Tag Archives: rendering

Autodesk Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU in public beta

Autodesk has made its Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU available as a public beta. The release provides artists with GPU rendering for a set number of features, and the flexibility to choose between rendering on the CPU or GPU without changing renderers.

From look development to lighting, support for GPU acceleration brings greater interactivity and speed to artist workflows, helping reduce iteration and review cycles. Arnold 5.3 also adds new functionality to help maximize performance and give artists more control over their rendering processes, including updates to adaptive sampling, a new version of the Randomwalk SSS mode and improved Operator UX.

Arnold GPU rendering makes it easier for artists and small studios to iterate quickly in a fast working environment and scale rendering capacity to accommodate project demands. From within the standard Arnold interface, users can switch between rendering on the CPU and GPU with a single click. Arnold GPU currently supports features such as arbitrary shading networks, SSS, hair, atmospherics, instancing, and procedurals. Arnold GPU is based on the Nvidia OptiX framework and is optimized to leverage Nvidia RTX technology.

New feature summary:
— Major improvements to quality and performance for adaptive sampling, helping to reduce render times without jeopardizing final image quality
— Improved version of Randomwalk SSS mode for more realistic shading
— Enhanced usability for Standard Surface, giving users more control
— Improvements to the Operator framework
— Better sampling of Skydome lights, reducing direct illumination noise
— Updates to support for MaterialX, allowing users to save a shading network as a MaterialX look

Arnold 5.3 with Arnold GPU in public beta will be available March 20 as a standalone subscription or with a collection of end-to-end creative tools within the Autodesk Media & Entertainment Collection. You can also try Arnold GPU with a free 30-day trial of Arnold. Arnold GPU is available in all supported plug-ins for Autodesk Maya, Autodesk 3ds Max, Houdini, Cinema 4D and Katana.

Autodesk launches Maya 2019 for animation, rendering, more

Autodesk has released the latest version of Maya, its 3D animation, modeling, simulation and rendering software. Maya 2019 features significant updates for speed and interactivity and addresses some challenges artists face throughout production, providing faster animation playback to reduce the need for playblasts, higher quality 3D previews with Autodesk Arnold updates in viewport 2.0, improved pipeline integration with more flexible development environment support, and performance improvements that most Maya artists will notice in their daily work.

Key new Maya 2019 features include:
• Faster Animation: New cached playback increases animation playback speeds in viewport 2.0, giving animators a more interactive and responsive animating environment to produce better quality animations. It helps reduce the need to produce time-consuming playblasts to evaluate animation work, so animators can work faster.


• Higher Quality Previews Closer to Final Renders: Arnold upgrades improve realtime previews in viewport 2.0, allowing artists to preview higher quality results that are closer to the final Arnold render for better creativity and less wasted time.
• Faster Maya: New performance and stability upgrades help improve daily productivity in a range of areas that most artists will notice in their daily work.
• Refining Animation Data: New filters within the graph editor make it easier to work with motion capture data, including the Butterworth filter and the key reducer to help refine animation curves.
• Rigging Improvements: New updates help make the work of riggers and character TDs easier, including the ability to hide sets from the outliner to streamline scenes, improvements to the bake deformer tool and new methods for saving deformer weights to more easily script rig creation.
• Pipeline Integration Improvements: Development environment updates make it easier for pipeline and tool developers to create, customize and integrate into production pipelines.
• Help for Animators in Training: Sample rigged and animated characters, as well as motion capture samples, make it easier for students to learn and quickly get started animating.

Maya 2019 is available now as a standalone subscription or with a collection of end-to-end creative tools within the Autodesk Media & Entertainment Collection.

Chaos Group to support Cinema 4D with two rendering products

At the Maxon Supermeet 2018 event, Chaos Group announced its plans to support the Maxon Cinema 4D community with two rendering products: V-Ray for Cinema 4D and Corona for Cinema 4D. Based on V-Ray’s Academy Award-winning raytracing technology, the development of V-Ray for Cinema 4D will be focused on production rendering for high-end visual effects and motion graphics. Corona for Cinema 4D will focus on artist-friendly design visualization.

Chaos Group, which acquired the V-Ray for Cinema 4D product from LAUBlab and will lead development on the product for the first time, will offer current customers free migration to a new update, V-Ray 3.7 for Cinema 4D. All users who move to the new version will receive a free V-Ray for Cinema 4D license, including all product updates, through January 15, 2020. Moving forward, Chaos Group will be providing all support, sales and product development in-house.

