Tag Archives: Siggraph 2018

Our SIGGRAPH 2018 video coverage

SIGGRAPH is always a great place to wander around and learn about new and future technology. You can get see amazing visual effects reels and learn how the work was created by the artists themselves. You can get demos of new products, and you can immerse yourself in a completely digital environment. In short, SIGGRAPH is educational and fun.

If you weren’t able to make it this year, or attended but couldn’t see it all, we would like to invite you to watch our video coverage from the show.

SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective has announced the winners of our Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver. Seeking to recognize debut products with real-world applications, the postPerspective Impact Awards are voted on by an anonymous judging body made up of respected industry artists and professionals. It’s working pros who are going to be using new tools — so we let them make the call.

The awards honor innovative products and technologies for the visual effects, post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. They celebrate companies that push the boundaries of technology to produce tools that accelerate artistry and actually make users’ working lives easier.

While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR, AI and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production, which makes these SIGGRAPH Impact Awards doubly interesting.

The winners are as follows:

postPerspective Impact Award — SIGGRAPH 2018 MVP Winner:

They generated a lot of buzz at the show, as well as a lot of votes from our team of judges, so our MVP Impact Award goes to Nvidia for its Quadro RTX raytracing GPU.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Winners:

  • Maxon for its Cinema 4D R20 3D design and animation software.
  • StarVR for its StarVR One headset with integrated eye tracking.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Horizon Winners:

This year we have started a new Imapct Award category. Our Horizon Award celebrates the next wave of impactful products being previewed at a particular show. At SIGGRAPH, the winners were:

  • Allegorithmic for its Substance Alchemist tool powered by AI.
  • OTOY and Epic Games for their OctaneRender 2019 integration with UnrealEngine 4.

And while these products and companies didn’t win enough votes for an award, our voters believe they do deserve a mention and your attention: Wrnch, Google Lightfields, Microsoft Mixed Reality Capture and Microsoft Cognitive Services integration with PixStor.

 

DeepMotion’s Neuron cloud app trains digital characters using AI

DeepMotion has launched DeepMotion Neuron, the first tool for completely procedural, physical character animation, for presale. The cloud application trains digital characters to develop physical intelligence using advanced artificial intelligence (AI), physics and deep learning. With guidance and practice, digital characters can now achieve adaptive motor control just as humans do, in turn allowing animators and developers to create more lifelike and responsive animations than those possible using traditional methods.

DeepMotion Neuron is a behavior-as-a-service platform that developers can use to upload and train their own 3D characters, choosing from hundreds of interactive motions available via an online library. Neuron will enable content creators to tell more immersive stories by adding responsive actors to games and experiences. By handling large portions of technical animation automatically, the service also will free up time for artists to focus on expressive details.

DeepMotion Neuron is built on techniques identified by researchers from DeepMotion and Carnegie Mellon University who studied the application of reinforcement learning to the growing domain of sports simulation, specifically basketball, where real-world human motor intelligence is at its peak. After training and optimization, the researchers’ characters were able to perform interactive ball-handling skills in real-time simulation. The same technology used to teach digital actors how to dribble can be applied to any physical movement using Neuron.

DeepMotion Neuron’s cloud platform is slated for release in Q4 of 2018. During the DeepMotion Neuron prelaunch, developers and animators can register on the DeepMotion website for early access and discounts.

Siggraph: StarVR One’s VR headset with integrated eye tracking

StarVR was at SIGGRAPH 2018 with its StarVR One, its next-generation VR headset built to support the most optimal lifelike VR experience. Featuring advanced optics, VR-optimized displays, integrated eye tracking and a vendor-agnostic tracking architecture, StarVR One is built from the ground up to support use cases in the commercial and enterprise sectors.

The StarVR One VR head-mounted display provides a nearly 100 percent human viewing angle — a 210-degree horizontal and 130-degree vertical field-of-view — and supports a more expansive user experience. Approximating natural human peripheral vision, StarVR One can support rigorous and exacting VR experiences such as driving and flight simulations, as well as tasks such as identifying design issues in engineering applications.

