Tag Archives: post production

HP offerings from Adobe Max 2018

By Brady Betzel

HP workstations have been a staple in the post community, especially for anyone not using a Mac or the occasional DIY/custom build from companies like Puget Systems or CyberPower PCs. The difference comes with customers who need workstation-level components and support. Typically, a workstation is run through much tougher and stringent tests so the client can be assured of 24/7/365 up-time. HP continues to evolve and become, in my opinion, a leader for all non-Apple dedicated workflows.

At Adobe Max 2018, HP announced updated components to its Z by HP line of mobile workstations, including the awesome ZBook Studio x360, ZBook Studio, ZBook 15 and ZBook 17. I truly love HP’s mobile workstation offerings. The only issue I constantly come up against is can I — or any freelance worker for that matter — justify the cost of their systems?

I always want the latest and greatest, and I feel I can get that with the updated performance options in this latest update to the ZBook line. They include the increased 6-core Intel i9 processors; expanded memory of up to 32GB (or 128GB in some instances); a really interesting M.2 SSD RAID-1 configuration from the factory that allows for constant mirroring of your boot drive (if one drive fails, the other will take over right where you left off); the ZBook Studio and Studio x360 getting a GPU increase with the Nvidia Quadro P2000; and the anti-glare touchscreen on the x360. This is all in addition to HP’s DreamColor option, which allows for 100% Adobe RGB coverage and 600 nits of brightness. But again, this all comes at a high cost when you max out the workstation with enough RAM and GPU horsepower. But there is some good news for those that don’t have a corporate budget to pull from: HP has introduced the pilot program Z Club.

The Z Club is essentially a leasing program for HP’s Z series products. At the moment, HP will take 100 creators for this pilot program, which will allow you to select a bundle of Z products and accessories that fit your creative lifestyle for a monthly cost. This is exactly how you solve the problem of getting prosumer and freelance workers who can’t quite justify a $5,000 price tag for purchase, but can justify a $100 a month payment. HP has touted categories of products for editors, photographers and many others. With monthly payments that range from $100 to $250, depending on what you order, this is much more manageable for mid-range end users who need the power of a workstation but up until now couldn’t afford it.

So what will you get if you are accepted to the Z Club pilot program? You can choose the products you want and not pay for three months. And you can continue or return your products, you can switch products and you will have access to a Z Club concierge service for any questions and troubleshooting.

On the call I had with HP, they mentioned that a potential bundle for a video editor could be an HP Z series mobile workstation or desktop, along with a DreamColor display, and an external RAID storage system to top it off.

In the end, I think HP (much like Blackmagic’s Resolve in the NLE/color world) is at the front of the pack. They are listening to what creatives are saying about Apple — how this giant company is not listening to their customers in an efficient and price-conscious way. Creating essentially a leasing program for mid- to high-range products with support is the future. It’s essentially Apple’s own iPhone program but with computers!

Hopefully this program takes off, and if you are lucky enough to be accepted into the pilot program, I would be curious to hear your experience, so please reach out. But with HP making strides in the workstation security initiatives like Sure Start, a privacy mode for mobile systems, and military-grade testing known as MIL-spec, HP is going from being a standard in the media and entertainment post industry. For those leaving Apple for a Windows-based PC, you should apply for the Z Club pilot program. Go to www.hp.com to find out more or follow along on Twitter @AdobeMax, @HP or using #AdobeMax.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Behind the Title: Pace Pictures owner Heath Ryan

NAME: Heath Ryan

COMPANY: Pace Pictures (@PacePictures)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a dailies-to-delivery post house, including audio mixing.

Pace’s Dolby Atmos stage.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Owner and editor.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As owner, I need to make sure everyone is happy.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Psychology. I deal with a lot of producers, directors and artists that all have their own wants and needs. Sometimes what that entails is not strictly post production but managing personalities.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Editing. My company grew out of my love for editing. It’s the final draft of any film. In the over 30 years I have been editing, the power of what an editor can do has only grown.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Chasing unpaid invoices. It’s part of the job, but it’s not fun.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Late, late in the evening when there are no other people around and you can get some real work done.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Not by design but through sheer single mindedness, I have no other skill set but film production. My sense of direction is so bad that armed with a GPS super computer in my phone even Uber driver is not an option.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I started making films in the single digit years. I won a few awards for my first short film in my teens and never looked back. I’m lucky to have found this passion early.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
This year I edited the reboot to Daddy Daycare called Grand-Daddy Daycare (2019) for Universal. I got to work with director Ron Oliver and actor Danny Trejo, and it meant a lot to me. It deals with what we do with our elders as time creeps up on us all. Sadly, we lost Ron’s mom while we were editing the film so it took on extra special meaning to us both.

