Tag Archives: post production

AJA adds HDR Image Analyzer 12G and more at IBC

AJA will soon offer the new HDR Image Analyzer 12G, bringing 12G-SDI connectivity to its realtime HDR monitoring and analysis platform developed in partnership with Colorfront. The new product streamlines 4K/Ultra HD HDR monitoring and analysis workflows by supporting the latest high-bandwidth 12G-SDI connectivity. The HDR Image Analyzer 12G will be available this fall for $19,995.

HDR Image Analyzer 12G offers waveform, histogram and vectorscope monitoring and analysis of 4K/Ultra HD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content for broadcast and OTT production, post, QC and mastering. It also features HDR-capable monitor outputs that not only go beyond HD resolutions and offer color accuracy but make it possible to configure layouts to place the preferred tool where needed.

“Since its release, HDR Image Analyzer has powered HDR monitoring and analysis for a number of feature and episodic projects around the world. In listening to our customers and the industry, it became clear that a 12G version would streamline that work, so we developed the HDR Image Analyzer 12G,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

AJA’s video I/O technology integrates with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1-RU chassis to bring HDR Image Analyzer 12G users a comprehensive toolset to monitor and analyze HDR formats, including PQ (Perceptual Quantizer) and hybrid log gamma (HLG). Additional feature highlights include:

● Up to 4K/Ultra HD 60p over 12G-SDI inputs, with loop-through outputs
● Ultra HD UI for native resolution picture display over DisplayPort
● Remote configuration, updates, logging and screenshot transfers via an integrated web UI
● Remote Desktop support
● Support for display referred SDR (Rec.709), HDR ST 2084/PQ and HLG analysis
● Support for scene referred ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, Red and Sony camera color spaces
● Display and color processing lookup table (LUT) support
● Nit levels and phase metering
● False color mode to easily spot pixels out of gamut or brightness
● Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
● Data analyzer with pixel picker
● Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
● File-based error logging with timecode
● Reference still store

At IBC 2019, AJA also showed new products and updates designed to advance broadcast, production, post and pro AV workflows. On the stand were the Kumo 6464-12G for routing and the newly shipping Corvid 44 12G developer I/O models. AJA has also introduced the FS-Mini utility frame sync Mini-Converter and three new OpenGear-compatible cards: OG-FS-Mini, OG-ROI-DVI and OG-ROI-HDMI. Additionally, the company previewed Desktop Software updates for Kona, Io and T-Tap; Ultra HD support for IPR Mini-Converter receivers; and FS4 frame synchronizer enhancements.

Behind the Title: Chapeau CD Lauren Mayer-Beug

This creative director loves the ideation process at the start of a project when anything is possible, and saving some of those ideas for future use.

COMPANY: LA’s Chapeau Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Chapeau provides visual effects, editorial, design, photography and story development fluidly with experience in design, web development, and software and app engineering.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It often entails seeing a job through from start to finish. I look at it like making a painting or a sculpture.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Perhaps just how hands-on the process actually is. And how analog I am, considering we work in such a tech-driven environment.

Beats

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Thinking. I’m always thinking big picture to small details. I love the ideation process at the start of a project when anything is possible. Saving some of those ideas for future use, learning about what you want to do through that process. I always learn more about myself through every ideation session.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Letting go of the details that didn’t get addressed. Not everything is going to be perfect, so since it’s a learning process there is inevitably something that will catch your eye.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
My mind goes to so many buckets. A published children’s book author with a kick-ass coffee shop. A coffee bean buyer so I could travel the world.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always skewed in this direction. My thinking has always been in the mindset of idea coaxer and gatherer. I was put in that position in my mid-20s and realized I liked it (with lots to learn, of course), and I’ve run with it ever since.

IS THERE A PROJECT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s hard to say. Every project is really so different. A lot of what I’m most proud of is behind the scenes… the process that will go into what I see as bigger things. With Chapeau, I will always love the Facebook projects, all the pieces that came together — both on the engineering side and the fun creative elements.

Facebook

What I’m most excited about is our future stuff. There’s a ton on the sticky board that we aim to accomplish in the very near future. Thinking about how much is actually being set in motion is mind-blowing, humbling and — dare I say — makes me outright giddy. That is why I’m here, to tell these new stories — stories that take part in forming the new landscape of narrative.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
Anything Adobe. My most effective tool is the good-old pen to paper. That works clearly in conveying ideas and working out the knots.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I’m always looking for inspiration and find it everywhere, as many other creatives do. However, nature is where I’ve always found my greatest inspiration. I’m constantly taking photos of interesting moments to save for later. Oftentimes I will refer back to those moments in my work. When I need a reset I hike, run or bike. Movement helps.

I’m always going outside to look at how the light interacts with the environment. Something I’ve become known for at work is going out of my way to see a sunset (or sunrise). They know me to be the first one on the roof for a particularly enchanting magic hour. I’m always staring at the clouds — the subtle color combinations and my fascination with how colors look the way they do only by context. All that said, I often have my nose in a graphic design book.

The overall mood realized from gathering and creating the ever-popular Pinterest board is so helpful. Seeing the mood color wise and texturally never gets old. Suddenly, you have a fully formed example of where your mind is at. Something you could never have talked your way through.

Then, of course, there are people. People/peers and what they are capable of will always amaze me.

Behind the Title: Bindery editor Matt Dunne

Name: Matt Dunne

Company: Bindery

Can you describe your company?
Bindery is an indie film and content studio based in NYC. We model ourself after independent film studios, where we tackle every phase of a project from concept all the way through finishing. Our work varies from branded web content and national broadcast commercials to shorts and feature films.

What’s your job title?
Senior Editor

What does that entail?
I’m part of all things post at Bindery. I get involved early on in projects to help ensure we have a workflow set up, and if I’m the editor I’ll often get a chance to work with the director on conceptualizing the piece. When I get to go on set I’m able to become the hub of the production side. I’ll work with the director and DP to make sure the image is what they want and

I’ll start assembling the edit as they are shooting. Most of my time is spent in an edit suite with a director and clients working through their concept and really bringing their story to life. An advantage of working with Bindery is that I’m able to sit and work with directors before they shoot and sometimes even before a concept is locked. There’s a level of trust that’s developed and we get to work through ideas and plan for anything that may come up later on during the post process. Even though post is the last stage of a film project, it needs to be involved in the beginning. I’m a big believer in that. From the early stages to the very end, I get to touch a lot of projects.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I’m a huge tech nerd and gear head, so with the help of two other colleagues I help maintain the post infrastructure of Bindery. When we expanded the office we had to rewire everything and I recently helped put a new server together. That’s something I never imagined myself doing.

Editors also become a sounding board for creatives. I think it’s partially because we are good listeners and partially because we have couches in our suites. People like to come in and riff an idea or work through something out loud, even if you aren’t the editor on that project. I think half of being a good editor is just being able to listen.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Working in an open environment that nurtures ideas and creativity. I love working with people that want to push their product and encourage one another to do the same. It’s really special getting to play a role in it all.

What’s your least favorite?
I think anything that takes me away from the editing process. Any sort of hardware or software issue will completely kill your momentum and at times it can be difficult to get that back.

What’s your most productive time of the day?
Early in the morning. I’m usually walking around the post department checking the stations, double checking processes that took place overnight or maintaining the server. Opposite that I’ve always felt very productive late at night. If I’m not actively editing in the office, then I’m usually rolling the footage back in my head that I screened during the day to try and piece it together away from the computer.

If you didn’t have this Job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be running a dog sanctuary for senior and abused dogs.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I first fell in love with post production when I was a kid. It was when Jurassic Park was in theaters and Fox would run these amazing behind-the-scene specials. There was this incredible in-depth coverage of how things in the film industry are done. I was too young to see the movie but I remember just devouring the content. That’s when I knew I wanted to be part of that scene.

Neurotica

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I recently got to help finish a pilot for a series we released called Neurotica. We were lucky enough to premiere it at Tribeca this past season, and getting to see that on the big screen with the people who helped make it was a real thrill for me.

I also just finished cutting a JBL spot where we built soundscapes for Yankees player Aaron Judge and captured him as he listened and was taken on a journey through his career, past and present. The original concept was a bit different than the final deliverable, but because of the way it was shot we were able to re-conceptualize the piece in the edit. There was a lot of room to play and experiment with that one.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? Can you elaborate?
Absolutely. With every job there comes a different approach and tools you need to use. If I’m cutting something more narrative focused I’ll make sure I have the script notes up, break my project out by scene and spend a lot of time auditioning different takes to make a scene work. Docu-style is a different approach entirely.

I’ll spend more time prepping that by location or subject and then break that down further. There’s even more back and forth when cutting doc. On a scripted project you have an idea of what the story flow is, but when you’re tasked with finding the edit you’re very much jumping around the story as it evolves. Whether it’s comedy, music or any type of genre, I’m always getting a chance to flex a different editing muscle.

1800 Tequila

What is the project you are most proud of?
There are a few, but one of my favorite collaborative experiences was when we worked with Billboard and 1800 Tequila to create a branded documentary series following Christian Scott aTunde Adjuh. It was five episodes shot in New York, Philadelphia and New Orleans, and the edit was happening simultaneously with production.

As the crew traveled and mapped out their days, I was able to screen footage, assemble and collaborate with the director on ideas that we thought could really enhance the piece. I was on the phone with him when they went back to NOLA for the last shoot and we were writing story beats that we needed to gather to make Episode 1 and 2 work more seamlessly now that the story had evolved. Being able to rework sections of earlier episodes before we were wrapped with production was an amazing opportunity.

What do you use to edit?
Software-wise I’m all in on the Adobe Creative Suite. I’ve been meaning to learn Resolve a bit more since I’ve been spending more and more time with it as a powerful tool in our workflow.

What is your favorite plugin?
Neat Video is a denoiser that’s really incredible. I’ve been able to work with low-light footage that would otherwise be unusable.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Since Bindery is involved in every stage of the process, I get this great opportunity to work with audio designers and colorists to see the project all the way through. I love learning by watching other people work.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My phone. I think that’s a given at this point. A great pair of headphones, and a really comfortable chair that lets me recline as far back as possible for those really demanding edits.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I met my wife back in college and we’ve been best friends ever since, so spending any amount of time with her helps to wash away the stress. We also just bough our first house in February, so there’s plenty of projects for me to focus all of my stress into.

Whiskytree experiences growth, upgrades tools

Visual effects and content creation company Whiskytree has gone through a growth spurt that included a substantial increase in staff, a new physical space and new infrastructure.

