Tag Archives: re-recording mixer

CAS and MPSE honor audio post pros and their work

By Mel Lambert

With a BAFTA win and high promise for the upcoming Oscar Awards, the sound team behind Bohemian Rhapsody secured a clean sweep at both the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) ceremonies here in Los Angeles last weekend.

Paul Massey

The 55th CAS Awards also honored sound mixer Lee Orloff with a Cinema Audio Society Career Achievement Award, while director Steven Spielberg received its Cinema Audio Society Filmmaker Award. And at the MPSE Awards, director Antoine Fuqua accepted the 2019 Filmmaker Award, while supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick secured the MPSE Career Achievement honor.

Re-recording mixer Paul Massey — accepting the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture-Live Action on behalf of his fellow dubbing mixers Tim Cavagin and Niv Adiri, together with production mixer John Casali — thanked Bohemian Rhapsody’s co-executive producer and band members Roger Taylor and Brian May for “trusting me to mix the music of Queen.”

The film topped a nominee field that also included A Quiet Place, A Star is Born, Black Panther and First Man; for several years the CAS winner in the feature-film category also has secured an Oscar Award for sound mixing.

Isle of Dogs secured a CAS Award in the animation category, which also included Incredibles 2, Ralph Breaks the Internet, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and The Grinch. The sound-mixing team included original dialogue mixer Darrin Moore and re-recording mixers Christopher Scarabosio and Wayne Lemmer, together with scoring mixers Xavier Forcioli and Simon Rhodes and Foley mixer Peter Persaud.

Free Solo won a documentary award for production mixer Jim Hurst, re-recording mixers Tom Fleischman and Ric Schnupp, together with scoring mixer Tyson Lozensky, ADR mixer David Boulton and Foley mixer Joana Niza Braga.

Finally, American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace (Part 1) The Man Who Would Be Vogue, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Vote For Kennedy, Vote For Kennedy and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Bhutan) won CAS Awards within various broadcast sound categories.

Steven Spielberg and Bradley Cooper

The CAS Filmmaker Award was presented to Steven Spielberg by fellow director Bradley Cooper. This followed tributes from regular members of Spielberg’s sound team, including production sound mixer Ron Judkins plus re-recording mixers Andy Nelson and Gary Rydstrom, who quipped: “We spent so much money on Jurassic Park that [Steven] had to shoot Schindler’s List in black & white!”

“Through your talent, [sound editors and mixers] allow the audience to see with their ears,” Spielberg acknowledged, while stressing the full sonic and visual impact of a theatrical experience. “There’s nothing like a big, dark theater,” he stated. He added that he still believes that movie theaters are the best environment in which to fully enjoy his cinematic creations.

Upon receiving his Career Achievement Award from sound mixer Chris Noyes and director Dean Parisot, production sound mixer Lee Orloff acknowledged the close collaboration that needs to exist between members of the filmmaking team. “It is so much more powerful than the strongest wall you could build,” he stated, recalling a 35-year career that spans nearly 80 films.

Lee Orloff

Outgoing CAS president Mark Ulano presented the President’s Award to leading Foley mixer MaryJo Lang, while the CAS Student Award went to Anna Wozniewicz of Chapman University. Finalists included Maria Cecilia Ayalde Angel of Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Allison Ng of USC, Bo Pang of Chapman University and Kaylee Yacono of Savannah College of Art and Design.

Finally, the CAS Outstanding Product Awards went to Dan Dugan Sound Design for its Dugan Automixing in the Sound Devices 633 Compact Mixer, and to Izotope for its RX7 Audio Repair Software.

The CAS Awards ceremony was hosted by comedian Michael Kosta.

 

Motion Picture Sound Editors Awards

During the 66th Annual Golden Reels, outstanding achievement in sound editing awards were presented in 23 categories, encompassing feature films, long- and short-form television, animation, documentaries, games, special venue and other media.

The Americans, Atlanta, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Westworld figured prominently within the honored TV series.

Following introductions by re-recording mixer Steve Pederson and supervising sound editor Mandell Winter, director/producer Michael Mann presented the 2019 MPSE Filmmaker Award to Antoine Fuqua, while Academy Award-winning supervising sound editor Ben Wilkins presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to fellow supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick, who also serves as professor of cinematic arts at the University of Southern California.

Antoine Fuqua

“We celebrate the creation of entertainment content that people will enjoy for generations to come,” MPSE president Tom McCarthy stated in his opening address. “As new formats appear and new ways to distribute content are developed, we need to continue to excel at our craft and provide exceptional soundtracks that heighten the audience experience.”

As Pederson stressed during his introduction to the MPSE Filmmaker Award, Fuqua “counts on sound to complete his vision [as a filmmaker].” “His films are stylish and visceral,” added Winter, who along with Pederson has worked on a dozen films for the director during the past two decades.