Lawless Range

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Lawless Range and The Producer. I produced and edited both projects with my dear friend and collaborator Sean McGinly. A modern-day Western and a behind-the-scenes of a Hollywood pilot. They were very satisfying projects because there was no one to blame but ourselves.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Meridian Sound system, the Internet and TV.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, I love it. I have always set the tone in the edit bay with music. Especially during dailies – I like to put music on, sometimes films scores, to set the mood of what we are making.

Encore adds colorist Andrea Chlebak, ups Genevieve Fontaine to director of production

Encore has added colorist Andrea Chlebak to its roster and promoted veteran post producer Genevieve Fontaine to director of production. Chlebak brings a multidisciplinary background in feature films, docu-series and commercials across a range of aesthetics. Fontaine has been a post producer since joining the Encore team in early 2010.

Chlebak’s credits include award-winning indies Mandy and Prospect, Neill Blomkamp features Elysium and Chappie and animated adaptation Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet.” Having worked primarily in the digital landscape, her experience as an artist, still photographer, film technician, editor and compositor are evident in both her work and how she’s able to streamline communication with directors and cinematographers in delivering their vision.

In her new role, Fontaine’s responsibilities shift toward ensuring organized, efficient and future-proof workflows. Fontaine began her career as a telecine and dailies producer at Riot before moving to Encore, where she managed post for up to 11 shows at a time, including Marvel’s The Defenders series for Netflix. She understands all the building blocks necessary to keep a facility running smoothly and has been instrumental in establishing Encore, a Deluxe company, as a leader in advanced formats, helping coordinate 4K, HDR and IMF-based workflows.

Main Image: (L-R) Genevieve Fontaine and Andrea Chlebak.

A Conversation: 3P Studio founder Haley Stibbard

Australia’s 3P Studio is a post house founded and led by artisan Haley Stibbard. The company’s portfolio of work includes commercials for brands such as Subway, Allianz and Isuzu Motor Company as well as iconic shows like Sesame Street. Stibbard’s path to opening her own post house was based on necessity.

After going on maternity to have her first child in 2013, she returned to her job at a content studio to find that her role had been made redundant. She was subsequently let go. Needing and wanting to work, she began freelancing as an editor — working seven days a week and never turning down a job. Eventually she realized that she couldn’t keep up with that type of schedule and took her fate into her own hands. She launched 3P Studio, one of Brisbane’s few women-led post facilities.

We reached out to Stibbard to ask about her love of post and her path to 3P Studio.

What made you want to get into post production? School?
I had a strong love of film, which I got from my late dad, Ray. He was a big film buff and would always come home from work when I was a kid with a shopping bag full of $2 movies from the video store and he would watch them. He particularly liked the crime stories and thrillers! So I definitely got my love of film and television from him.

We did not have any film courses at high school in the ‘90s, so the closest I could get was photography. Without a show reel it was hard to get a place at university in the college of art; a portfolio was a requirement and I didn’t have one. I remember I had to talk my way into the film program, and in the end I think they just got sick of me and let me into the course through the back door without a show reel — I can be very persistent when I want to be. I always had enjoyed editing and I was good at it, so in group tasks I was always chosen as the editor and then my love of post came from there.

What was your first job?
My very first job was quite funny, actually. I was working in both a shoe store and a supermarket at the time, and two post positions became available one day, an in-house editor for a big furniture chain and a job as a production assistant for a large VFX company at Movie World on the Gold Coast. Anyone who knows me knows that I would be the worst PA in the world. So, luckily for that company director, I didn’t get the PA job and became the in-house editor for the furniture chain.

