Tag Archives: SIGGRAPH 2019

An artist’s view of SIGGRAPH 2019

By Andy Brown

While I’ve been lucky enough to visit NAB and IBC several times over the years, this was my first SIGGRAPH. Of course, there are similarities. There are lots of booths, lots of demos, lots of branded T-shirts, lots of pairs of black jeans and a lot of beards. I fit right in. I know we’re not all the same, but we certainly looked like it. (The stats regarding women and diversity in VFX are pretty poor, but that’s another topic.)

Andy Brown

You spend your whole career in one industry and I guess you all start to look more and more like each other. That’s partly the problem for the people selling stuff at SIGGRAPH.

There were plenty of compositing demos from of all sorts of software. (Blackmagic was running a hands-on class for 20 people at a time.) I’m a Flame artist, so I think that Autodesk’s offering is best, obviously. Everyone’s compositing tool can play back large files and color correct, composite, edit, track and deliver, so in the midst of a buzzy trade show, the differences feel far fewer than the similarities.

Mocap
Take the world of tracking and motion capture as another example. There were more booths demonstrating tracking and motion capture than anything in the main hall, and all that tech came in different shapes and sizes and an interesting mix of hardware and software.

The motion capture solution required for a Hollywood movie isn’t the same as the one to create a live avatar on your phone, however. That’s where it gets interesting. There are solutions that can capture and translate the movement of everything from your fingers to your entire body using hardware from an iPhone X to a full 360-camera array. Some solutions used tracking ball markers, some used strips in the bodysuit and some used tiny proximity sensors, but the results were all really impressive.

Vicon

Vicon

Some tracking solution companies had different versions of their software and hardware. If you don’t need all of the cameras and all of the accuracy, then there’s a basic version for you. But if you need everything to be perfectly tracked in real time, then go for the full-on pro version with all the bells and whistles. I had a go at live-animating a monkey using just my hands, and apart from ending with him licking a banana in a highly inappropriate manner, I think it worked pretty well.

AR/VR
AR and VR were everywhere, too. You couldn’t throw a peanut across the room without hitting someone wearing a VR headset. They’d probably be able to bat it away whilst thinking they were Joe Root or Max Muncy (I had to Google him), with the real peanut being replaced with a red or white leather projectile. Haptic feedback made a few appearances, too, so expect to be able to feel those virtual objects very soon. Some of the biggest queues were at the North stand where the company had glasses that looked like the glasses everyone was wearing already (like mine, obviously) except the glasses incorporated a head-up display. I have mixed feelings about this. Google Glass didn’t last very long for a reason, although I don’t think North’s glasses have a camera in them, which makes things feel a bit more comfortable.

Nvidia

Data
One of the central themes for me was data, data and even more data. Whether you are interested in how to capture it, store it, unravel it, play it back or distribute it, there was a stand for you. This mass of data was being managed by really intelligent components and software. I was expecting to be writing all about artificial intelligence and machine learning from the show, and it’s true that there was a lot of software that used machine learning and deep neural networks to create things that looked really cool. Environments created using simple tools looked fabulously realistic because of deep learning. Basic pen strokes could be translated into beautiful pictures because of the power of neural networks. But most of that machine learning is in the background; it’s just doing the work that needs to be done to create the images, lighting and physical reactions that go to make up convincing and realistic images.

The Experience Hall
The Experience Hall was really great because no one was trying to sell me anything. It felt much more like an art gallery than a trade show. There were long waits for some of the exhibits (although not for the golf swing improver that I tried), and it was all really fascinating. I didn’t want to take part in the experiment that recorded your retina scan and made some art out of it, because, well, you know, its my retina scan. I also felt a little reluctant to check out the booth that made light-based animated artwork derived from your date of birth, time of birth and location of birth. But maybe all of these worries are because I’ve just finished watching the Netflix documentary The Great Hack. I can’t help but think that a better source of the data might be something a little less sinister.

The walls of posters back in the main hall described research projects that hadn’t yet made it into full production and gave more insight into what the future might bring. It was all about refinement, creating better algorithms, creating more realistic results. These uses of deep learning and virtual reality were applied to subjects as diverse as translating verbal descriptions into character design, virtual reality therapy for post-stroke patients, relighting portraits and haptic feedback anesthesia training for dental students. The range of the projects was wide. Yet everyone started from the same place, analyzing vast datasets to give more useful results. That brings me back to where I started. We’re all the same, but we’re all different.