Providing content for films, television, the Web, apps, game and VR or AR, Whiskytree’s team of artists, designers and technicians use applications such as Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Autodesk Arnold, Gaffer and Foundry Nuke on Linux — along with custom tools — to create computer graphics and visual effects.

To help manage its growth and the increase in data that came with it, Whiskytree recently installed Panasas ActiveStor. The platform is used to store and manage Whiskytree’s computer graphics and visual effects workflows, including data-intensive rendering and realtime collaboration using extremely large data sets for movies, commercials and advertising; work for realtime render engines and games; and augmented reality and virtual reality applications.

“We recently tripled our employee count in a single month while simultaneously finalizing the build-out of our new facility and network infrastructure, all while working on a 700-shot feature film project [The Captain],” says Jonathan Harb, chief executive officer and owner of Whiskytree. “Panasas not only delivered the scalable performance that we required during this critical period, but also delivered a high level of support and expertise. This allowed us to add artists at the rapid pace we needed with an easy-to-work-with solution that didn’t require fine-tuning to maintain and improve our workflow and capacity in an uninterrupted fashion. We literally moved from our old location on a Friday, then began work in our new facility the following Monday morning, with no production downtime. The company’s ‘set it and forget it’ appliance resulted in overall smooth operations, even under the trying circumstances.”

In the past, Whiskytree operated a multi-vendor storage solution that was complex and time consuming to administer, modify and troubleshoot. With the office relocation and rapid team expansion, Whiskytree didn’t have time to build a new custom solution or spend a lot of time tuning. It also needed storage that would grow as project and facility needs change.

Projects from the studio include Thor: Ragnarok, Monster Hunt 2, Bolden, Mother, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Downsizing, Warcraft and Rogue One: A Star Wars.

Nvidia and Asus offer first laptop with Quadro RTX 6000 GPU

In another new addition to the Nvidia RTX Studio of laptops, the Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU will power the Asus ProArt StudioBook One, making it the first laptop to offer the Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 in a mobile solution so creatives can run complex workloads regardless of location.

The Quadro RTX 6000 within the ProArt StudioBook One provides creatives a similar high-end experience as a deskside workstation. The ProArt StudioBook One is able to handle massive datasets and accelerate compute-intensive workflows, such as creating 3D animations, rendering photoreal product designs, editing 8K video, visualizing volumetric geophysical datasets and conducting walk-throughs of photoreal building designs in VR.

RTX Studio systems, which integrate Nvidia Quadro RTX or GeForce RTX GPUs, offer advanced features — like realtime raytracing, AI and 8K Red video acceleration — to creative and technical professionals.

The Asus ProArt StudioBook One combines performance and portability with the power of Quadro RTX 6000 and features of the new Nvidia “ACE” reference design system, including:
• 24GB of ultra-fast GPU memory to tackle large scenes, models, datasets and complex multi-app workflows.
• Nvidia Turing architecture RT Cores and Tensor Cores to deliver realtime raytracing, advanced shading and AI-enhanced tools to accelerate professional workflows.
• Advanced thermal cooling solution featuring ultra-thin titanium vapor chambers.
• Enhanced Nvidia Optimus technology for seamless switching between the discrete and integrated graphics based on application use with no need to restart applications or reboot the system.
• Slim 300W high-density, high-efficiency power adapter for charging and power at half the size of traditional 300W power adapters.
• Professional 4K 120Hz Pantone-validated display with 100% Adobe RGB color coverage, color accuracy and factory calibration.

In other Nvidia-related news, Acer announced its latest additions to the ConceptD series of laptops, including the ConceptD Pro models featuring Quadro GPUs.

In addition to the Asus ProArt StudioBook One, Nvidia announced 11 additional RTX Studio laptops and desktops from Acer, Asus, HP and MSI, bringing the total number of RTX Studio systems to 39.

Nigel Bennett upped to managing director at UK’s Molinare

Molinare has promoted Nigel Bennett to the role of managing director. He joined the studio earlier this year from Pinewood Studios, where over a 20-year period he worked his way up from re-recording mixer to group director of creative services, a position that he held since 2014.

Bennett’s responsibilities include growing revenue across feature film, TV drama, feature documentaries and reality TV. Over the coming months he will work with the existing senior team at Molinare to implement a new business growth and investment plan with the full support of Molinare’s shareholders, Saphir Capital and Next Wave Partners.

Bennett replaces Julie Parmenter, who has left the company after seven years. While at Molinare, Parmenter was integral to maintaining the successful Molinare brand, subsequent acquisition of Hackenbacker and expansion into Hoxton.

Fred Raskin talks editing and Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

By Amy Leland

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood is marketed in a style similar to its predecessors — “the ninth film from Quentin Tarantino.” It is also the third film with Fred Raskin, ACE, as Tarantino’s editor. Having previously edited Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight, as well as working as assistant editor on the Kill Bill films, Raskin has had the opportunity to collaborate with a filmmaker who has always made it clear how much he values collaboration.

On top of this remarkable director/editor relationship, Raskin has also lent his editing hand to a slew of other incredibly popular films, including three entries in the Fast & Furious saga and both Guardians of the Galaxy films. I had the chance to talk with him about his start, his transition to editor and his work on Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. A tribute to Hollywood’s golden age, the film stars Brad Pitt as the stunt double for a faded actor, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, as they try to find work in a changing industry.

Fred Raskin

How did you get your start as an editor?
I went to film school at NYU to become a director, but I had this realization about midway through that that I might not get a directing gig immediately upon graduation, so perhaps I should focus on a craft. Editing was always my favorite part of the process, and I think that of all the crafts, it’s the closest to directing. You’re crafting performances, you’re figuring out how you’re going to tell the story visually… and you can do all of this from the comfort of an air-conditioned room.

I told all of my friends in school, if you need an editor for your projects, please consider me. While continuing to make my own stuff, I also cut my friends’ projects. Maybe a month after I graduated, a friend of mine got a job as an assistant location manager on a low-budget movie shooting in New York. He said, “Hey, they need an apprentice editor on this movie. There’s no pay, but it’s probably good experience. Are you interested?” I said, “Sure.” The editor and I got along really well. He asked me if I was going to move out to LA, because that’s really where the work is. He then said, “When you get out to LA, one of my closest friends in the world is Rob Reiner’s editor, Bob Leighton. I’ll introduce the two of you.”

So that’s what I did, and this kind of ties into Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, because when I made the move to LA, I called Bob Leighton, who invited me to lunch with his two assistants, Alan Bell and Danny Miller. We met at Musso & Frank. So the first meeting that I had was at this classic, old Hollywood restaurant. Cut to 23 years later, and I’m on the set of a movie that’s shooting at Musso & Frank. It’s a scene between Al Pacino and Leonardo DiCaprio, arguably the two greatest actors of their generations, and I’m editing it. I thought back to that meeting, and actually got kind of emotional.

So Bob’s assistants introduced me to people. That led to an internship, which led to a paying apprentice gig, which led to me getting into the union. I then spent nine years as an assistant editor before working my way up to editor.

When you were starting out, were there any particular filmmakers or editors who influenced the types of stories you wanted to tell?
Growing up, I was a big genre guy. I read Fangoria magazine and gravitated to horror, action and sci-fi. Those were the kinds of movies I made when I was in film school. So when I got out to LA, Bob Leighton got a pretty good sense as to what my tastes were, and he gave me the numbers of a couple of friends of his, Mark Goldblatt and Mark Helfrich, who are huge action/sci-fi editors. I spoke with them, and that was just a real thrill because I was so familiar with their work. Now we are all colleagues, and I pinch myself regularly.

 You have edited many action and VFX films. Has that presented particular challenges to your way of working as an editor?
The challenges, honestly, are more ones of time management because when you’re on a big visual effects movie, at a certain point in the schedule you’re spending two to four hours a day watching visual effects. Then you have to make adjustments to the edit to accommodate for how things look when the finished visual effects come in. It’s extremely time-consuming, and when you’re not only dealing with visual effects, but also making changes to the movie, you have to figure out a way to find time for all of this.

Every project has its own specific set of challenges. Yes, the big Marvel movies have a ton of visual effects, and you want to make sure that they look good. The upside is that Marvel has a lot of money, so when you want to experiment with a new visual effect or something, they’re usually able to support your ideas. You can come up with a concept while you’re sitting behind the Avid and actually get to see it become a reality. It’s very exciting.

Let’s talk about the world of Tarantino. A big part of his legacy was his longtime collaboration with editor Sally Menke, who tragically passed away. How were you then brought in? I’m assuming it has something to do with your assistant editor credit on Kill Bill?
Yes. I assisted Sally for seven years. There were a couple of movies that we worked on together, and then she brought me in for the Kill Bill movies. And that’s when I met Quentin. She taught me how an editing room is supposed to work. When she finished a scene, she would bring me and the other assistants into the room and get our thoughts. It was a welcoming, family-like environment, which I think Quentin really leaned into as well.

While he’s shooting, Quentin doesn’t come into the editing room. He comes in during post, but during production, he’s really focused on shooting the movie. On Kill Bill, I didn’t meet him until a few weeks after the shoot ended. He started coming in, and whenever he and Sally worked on a scene together, they would bring us in and get our thoughts. I learned pretty quickly that the more feedback you’re able to give, the more appreciated it will be. Quentin has said that at least part of the reason why he went with me on Django Unchained was because I was so open with my comments. Also, as the whole world knows, Quentin is a huge movie lover. We frequently would find ourselves talking about movies. He’d be walking through the hall, and we’d just strike up a conversation, and so I think he saw in me a kindred spirit. He really kept me in the family after Kill Bill.

I got my first big editing break right after Kill Bill ended. I cut a movie called Annapolis, which Justin Lin directed. I was no longer on Quentin’s crew, but we still crossed paths a lot. Over the years we’d just bump into each other at the New Beverly Cinema, the revival house that he now owns. We’d talk about whatever we’d seen lately. So he always kept me in mind. When he and Sally finished the rough cuts on Death Proof and Inglourious Basterds, he invited me to come to their small friends-and-family screenings, which was a tremendous honor.

On Django, you were working with a director who had the same collaborator in Sally Menke for such a long time. What was it like in those early days working on Django?
It was without question the most daunting experience that I have gone through in Hollywood. We’re talking about an incredibly talented editor, Sally, whose shoes I had to attempt to fill, and a filmmaker for whom I had the utmost respect.

Some of the western town stuff was shot at movie ranches just outside of LA, and we would do dailies screenings in a trailer there. I made sure that I sat near him with a list of screening notes. I really just took note of where he laughed. That was the most important thing. Whatever he laughed at, it meant that this was something that he liked. There was a PA on set when they went to New Orleans. I stayed in LA, but I asked her to write down where he laughs.