I’m glad that I took that job, as it taught me so much — how to work under pressure, how to use an Avid, how to work with deadlines, what a key number was, how to dispatch TVCS to the stations, be quick, be accurate, how to take constructive feedback.

I made every mistake known to man, including one weekend when I forgot to remove the 4×3 safe bars from a TVC and my boss saw it on TV. I ended up having to drive to the office, climb the fence that was locked to get into the office and pull it off air. So I’ve learned a lot of things the hard way, but my boss was a very patient and forgiving man, and 18 years later is now a client of mine!

What job did you hold when you went out on maternity leave?
Before I left on maternity leave to have my son Dashiell, I was an editor for a small content company. I have always been a jack-of-all-trades and I took care of everything from offline to online, grading in Resolve, motion graphics in After Effects and general design. I loved my job and I loved the variety that it brought. Doing something different every day was very enjoyable.

After leaving that job, you started freelancing as an editor. What systems did you edit on at the time and what types of projects? How difficult a time was that for you? New baby, working all the time, etc.
I started freelancing when my son was just past seven months old. I had a mortgage and had just come off six months of unpaid maternity leave, so I needed to make a living and I needed to make it quickly. I also had the added pressure of looking after a young child under the age of one who still needed his mother.

So I started contacting advertising agencies and production companies that I thought may be interested in my skill set. I just took every job that I could get my hands on, as I was always worried that every job that I took could potentially be my last for a while. I was lucky that I had an incredibly well-behaved baby! I never said “no” to a job.

As my client base started to grow, my clients would always book me since they knew that I would never say “no” (they know I still don’t say no!). It got to the point where I was working seven days a week. I worked all day when my son was in childcare and all night after he would go to bed. I would take the baby monitor downstairs where I worked out of my husband’s ‘man den.’

As my freelance business grew, I was so lucky that I had the most supportive husband in the world who was doing everything for me, the washing, the cleaning, the cooking, bath time, as well has holding down his own full-time job as an engineer. I wouldn’t have been able to do what I did for that period of time without his support and encouragement. This time really proved to be a huge stepping stone for 3P Studio.

Do you remember the moment you decided you would start your own business?
There wasn’t really a specific moment where I decided to start my own business. It was something that seemed to just naturally come together. The busier I became, the more opportunities came about, like having enough work through the door to build a space and hire staff. I have always been very strategic in regard to the people that I have brought on at 3P, and the timing in which they have come on board.

Can you walk us through that bear of a process?
At the start of 2016, I made the decision to get out of the house. My work life was starting to blend in with my home life and I needed to have that separation. I worked out of a small office for 12 months, and about six months into that it came to a point where I was able to purchase an office space that would become our studio today.

I went to work planning the fit out for the next six months. The studio was an investment in the business and I needed a place that my clients could also bring their clients for approvals, screenings and collaboration on jobs, as well as just generally enjoying the space.

The office space was an empty white shell, but the beauty of coming into a blank canvas was that I was able to create a studio that was specifically built for post production. I was lucky in that I had worked in some of the best post houses in the country as an editor, and this being a custom build I was able to take all the best bits out of all the places I had previously worked and put them into my studio without the restriction of existing walls.

I built up the walls, ripped down the ceilings and was able to design the edit suites and infrastructure all the way down to designing and laying the cable runs myself that I knew would work for us down the line. Then, we saved money and added more equipment to the studio bit by bit. It wasn’t 0 to 100 overnight, I had to work at the business development side of the company a lot, and I spent a lot of long days sitting by myself in those edit suites doing everything. Soon, word of mouth started to circulate and the business started to grow on the back of some nice jobs from my existing loyal clients.

What type of work do you do, and what gear do you call on?
3P Studio is a boutique post production studio that specializes in full-service post production, we also shoot content when required.

Our clients range anywhere from small content videos for the web all the way up to large commercial campaigns and everything in between.

There are currently six of us working full time in the studio, and we handle everything in-house from offline editing to VFX to videography and sound design. We work primarily in the Adobe Creative suite for offline editing in Premiere, mixed with Maxon Cinema 4D/Autodesk Maya for 3D work, Autodesk Flame and Side Effects Houdini for online compositing and VFX, Blackmagic Resolve for color grading and Pro Tools HD for sound mixing. We use EditShare EFS shared storage nodes for collaborative working and sharing of content between the mix of creative platforms we use.