StarVR’s custom AMOLED displays serve up 16 million subpixels at a refresh rate of 90 frames per second. The proprietary displays are designed specifically for VR with a unique full-RGB-per-pixel arrangement to provide a professional-grade color spectrum for real-life color. Coupled with StarVR’s custom Fresnel lenses, the result is a clear visual experience within the entire field of view.

StarVR One automatically measures interpupillary distance (IPD) and instantly provides the best image adjusted for every user. Integrated Tobii eye-tracking technology enables foveated rendering, a technology that concentrates high-quality rendering only where the eyes are focused. As a result, the headset pushes the highest-quality imagery to the eye-focus area while maintaining the right amount of peripheral image detail.

StarVR One eye-tracking thus opens up commercial possibilities that leverage user-intent data for content gaze analysis and improved interactivity, including heat maps.

Two products are available with two different integrated tracking systems. The StarVR One is ready out of the box for the SteamVR 2.0 tracking solution. Alternatively, StarVR One XT is embedded with active optical markers for compatibility with optical tracking systems for more demanding use cases. It is further enhanced with ready-to-use plugins for a variety of tracking systems and with additional customization tools.

The StarVR One headset weighs 450 grams, and its ergonomic headband design evenly distributes this weight to ensure comfort even during extended sessions.

The StarVR software development kit (SDK) simplifies the development of new content or the upgrade of an existing VR experience to StarVR’s premium wide-field-of-view platform. Developers also have the option of leveraging the StarVR One dual-input VR SLI mode, maximizing the rendering performance. The StarVR SDK API is designed to be familiar to developers working with existing industry standards.

The development effort that culminated in the launch of StarVR One involved extensive collaboration with StarVR technology partners, which include Intel, Nvidia and Epic Games.

Siggraph: Chaos Group releases the open beta for V-Ray for Houdini

With V-Ray for Houdini now in open beta, Chaos Group is ensuring that its rendering technology can be used on to each part of the VFX pipeline. With V-Ray for Houdini, artists can apply high-performance raytracing to all of their creative projects, connecting standard applications like Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya, and Foundry’s Katana and Nuke.

“Adding V-Ray for Houdini streamlines so many aspects of our pipeline,” says Grant Miller, creative director at Ingenuity Studios. “Combined with V-Ray for Maya and Nuke, we have a complete rendering solution that allows look-dev on individual assets to be packaged and easily transferred between applications.” V-Ray for Houdini was used by Ingenuity on the Taylor Swift music video for Look What You Made Me Do. (See our main image.) 

V-Ray for Houdini uses the same smart rendering technology introduced in V-Ray Next, including powerful scene intelligence, fast adaptive lighting and production-ready GPU rendering. V-Ray for Houdini includes two rendering engines – V-Ray and V-Ray GPU – allowing visual effects artists to choose the one that best takes advantage of their hardware.

V-Ray for Houdini, Beta 1 features include:
• GPU & CPU Rendering – High-performance GPU & CPU rendering capabilities for high-speed look development and final frame rendering.
• Volume Rendering – Fast, accurate illumination and rendering of VDB volumes through the V-Ray Volume Grid. Support for Houdini volumes and Mac OS are coming soon.
• V-Ray Scene Support – Easily transfer and manipulate the properties of V-Ray scenes from applications such as Maya and 3ds Max.
• Alembic Support – Full support for Alembic workflows including transformations, instancing and per object material overrides.
• Physical Hair – New Physical Hair shader renders realistic-looking hair with accurate highlights. Only hair as SOP geometry is supported currently.
• Particles – Drive shader parameters such as color, alpha and particle size through custom, per-point attributes.
• Packed Primitives – Fast and efficient handling of Houdini’s native packed primitives at render time.
• Material Stylesheets – Full support for material overrides based on groups, bundles and attributes. VEX and per-primitive string overrides such as texture randomization are planned for launch.
• Instancing – Supports copying any object type (including volumes) using Packed Primitives, Instancer and “instancepath” attribute.
• Light Instances – Instancing of lights is supported, with options for per-instance overrides of the light parameters and constant storage of light link settings.