I’m a fan of his. When I went to see Reservoir Dogs, I remember walking out of the theater and thinking, “Well, that’s like the most exciting filmmaker that I’ve seen in quite some time.” Now I’m getting the chance to work with him. And I’ll say because of my fandom, I have a pretty good sense as to his style and his sense of humor. I think that that all helped me when I was in the process of putting the scenes together on Django. I was very confident in my work when I started showing him stuff on that movie.

Now, seven years later, you are on your third film with him. Have you found a different kind of rhythm working with him than you had on that first film?
I would say that a couple of little things have changed. I personally have gained some confidence in how I approach stuff with him. If there was something that I wasn’t sure was working, or that maybe I felt was extraneous, in Django, I might have had some hesitation about expressing it because I wouldn’t want to offend him. But now both of us are coming from the perspective of just wanting to make the best movie that we possibly can. I’m definitely more open than I might have been back then.

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood has an interesting blend of styles and genres. The thing that stands out is that it is a period piece. Beyond that, you have the movies and TV shows within the movie that give you additional styles. And there is a “horror movie” scene.
Right, the Spahn Ranch sequence.

 That was so creepy! I really had that feeling the whole time of, “They can’t possibly kill off Brad Pitt’s character this early, can they?
That’s the idea. That’s what you’re supposed to be feeling.

When you are working with all of those overlapping styles, do you have to approach the work a different way?
The style of the films within the film was influenced by the movies of the era to some degree. There wasn’t anything stylistically that had us trying to make the movie itself feel like a movie from 1969. For example, Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Rick Dalton, is playing the heavy on a western TV show called Lancer in the movie. Quentin referred to the Lancer stuff as, “Lancer is my third western, after Django and The Hateful Eight.” He didn’t direct that show as though it was a TV western from the late ’60s. He directed it like it was a Quentin Tarantino western from 2019. Quentin’s style is really all his own.

There are no rules when you’re working on a Quentin Tarantino movie because he knows everything that’s come before, and he is all about pushing the boundaries of what you can do — which is both tremendously exciting and a little scary, like is this going to work for everyone? The idea that we have a narrator who appears once in the first 10 minutes of the movie and then doesn’t appear again until the last 40 minutes, is that something that’s going to throw people off? His feeling is like, yeah, there are going to be some people out there who are going to feel that it’s weird, but they’re also going to understand it. That’s the most important thing. He’s a firm believer in doing whatever we need to do to tell the story as clearly and as concisely as possible. That voiceover narration serves that purpose. Weird or not.

You said before that he doesn’t come into the edit during production. What is your work process during production? Are you beginning the rough cut? And if so, are you sending him things, or are you really not collaborating with him on that process at all until post begins?
This movie was shot in LA, so for the first half of the shoot, we would do regular dailies screenings. I’d sit next to him and write down whatever he laughed at. That process that began on Django has continued. Then I’ll take those notes. Then I assemble the material as we’re shooting, but I don’t show him any of it. I’m not sending him cuts. He doesn’t want to see cuts. I don’t think he wants the distractions of needing to focus on editing.

On this movie, there were only two occasions when he did come into the editing room during production. The movie takes place over the course of three days, and at the end of the second day, the characters are watching Rick on the TV show The F.B.I., which was a real show and that episode was called “All the Streets Are Silent.” The character of Michael Murtaugh was played in the original episode by a young Burt Reynolds. They found a location that matched pretty perfectly and reshot only the shots that had Burt Reynolds in them. They reshot with Leonardo DiCaprio, as Rick Dalton, playing that character. He had to come into the editing room to see how it played and how it matched, and it matched remarkably well. I think that people watching the movie probably assume that Quentin shot the whole thing, or that we used some CG technology to get Leo into the shots. But no, they just figured out exactly the shots that they needed to shoot, and that was all the new material. The rest was from the original episode.

 The other time he came into the edit during production was the sequence in which Bruce Lee and Cliff have their fight. The whole dialogue scene that opens that sequence, it all plays out in one long take. So he was very excited to see how that shot played out. But one of the things that we had spoken about over the course of working together is when you do a long take, the most important thing is what that cut is going to be at the end of the long take. How can we make that cut the most impactful? In this case, the cut is to Cliff throwing Bruce Lee into the car. He wanted to watch the whole scene play out, and then see how that cut worked. When I showed it to him, I had my finger on the stop button so that after that cut, I would stop it so he wouldn’t see anything more and wouldn’t get tempted to get sucked into maybe giving notes. I reached to stop, but he was like, “No, no, no let it play out.” He watched the fight scene, and he was like, “That’s fantastic.” He was very happy.

Once you were in post, what were some of the particular challenges of this film?
One of the really important things is how integral sound was to the process of making this movie. First there were the movies and shows within the movie. When we’re watching the scenes from Bounty Law, the ‘50s Western that Rick starred in, it wasn’t just about the 4×3, black and white photography, but also how we treated the sound. Our sound editorial team and our sound mixing team did an amazing job of getting that stuff to sound like a 16-millimeter print. Like, they put just the right amount of warble into the dialogue, and it makes it feel very authentic. Also, all the Bounty Law stuff is mono, not this wide stereo thing that would not be appropriate for the material from that era.

And I mentioned the Spahn Ranch sequence, when for 20 minutes the movie turns into an all-out horror movie. One of Quentin’s rules for me when I’m putting my assembly together is that he generally does not want me cutting with music. He frequently has specific ideas in his head about what the music is going to be, and he doesn’t want to see something that’s not the way he imagined it. That’s going to take him out of it, and he won’t be able to enjoy the sequence.

When I was putting the Spahn Ranch sequence together, I knew that I had to make it suspenseful without having music to help me. So, I turned to our sound editors, Wylie Stateman and Leo Marcil, and said, “I want this to sound like The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, like I want to have low tones and creaking wood and metal wronks. Let’s just feel the sense of dread through this sequence.” They really came through.

And what ended up happening is, I don’t know if Quentin’s intention originally was to play it without music, but ultimately all the music in the scene comes from what Dakota Fanning’s character, Squeaky, is watching on the TV. Everything else is just sound effects, which were then mixed into the movie so beautifully by Mike and Chris Minkler. There’s just a terrific sense of dread to that sequence, and I credit the sound effects as much as I do the photography.

This film was cut on Avid. Have you always cut on Avid? Do you ever cut on anything else?
When I was in film school, I cut on film. If fact, I took the very first Avid class that NYU offered. That was my junior year, which was long before there were such things as film options or anything. It was really just kind of the basics, a basic Avid Media Composer.

I’ve worked on Final Cut Pro a few times. That’s really the only other nonlinear digital editing system that I’ve used. I’ve never actually used Premiere.

At this point my whole sound effects and music library is Avid-based, and I’m just used to using the Avid. I have a keyboard where all of my keys are mapped, and I find, at this point, that it’s very intuitive for me. I like working with it.

This movie was shot on film, and we printed dailies from the negative. But the negative was also scanned in at 4K, and then those 4K scans were down-converted to DNx115, which is an HD resolution on the Avid. So we were editing in HD, and we could do screenings from that material when we needed to. But we would also do screenings on film.

Wow, so even with your rough cuts, you were turning them around to film cuts again?
Yeah. Once production ended, and Quentin came into the editing room, when we refined a scene to his liking, I would immediately turn that over to my Avid assistant, Chris Tonick. He would generate lists from that cut and would turn it over to our film assistants, Bill Fletcher and Andrew Blustain. They would conform the film print to match the edit that we had in the Avid so that we were capable of screening the movie on film whenever we wanted to. There was always going to be a one- or two-day lag time, depending on when we finished cutting on the Avid. But we were able to get it up there pretty quickly.

Sometimes if you have something like opticals or titles, you wouldn’t be able to generate those for film quickly enough. So if we wanted to screen something immediately, we would have to do it digitally. But as long as we had a couple of days, we would be able to put it up on film, and we did end up doing one of our test screenings on 35 millimeter, which was really great. It added one more layer of authenticity to the movie, getting to see it projected on film.

For a project of this scope, how many assistants do you work with, and how do you like to work with those assistants?
Our team consists of post production supervisor Tina Anderson, who really oversees everything. She runs the editing room. She figures out what we’re going to need. She’s got this long list of items that she goes down every day, and makes sure that we are prepared for whatever is going to come our way. She’s really remarkable.

My first assistant Chris Tonick is the Avid assistant. He cut a handful of scenes during production, and I would occasionally ask him to do some sound work. But primarily during production, he was getting the dailies prepped — getting them into the Avid for me and laying out my bins the way I like them.

In post, we added an Avid second named Brit DeLillo, who would help Chris when we needed to do turnovers for sound or visual effects, music, all of those people.

Then we had our film crew, Bill Fletcher and Andrew Blustain. They were syncing dailies during production, and then they were conforming the film print during post.

Last, but certainly not least, we had Alana Feldman, our post PA, who made sure we had everything we needed.

And honestly, for everybody on the crew, their most important role beyond the work that they were hired to do, was to be an audience member for us whenever we finished a scene. That tradition I experienced as an assistant working under Sally is the tradition that we’ve continued. Whenever we finish a sequence, we bring the whole crew up and show them the scene. We want people to react. We want to hear how they’re responding. We want to know what’s working and what isn’t working. Being good audience members is actually a key part of the job.

L-R: Quentin Tarantino, post supervisor Tina Anderson, first assistant editor (Film) Bill Fletcher, Fred Raskin, 2nd assistant editor (Film) Andrew Blustain, 2nd assistant editor (Avid) Brit DeLillo, post assistant Alana Feldman, producer Shannon McIntosh, 1st assistant editor (Avid) Chris Tonick, assistant to producer Ryan Jaeger and producer David Heyman

When you’re looking for somebody to join your team as an assistant, what are you looking for?
There are a few things. One obvious thing, right off the bat, is someone who is personable. Is this someone I’m going to want to have lunch with every day for months on end? Generally, especially working on a Quentin Tarantino movie, somebody with a good knowledge of film history who has a love of movies is going to be appreciated in that environment.

The other thing that I would say honestly  — and this might sound funny — is having the ability to see the future. And I don’t mean that I need psychic film assistants. I mean they need to be able to figure out what we’re going to need later on down the line and be prepared for it.

If I turn over a sequence, they should be looking at it and realizing, oh, there are some visual effects in here that we’re going to have to address, so we have to alert the visual effects companies about this stuff, or at least ask me if it’s something that I want.