This year we have invested in a Red Digital Cinema camera as well as an EditShare XStream 200 EFS scale-out single-node server so we can become that one-stop shop for our clients. We have been able to create an amazing creative space for our clients to come and work with us, be it from the bespoke design of our editorial suites or the high level of client service we offer.

How did you build 3P Studios to be different from other studios you’ve worked at?
From a personal perspective, the culture that we have been able to build in the studio is unlike anywhere else I have worked in that we genuinely work as a team and support each other. On the business side, we cater to clients of all sizes and budgets while offering uncompromising services and experience whether they be large or small. Making sure they walk away feeling that they have had great value and exemplary service for their budget means that they will end up being a customer of ours for life. This is the mantra that I have been able to grow the business on.

What is your hiring process like, and how do you protect employees who need to go out on maternity or family leave?
When I interview people to join 3P, attitude and willingness to learn is everything to me — hands down. You can be the most amazing operator on the planet, but if your attitude stinks then I’m really not interested. I’ve been incredibly lucky with the team that I have, and I have met them along the journey at exactly the right times. We have an amazing team culture and as the company grows our success is shared.

I always make it clear that it’s swings and roundabouts and that family is always number one. I am there to support my team if they need me to be, not just inside of work but outside as well and I receive the same support in return. We have flexible working hours, I have team members with young families who, at times, are able to work both in the studio and from home so that they can be there for their kids when they need to be. This flexibility works fine for us. Happy team members make for a happy, productive workplace, and I like to think that 3P is forward thinking in that respect.

Any tips for young women either breaking into the industry or in it that want to start a family but are scared it could cost them their job?
Well, for starters, we have laws in Australia that make it illegal for any woman in this country to be discriminated against for starting a family. 3P also supports the 18 weeks paid maternity leave available to women heading out to start a family. I would love to see more female workers in post production, especially in operator roles. We aren’t just going to be the coffee and tea girls, we are directors, VFX artists, sound designers, editors and cinematographers — the future is female!

Any tips for anyone starting a new business?
Work hard, be nice to people and stay humble because you’re only as good as your last job.

Main Image: Haley Stibbard (second from left) with her team.

Panavision, Sim, Saban Capital agree to merge

Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., a publicly traded special purpose acquisition company, Panavision and Sim Video International have agreed to combine their businesses to create a premier global provider of end-to-end production and post production services to the entertainment industry. Under the terms of the business combination agreement, Panavision and Sim will become wholly owned subsidiaries of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. Upon completion, Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. will change its name to Panavision Holdings Inc. and is expected to continue to trade on the Nasdaq stock exchange. Kim Snyder, president and chief executive officer of Panavision, will serve as chairman and chief executive officer. Bill Roberts, chief financial officer of Panavision, will serve in that role for the combined company.

Panavision designs, manufactures and provides high-precision optics and camera technology for the entertainment industry and is a leading global provider of production equipment and services. Sim is a leading provider of production and post production solutions with facilities in Los Angeles, Vancouver, Atlanta, New York and Toronto.

“This acquisition will leverage the best of Panavision’s and Sim’s resources by providing comprehensive products and services to best address the ever-adapting needs of content creators globally,” says Snyder.

“We’re combining the talent and integrated services of Sim with two of the biggest names in the business, Panavision and Saban,” adds James Haggarty, president and CEO of Sim. “The resulting scale of the new combined enterprise will better serve our clients and help shape the content-creation landscape.”

The respective boards of directors of Saban Capital Acquisition Corp., Panavision and Sim have unanimously approved the merger with completion subject to Saban Capital Acquisition Corp. stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. The parties expect that the process will be completed in the first quarter of 2019.

mLogic at IBC with four new storage solutions

mLogic will be at partner booths during IBC showing four new products at: the mSpeed Pro, mRack Pro, mShare MDC and mTape SAS.

