Tag Archives: remote collaboration

EditShare and Adobe update combined remote workflow

EditShare and Adobe have updated their integrated remote production and collaborative editing workflow. A new Flow panel for Adobe Premiere Pro helps with content management, proxy and remote editing, and review and approval workflows for editors.

EditShare’s EFS open storage solution enhances collaborative editing with full support for project-locking for Productions in Premiere. With the Productions feature set, Premiere can now handle projects with an extraordinary number of assets while maintaining peak performance. Sharing and organizing those assets is much easier than before.

Flow manages the entire media technology stack with tools to orchestrate assets and workflows across tiered on-premises, nearline and cloud storage environments. A secure platform for remote, collaborative productions, Flow offers a proxy-based workflow with support for over 500 codecs. Its enhanced Premiere panel connects individual editors and production teams directly to Flow media asset management and its productivity-focused tool set, including extensive asset tracking, a collaborative proxy editing workflow, and review and approval workflows globally.

EFS scalable storage enables media organizations to build extensive collaborative workflows on premises, in the cloud or in hybrid installations, shielding creative personnel from the underlying technical complexity while equipping administrators and technicians with a comprehensive set of storage management tools. For Adobe editors, EFS is fast and flexible collaborative storage with support for Productions in Premiere Pro to enable project sharing.

For a limited time, EditShare is offering a special Adobe workflow bundle that includes Flow media management, the EFS open storage solution and Helmut workgroup management tools.

Posting John Krasinski’s Some Good News

By Randi Altman

Need an escape from a world filled with coronavirus and murder hornets? You should try John Krasinski’s weekly YouTube show, Some Good News. It focuses on the good things that are happening during the COVID-19 crisis, giving people a reason to smile with things such as a virtual prom, Krasinski’s chat with astronauts on the ISS and bringing the original Broadway cast of Hamilton together for a Zoom singalong.

L-R: Remy, Olivier, Josh and Lila Senior

Josh Senior, owner of Leroi and Senior Post in Dumbo, New York, is providing editing and post to SGN. His involvement began when he got a call from a mutual friend of Krasinski’s, asking if he could help put something together. They sent him clips via Dropbox, and a workflow was born.

While the show is shot at Krasinski’s house in New York at different times during the week, Senior’s Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays are spent editing and posting SGN.

In addition to his post duties, Senior is an EP on the show, along with his producing partner Evan Wolf Buxbaum at their production company, Leroi. The two work in concert with Allyson Seeger and Alexa Ginsburg, who executive produced for Krasinski’s company, Sunday Night Productions. Production meetings are held on Tuesday, and then shooting begins. After footage is captured, it’s still shared via Dropbox or good old iMessage.

Let’s find out more…

What does John use for the shoot?
John films on two iPhones. A good portion of the show is screen-recorded on Zoom, and then there’s the found footage user-generated content component.

What’s your process once you get the footage? And, I’m assuming, it’s probably a little challenging getting footage from different kinds of cameras?
Yes. In the alternate reality where there’s no coronavirus, we run a pretty big post house in Dumbo, Brooklyn. And none of the tools of the trade that we have there are really at play here, outside of our server, which exists as the ever-present backend for all of our remote work.

The assets are pulled down from wherever they originate. The masters are then housed behind an encrypted firewall, like we do for all of our TV shows at the post house. Our online editor is the gatekeeper. All the editors, assistant editors, producers, animators, sound folks — they all get a mirrored drive that they download, locally, and we all get to work.

Do you have a style guide?
We have a bible, which is a living document that we’ve made week over week. It has music cues, editing style, technique, structure, recurring themes, a living archive of all the notes that we’ve received and how we’ve addressed them. Also, any style that’s specific to segments, post processing, any phasing or audio adjustments that we make all live within a document, that we give to whoever we onboard to the show.

Evan Wolf Buxbaum

Our post producers made this really elegant workflow that’s a combination of Vimeo and Slack where we post project files and review links and share notes. There’s nothing formal about this show, and that’s really cool. I mean, at the same time, as we’re doing this, we’re rapidly finishing and delivering the second season of Ramy on Hulu. It comes out on May 29.

I bet that workflow is a bit different than SGN’s.
It’s like bouncing between two poles. That show has a hierarchy, it’s formalized, there’s a production company, there’s a network, there’s a lot of infrastructure. This show is created in a group text with a bunch of friends.

What are you using to edit and color Some Good News?
We edit in Adobe Premiere, and that helps mitigate some of the challenges of the mixed media that comes in. We typically color inside of Adobe, and we use Pro Tools for our sound mix. We online and deliver out of Resolve, which is pretty much how we work on most of our things. Some of our shows edit in Avid Media Composer, but on our own productions we almost always post in Premiere — so when we can control the full pipeline, we tend to prefer Adobe software.

Are review and approvals with John and the producers done through iMessage in Dropbox too?
Yes, and we post links on Vimeo. Thankfully we actually produce Some Good News as well as post it, so that intersection is really fluid. With Ramy it’s a bit more formalized. We do notes together and, usually internally, we get a cut that we like. Then it goes to John, and he gives us his thoughts and we retool the edit; it’s like a rapid prototyping rather than a gated milestone. There are no network cuts or anything like that.