In addition to ongoing improvements to V-Ray for Cinema 4D, Chaos Group is also released the Corona for Cinema 4D beta 2 at Supermeet, with the final product to follow in January 2019.

Main Image: Daniel Sian created Robots using V-ray for Cinema 4D.

SIGGRAPH: Nvidia intros Quadro RTX raytracing GPU

At SIGGRAPH, Nvidia announced its first Turing architecture-based GPUs, which enable artists to render photorealistic scenes in realtime, add new AI-based capabilities to their workflows and experience fluid interactivity with complex models and scenes.

The Nvidia Quadro RTX 8000, Quadro RTX 6000 and Quadro RTX 5000 enable hardware-accelerated raytracing, AI, advanced shading and simulation. Also announced was the Quadro RTX Server, a reference architecture for highly configurable, on-demand rendering and virtual workstation solutions from the datacenter.

“Quadro RTX marks the launch of a new era for the global computer graphics industry,” says Bob Pette, VP of professional visualization at Nvidia. “Users can now enjoy powerful capabilities that weren’t expected to be available for at least five more years. Designers and artists can interact in realtime with their complex designs and visual effects in raytraced photo-realistic detail. And film studios and production houses can now realize increased throughput with their rendering workloads, leading to significant time and cost savings.”

Quadro RTX GPUs are designed for demanding visual computing workloads, such as those used in film and video content creation, automotive and architectural design and scientific visualization.

Quadro RTX Server

Features include:
• New RT cores to enable realtime raytracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination.
• Turing Tensor Cores to accelerate deep neural network training and inference, which are critical to powering AI-enhanced rendering, products and services.
• New Turing Streaming Multiprocessor architecture, featuring up to 4,608 CUDA cores, that delivers up to 16 trillion floating point operations in parallel with 16 trillion integer operations per second to accelerate complex simulation of real-world physics.
• Advanced programmable shading technologies to improve the performance of complex visual effects and graphics-intensive experiences.
• First implementation of ultra-fast Samsung 16Gb GDDR6 memory to support more complex designs, massive architectural datasets, 8K movie content and more.
• Nvidia NVLink to combine two GPUs with a high-speed link to scale memory capacity up to 96GB and drive higher performance with up to 100GB/s of data transfer.
• Hardware support for USB Type-C and VirtualLink, a new open industry standard being developed to meet the power, display and bandwidth demands of next-generation VR headsets through a single USB-C connector.• New and enhanced technologies to improve performance of VR applications, including Variable-Rate Shading, Multi-View Rendering and VRWorks Audio.

The Quadro RTX Server combines Quadro RTX GPUs with new Quadro Infinity software (available in the 1st quarter of 2019) to deliver a flexible architecture to meet the demands of creative pros. Quadro Infinity will enable multiple users to access a single GPU through virtual workstations, dramatically increasing the density of the datacenter. End-users can also easily provision render nodes and workstations based on their specific needs.

Quadro RTX GPUs will be available starting in the 4th quarter. Pricing is as follows:
Quadro RTX 8000 with 48GB memory: $10,000 estimated street price
Quadro RTX 6000 with 24GB memory: $6,300 ESP
Quadro RTX 5000 with 16GB memory: $2,300 ESP

Siggraph: Chaos Group releases the open beta for V-Ray for Houdini

With V-Ray for Houdini now in open beta, Chaos Group is ensuring that its rendering technology can be used on to each part of the VFX pipeline. With V-Ray for Houdini, artists can apply high-performance raytracing to all of their creative projects, connecting standard applications like Autodesk’s 3ds Max and Maya, and Foundry’s Katana and Nuke.

“Adding V-Ray for Houdini streamlines so many aspects of our pipeline,” says Grant Miller, creative director at Ingenuity Studios. “Combined with V-Ray for Maya and Nuke, we have a complete rendering solution that allows look-dev on individual assets to be packaged and easily transferred between applications.” V-Ray for Houdini was used by Ingenuity on the Taylor Swift music video for Look What You Made Me Do. (See our main image.) 

V-Ray for Houdini uses the same smart rendering technology introduced in V-Ray Next, including powerful scene intelligence, fast adaptive lighting and production-ready GPU rendering. V-Ray for Houdini includes two rendering engines – V-Ray and V-Ray GPU – allowing visual effects artists to choose the one that best takes advantage of their hardware.