The mLogic mSpeed Pro (pictured) is a 10-drive RAID system with integrated LTO tape. Thishybrid storage solution and hard drive provides high-speed access to media for coloring, editing and VFX, while also providing an extended, long-term archive for content to LTO tape, which promises more than 30+ years of media preservation.

mSpeed Pro supports multiple RAID levels, including RAID-6 for the ultimate in fault tolerance. It connects to any Linux, macOS, or Windows computer via a fast 40Gb/second Thunderbolt 3 port. The unit ships with the mLogic Linear Tape File System (LTFS) Utility, a simple drag-and-drop application that transfers media from the RAID to the LTO.

The mLogic mSpeed Pro will be available in 60, 80 and 100TB with an LT0-7 or LTO-8 tape drive. Pricing starts at $8,999.

The mRack Pro is a 2U rack-mountable archiving solution that features full-height LTO-8 drives and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity. Full-height (FH) LTO-8 drives offer numerous benefits over their half-height counterparts, including:
– Having larger motors that move media faster
– Working more optimally in LTFS (Linear Tape File System) environments
– Providing increased mechanical reliability
– Being a better choice for high-duty cycle workloads
– Having a lower operating temperature

The mRack Pro is available with one or two LTO-8 FH drives. Pricing starts at $7,999.

mLogic’s mShare is a metadata controller (MDC) with PCIe switch and embedded Storage Area Network (SAN) software, all integrated in a single compact rack-mount enclosure. Designed to work with mLogic’s mSAN Thunderbolt 3 RAID, the unit can be configured with Apple Xsan or Tiger Technology Tiger Store software. With mShare and mSAN, collaborative workgroups can be configured over Thunderbolt at a fraction of the cost of traditional SAN solutions. Pricing TBD.

Designed for archiving media in the Linux and Windows environments, mTape SAS is a desktop LTO-7 or LTO-8 that ships bundled with a high-speed SAS PCIe adapter to install in host computers. The mTape SAS can also be bundled with Xendata Workstation 6 archiving software for Windows. Pricing starts at $3,399.

HPA Tech Retreat 2019 opens call for proposals

The Hollywood Professional Association has issued the call for proposals for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat, the annual gathering of professionals from around the world who work at the intersection of technology and content creation. The main conference is determined by the proposals submitted during this process.

The HPA Tech Retreat is comprised of Tech Retreat Extra (TR-X), the Supersession, breakfast roundtables, an Innovation Zone and the main conference.  Also open now are submissions for the breakfast roundtables.

Now in its 24th year, the HPA Tech Retreat will take place February 11-15, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Springs Resort & Spa in Palm Desert, California, near Palm Springs.

The main program presentations are set for Wednesday, February 13 through Friday, February 15. These presentations are strictly reserved for marketing-free content.  Mark Schubin, who has programmed the Tech Retreat since its inception, notes that main program sessions can include a wide range of content. “We are looking for the most interesting, thought provoking, challenging and important ideas, diving into almost anything that is related to moving images and associated sounds. That includes, but is not limited to: alternative content for cinema, AR, broadcast in the age of broadband, content protection, dynamic range, enhanced cinema, frame rate, global mastering, higher immersion, international law, joke generation, kernel control, loss recovery, media management, night vision, optical advances, plug-‘n’-play, queasiness in VR, robo-post, surround imagery, Terabyte thumb drives, UHD II, verification, wilderness production, x-band Internet access, yield strength of lighting trusses and zoological holography.”

It is a far-ranging and creative call to the most innovative thinkers exploring the most interesting ideas and work. He concludes with his annual salvo, “Anything from scene to seen and gear to ear is fair game. So are haptic/tactile, olfactory and gustatory applications.”

Proposals, which are informal in nature and can be as short as a few sentences in length, must be submitted by the would-be presenter. Submitters will be contacted if the topic is of interest. Presentations in the main program are typically 30 minutes long, including set-up and Q&A. The deadline to submit main program proposals is end of day, Friday, October 26, 2018. Submissions should be sent to tvmark@earthlink.net.

Breakfast roundtables take place Wednesday to Friday, beginning at 7:30am. Unlike the main program, moderator-led breakfast roundtables can include marketing information. Schubin comments, “Table moderators are free to teach, preach, inquire, ask, call-to-task, sell or do anything else that keeps conversation flowing for an hour.”

There is no vetting process for breakfast roundtables. All breakfast roundtable moderators must be registered for the retreat, and there is no retreat registration discount conveyed by moderating a breakfast roundtable. Proposals for breakfast roundtables must be submitted by their proposed moderators, and once the maximum number of tables is reached (32 per day) no more can be accepted.