Joanna Naugle

For me, what’s super-interesting is that everyone’s ideas are merited and validated. I feel like there’s nothing that you shouldn’t say because this show has no agenda outside of making people happy, and everybody’s uniquely qualified to speak to that. With other projects, there are people who have an experience advantage, a technical advantage or some established thought leadership. Everybody knows what makes people happy. So you can make the show, I can make the show, my mom can make the show, and because of that, everything’s almost implicitly right or wrong.

Let’s talk about specific episodes, like the ones featuring the prom and Hamilton? What were some of the challenges of working with all of that footage. Maybe start with Hamilton?
That one was a really fun puzzle. My partner at Senior Post, Joanna Naugle, edited that. She drew on a lot of her experience editing music videos, performance content, comedy specials, multicam live tapings. It was a lot like a multicam live pre-taped event being put together.

We all love Hamilton, so that helps. This was a combination of performers pre-taping the entire song and a live performance. The editing technique really dissolves into the background, but it’s clear that there’s an abundance of skill that’s been brought to that. For me, that piece is a great showcase of the aesthetic of the show, which is that it should feel homemade and lo-fi, but there’s this undercurrent of a feat to the way that it’s put together.

Getting all of those people into the Zoom, getting everyone to sound right, having the ability to emphasize or de-emphasize different faces. To restructure the grid of the Zoom, if we needed to, to make sure that there’s more than one screen worth of people there and to make sure that everybody was visible and audible. It took a few days, but the whole show is made from Thursday to Sunday, so that’s a limiting factor, and it’s also this great challenge. It’s like a 48-hour film festival at a really high level.

What about the prom episode?
The prom episode was fantastic. We made the music performances the day before and preloaded them into the live player so that we could cut to them during the prom. Then we got to watch the prom. To be able to participate as an audience member in the content that you’re still creating is such a unique feeling and experience. The only agenda is happiness, and people need a prom, so there’s a service aspect of it, which feels really good.

John Krasinski setting up his shot.

Any challenges?
It’s hard to put things together that are flat, and I think one of the challenges that we found at the onset was that we weren’t getting multiple takes of anything, so we weren’t getting a lot of angles to play with. Things are coming in pretty baked from a production standpoint, so we’ve had to find unique and novel ways to be nonlinear when we want to emphasize and de-emphasize certain things. We want to present things in an expositional way, which is not that common. I couldn’t even tell you another thing that we’ve worked on that didn’t have any subjectivity to it.

Let’s talk sound. Is he just picking up audio from the iPhones or is he wearing a mic?
Nope. No, mic. Audio from the iPhones that we just run through a few filters on Pro Tools. Nobody mics themselves. We do spend a lot of time balancing out the sound, but there’s not a lot of effect work.

Other than SGN and Ramy, what are some other shows you guys have worked on?
John Mulaney & the Sack Lunch Bunch, 2 Dope Queens, Random Acts of Flyness, Julio Torres: My Favorite Shapes by Julio Torres and others.

Anything that I haven’t asked that you think is important?
It’s really important for me to acknowledge that this is something that is enabling a New York-based production company and post house to work fully remotely. In doing this week over week, we’re really honing what we think are tangible practices that we can then turn around and evangelize out to the people that we want to work with in the future.

I don’t know when we’re going to get back to the post house, so being able to work on a show like this is providing this wonderful learning opportunity for my whole team to figure out what we can modulate from our workflow in the office to be a viable partner from home.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Updated: Product makers offer support to cope with COVID-19 disruption

This is a weird time for our industry and the world. The best we can do is try to keep working and stay safe. For our part, postPerspective will continue to report industry news and tell stories about workflows, artists and tools, in addition to running pieces about how pros are working remotely… and keeping sane.

In fact, if you have a story about how you are working remotely and keeping on keeping on, please share it with us (info@postPerspective.com). Even though we can’t see each other face to face right now, keeping a sense of community has never been more important.

A number of companies are releasing updates, offering discounts, and even making their remote services free for a limited time in order to help everyone keep working through this pandemic. Here is a bit of news from some of those companies, and we will add more companies to this list as the news comes in, so watch this space.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Nvidia
Nvidia is expanding its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix is offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by co-founder Nicholas Pearce, are here.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects ±that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical.

And last week’s offerings as well

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Adobe

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Adobe
Adobe has shared a guide to best practices for working from home, created in support of creators and filmmakers who may be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide below and here.

Adobe’s Jason Levine and Karl Soule will also be hosting two livestreams this week that focus on remote workflows, in the hopes of offering helpful tips during this uncertain time – details are below.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Frame.io

Blog: Narrowing distances, building creative relationships

By Lenny Mastrandrea

Remote collaboration is not a new concept to our industry. The technology to do so is available to all. A number of software and hardware providers have used the expanded capabilities of robust Internet connections to encourage creative people to connect on projects across great distances, or to allow an artist beginning a project in one location to finish in another.

For us, the service emerged from a concern of clients outside of the New York area: time and budget constraints often precluded a trip to New York for color grading. We needed a solution that met our clients’ needs remotely without sacrificing production value or client experience. Our engineering team did extensive research into existing solutions in order to Continue reading