V-Ray for Houdini, Beta 1 features include:
• GPU & CPU Rendering – High-performance GPU & CPU rendering capabilities for high-speed look development and final frame rendering.
• Volume Rendering – Fast, accurate illumination and rendering of VDB volumes through the V-Ray Volume Grid. Support for Houdini volumes and Mac OS are coming soon.
• V-Ray Scene Support – Easily transfer and manipulate the properties of V-Ray scenes from applications such as Maya and 3ds Max.
• Alembic Support – Full support for Alembic workflows including transformations, instancing and per object material overrides.
• Physical Hair – New Physical Hair shader renders realistic-looking hair with accurate highlights. Only hair as SOP geometry is supported currently.
• Particles – Drive shader parameters such as color, alpha and particle size through custom, per-point attributes.
• Packed Primitives – Fast and efficient handling of Houdini’s native packed primitives at render time.
• Material Stylesheets – Full support for material overrides based on groups, bundles and attributes. VEX and per-primitive string overrides such as texture randomization are planned for launch.
• Instancing – Supports copying any object type (including volumes) using Packed Primitives, Instancer and “instancepath” attribute.
• Light Instances – Instancing of lights is supported, with options for per-instance overrides of the light parameters and constant storage of light link settings.

To join the beta, check out the Chaos Group website.

V-Ray for Houdini is currently available for Houdini and Houdini Indie 16.5.473 and later. V-Ray for Houdini supports Windows, Linux and Mac OS.

Saddington Baynes adds senior lighting artist Luis Cardoso

Creative production house Saddington Baynes has hired Luis Cardoso as a senior lighting artist, adding to the studio’s creative team with specialist CGI skills in luxury goods, beauty and cosmetics. He joins the team following a four-year stint at Burberry, where he worked on high-end CGI.

He specializes in Autodesk 3ds Max, Chaos Group’s V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop. Cardoso’s past work includes imagery for all Burberry fragrances, clothing and accessories and social media assets for the Pinterest Cat Lashes campaign. He also has experience under his belt as senior CG artist at Sectorlight, and later in his career Assembly Studios.

At Saddington Baynes, Cardoso will be working on new motion cinematic sequences for online video to expand the beauty, fragrance, fashion and beverage departments and take the expertise further, particularly in regards to video lighting.

According to executive creative director James Digby-Jones, “It no longer matters whether elements are static or moving; whether the brief is for a 20,000-pixel image or 4K animation mixed with live action. We stretch creative and technical boundaries with fully integrated production that encompasses everything from CGI and motion to shoot production and VR capability.”

Foundry’s Nuke and Hiero 11.0 now available

Foundry has made available Nuke and Hiero 11.0, the next major release for the Nuke line of products, including Nuke, NukeX, Nuke Studio, Hiero and HieroPlayer. The Nuke family is being updated to VFX Platform 2017, which includes several major updates to key libraries used within Nuke, including Python, Pyside and Qt.

The update also introduces a new type of group node, which offers a powerful new collaborative workflow for sharing work among artists. Live Groups referenced in other scripts automatically update when a script is loaded, without the need to render intermediate stages.

Nuke Studio’s intelligent background rendering is now available in Nuke and NukeX. The Frame Server takes advantage of available resource on your local machine, enabling you to continue working while rendering is happening in the background. The LensDistortion node has been completely revamped, with added support for fisheye and wide-angle lenses and the ability to use multiple frames to produce better results. Nuke Studio now has new GPU-accelerated disk caching that allows users to cache part or all of a sequence to disk for smoother playback of more complex sequences.

 

 

GPU-accelerated renderer Redshift now in v.2.0, integrates with 3ds Max

Redshift Rendering has updated its GPU-accelerated rendering software to Redshift 2.0. This new version includes new features and pipeline enhancements to the existing Maya and Softimage plug-ins. Redshift 2.0 also introduces integration with Autodesk 3ds Max. Integrations with Side Effects Houdini and Maxon Cinema 4D are currently in development and are expected later in 2016.

New features across all platforms include realistic volumetrics, enhanced subsurface scattering and a new PBR-based Redshift material, all of which deliver improved final render results. Starting July 5, Redshift is offering 20 percent off new Redshift licenses through July 19.