Further details for the 2019 HPA Tech Retreat will be announced in the coming weeks, including TR-X focus, supersession topics and Innovation Zone details, as well as seminars and meetings held in advance of the Tech Retreat.

Review: Foundry’s Athera cloud platform

By David Cox

I’ve been thinking for a while that there are two types of post houses — those that know what cloud technology can do for them, and those whose days are numbered. That isn’t to say that the use of cloud technology is essential to the survival of a post house, but if they haven’t evaluated the possibilities of it they’re probably living in the past. In such a fast-moving business, that’s not a good place to be.

The term “cloud computing” suffers a bit from being hijacked by know-nothing marketeers and has become a bit vague in meaning. It’s quite simple though: it just means a computer (or storage) owned and maintained by someone else, housed somewhere else and used remotely. The advantage is that a post house can reduce its destructive fixed overheads by owning fewer computers and thus save money on installation and upkeep. Cloud computers can be used as and when they are needed. This allows scaling up and down in proportion to workload.

Over the last few years, several providers have created global datacenters containing upwards of 50,000 servers per site, entirely for the use of anyone who wants to “remote in.” Amazon and Google are the two biggest providers, but as anyone who has tried to harness their power for post production can confirm, they’re not simple to understand or configure. Amazon alone has hundreds of different computer “instance” types, and accessing them requires navigating through a sea of unintelligible jargon. You must know your Elastic Beanstalks from your EC2, EKS and Lambda. And make sure you’ve worked out how to connect your S3, EFS and Glacier. Software licensing can also be tricky.

The truth is, these incredible cloud installations are for cleverer people than those of us that just like to make pretty pictures. They are more for the sort that like to build neural networks and don’t go outside very much. What our industry needs is some clever company to make a nice shiny front end that allows us to harness that power using the tools we know and love, and just make it all a bit simpler. Enter Athera, from Foundry. That’s exactly what they’ve done.

What is Athera?

Athera is a platform hosted on Google Cloud infrastructure that presents a user with icons for apps such as Nuke and Houdini. Access to each app is via short-term (30-day) rental. When an available app icon is clicked, a cloud computer is commanded into action, pre-installed with the chosen app. From then on, the app is used just as if locally installed. Of course, the app is actually running on a high-performance computer located in a secure and nicely cooled datacenter environment. Provided the user has a vaguely decent Internet connection, they’re good to go, because only the user interface is being transmitted across the network, not the actual raw image data.

Apps available on Athera include Foundry’s products, plus a few others. Nuke is represented in its base form, plus a Nuke X variant, Nuke Studio, and a combination of Nuke X and Cara VR. Also available are the Mari texture painting suite, Katana look-creating app and Modo CGI modeling software.

Athera also offers access to non-Foundry products like CGI software Houdini and Blender, as well as the Gaffer management tool.

NukeIn my first test, I rustled up an instance of Nuke Studio and one of Blender. The first thing I wanted to test was the GPU speed, as this can be somewhat variable for many cloud computer types (usually between zero and not much). I was pleasantly surprised as the rendering speed was close to that of a local Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080, which is pretty decent. I was also pleased to see that user preferences were maintained between sessions.

One thing that particularly impressed me was how I could call up multiple apps together and Athera would effectively build a network in the background to link them all up. Frames rendered out of Blender were instantly available in the cloud-hosted Nuke Studio, even though it was running on a different machine. This suggests the Athera infrastructure is well thought out because multi-machine, networked pipelines with attached storage are constructed with just a few clicks and without really thinking about it.

Access to the Athera apps is either by web browser or via a local client software called “Orbit.” In web browser mode, each app opens in its own browser tab. With Orbit, each app appears in a dedicated local window. Orbit boasts lower latency and the ability to use local hardware such as multiple monitors. Latency, which would show itself as a frustrating delay between control input and visual feedback, was impressively low, even when using the web browser interface. Generally, it was easy to forget that the app being used was not installed locally.

Getting files in and out was also straightforward. A Dropbox account can be directly linked, although a Google or Amazon S3 storage “bucket” is preferred for speed. There is also a hosted app called “Toolbox,” which is effectively a file browser to allow the management of files and folders.