If there were somebody who thought to themselves, “I want a career like Fred Raskin’s. I want to edit these kinds of cool films,” what advice would you give them as they’re starting out?
I have three standard pieces of advice that I give to everyone. My experience, I think, is fairly unique. I’ve been incredibly fortunate to get to work with some of my favorite filmmakers. The way my story unfolded … not everybody is going to have the opportunities I’ve had.

But my standard pieces of advice are, number one — and I mentioned this earlier — be personable. You’re working with people you’re going to share space with for many months on end. You want to be the kind of person with whom they’re going to want to spend time. You want to be able to get along with everyone around you. And you know, sometimes you’ve got some big personalities to deal with, so you have to be the type who can navigate that.

Then I would say, watch everything you possibly can. Quentin is obviously an extreme example, but most filmmakers got into this business because they love movies. And so the more you know about movies, and the more you’re able to talk about movies, the more those filmmakers are going to respect you and want to work with you. This kind of goes hand in hand with being personable.

The other piece of advice — and I know this sounds like a no-brainer — if you’re going for an interview with a filmmaker, make sure you’ve familiarized yourself with that person’s work. Be able to talk with them about their movies. They’re going to appreciate that you took the time to explore their work. Everybody wants to talk about the work they’ve done, so if you’re able to engage them on that level, I think it’s going to reflect well on you.

Absolutely. That’s great advice.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Behind the Title: Element EP Kristen Kearns

NAME: Kristen Kearns

COMPANY: Boston’s Element Productions

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Element has been in business for 20 years. We handle production and post production for video content on all platforms.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Producer / COO

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I oversee the office operations and company culture, and I work with clients on their production and post projects. I handle sales and bidding and work with our post and production talent to keep growing and expanding their creative goals.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I wear a lot of hats. I think people are always surprised by how much I have to juggle. From hiring employees, approving bills, bidding projects and collaborating with directors on treatments.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
We love Slack, Box and Google Apps. Collaboration is such a big part of what we do, and we could not function as seamlessly as we do without these awesome tools.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The people. I love who I work with.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When we work really hard on bidding a project and we don’t win. I understand this is a competitive business, but it is still really hard to lose after you put so much time and energy into a bid.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I love the mornings. I like the quiet before everyone comes in. I get into the office early and take that time to think through my day and my priorities. Or, sometimes I use the time to brainstorm and think through business challenges or business goals for the overall growth of the company.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I am a bit obsessed with The Home Edit. If you don’t follow them on Instagram, you should. Their stories are hilarious. Anyway, I would want to work for them. Crazy lives all wrapped up in tidy cabinets.

Alzheimer’s Association

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently launched a project for a local bank that featured a Yeti, a unicorn and a Sasquatch. Projects like this are what keep my job interesting and challenging. I had to do a bunch of research on costumes and prosthetics.

We also just wrapped on a short film for the Alzheimer’s Association. Giving back is a really important part of our company culture. We were so moved by the story of this couple and their struggles with this debilitating disease. I was really proud to be a part of this production.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am proud of a lot of the work that we do, but I would say most recently we worked on a multi-platform project with Dunkin’ that really stretched our producing skills. The idea was very innovative, with the goal being to power a home entirely on coffee grounds.

We connected all the dots of the projects, from finding a biofuel manufacturer to the builder in Nashville, and documented the entire process. The project manifested itself into a live event in New York City before traveling to the coast of Massachusetts to be listed as an Airbnb.

Dunkin

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I recently went to Washington, DC, with my family, and the National Museum of American History had an exhibit “Within These Walls.” It highlighted the evolution of one home, and with it the changing technology. I remember being really taken aback by the laundry exhibit. I think we all take for granted the time and convenience it saves us. Can you imagine if we had to spend hours dunking and ringing out clothes? It has actually given us more freedom and convenience to pursue passions and interests. I could live without my phone or a television, but trap me with a bucket and a clothesline and I would lose my mind.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I grew up in a dance studio, so I actually find that I work better with some sort of music in the background. The office has a Sonos system, so we all take turns playing music.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Immersing myself in art and culture. Whether it is going to a museum to view artwork, seeing a band or heading to a movie to truly appreciate other people’s creativity. It is the best way for me to unwind as I enjoy the talent and art of others.

Company 3 buys Sixteen19, offering full-service post in NYC

Company 3 has acquired Sixteen19, a creative editorial, production and post company based in New York City. The deal includes Sixteen19’s visual effects wing, PowerHouse VFX, and a mobile dailies operation with international reach.

The acquisition helps Company 3 further serve NYC’s booming post market for feature film and episodic TV. As part of the acquisition, industry veterans and Sixteen19 co-founders Jonathan Hoffman and Pete Conlin, along with their longtime collaborator, EVP of business development and strategy Alastair Binks, will join Company 3’s leadership team.

“With Sixteen19 under the Company 3 umbrella, we significantly expand what we bring to the production community, addressing a real unmet need in the industry,” says Company 3 president Stefan Sonnenfeld. “This infusion of talent and infrastructure will allow us to provide a complete suite of services for clients, from the start of production through the creative editing process to visual effects, final color, finishing and mastering. We’ve worked in tandem with Sixteen19 many times over the years, so we know that they have always provided strong client relationships, a best-in-class team and a deeply creative environment. We’re excited to bring that company’s vision into the fold at Company 3.”

Sonnenfeld will continue to serve as president of Company 3, and oversee operations of Sixteen19. As a subsidiary of Deluxe, Company 3 is part of a broad portfolio of post services. Bringing together the complementary services and geographic reach of Company3, Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX, will expand Company 3’s overall portfolio of post offerings and reach new markets in the US and internationally.

Sixteen19’s New York location includes 60 large editorial suites; two 4K digital cinema grading theaters; and a number of comfortable spaces, open environments and many common areas. Sixteen19’s mobile dailies services will add a perfect companion to Company 3’s existing offerings in that arena. PowerHouse VFX includes dedicated teams of experienced supervisors, producers and artists in 2D and 3D visual effects and compositing.

“The New York film community initially recognized the potential for a Company 3 and Sixteen19 partnership,” says Sixteen19’s Hoffman. “It’s not just the fact that a significant majority of the projects we work on are finished at Company 3, it’s more that our fundamental vision about post has always been aligned with Stefan’s. We value innovation; we’ve built terrific creative teams; and above all else, we both put clients first, always.”

Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX will retain their company names.

Review: LaCie mobile, high Speed 1TB SSD

By Brady Betzel

With the flood of internal and external hard drives hitting the market at relatively low prices, it is sometimes hard to wade through the swamp and find the drive that is right for your workflow. In terms of external drives, do you need a RAID? USB-C? Is Thunderbolt 3 the same as USB-C? Should I save money and go with a spinning drive? Are spinning drives even cheaper than SSD drives these days? All of these questions are valid and, hopefully, I will answer them.

For this review, I’m taking a look at the LaCie Mobile SSD  which comes in three versions: 500GB, 1TB and 2TB, costing around $129.95, $219.95 and $399.95, respectively. According to LaCie’s website the mobile SSD drives are exclusive to Apple, but with some searching on Amazon you can find all three available as well and at lower prices than I’ve mentioned. The 1TB version I am seeing for $152.95 is being sold on Amazon through LaCie, so I assume the warranty still holds up.

I was sent the 1TB version of the LaCie Mobile SSD for review and testing. Along with the drive itself, you will get two connection cables: a (USB 3.0 speed) USB-A to USB-C cable, as well as a (USB 3.1 Gen2 speed) GenUSB-C to USB-C cable. For clarity, USB-C is the type of connection — the oval-like shape and technology used to transfer data. While USB-C will work on Thunderbolt 3 connections, Thunderbolt 3 only connections will not work on USB-C connections. Yes, that is super-confusing considering they look the same. But in the real world, Thunderbolt 3 is more Mac OS-based while USB-C is more Windows-based. You can find rare Thunderbolt 3 connections on Windows-based PCs, but you are more likely to find USB-C. That being said, the LaCie Mobile SSD is compatible with both USB-C and Thunderbolt 3, as well as USB 3.0. Keep in mind you will not get the high transfer speed with the USB 3.0 to USB-C cable. You will only get that with the (USB 3.1 Gen 2) USB-C to USB-C cable. The drive comes formatted as exFAT, which is immediately compatible with both Mac OS and Windows.

So, are spinning drives worth the cheaper price? In my opinion, no. Spinning drives are more fragile when moved around a lot and they transfer at much slower speeds. Advertised speeds vary from about 130MB/s for spinning drives to 540MB/s for SSDs, so for today what amounts to $100 more will give you a significant speed increase.

A very valuable piece of the LaCie Mobile SSD purchase is the limited three-year warranty and three years of data recovery services for free. No matter how your data becomes corrupted, Seagate will try and recover it — Seagate became LaCie’s parent company in 2014. Each product is eligible for one in-lab data recovery attempt and can be turned around in as little as two days, depending on the type of recovery. The recovered media will then be sent back to you on a storage device as well as be available to you from a cloud-based account that will be hosted online for 60 days. This is a great feature that’s included in the price.

The drive itself is small, measuring approximately .35” x 3” x 3.8” and weighing only .22 lbs. The outside has sharp lines much in the vein of a faceted diamond. It feels solid and great to carry. The color is about the same as a MacBook Pro, space gray and is made of aluminum.

Transfer SpeedsAlright, let’s get to the nitty-gritty: transfer speeds. I tested the LaCie Mobile SSD on both a Windows-based PC with USB-C and an iMac Pro with Thunderbolt 3/USB-C. On the Windows PC, I initially connected the drive to a port on the front of my system and I was only getting around 150MB/s write speed (about the speed of USB 3.0). Immediately, I knew something was wrong, so I connected to a USB-C port that was in a PCI-e slot in the rear of my PC. On that port I was getting 440.9MB/s write speed and 516.3MB/s read speeds. Moral of the story, make sure your USB-C ports are not just for charging or simply the USB-C connector running at USB 3.0 speeds.

On the iMac Pro, I was getting write speeds of 487.2MB/s and read speeds of 523.9MB/s. This is definitely on par with the correct Windows PC transfer speeds. The retail packaging on the LaCie Mobile SSD states a 540MB/s speed (doesn’t differentiate between read or write), but much like retail miles-per-gallon readouts on car sales brochures, you have to take their numbers with a few grains of salt. And while I have previoulsy tested drives (not from LaCie) that would initially transfer at a high rate and drop down, the LaCie Mobile SSD drive sustained the high speed transfer rates.