“He is a director who trusts his own vision,” Mandell confirmed. “Antoine loves a layered soundtrack. And ADR has to be authentic and true to his artistic intentions. He is a bone fide storyteller.”

Four-time Oscar-nominee Mann stated that the honored director “always elevates everything he touches; he uses sound design and music to its fullest extent. [He is] a director who always pushes the limits, while evolving his art.”

Pre-recorded tributes to Fuqua came from actor Chis Pratt, who starred in The Magnificent Seven (2017). “Nobody deserves [this award] more,” he stated. Actor Mark Wahlberg, who starred in Shooter (2007), and producer Jerry Bruckheimer were also featured.

Stephen Hunter Flick

During his 40-year career in the motion picture industry, while working on some 150 films, Steven H. Flick has garnered two Oscar Award wins for Speed (1994) and Robocop (1987) together with nominations for Total Recall (1990), Die Hard (1988) and Poltergeist (1982).

The award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Animation Short Form went to Overwatch – Reunion from Blizzard Entertainment, headed by supervising sound editor Paul Menichini. The Non-Theatrical Animation Long Form award was awarded to NextGen from Netflix, headed by supervising sound editors David Acord and Steve Slanec.

The Feature Animation award went to the Oscar-nominated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse from Sony Pictures Entertainment/Marvel, headed by supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey. The Non-Theatrical Documentary award went to Searching for Sound — Islandman and Veyasin from Karga Seven Pictures/Red Bull TV, headed by supervising sound editor Suat Ayas. Finally, the Feature Documentary was a tie between Free Solo from National Geographic Documentary Films, headed by supervising sound editor Deborah Wallach, and They Shall Not Grow Old from Wingnut Films/Fathom Events/Warner Bros., headed by supervising sound editors Martin Kwok, Brent Burge, Melanie Graham and Justin Webster.

The Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Music Score award also went to Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, with music editors Katie Greathouse and Catherine Wilson, while the Musical award went to Bohemian Rhapsody from GK Films/Fox Studios, with supervising music editor John Warhurst and music editor Neil Stemp. The Dialogue/ADR award also went to Bohemian Rhapsody, with supervising ADR/dialogue editors Nina Hartston and Jens Petersen, while the Effects/Foley award went to A Quiet Place from Paramount Pictures, with supervising sound editors Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl.

The Student Film/Verna Fields Award went to Facing It from National Film and Television School, with supervising sound designer/editor Adam Woodhams.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Sony Post adds mix team of Steve Pederson, Daniel J. Leahy

Sony Pictures Post Production Services has added re-recording mixers Steve Pederson and Daniel J. Leahy to its audio post staff. Pederson and Leahy have worked as a team on a number of motion picture projects, including the Antoine Fuqua film The Equalizer, which, as independents, they mixed on Sony Pictures’ Cary Grant Stage last year.

They are currently mixing Fuqua’s latest film, Southpaw on the Sony lot. Upcoming projects include HBO’s True Detective and Fuqua’s remake of The Magnificent Seven.

Pederson’s career includes tenures at Universal Studios, Warner Bros. and Todd-AO. He won an Academy Award for Best Sound in 1996 for Apollo 13 (shared with Rick Dior, Scott Millan and David MacMillan), alongside one other Academy Award, three BAFTA and two Emmy Award nominations. His credits include Rock of Ages, The Blind Side, Hall Pass and Schindler’s List.

Leahy’s career spans 30 years and includes work at Todd-AO, Warner Bros., and Universal Studios, and as an independent. He won Emmy Awards in 2010 and 1999 for The Pacific (shared with Michael Minkler and Andrew Ramage) and The Rat Pack (shared with Michael C. Casper and Felipe Borrero), respectively. Other notable credits include The Boy Next Door, Olympus Has Fallen, Training Day and The Fast and the Furious. One of his first credits as re-recording mixer came on Back to the Future.

Pederson and Leahy (pictured above L-R) were impressed by how Sony has grown and modernized its sound facilities. “While the creative concepts of our craft haven’t changed through the years, the way we achieve those concepts has changed dramatically,” Pederson explains. “Sony has embraced changing technology without losing sight of the basics that keep filmmakers confident they’re being taken care of. To work in a progressive department that sits on a historic movie studio lot in a great West Side location made it an easy choice!”

The audio team at Sony Pictures Post takes on Netflix’s ‘Bloodline’

By Jennifer Walden

For many in the country, this past winter was a rough one. In fact, at times it felt never-ending. While spring now limps toward us just a little too slowly, you might want to imagine yourself in a tropical climate. May we recommend settling in with a refreshing drink and binge watching Netflix’s new drama series Bloodline. Shot on-location in Islamorada, a six-island section of the Florida Keys, Bloodline unravels the story of the locally renowned Rayburn family, whose children engage in a bit of Floridian fratricide.