The Athera platform also contains management and reporting features. A manager can set up projects and users, setting out which apps and projects a user has access to. Quotas can be set, and full reports are given as to who did what, when and with which app.

Athera’s pricing is laid out on their website and it’s interesting to drill into the costs and make comparisons. A user buys access to apps in 30-day blocks. Personally, I would like to see shorter blocks at some point to increase up/down scale flexibility. That said, render-only instances for many of the apps can be accessed on a per-second billing basis. The 30-day block comes with a “fair use” policy of 200 hours. This is a hard limit, which equates to around nine and a half hours per day for five-day weeks (which is technically known in post production as part time).

Figuring Out Cost
Blender is a good place to start analyzing cost because it’s open source (free) software, so the $244 Athera cost to run for 30 days/200 hours must be for hardware only. This equates to $1.22 per hour, which, compared to direct cloud computer usage, is pretty good value for the GPU-backed machine on offer.

Modo

Another way of comparing the amount of $244 a month would be to say that a new computer costing $5,800 depreciates at roughly this monthly rate if depreciated over two years. That is to say, if a computer of that value is kept for two years before being replaced, it effectively loses roughly $241 per month in value. If depreciated over three years, the figure is $80 per month less. Of course, that’s just comparing the cost of depreciation. Cost of ownership must also include the costs of updating, maintaining, powering, cooling, insuring, housing and repairing if (when!) it breaks down. If a cloud computer breaks down, Google has a few thousand waiting in the wings. In general, the base hardware cost seems quite competitive.

Of course, Blender is not really the juicy stuff. Access to a base Nuke, complete with workstation, is $685 per 30 days / 200 hours. Nuke X is $1,025. There are also “power” options for around 20% more, where a significantly more powerful machine is provided. Compared to running a local machine with purchased or rented software, these prices are very interesting. But when the ability to scale up and down with workload is factored in, especially being able to scale down to nothing during quiet times, the case for Athera becomes quite compelling.

Another helpful factor is that a single 30-day access block to a particular app can be shared between multiple users — as long as only one user has control of the app at a time. This is subject to the fair use limitation.

There is an issue if commercial (licensed) plug-ins are needed. For the time being, these can’t be used on Athera due to the obvious licensing issues relating to their installation on a different cloud machine each time. Hopefully, plugin developers will become alive to the possibilities of pay-per-use licensing, as a platform like Athera could be the perfect storefront.

Mari

Security
One of the biggest concerns about using remote computing is that of security. This concern tends to be more perceptual than real. The truth is that a Google datacenter is likely to have significantly more security than an average post company’s machine room. Also, they will be employing the best in the security business. But if material being worked on leaks out into the public, telling a client, “But I just sent it to Google and figured it would be fine,” isn’t going to sound great. Realistically, the most likely concern for security is the sending of data to and from a datacenter. A security breach inside the datacenter is very unlikely. As ever, a post producer has to remain vigilant.

Summing Up
I think Foundry has been very smart and forward thinking to create a platform that is able to support more than just Foundry products in the cloud. It would have been understandable if they just made it a storefront for alternative ways of using a Nuke (etc), but they clearly see a bigger picture. Using a platform like Athera, post infrastructure can be assembled and disassembled on demand to allow post producers to match their overheads to their workload.

Athera enables smart post producers to build a highly scalable post environment with access to a global pool of creative talent who can log in and contribute from anywhere with little more than a modest computer and internet connection.

I hate the term game-changer — it’s another term so abused by know-nothing marketeers who have otherwise run out of ideas — but Athera, or at least what this sort of platform promises to provide, is most certainly a game-changer. Especially if more apps from different manufacturers can be included.


David Cox is a VFX compositor and colorist with 20-plus years of experience. He started his career with MPC and The Mill before forming his own London-based post facility. Cox recently created interactive projects with full body motion sensors and 4D/AR experiences.

MSI’s new Intel Core i9 ultra-thin WS65 mobile workstation, curved monitors

MSI has introduced its new WS65 mobile workstation and announced the availability of its PS42 professional laptop and Optix MAG241C and MAG271C gaming monitors.