Summing Up
In the end, the size and design of the LaCie Mobile SSD will be one of the larger factors in determining if you buy this drive. It’s small. Like real small, but it feels sturdy. I don’t think anyone can argue that the LaCie Rugged drives (the ones that are orange-rubber encased) are a staple of the post industry. I really wish LaCie kept that tradition and added a tiny little orange rubberized edge. Not only does it feel safer for some reason, but it is a trademark that immediately says, “I’m a professional.”

Besides the appearance, the $152.95 price tag for a 1TB SSD drive that can easily fit into your shirt pocket without being noticed is pretty reasonable. At $219.95 I might say keep looking around. In addition, if you aren’t already an Adobe Creative Cloud subscriber you will get a free 30-day trial (normally seven days) included with purchase.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Shipping + Handling adds Jerry Spivack, Mike Pethel, Matthew Schwab

VFX creative director Jerry Spivack and colorists Michael Pethel and Matthew Schwab have joined LA’s Shipping + Handling, Spot Welders‘ VFX, color grading, animation, and finishing arm/sister company.

Alongside executive producer Scott Friske and current creative director Casey Price, Spivack will help lead the company’s creative team. As the creative director/co-founder at Ring of Fire, Spivack was responsible for crafting and spearheading VFX on commercials for brands including FedEx, Nike and Jaguar; episodic work for series television including Netflix’s Wormwood and 12 seasons of FX’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia; promos for NBC’s The Voice and The Titan Games; and feature films such as Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man 2, Bold Films’ Drive and Warner Bros.’ The Bucket List.

Colorist Pethel was a founding partner of Company 3 and for the past five years has served client and director relationships under his BeachHouse Color brand, which he will continue to maintain. Pethel’s body of work includes campaigns for Carl’s Jr., Chase, Coke, Comcast/Xfinity, Hyundai, Jeep, Netflix and Southwest Airlines.

Commenting on the move, Pethel says, “I’m thrilled to be joining such a fantastic group of highly regarded and skilled professionals at Shipping + Handling. There is so much creativity here; the people are awesome to work with and the technology they are able to offer clientele at the facility is top-notch.”

Schwab formally joins the Shipping + Handling roster after working closely with the company over the past two years on multiple campaigns for Apple, Acura, QuickBooks and many others. Aside from his role at Shipping + Handling, Schwab will also continue his work through Roving Picture Company. Having worked with a number of internationally recognized brands, Schwab has collaborated on projects for Amazon, Honda, Mercedes-Benz, National Geographic, Netflix, Nike, PlayStation and Smirnoff.

“It’s exciting to be part of a team that approaches every project with such energy. This partnership represents a shared commitment to always deliver outstanding color and technical results for our clients,” says Schwab.

“Pethel is easily amongst the best colorists in our industry. As a longtime client of his, I have a real understanding of the professionalism he brings to every session. He is a delight in the room and wickedly talented. Schwab’s talent has just been realized in the last few years, and we are pleased to offer his skill to our clients. If our experience working with him over the last couple of years is any indication, we’re going to make a lot of clients happy he’s on our roster,” adds Friske.

Spivack, Pethel and Schwab will operate out of Shipping + Handling’s West Coast office on the creative campus it shares with its sister company, editorial post house Spot Welders.

Image: (L-R) Mike Pethel, Matthew Schwab, Jerry Spivack

 

Quick Chat: Bonfire Labs’ Mary Mathaisell

Over the course of nearly 30 years, San Francisco’s Bonfire Labs has embraced change. Over the years, the company evolved from an editorial and post house to a design and creative content studio that leverages the best aspects of the agency and production company models without adhering to either one.

This hybrid model has worked well for product launches for Google, Facebook, Salesforce, Logitech and many others.

The latest change is in the company’s ownership, with the last of the original founders stepping down and a new management partnership taking over — led by executive producer Mary Mathaisell, managing director Jim Bartel and head of strategy and creative Chris Weldon.

We spoke with Mathaisell to get a better sense of Bonfire Labs’ past, present and future.

Can you give us some history of Bonfire Labs? When did you join the company? How/why did you first get into producing?
I’ve been with Bonfire Labs for seven years. I started here as head of production. After being at several large digital agencies working on campaigns and content for brands like Target, Gap, LG and PayPal, I wanted to build something more sustainable than just another campaign and was thrilled that Bonfire was interested in growing into a full-service creative company with integrated production.

Prior to working at AKQA and Publicis, I worked in VFX and production as well as design for products and interfaces, but my primary focus and love has always been commercial production.

The studio has evolved from a traditional post studio to creative strategy and content company. What were the factors that drove those changes?
Bonfire Labs has always been smart about staying small and strategic about the kind of work and clients to focus on. We have been able to change based on both the kind of work we want to be doing and what the market needs. With a giant need for content, especially video content, we have decided to staff and service clients as experts across all the phases of creative development and production and finishing. Instead of going to an agency and a production company and post houses, our clients can work directly with us on everything from concept to finishing.

Silicon Valley is clearly a big client base for you. What are they generally coming to you for? Are the content needs in high tech different from other business sectors?
Our clients usually have a new product, feature or brand that they want the world to know about. We work on product launches, brand awareness campaigns, product education, event content and social content. Most of our work is for technology companies, but every company these days has a technology component. I would say that speed to market is one key differentiator for our clients. We are often building stories as we are in production, so we get a lot done with our clients through creative collaboration and by not following the traditional rules of an agency or a production company.

Any specific trends that you’re seeing recently from your clients? New areas that Bonfire is looking to explore, either new markets for your talents or technology you’re looking to explore further?
Rapid brand prototyping is a new service we are offering to much excitement. Because we have experience across so many technology brands and work closely with our clients, we can develop a language and brand voice faster than most traditional agencies. Technology brands are evolving so quickly that we often start working on content creation before a brand has defined itself or transitioned to its next phase. Rapid brand prototyping allows brands to test content and grow the brand simultaneously.

Blade Shadow

Can you talk about some projects that you have done recently that challenged you and the team?
We rolled out a launch film for a new start-up client called Blade Shadow. We are working with Salesforce to develop trailblazer stories and anthem films for its .org branch, which focuses on NGOs, education and philanthropy.

The company is undergoing a transition with some of the original partners. Can you talk about that a bit as well?
The original founders have passed the torch to the group of people who have been managing and producing the work over the past five to 15 years. We have six new owners, three managing partners and three associate partners. Jim Bartel is the managing director; Chris Weldon is the head of strategy and creative, and I’m the executive producer in charge of content development and production. The three of us make up the management team.

The three of us make up the management team. Sheila Smith (head of production) Robbie Proctor (head of editorial) and Phil Spitler (creative technology lead) are associate partners as they contribute to and lead so much of our work and process and have been part of the company for over 10 years each.

 

Behind the Title: Compadre’s Mika Saulitis

This creative started writing brand campaigns for his favorite oatmeal at eight years old.

NAME: Mika Saulitis

COMPANY: Culver City, California’s Compadre

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re a creative marketing agency. I could get into the nuts and bolts of our process and services, but what we specialize in is pretty simple: building a brand’s story, telling that story and spreading that story everywhere people can fall in love with it.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Creative Strategy

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The short answer is that I oversee brand strategy and integrated marketing campaigns. The longer answer is that our creative strategy team’s primary goal is to take complex insights and business challenges and develop simple, clear creative solutions. Sometimes that’s renaming a company or developing a new brand position, or conceiving a big “hook” for a 360 marketing campaign and rippling it out across on-air, social, experiential, and brand partnerships.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Identifying the unique differentiator of a brand or product and figuring out how to express that in a succinct, unexpected way.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Proofreading 150-page presentations.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
9am. Once that coffee hits, I’m off to the races.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I always wanted to be a garbage man growing up, so if they still ride along on the back of the truck, probably that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I started writing ads for my favorite oatmeal to convert my classmates when I was eight years old, so I’ve been a marketer at heart for pretty much my whole life.

Freeform

Freeform

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
We just developed a brand campaign for Freeform that rejects dated societal norms. Our concept, “It’s Not Us, It’s You,” was a breakup letter to society; we shot real people, as well as the network’s talent, and empowered them to speak their piece and break up with all the things that suck about societal standards.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Noise-canceling headphones, Apple TV and my bike. That was technology at one point, right?

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I’m not ashamed to admit that Flo Rida gets my creative juices flowing.

THIS IS A HIGH STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS.
Golf is my ultimate stress reliever. Being surrounded by trees, chirping birds and the occasional “fore” puts me at ease.

The Umbrella Academy‘s Emmy-nominated VFX supe Everett Burrell

By Iain Blair

If all ambitious TV shows with a ton of visual effects aspire to be cinematic, then Netflix’s The Umbrella Academy has to be the gold standard. The acclaimed sci-fi, superhero, adventure mash-up was just Emmy-nominated for its season-ending episode “The White Violin,” which showcased a full range of spectacular VFX. This included everything from the fully-CG Dr. Pogo to blowing up the moon and a mansion to the characters’ varied superpowers. Those VFX, mainly created by movie powerhouse Weta Digital in New Zealand and Spin VFX in Toronto, indeed rival anything in cinema. This is partly thanks to Netflix’s 4K pipeline.

The Umbrella Academy is based on the popular, Eisner Award-winning comics and graphic novels created and written by Gerard Way (“My Chemical Romance”), illustrated by Gabriel Bá, and published by Dark Horse Comics.

The story starts when, on the same day in 1989, 43 infants are born to unconnected women who showed no signs of pregnancy the day before. Seven are adopted by Sir Reginald Hargreeves, a billionaire industrialist, who creates The Umbrella Academy and prepares his “children” to save the world. But not everything went according to plan. In their teenage years, the family fractured and the team disbanded. Now, six of the surviving members reunite upon the news of Hargreeves’ death. Luther, Diego, Allison, Klaus, Vanya and Number Five work together to solve a mystery surrounding their father’s death. But the estranged family once again begins to come apart due to divergent personalities and abilities, not to mention the imminent threat of a global apocalypse.

The live-action series stars Ellen Page, Tom Hopper, Emmy Raver-Lampman, Robert Sheehan, David Castañeda, Aidan Gallagher, Cameron Britton and Mary J. Blige. It is produced by Universal Content Productions for Netflix. Steve Blackman (Fargo, Altered Carbon) is the executive producer and showrunner, with additional executive producers Jeff F. King, Bluegrass Television, and Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg from Dark Horse Entertainment.

