?
Probably the lack of travel. I love our office, but it would be fun to do my job in different cities once in a while.

What is your favorite time of the day?
Walking in my front door and seeing my wife and kids.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Something that involves beaches and nice weather.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I totally fell into this profession. I went to school to become a music engineer/producer. I had no idea there was a whole industry for mixing TV spots. Once I got into it though, I knew immediately that I loved it.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I worked on some really nice pieces for Maybelline, Google, Lincoln and TD Ameritrade.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
Miracle Stain, a Super Bowl commercial that I mixed for Tide a few years back. I finished the mix at 10pm on Thursday and got a call at 2am that there had been some changes, so I had to come back to work in the middle of the night. I tweaked the mix until the sun came up and had it ready to ship by 9am. It was one of those very epic projects that had all the classic markings of a Super Bowl spot.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my DSLR camera and iZotope RX.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’m a big Instagram guy. I love seeing people’s lives told through photos. Facebook is so 2015.

Do you listen to music while you work? Care to share your favorite music to work to?
Since I work in audio I can’t listen to music while I work, but when I’m not working I listen to a lot of modern country music, Dave Matthews Band (not afraid to say it!), prog metal and pretty much everything in between.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I just leased a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. There’s nothing like putting the top down and taking a drive to the beach!

Cleaning, creating and mixing sounds for ‘The Americans’

Sync Sound digs into its third season of audio post for this FX series

By Jennifer Walden

The concept of FX’s The Americans, now in its third season, is incredibly compelling — two Cold War-era Soviet spies, who look and sound as American as the proverbial apple pie. They have two kids, a house in the D.C. suburbs and a very dangerous double life dedicated to gathering intel for the Motherland. The couple, Elizabeth (Keri Russell) and Phillip Jennings (Matthew Rhys), struggles to balance family values with espionage.

To learn the secrets of The Americans sound, I infiltrated the inner circle at New York-based audio post house Sync Sound, which has handled the audio post on all three seasons. Continue reading

Creating Under the Dome’s sound experience

By Jennifer Walden

Imagine living your life under an invisible dome that offers no escape, seeing the same people in the same town day after day… oh, and the  “prison” you call home has supernatural powers that might or might not be evil. That’s what the residents of the fictional town of Under the Dome’s Chester’s Mill have to contend with every day on CBS’s sophomore offering based on a Stephen King novel of the same name. Then imagine what that would sound like. Would there be echoes? Would the sounds be magnified? Dulled?

Walter Newman, supervising sound editor at Burbank’s Warner Bros. Sound, is currently working on Season 2 of Under the Dome, which premieres June 30 on CBS with an episode written by King himself.

Continue reading

Catching up with some Oscar nominees

By Randi Altman

On the heels of the recent Oscar nominations, postPerspective decided to reach out to a few of those chosen and gather their reactions.

Ben Grossmann was nominated for his work (alongside Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, and Burt Dalton) on Star Trek Into Darkness.  He is already the owner of a VFX Oscar statue for his contribution to Hugo (2011). Now a partner in Magnopus, a visual solutions companybased in downtown LA, Grossmann was at Pixomondo while working Star Trek Into Continue reading