The WS65 mobile workstation features a chassis similar to that of the GS65 Stealth Thin, with attractive styling and 15.6-inch, ultra-thin bezel display. With up to Intel’s 8th Generation Core i9 processor and up to Nvidia Quadro P4200 graphics, the WS65 is up to 40 percent faster than the previous-generation model. Although it is designed for portability, the WS65 also incorporates an 82Whr battery for up to eight hours of battery life.

The WS65 features a 15.6-inch Full HD IPS display with 72 percent coverage of the NTSC color gamut. For storage, the workstation offers one PCI-e SSD / SATA combo and one PCI-e SSD. Ports include three USB 3.1 Type-A, one USB 3.1 Type-C, one HDMI 2.0, one mDP 1.4, one mic-in and a headphone out. The WS65 will be available this September, and it will bear the new elegant and minimalistic MSI workstation logo tailored to the business environment.

The PS42 notebook is the newest member of the MSI Prestige series. Measuring 0.63 inches thick, weighing 2.6 pounds and featuring a nearly bezel-free screen, the notebook offers high performance. The PS42 is powered by an Intel 8th Generation Core i7 processor and an Nvidia MX150 GPU and provides 10 hours of battery life, plus a Windows Hello Certified fingerprint sensor. It is now available at major e-tailers, starting at $899.

The Optix MAG271C and MAG241C feature a 144Hz curved VA LED display and fast -ms response time. The series also uses MSI’s Gaming On-Screen Display software to allow users to control monitor settings, including contrast ratio and brightness, from their Windows desktops. The software also supports hotkey options, so users can switch profiles while in-game or use the MSI remote display app on their Android phones. The MAG271C and MAG241C are now available on Amazon for $299.99 and $229.99, respectively.

Behind the Title: Sim LA’s VP of Post LA Greg Ciaccio

Name: Greg Ciaccio

Company: Sim

Can you describe your company?
We’re a full-service company providing studio space, lighting and grip, cameras, dailies and finishing in Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Vancouver and Atlanta with outposts in New Mexico and Texas.

What’s your job title?
VP, Post Los Angeles

What does that entail?
Essentially, I’m the GM of our dailies and rentals and finishing businesses — the 2nd and 3rd floor of our building — formerly Kodak Cinesite. The first floor houses our camera rental business.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I coproduce our SimLab industry events with Bill Russell in our camera department.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Having camera, dailies, editorial and finishing under one roof — the workflows that tie them all together provide meaningful solutions for our clients.

What’s your least favorite?
Like most facility heads, business constraints. There’s not much of it, which is great, but running any successful company relies on managing the magic.

What is your favorite time of the day?
The early mornings when I can power through management work so I can spend time with staff and clients.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably a post sound mixer. I teach post production management one night a week at CSUN, so that provides a fresh perspective on my role in the industry.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I really started back in the 4th grade in lighting. I then ran and designed lighting in high school and college, moving into radio-TV-film halfway through. I then moved into production sound. The move from production to post came out of a desire for (fairly) regular hours and consistent employment.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
TV series: Game of Thrones, The Gifted, Krypton, The Son, Madam Secretary, Jane the Virgin. On the feature dailies and DI side: Amy Poehler’s Wine Country.

We’re also posting Netflix’ Best Worst Weekend Ever in ACES (Academy Color Encoding System) in UHD/Dolby Vision HDR.

Game of Thrones

What is the project that you are most proud of?
Game of Thrones. The quality bar which HBO has set is evident in the look of the show. It’s so well-produced — the production design, cinematography, editing and visual effects are stunning.

Name three pieces of technology that you can’t live without.
My iPhone X, my Sony Z9D HDR TV and my Apple Watch.

What social media channels do you follow?
Instagram for DP/other creative photography interests; LinkedIn for general socially/influencer-driven news; Facebook for peripheral news/personal insights; and channels, which include ETCentric — USC ETC; ACES Central for ACES-related community info; and Digital Cinema Society for industry events

Do you listen to music while you work? Care to share your favorite music to work to?
I listen to Pandora. The Thievery Corporation station.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Getting out for lunch and walking when possible. I visit our staff and clients throughout the day. Morning yoga. And the music helps!