Everett Burrell

I spoke with senior visual effects supervisor and co-producer Everett Burrell (Pan’s Labyrinth, Altered Carbon), who has an Emmy for his work on Babylon 5, about creating the VFX and the 4K pipeline.

Congratulations on being nominated for the first season-ending episode “The White Violin,” which showcased so many impressive visual effects.
Thanks. We’re all really proud of the work.

Have you started season two?
Yes, and we’re already knee-deep in the shooting up in Canada. We shoot in Toronto, where we’re based, as well as Hamilton, which has this great period look. So we’re up there quite a bit. We’re just back here in LA for a couple of weeks working on editorial with Steve Blackman, the executive producer and showrunner. Our offices are in Encino, in a merchant bank building. I’m a co-producer as well, so I also deal a lot with editorial — more than normal.

Have you planned out all the VFX for the new season?
To a certain extent. We’re working on the scripts and have a good jump on them. We definitely plan to blow the first season out of the water in terms of what we come up with.

What are the biggest challenges of creating all the VFX on the show?
The big one is the sheer variety of VFX, which are all over the map in terms of the various types. They go from a completely animated talking CG chimpanzee Dr. Pogo to creating a very unusual apocalyptic world, with scenes like blowing up the moon and, of course, all the superpowers. One of the hardest things we had to do — which no one will ever know just watching it — was a ton of leaf replacement on trees.

Digital leaves via Montreal’s Folks.

When we began shooting, it was winter and there were no leaves on the trees. When we got to editorial we realized that the story spans just eight days, so it wouldn’t make any sense if in one scene we had no leaves and in the next we had leaves. So we had to add every single leaf to the trees for all of the first five episodes, which was a huge amount of work. The way we did it was to go back to all the locations and re-shoot all the trees from the same angles once they were in bloom. Then we had to composite all that in. Folks in Montreal did all of it, and it was very complicated. Lola did a lot of great work on Hargreeves, getting his young look for the early 1900s and cleaning up the hair and wrinkles and making it all look totally realistic. That was very tricky too.

Netflix is ahead of the curve thanks to its 4K policy. Tell us about the pipeline.
For a start, we shoot with the ARRI Alexa 65, which is a very robust cinema camera that was used on The Revenant. With its 65mm sensor, it’s meant for big-scope, epic movies, and we decided to go with it to give our show that great cinema look. The depth of field is like film, and it can also emulate film grain for this fantastic look. That camera shoots natively at 5K — it won’t go any lower. That means we’re at a much higher resolution than any other show out there.

And you’re right, Netflix requires a 4K master as future-proofing for streaming and so on. Those very high standards then trickle down to us and all the VFX. We also use a very unique system developed by Deluxe and Efilm called Portal, which basically stores the entire show in the cloud on a server somewhere, and we can get background plates to the vendors within 10 minutes. It’s amazing. Back in the old days, you’d have to make a request and maybe within 24 or 48 hours, you’d get those plates. So this system makes it almost instantaneous, and that’s a lifesaver.

   
Method blows up the moon.

How closely do you work with Steve Blackman and the editors?
I think Steve said it best:”There’s no daylight between the two of us” We’re linked at the hip pretty much all the time. He comes to my office if he has issues, and I go to his if we have complications; we resolve all of it together in probably the best creative relationship I’ve ever had. He relies on me and counts on me, and I trust him completely. Bottom line, if we need to write ourselves out of a sticky situation, he’s also the head writer, so he’ll just go off and rewrite a scene to help us out.

How many VFX do you average for each show?
We average between 150 and 200 per episode. Last season we did nearly 2,000 in total, so it’s a huge amount for a TV show, and there’s a lot of data being pushed. Luckily, I have an amazing team, including my production manager Misato Shinohara. She’s just the best and really takes care of all the databases, and manages all the shot data, reference, slates and so on. All that stuff we take on set has to go into this massive database, and just maintaining that is a huge job.

Who are the main VFX vendors?
The VFX are mainly created by Weta in New Zealand and Spin VFX in Toronto. Weta did all the Pogo stuff. Then we have Folks, Lola, Marz, Deluxe Toronto, DigitalFilm Tree in LA… and then Method Studios in Vancouver did great work on our end-of-the-world apocalyptic sequence. They blew up the moon and had a chunk of it hitting the Earth, along with all the surrounding imagery. We started R&D on that pretty early to get a jump on it. We gave them storyboards and they did previz. We used that as a cut to get iterations of it all. There were a lot of particle simulations, which was pretty intense.

Weta created Dr. Pogo

What have been the most difficult VFX sequences to create?
Just dealing with Pogo is obviously very demanding, and we had to come up with a fast shortcut to dealing with the photo-real look as we just don’t have the time or budget they have for the Planet of the Apes movies. The big thing is integrating him in the room as an actor with the live actors, and that was a huge challenge. We used just two witness cameras to capture our Pogo body performer. All the apocalyptic scenes were also very challenging because of the scale, and then those leaves were very hard to do and make look real. That alone took us a couple of months. And we might have the same problem this year, as we’re shooting in the summer through fall, and I’m praying that the leaves don’t start falling before we wrap.

What have been the main advances in technology that have really helped you pull off some of the show’s VFX?
I think the rendering and the graphics cards are the big ones, and the hardware talks together much more efficiently now. Even just a few years ago, and it might have taken weeks and weeks to render a Pogo. Now we can do it in a day. Weta developed new software for creating the texture and fabric of Pogo’s clothes. They also refined their hair programs.

 

I assume as co-producer that you’re very involved with the DI?
I am… and keeping track of all that and making sure we keep pushing the envelope. We do the DI at Company 3 with colorist Jill Bogdanowicz, who’s a partner in all of this. She brings so much to the show, and her work is a big part of why it looks so good. I love the DI. It’s where all the magic happens, and I get in there early with Jill and take care of the VFX tweaks. Then Steve comes in and works on contrast and color tweaks.By the time Steve gets there, we’re probably 80% of the way there already.

What can fans expect from season two?
Bigger, better visual effects. We definitely pay attention to the fans. They love the graphic novel, so we’re getting more of that into the show.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Post vet Chris Peterson joins NYC’s Chimney North

Chimney’s New York studio has hired Chris Peterson as its new EP of longform entertainment, building on the company’s longform credits, which include The Dead Don’t Die, Atomic Blonde, Chappaquiddick, The Wife and Her.

Chimney is a full-service company working in feature films, television, commercials, digital media, live events and business-to-business communications. The studio has offices in 11 cities and eight countries worldwide.

In his new role, Peterson will be using his expertise in film finance, tax credit maximization and technical workflows to grow Chimney’s feature film and television capabilities. He brings over 20 years of experience in production and post, including a stint at Mechanism Digital and Post Factory, NY.

Peterson’s resume is diverse and spans the television, film, technology, advertising, music, video game and XR industries. Projects include the Academy Award-winning feature Spotlight, the Academy Award-winning documentary OJ: Made in America, and the Grammy-nominated Roger Waters: The Wall. For E! Entertainment’s travel series Wild On, he produced shows in Argentina, Brazil, Trinidad and across the United States. He was also a post producer on Howard Stern on Demand.

“Chimney combines the best of both worlds: a boutique feel and global resources,” says Peterson. “Add to that the company’s expertise in financing and tax credits, and you have a unique resource for producers and filmmakers.”

For the past eight years, Peterson has been board secretary of the Post New York Alliance, which was co-founded by Chimney North America CEO Marcelo Gandola. The PNYA is a trade association that lobbied for and passed the first post-only tax credit, which was recently extended for two years. Peterson is also a member of SMPTE.

Behind the Title: Amazon senior post exec Frank Salinas

NAME: Frank Salinas

COMPANY: Amazon Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re Amazon.com….Look us up. Small e-commerce bookstore turned global marketplace, cloud storage services and content maker and broadcaster.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Post Production Executive

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My core responsibility is to support and shepherd our series, specials and/or episodes in partnership with our production company from preproduction to delivery.

From the early stages of conceptualizing and planning our productions through color grading, mixing, QC, mastering, publishing and broadcast/launch, it’s my responsibility to oversee that our timelines are met and our commitments to our customers are kept.

Our customers expect the highest standards for quality. I work closely and in tandem with all the other departments to assure that our content is ready for distribution on time, under budget and to the utmost standards. Meaning we are shooting at the highest quality, localizing (whether subtitles or dubbing) in all the languages we are distributing to and that the quality is upheld throughout that process.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m making it a point of getting involved in the post production process before cameras are chosen or scripts are ever finalized to assure we have a clear runway and a set workflow for success.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Being on set or leading into that moment before going on set and having a plan and a strategy in motion and being able to watch it be executed. It almost never plays out as you predicted, but having the knowledge and the confidence to adjust, and being fluid in that moment, is my favorite part of the job.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job would have to be the extraneous meetings that go into making a series. It’s part of the process but I’m not a big fan of meetings

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
My most productive part of the day would likely be my 90-minute drive into the office. This is when I can create my “to-do’s list” for that day, and then the two to three hours I have in the morning before anyone arrives. This allows me to tackle the list without interruption. That and the few times I have the opportunity to run in the morning. It’s those times that allow me to clear my head and process my thoughts linearly.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
If I wasn’t a post executive, I’d likely be a real estate agent or TV/film agent. I get a lot of joy whenever I’m able to make someone happy by being able to pair them with something or someone that fits them perfectly — whatever it is that they are looking for. Finding that perfect marriage between that person and that thing they are needing or wanting brings me a lot of happiness.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I’ve enjoyed television and the film medium for as long as I can remember. From the moment I saw my first episode of The Twilight Zone and realized that you could really leave your audience asking the question of “Is this real?” or “What if? I thought there was something so powerful about that.

Lorena

CAN YOU NAME A RECENT PROJECT YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The documentary Lorena; Last One Laughing Mexico;This Is Football, premiering early August; Gymkhana; The Jonas Brothers film Chasing Happiness; The live Prime Day concert 2019;
The series Carnival Row (launching 8/31); and the All or Nothing series, just to name a few.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a few, but most of them stem from my time at 25/7 Productions. Ultimate Beastmaster, The Briefcase and Strong all hold a special place in my heart, not only because I was able to work on them with people whom I consider my family but because we created something that positively changed peoples lives and expanded their way of thinking

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I’m going to list four since I’m a techy through and through…

My phone. It’s my safety blanket and my window to the world.

My laptop, which is just a larger window or blanket.

My car. Although it’s basic in nature and not pretentious at all, it allows me to be mobile but still allows me a safe place to work. For the amount of time I spend in my car it’s really become my mobile office.