Age of Vultures

Age of Vultures

A closer look at Redshift 2.0’s new features:

● Volumetrics (OpenVDB) – Render clouds, smoke, fire and other volumetric effects with production-quality results (initial support for OpenVDB volume containers).

● Nested dielectrics – The ability to accurately simulate the intersection of transparent materials with realistic results and no visual artifacts.

● New BRDFS and linear glossiness response – Users can model a wider variety of metallic and reflective surfaces via the latest and greatest in surface shading technologies (GGX and Beckmann/CookTorrance BRDFs).

● New SSS models and single scattering – More realistic results with support for improved subsurface scattering models and single-scattering.

● Redshift material – The ability to use more intuitive, PBR-based main material, featuring effects such as dispersion/chromatic aberration.

● Multiple dome lights – Users can combine multiple dome lights to create more compelling lighting.

● alSurface support – There is now full support for the Arnold shader without having to port settings.

● Baking – Users can save a lot of rendering time with baking for lighting and AOVs.

Users include Blizzard, Jim Henson’s Creature Shop, Glassworks and Blue Zoo.

Main Image: Rendering example from A Large Evil Corporation.

Jon Neill joins Axis as head of lighting, rendering, compositing

Axis Animation in Glasgow, Scotland, has added Jon Neill as their new head of lighting, rendering and compositing (LRC). He has previously held senior positions at MPC and Cinesite, working on such projects as Jungle Book, Skyfall and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

His role at Axis will be overseeing the LRC team at both the department and project level, providing technical and artistic leadership across multiple projects and managing the day-to-day production needs.

“Jon’s supervisory skills coupled with knowledge in a diverse range of execution techniques is another step forward in raising the bar in both our short- and long-form projects.” says Graham McKenna, co-founder and head of 3D at Axis.

Thinkbox addresses usage-based licensing

At the beginning of May, Thinkbox Software launched Deadline 8, which introduced on-demand, per-minute licensing as an option for Thinkbox’s Deadline and Krakatoa, The Foundry’s Nuke and Katana, and Chaos Group’s V-Ray. The company also revealed it is offering free on-demand licensing for Deadline, Krakatoa, Nuke, Katana and V-Ray for the month of May.

Chris BondThinkbox founder/CEO Chris Bond explained, “As workflows increasingly incorporate cloud resources, on-demand licensing expands options for studios, making it easy to scale up production, whether temporarily or for a long-term basis. While standard permanent licenses are still the preferred choice for some VFX facilities, the on-demand model is an exciting option for companies that regularly expand and contract based on their project needs.”

Since the announcement, users have been reaching out to Thinkbox with questions about usage-based licensing. We reached out to Bond to help those with questions get a better understanding of what this model means for the creative community.

What is usage-based licensing?
Usage-based licensing is an additional option to permanent and temporary licenses and gives our clients the ability to easily scale up or scale down, without increasing their overhead, on a project-need basis. Instead of one license per render node, you can purchase minutes from the Thinkbox store (as pre-paid bundles of hours) that can be distributed among as many render nodes as you like. And, once you have an account with the Store, purchasing extra time only takes a few minutes and does not require interaction with our sales team.

Can users still purchase perpetual licenses of Deadline?
Yes! We offer both usage-based licensing and perpetual licenses, which can be used separately or together in the cloud or on-premise.

How is Deadline usage tracked?
Usage is tracked per minute. For example, if you have 10,000 hours of usage-based licensing, that can be used on a single node for 10,000 hours, 10,000 nodes for one hour or anything in between. Minutes are only consumed while the Deadline Slave application is rendering, so if it’s sitting idle, minutes won’t be used.

What types of renderfarms are compatible with usage-based licensing?
Usage-based licensing works with both local- and cloud-based renderfarms. It can be used exclusively or alongside existing permanent and temporary licenses. You configure the Deadline Client on each machine for usage-based or standard licensing. Alternatively, Deadline’s Auto-Configuration feature allows you to automatically assign the licensing mode to groups of Slaves in the case of machines that might be dynamically spawned via our Balancer application. It’s easy to do, but if anyone is confused they can send us an email and we’ll schedule a session to step you through the process.

Can people try it out?
Of course! For the month of May, we’re providing free licensing hours of Deadline, Krakatoa, Nuke, Katana and V-Ray. Free hours can be used for on-premise or cloud-based rendering, and users are responsible for compute resources. Hours are offered on a first-come, first-served basis and any unused time will expire at 12am PDT on June 1.