Tag Archives: smartphone

Motorola’s next-gen Razr gets a campaign for today

Many of us have fond memories of our Razr flip phone. At the time, it was the latest and greatest. Then new technology came along, and the smartphone era was born. Now Motorola is asking, “Why can’t you have both?”

Available as of November 13, the new Razr fits in a palm or pocket when shut and flips open to reveal an immersive, full-length touch screen. There is a display screen called the Quick View when closed and the larger Flex View when open — and the two displays are made to work together. Whatever you see on Quick View then moves to the larger Flex View display when you flip it open.

In order to help tell this story, Motorola called on creative shop Los York to help relaunch the Razr. Los York created the new smartphone campaign to tap into the Razr’s original DNA and launch it for today’s user.

Los York developed a 360 campaign that included films, social, digital, TV, print and billboards, with visuals in stores and on devices (wallpapers, ringtones, startup screens). Los York treated the Razr as a luxury item and a piece of art, letting the device reveal itself unencumbered by taglines and copy. The campaign showcases the Razr as a futuristic, high-end “fashion accessory” that speaks to new industry conversations, such as advancing tech along a utopian or dystopian future.

The campaign features a mix of live action and CG. Los York shot on a Panavision DXL with Primo 70 lenses. CG was created using Maxon Cinema 4D with Redshift and composited in Adobe After Effects. The piece was edited in-house on Adobe Premiere.

We reached out to Los York CEO and founder Seth Epstein to find out more:

How much of this is live action versus CG?
The majority is CG, but, originally, the piece was intended to be entirely CG. Early in the creative process, we defined the world in which the new Razr existed and who would belong there. As we worked on the project, we kept feeling that bringing our characters to life in live action and blending the worlds. The proper live action was envisioned after the fact, which is somewhat unusual.

What were some of the most challenging aspects of this piece?
The most challenging part of the project was the fact that the project happened over a period of nine months. Wisely, the product release needed to push, and we continued to evolve the project over time, which is a blessing and a curse.

How did it feel taking on a product with a lot of history and then rebranding it for the modern day?
We felt the key was to relaunch an iconic product like the Razr with an eye to the future. The trap of launching anything iconic is falling back on the obvious retro throwback references, which can come across as too obvious. We dove into the original product and campaigns to extract the brand DNA of 2004 using archetype exercises. We tapped into the attitude and voice of the Razr at that time — and used that attitude as a starting point. We also wanted to look forward and stand three years in the future and imagine what the tone and campaign would be then. All of this is to say that we wanted the new Razr to extract the power of the past but also speak to audiences in a totally fresh and new way.

Check out the campaign here.