My headphones. Whether I’m running in my neighborhood or traveling on a plane, the joy I get from listening to music and podcasts is absolute. I love music.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram and Facebook are the two I find myself on, and I tend to follow things that I’m passionate about. My sports teams — the Dodgers, Lakers and Kings — and I love architecture and food so I tend to follow those publications that showcase great photos of both.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I love music… almost all of it. Classic rock, reggae, pop, hip-hop, rap, house, country, jazz, Latin, punk. Everything but Phish or Grateful Dead? I just don’t get it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
My love for running, cooking or eating great food, traveling and being with my family helps to remind me that it’s only TV. I constantly need to be reminded that what we are doing, while important, is also just entertainment.

Behind the Title: Cinematic Media head of sound Martin Hernández

This audio post pro’s favorite part of the job is the start of a project — having a conversation with the producer and the director. “It’s exciting, like any new relationship,” he says.

Name: Martin Hernández

Job Title: Supervising Sound Editor

Company: Mexico City’s Cinematic Media

Can you describe Cinematic Media and your role there?
I lead a new sound post department at Cinematic Media, Mexico’s largest post facility focused on television and cinema. We take production sound through the full post process: effects, backgrounds, music editing… the whole thing. We finish the sound on our mix stages.

What would surprise people most about what you do?
We want the sound to go unnoticed. The viewer shouldn’t be aware that something has been added or is unnatural. If the viewer is distracted from the story by the sound, it’s a lousy job. It’s like an actor whose performance draws attention to himself. That’s bad acting. The same applies to every aspect of filmmaking, including sound. Sound needs to help the narrative in a subjective and quiet way. The sound should be unnoticed… but still eloquent. When done properly, it’s magical.

Hernandez has been working on Easy for Netflix.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Entering the project for the first time and having a conversation with the team: the producer and the director. It’s exciting, like any new relationship. It’s beautiful. Even if you’re working with people you’ve worked with before, the project is newborn.

My second favorite part is the start of sound production, when I have a picture but the sound is a blank page. We must consider what to add. What will work? What won’t? How much is enough or too much? It’s a lot like cooking. The dish might need more of this spice and a little less of that. You work with your ingredients, apply your personal taste and find the right flavor. I enjoy cooking sound.

What’s your least favorite part of the job?
Me.

What do you mean?
I am very hard on myself. I only see my shortcomings, which are, to tell you the truth, many. I see my limitations very clearly. In my perception of things, it is very hard to get where I want to go. Often you fail, but every once in a while, a few things actually work. That’s why I’m so stubborn. I know I am going to have a lot of misses, so I do more than expected. I will shoot three or four times, hoping to hit the mark once or twice. It’s very difficult for me to work with me.

What is your most productive time of the day?
In the morning. I’m a morning person. I work from my own place, very early, like 5:30am. I wake up thinking about things that I left behind in the session. It’s useless to remain in bed, so I go to my studio and start working on these ideas. It’s amazing how much you can accomplish between 6am and 9am. You have no distractions. No one’s calling. No emails. Nothing. I am very happy working in the mornings.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing?
That’s a tough question! I don’t know anything else. Probably, I would cook. I’d go to a restaurant and offer myself as an intern in the kitchen.

For most people I know, their career is not something they’ve chosen; it was embedded in them when they were born. It’s a matter of realizing what’s there inside you and embracing it. I never, in my wildest dreams, expected to be doing this work.

When I was young, I enjoyed watching films, going to the movies, listening to music. My earliest childhood memories are sound memories, but I never thought that would be my work. It happened by accident. Actually, it was one accident after another. I found myself working with sound as a hobby. I really liked it, so I embraced it. My hobby then became my job.

So you knew early on that audio would be your path?
I started working in radio when I was 20. It happened by chance. A neighbor told me about a radio station that was starting up from scratch. I told my friend from school, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu, the director. Suddenly, we’re working at a radio station. We’re writing radio pieces and doing production sound. It was beautiful. We had our own on-air, live shows. I was on in the mornings. He did the noon show. Then he decided to make films and I followed him.

Easy

What are some of your recent projects?
I just finished a series for Joe Swanberg, the third season of Easy. It’s on Netflix. It’s the fourth project I’ve done with Joe. I’ve also done two shows here in Mexico. The first one is my first full-time job as supervisor/designer for Argos, the company lead by Epigmenio Ibarra. Yankee is our first series together for Netflix, and we’re cutting another one to be aired later in the year. It’s a very exciting for me.

Is there a project that you’re most proud of?
I am very proud of the results that we’ve been getting on the first two series here in Mexico. We built the sound crew from scratch. Some are editors I’ve worked with before, but we’ve also brought in new talent. That’s a very joyful process. Finding talent is not easy, but once you do, it’s very gratifying. I’m also proud of this work because the quality is very good. Our clients are happy, and when they’re happy, I’m happy.

What pieces of technology can you not live without?
Avid Pro Tools. It’s the universal language for sound. It allows me to share sound elements and sessions from all over the world, just like we do locally, between editing and mixing stages. The second is my converter. We are using the Red system from Focusrite. It’s a beautiful machine.

This is a high-stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Keep working.

Veteran episodic colorist Scott Klein joins Light Iron

Colorist Scott Klein has joined post house Light Iron, which has artists working on feature films, episodic series and music videos at its Los Angeles- and New York-based studios. Klein brings with him 40 years of experience supervising a variety of episodic series.

“While Light Iron was historically known for its capabilities with feature films, we have developed an equally strong episodic division, and Scott builds upon our ongoing commitment to providing the talent and technology necessary for supporting all formats and distribution platforms,” says GM Peter Cioni of Light Iron.

Klein’s list of credits include Fox’s Empire, HBO’s Deadwood: The Movie and Showtime’s Ray Donovan. He also collaborated on the series Bosch, True Blood, The Affair, Halt and Catch Fire, Entourage and The Sopranos. Klein is also an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC). He will be working on Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

“I really enjoy the artistic collaboration with filmmakers,” he says. “It is great to be part of a facility with such a pure passion for supporting the creative through technology. Colorists need strong technology that serves as a means to best express the feelings being conveyed in the images and further enhance the moods that draw audiences into a story.”

Also joining Klein are his colleagues and fellow colorists Daniel Yang, Jesús Borrego and Ara Thomassian. They join Light Iron after working together at Warner Bros. and then Technicolor.

In addition to growing its team of artists to support the expanding market and client needs, Light Iron has also expanded its physical footprint with a second Hollywood-based location a short distance from its flagship facility. A full breadth of creative finishing services for feature films and episodic series is available at both locations. Light Iron also has locations in Atlanta, Albuquerque, Chicago and New Orleans.

 

CVLT hires Katya Pavlova as head of post

Bi-coastal video production studio CVLT has added Katya Pavlova as head of post production. She will be based in the studio’s New York location.

Pavlova joins the team after six years at The Mill, where she produced projects that include David Bowie’s Life on Mars music video remake directed by photographer Mick Rock, as well as Steven Klein’s augmented reality experience for W Magazine’s cover, featuring an interactive 3D digital portrait of Katy Perry.

In her new role, Pavlova will focus on growing CVLT’s post production operation and developing new partnerships. She brings career expertise in a broad range of editorial, VFX, design and CG disciplines across digital and broadcast. In her time as a producer at The Mill, she worked on variety of work for brands including Netflix, Facebook, Ralph Lauren, Jimmy Choo and Vogue.

“We have seen post production needs shift focus from traditional media channels to multi-platform requirements, including emerging technology like augmented reality and crafting short-form videos for social media and mobile audiences. At CLVT, I intend to adapt our team to execute post on advanced AR projects as well as quick turnaround videos for social channels.”

Picture Shop buys The Farm Group

Burbank’s Picture Shop has acquired UK-based The Farm Group. The Farm Group was founded in 1998 and currently has four locations in London, as well as facilities in Manchester, Bristol and Los Angeles.

The Farm, London

The Farm also operates the in-house post production teams for BBC Sport in Salford, England; UKTV; and Fremantle Media. This deal marks Picture Shop’s second international acquisition, followed by the deal it made for Vancouver’s Finalé Post earlier this year.

The founders of The Farm, Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn, will stay involved in The Farm Group. In a joint statement, Sargent and Dunn said, “We are delighted that after 20 successful years, we have a new partner. Picture Shop is poised to expand in the international post market and provide the combination of technical, creative and professional excellence to the world’s content creators.”

The duo will also re-invest in the expanded Picture Head Group, which includes Picture Head and audio post company Formosa Group, in addition to Picture Shop.

L-R: The Farm Group’s Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn.

Bill Romeo, president of Picture Shop, says, “Based on the amount of content being created internationally, we felt it was important to have a presence worldwide and support our clients’ needs. The Farm, based on its reputation and creative talent, will be able to maintain the philosophy of Picture Shop. It is a perfect fit. Our clients will benefit from our collaborative efforts internationally, as well as benefit from our technology and experience. We will continue to partner and support our clients while maintaining our boutique feel.”

Recent work from The Farm Group includes BBC Two’s Summer of Rockets, Sky One’s Jamestown and Britain’s Got Talent.

 

London’s Media Production Show: technology for content creation

By Mel Lambert

The fourth annual Media Production Show, held June 11-12 at Olympia West, London, once again attracted a wide cross section of European production, broadcast, post and media-distribution pros. According to its organizers, the two-day confab drew 5,300 attendees and “showcased the technology and creativity behind content creation,” focusing on state-of-the-art products and services. The full program of standing room-only discussion seminars covered a number of contemporary topics, while 150-plus exhibitors presented wares from the media industry’s leading brands.

The State of the Nation: Post Production panel.

During a session called “The State of the Nation: Post Production,” Rowan Bray, managing director of Clear Cut Pictures, said that “while [wage and infrastructure] costs are rising, our income is not keeping up.” And with salaries, facility rent and equipment amortization representing 85% of fixed costs, “it leaves little over for investment in new technology and services. In other words, increasing costs are preventing us from embracing new technologies.”

Focusing on the long-term economic health of the UK post industry, Bray pointed out that few post facilities in London’s Soho area are changing hands, which she says “indicates that this is not a healthy sector [for investment].”

“Several years ago, a number of US companies [including Technicolor and Deluxe] invested £100 million [$130 million] in Soho; they are now gone,” stated Ian Dodd, head of post at Dock10.

Some 25 years ago, there were at least 20 leading post facilities in London. “Now we have a handful of high-end shops, a few medium-sized ones and a handful of boutiques,” Dodd concluded. Other panelists included Cara Kotschy, managing director of Fifty Fifty Post Production.