To join the beta, check out the Chaos Group website.

V-Ray for Houdini is currently available for Houdini and Houdini Indie 16.5.473 and later. V-Ray for Houdini supports Windows, Linux and Mac OS.

Ziva VFX 1.4 adds real-world physics to character creation

Ziva Dynamics has launched Ziva VFX 1.4, a major update that gives the company’s character-creation technology five new tools for production artists. With this update, creators can apply real-world physics to even more of the character creation process — muscle growth, tissue tension and the effects of natural elements, such as heavy winds and water pressure — while removing difficult steps from the rigging process.

Ziva VFX 1.4 combines the effects of real-world physics with the rapid creation of soft-tissue materials like muscles, fat and skin. By mirroring the fundamental properties of nature, users can produce CG characters that move, flex and jiggle just as they would in real life.

With External Forces, users are able to accurately simulate how natural elements like wind and water interact with their characters. Making a character’s tissue flap or wrinkle in the wind, ripple and wave underwater, or even stretch toward or repel away from a magnetic field can all be done quickly, in a physically accurate way.

New Pressure and Surface Tension properties can be used to “fit” fat tissues around muscles, augmenting the standard Ziva VFX anatomy tools. These settings allow users to remove fascia from a Ziva simulation while still achieving the detailed wrinkling and sliding effects that make humans and creatures look real.

Muscle growth can rapidly increase the overall muscle definition of a character or body part without requiring the user to remodel the geometry. A new Rest Scale for Tissue feature lets users grow or shrink a tissue object equally in all directions. Together, these tools improve collaboration between modelers and riggers while increasing creative control for independent artists.

Ziva VFX 1.4 also now features Ziva Scene Panel, which allows artists working on complex builds to visualize their work more simply. Ziva Scene Panel’s tree-like structure shows all connections and relationships between an asset’s objects, functions and layers, making it easier to find specific items and nodes within an Autodesk Maya scene file.

Ziva VFX 1.4 is available now as a Maya plug-in for Windows and Linux users.

Allegorithmic’s Substance Painter adds subsurface scattering

Allegorithmic has released the latest additions to its Substance Painter tool, targeted to VFX, game studios and pros who are looking for ways to create realistic lighting effects. Substance Painter enhancements include subsurface scattering (SSS), new projections and fill tools, improvements to the UX and support for a range of new meshes.

Using Substance Painter’s newly updated shaders, artists will be able to add subsurface scattering as a default option. Artists can add a Scattering map to a texture set and activate the new SSS post-effect. Skin, organic surfaces, wax, jade and any other translucent materials that require extra care will now look more realistic, with redistributed light shining through from under the surface.

The release also includes updates to projection and fill tools, beginning with the user-requested addition of non-square projection. Images can be loaded in both the projection and stencil tool without altering the ratio or resolution. Those projection and stencil tools can also disable tiling in one or both axes. Fill layers can be manipulated directly in the viewport using new manipulator controls. Standard UV projections feature a 2D manipulator in the UV viewport. Triplanar Projection received a full 3D manipulator in the 3D viewport, and both can be translated, scaled and rotated directly in-scene.

Along with the improvements to the artist tools, Substance Painter includes several updates designed to improve the overall experience for users of all skill levels. Consistency between tools has been improved, and additions like exposed presets in Substance Designer and a revamped, universal UI guide make it easier for users to jump between tools.

Additional updates include:
• Alembic support — The Alembic file format is now supported by Substance Painter, starting with mesh and camera data. Full animation support will be added in a future update.
• Camera import and selection — Multiple cameras can be imported with a mesh, allowing users to switch between angles in the viewport; previews of the framed camera angle now appear as an overlay in the 3D viewport.
• Full gITF support — Substance Painter now automatically imports and applies textures when loading gITF meshes, removing the need to import or adapt mesh downloads from Sketchfab.
• ID map drag-and-drop — Both materials and smart materials can be taken from the shelf and dropped directly onto ID colors, automatically creating an ID mask.
• Improved Substance format support — Improved tweaking of Substance-made materials and effects thanks to visible-if and embedded presets.