Main Image Credit: Mike Tosti


Andy Brown is a Flame artist and creative director of Jogger Studios, a visual effects studio with offices in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London.

SIGGRAPH making-of sessions: Toy Story 4, GoT, more

The SIGGRAPH 2019 Production Sessions program offers attendees a behind-the-scenes look at the making of some of the year’s most impressive VFX films, shows, games and VR projects. The 11 production sessions will be held throughout the conference week of July 28 through August 1 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

With 11 total sessions, attendees will hear from creators who worked on projects such as Toy Story 4, Game of Thrones, The Lion King and First Man.

Other highlights include:

Swing Into Another Dimension: The Making of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
This production session will explore the art and innovation behind the creation of the Academy Award-winning Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. The filmmaking team behind the first-ever animated Spider-Man feature film took significant risks to develop an all-new visual style inspired by the graphic look of comic books.

Creating the Immersive World of BioWare’s Anthem
The savage world of Anthem is volatile, lush, expansive and full of unexpected characters. Bringing these aspects to life in a realtime, interactive environment presented a wealth of problems for BioWare’s technical artists and rendering engineers. This retrospective panel will highlight the team’s work, alongside reflections on innovation and the successes and challenges of creating a new IP.

The VFX of Netflix Series
From the tragic tales of orphans to a joint force of super siblings to sinister forces threatening 1980s Indiana, the VFX teams on Netflix series have delivered some of the year’s most best visuals. Creatives behind A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Umbrella Academy and Stranger Things will present the work and techniques that brought these worlds and characters into being.

The Making of Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Endgame
The fourth installment in the Avengers saga is the culmination of 22 interconnected films and has drawn audiences to witness the turning point of this epic journey. SIGGRAPH 2019 keynote speaker Victoria Alonso will join Marvel Studios, Digital Domain, ILM and Weta Digital as they discuss how the diverse collection of heroes, environments, and visual effects were assembled into this ultimate, climactic final chapter.

Space Explorers — Filming VR in Microgravity
Felix & Paul Studios, along with collaborators from NASA and the ISS National Lab, share insights from one of the most ambitious VR projects ever undertaken. In this session, the team will discuss the background of how this partnership came to be before diving into the technical challenges of capturing cinematic virtual reality on the ISS.

Productions Sessions are open to conference participants with Select Conference, Full Conference or Full Conference Platinum registrations. The Production Gallery can be accessed with an Experiences badge and above.

Marvel Studios’ Victoria Alonso to keynote SIGGRAPH 2019

Marvel Studios executive VP of production Victoria Alonso has been name keynote speaker for SIGGRAPH 2019, which will run from July 28 through August 1 in downtown Los Angeles. Registration is now open. The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a melting pot for researchers, artists and technologists, among other professionals.

“Victoria is the ultimate symbol of where the computer graphics industry is headed and a true visionary for inclusivity,” says SIGGRAPH 2019 conference chair Mikki Rose. “Her outlook reflects the future I envision for computer graphics and for SIGGRAPH. I am thrilled to have her keynote this summer’s conference and cannot wait to hear more of her story.”

One of few women in Hollywood to hold such a prominent title, Alonso’s dedication to the industry has been admired for a long time, leading to multiple awards and honors, including the 2015 New York Women in Film & Television Muse Award for Outstanding Vision and Achievement, the Advanced Imaging Society’s first female Harold Lloyd Award recipient, and the 2017 VES Visionary Award (another female first). A native of Buenos Aires, her career began in visual effects and included a four-year stint at Digital Domain.

Alonso’s film credits include productions such as Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek, and numerous Marvel titles — Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, Iron Man 3, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Captain America: Civil War, Thor: The Dark World, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Spider-Man: Homecoming, Thor: Ragnarok, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, Ant-Man and the Wasp and, most recently, Captain Marvel.

“I’ve been attending SIGGRAPH since before there was a line at the ladies’ room,” says Alonso. “I’m very much looking forward to having a candid conversation about the state of visual effects, diversity and representation in our industry.”

She adds, “At Marvel Studios, we have always tried to push boundaries with both our storytelling and our visual effects. Bringing our work to SIGGRAPH each year offers us the opportunity to help shape the future of filmmaking.”

The 2019 keynote session will be presented as a fireside chat, allowing attendees the opportunity to hear Alonso discuss her life and career in an intimate setting.