Re-recording mixer Joe Barnett at Sony Pictures Post notes, unsurprisingly, that bug sounds Continue reading

‘Chicago Fire’: the sound of drama

By Jennifer Walden

Whether it’s a raging high-rise fire, a horrific car accident or another life-threatening event, the firefighters, rescue squad and paramedics of Chicago Firehouse 51 on NBC’s Chicago Fire are always in the center of some sort of dramatic adventure. And sometimes that drama spills into the personal lives of these imperfect heroes.

To help enhance the feeling of action and drama throughout each episode, the audio post team at BluWave Audio, a division of Universal Studios Sound that handles TV mixing, audio restoration/preservation and digital mastering, fills in the backgrounds with off-screen sounds such as fire radios, equipment being moved around, phones ringing, voices and other more typical sounds.

“The fire house they’re stationed at is a hub for many different activities for the fire Continue reading

Quick Chat: Oscar-winning re-recording mixer Steve Maslow

Burbank — Motion picture sound re-recording mixer Steve Maslow got his start in the entertainment industry in late 1969 as a roadie for a local LA band called Strawberry Alarm Clock.

From there he entered the recording industry, becoming a recording engineer, for acts including Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons and A Taste of Honey. Maslow earned a Gold record, a Platinum record and a Platinum album, for “Oh What A Night (December 1963)” and “Boogie Oogie Oogie.”

By late 1978, Maslow moved into the film audio industry, working on such films as The Last Waltz, Ten, Hair, More American Graffiti, Star Trek and The Postman Always Rings Twice.

He received the first of his three Academy Awards in 1980 for Best Achievement in Sound for Raiders of The Lost Ark, and again in 1981 for The Empire Strikes Back. He was nominated again in 1984 for Dune. Then came another Oscar in 1995 for Speed, which also gave him his first British Academy Award. More Oscar nods came, for 1996’s Waterworld, 1997’s Twister and 2000’s U-571.

Recent films include The Town, The Conjuring and The Great Gatsby. Maslow can often be found working at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank.

Maslow has been using the new plug-in, Penteo 4 Pro, which converts stereo to 5.1. In this Q&A, he talks about what led him to sound for picture, his workflow and using this new plug-in.

What led you to a career in sound for film?
I started off in records. My last big hit was with Taste of Honey and The Four Seasons. Then it started getting tougher to make a living in the music industry. It became garage band sound and people recording out of their home studios, so things didn’t look as rosy as they used to be. I transitioned into the film business when the door opened for me, and I started mixing music and eventually went into dialogue and music.

Let’s talk about turning stereo into 5.1 surround. What was your process?
I would take the left and right track of a 2-track and run them through a couple of panners, fold it in a little so the left and right contributed to the center just a little bit. Then I would take a boom box, take a bass feed from the left and the right and return it to a fader to get the bottom end. That would give me left, center, right, and the bass for the subwoofer. For left surround, right surround I would try to get a very short reverb to feed to the surrounds. That was the problem; it would always put some sort of echo into the track.

You currently use Penteo. How did you discover the product?
One of the engineers or mixers told me about a device that would take a 2-track and make a 5.1 out of it.

What type of music do you use Penteo on? Does it perform better for rock, pop, symphonic, sound effects?
I’ll use it on any 2-track mix that I get. Sometimes, like for the film I am working on now, I will get maybe 10 stereo tracks. It’s kind of retro to think that some people are still giving you 2-track scores, its 2, 2, and 2. I’ll get 2-track strings, 2-track brass, 2-track percussion, and then I have to think about how I’m going to work with them. I can’t just put them all left-right. Sometimes I’ll take the percussion and put it in the center, but with Penteo, I just feed all the 2-channel stereo mixes in and it comes out as a great sounding 5.1 surround score.

Can you then manipulate it from there and adjust where you want things to be?
Yes, typically I don’t go straight across on the outputs. I pull the surround up or down using the Penteo fader. There are a lot of parameters inside the Penteo process, in terms of preferences. But I generally just use the default settings, because I’m usually under a lot of pressure to get going and Penteo is a real time saver. I’ll just use a default setting and pull back on the left surround, right surround and sprinkle the bottom in to “taste.”

TAMMY

Warner Bros. Tammy.

What are some recent stereo-to-surround projects you have worked on?
I just finished a film called Tammy. Everything was 2-track. Every cue in that movie from source needle drops to score was all 2-track. I used Penteo from reel 1 to reel 6. The last film I used it on before that was the Bruce Willis film Red 2. I had to work with a lot of 2-track music.

How valuable is Penteo to your workflow?
For me now, it’s an essential workflow tool. I wouldn’t do another film without it if 2-track music came in. Penteo makes you sound good, and it definitely expands and turns a 2-track mix into a great 5-channel mix.

Photo Caption:  Steve Maslow using Penteo 4 Pro at Warner Bros. Studios.