The Women in Sound panel

During his keynote presentation called “How we made Bohemian Rhapsody,” leading production designer Aaron Haye explained how the film’s large stadium concert scenes were staged and supplemented with high-resolution CGI; he is currently working on Charlie’s Angels (2019) with director/actress Elizabeth Banks.

The panel discussion “Women in Sound” brought together a trio of re-recording mixers with divergent secondary capabilities and experience. Participants were Emma Butt, a freelance mixer who also handles sound editorial and ADR recordings; Lucy Mitchell, a freelance sound editor and mixer; plus Kate Davis, head of sound at Directors Cut Films. As the audience discovered, their roles in professional sound differ. While exploring these differences, the panel revealed helpful tips and tricks for succeeding in the post world.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

New Boxx workstation features Intel Xeon W-3200 processor

Boxx Technologies, which makes computer workstations, rendering systems and servers, has introduced the Apexx W4L workstation featuring new Intel Xeon W-3200 series processors. This new single-socket processor provides performance increases over previous Intel Xeon W technology. Boxx’s Apexx W4L is purpose-built for rendering, simulation and other GPU-accelerated compute applications.

A new single-socket solution, 28-core (56 thread) Intel Xeon W-3200 processors offer up to 4.6GHz with Intel Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0, 64 processor PCIe lanes for more I/O throughput for networking, graphics and storage, and new Intel Deep Learning Boost for accelerated AI performance.

In addition to the new Intel processor technology, Apexx W4L features up to 1TB of memory and four Nvidia or AMD professional GPUs, making the workstation ideal for GPU-intensive workloads, including media and entertainment.

Pricing starts at $7,395 and you can expect two to three weeks for delivery.

 

Post vet Jason Mayo named COO of Chimney North America

Chimney Group has hired industry veteran Jason Mayo as chief operating officer for North America. He will be based in the studio’s New York office. Mayo joins at a time of significant growth for Chimney Group, an independently-owned Stockholm-based creative and post company with studios in 11 cities and eight countries worldwide.

“What attracted me is Chimney being able to leverage their full power of resources around the globe. We need to make budgets and schedules work harder for our clients, and having a 24/7 production and post pipeline is a powerful package we can offer clients on a global scale,” says Mayo.

He joins from Postal TV, where he was managing director. Before that, Mayo was managing director/partner at NYC’s Click 3X. He helped grow the studio from a 20-person VFX boutique to a fully integrated digital production company with a staff of over 75 full-time designers, animators, live-action directors, producers, developers, editors, colorists and VFX artists.

The Chimney Group’s recent foray into the North American market includes the opening of studios in New York and Los Angeles and the hiring of over 35 people, including the recent addition of chief client officer Kristen Martini. Mayo will work closely with North American CEO Marcelo Gandola to bring the Swedish operational and creative model to the States, delivering brand strategy as well as full-service production and post capabilities to multiple verticals.

“The work we are doing for our clients is increasingly global and full-service in nature,” says Gandola. “Jason has a great track record building companies and is an ideal operational leader for us to build a team to serve Chimney’s global clientele in the US market.”

Dell adds to Precision workstation line, targets M&E

During the Computex show, Dell showed new Precision mobile workstations featuring the latest processors, next-gen graphics, new display options and longer battery life. These systems are designed demanding data- and graphics-intensive workloads.

Dell Precision workstations are ISV-certified and come with Dell Precision Optimizer software that automatically tailors the system’s settings to get the best software performance from the workstation. The compact design of the new 5000 and 7000 series models offer a combination of extreme battery life, powerful processor configurations and large storage options. Starting at 3.9 pounds, the Dell Precision 5540 comes with Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core eight-core processors.

With a 15.6-inch InfinityEdge display inside a 14-inch chassis, the Precision 5540 houses up to 4TB of storage and up to 64GB of memory, which helps pros to quickly access, transfer and store large 3D, video and multimedia files. Editors and designers will also benefit from contrast ratios, touch capability and picture quality with up to a UHD, 100% Adobe color gamut display or the new OLED display with 100% DCI-P3 color gamut.

The Dell Precision 7540 15-inch mobile workstation comes with a range of 15.6-inch display options, including a UHD HDR 400 display. It supports up to 8K resolution and playback of HDR content via single DisplayPort 1.4. The Precision 7540 can accelerate heavy workflows with up to 3200MHz SuperSpeed memory or up to 128GB of 2666MHz ECC memory.

For creatives whose process requires an even more immersive experience, the new Dell Precision 7740 has a 17.3-inch screen and is Dell’s most powerful and scalable mobile workstation. VR- and AI-ready, it is designed to help users bring their most data-heavy, graphic-intensive ideas to life while keeping applications running smoothly.

The Precision 7740 has been updated to feature up to the latest Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core eight-core processors and comes with up to 128GB of ECC memory and a large PCIe SSD storage capacity (up to 8TB). Nvidia Quadro RTX graphics offer realtime raytracing with AI-based graphics acceleration. Additional options include next-generation AMD Radeon Pro GPUs. It is available with a range of display options, including a new 17.3-inch UltraSharp UHD IGZO display featuring 100% Adobe color gamut.

Along with the new Precision mobile workstation models, Dell has also updated its Precision 3000 series towers and the Precision 1U rack workstation. The 3930 1U rack workstation has been updated with Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core processor options. The solution now offers up to 128GB of memory and up to one double-width 295W of Nvidia Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro professional graphics support.

The next-gen Dell Precision 3630 and 3431 towers improve response time with up to 128GB or 64GB of 2666MHz ECC or non-ECC memory, respectively, and both offer scalable storage options. All workstations have a range of operating system options, including Windows 10 Pro, Red Hat and Ubuntu Linux.

The Dell Precision 5540, 7540 and 7740 mobile workstations will be available on Dell.com in early July. Starting prices are $1339, $1149 and $1409, respectively. The Dell Precision 3630 tower workstation will be available on dell.com in mid-July starting at $609.

The Dell Precision 3431 Tower workstation will be available on their site in June starting at $609. The Dell Precision 3930 Rack will be available on their site in mid-July starting at $879.

Phil Kubel named director of HPA

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has appointed Phil Kubel as the organization’s director. He will be the Burbank-based presence of the HPA management team, managing the organization’s day-to-day business as well as supporting strategic planning, membership development and program development.

After his graduation from USC, Kubel worked in a number of production-related positions. In 2003 he became one of the founding members of HRTV, a national television network that featured equestrian and horse racing content. Kubel was instrumental in the design, engineering and production build of the studios and broadcast facility at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California. He went on to oversee day-to-day operations of all digital media, production and technology initiatives at HRTV, including creating the subscription-based HRTV.com.

In addition to Kubel’s technical portfolio, he served as VP of post production for HRTV and was the creative force behind the documentary series Inside Information, which earned 10 Emmy wins.

In 2015, Kubel was named VP/EP for a new digital media initiative for The Stronach Group. Under Stronach Digital, he oversaw the launch of XBTV, which is now an industry-leading multi-media horse racing product that provides insight and analysis for wagering customers.

“It’s an exciting time to be joining HPA,” notes Kubel. “We have a rare opportunity to use our accumulated knowledge and relationships to support industry growth by connecting the players and leading the conversation. I look forward to continuing the vision of HPA and developing it as a world-class resource for production professionals.”

He will report to HPA’s executive director, Barbara Lange.

Sonnet adds new card and adapter to 10GbE line

Sonnet Technologies is offering the Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card and the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter, the latest products in the company’s line of 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) network adapters.

Solo10G SFP+ adapters add fast 10GbE network connectivity to a wide range of computers, enabling users to easily connect to 10GbE-enabled network infrastructure and storage systems via LC fiber optic cables (sold separately). Both products include a 10GBase-SR (short-range) SFP+ transceiver (the most commonly used optical transceiver), enabling 10Gb connectivity at distances up to 300 meters.

The Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card is a low-profile x4 PCIe 3.0 adapter card that offers Mac, Windows and Linux users an easy-to-install and easy-to-manage solution for adding 10GbE fiber network connectivity to computers with PCIe card slots. This card is also suited for use in a multi-slot Thunderbolt-to-PCIe card expansion system connected to a Mac. The Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter is a compact, rugged, bus-powered, fanless Thunderbolt 3 adapter for Mac and Windows computers with Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Sonnet’s Solo10G SFP+ products offer Mac users a plug-and-play experience with no driver installation required; Windows and Linux use only requires a simple driver installation. Both products are configured using operating system settings, so there’s no separate management program to install or run.

With its broad OS support and small form factor, the Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card allows companies to standardize on a single adapter and deploy it across platforms with ease. For users with Thunderbolt 3-equipped Mac and Windows computers, the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter is a simple external solution for adding 10GbE fiber network connectivity. From its replaceable captive cable to its bus-powered operation, the Thunderbolt 3 adapter is highly portable.

Solo10G SFP+ products were engineered with security features essential to today’s users. Incorporating encryption in hardware, the Sonnet network adapters are protected against malicious firmware modification. Any unauthorized attempt to modify the firmware to enable covert computer access renders them inoperable. These security features prevent the Solo10G SFP+ adapters from being reprogrammed, except by a manufacturer’s update using a secure encryption key.

Measuring a compact 3.1 inches wide by 4.9 inches deep by 1.1 inches tall — less than half the size of every other adapter in its class — the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter features an aluminum enclosure that effectively cools the circuitry and eliminates the need for a fan, enabling silent operation. Unlike every other 10GbE fiber Thunderbolt adapter available, Sonnet’s Solo10G SFP+ adapter requires no power adapter and instead is powered by the computer to which it’s connected.

The Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card and Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter are available now for $149 and $249, respectively.

Cutters Studios promotes Heather Richardson, Patrick Casey

Cutters Studios has promoted Heather Richardson to executive producer and Patrick Casey to head of production. Richardson’s oversight will expand into managing and recruiting talent, and in maintaining and building the company’s client base. Casey will focus on optimizing workflows, project management and bidding processes.

Richardson joined Cutters in 2015, after working as a producer for visual effects studio A52 in LA and for editorial company Cosmo Street in both LA and New York for more than 10 years. On behalf of Cutters, she has produced Super Bowl spots for Lifewtr, Nintendo and WeatherTech, and campaigns including Capital One, FCA North America (Fiat, Dodge Ram, and Jeep), Gatorade, Google, McDonald’s and Modelo.

“I’ve been fortunate to have worked with some excellent executive producers during my career, and I’m honored and excited for the opportunity to expand the scope of my role on behalf of Cutters Studios, and alongside Patrick Casey,” says Richardson. “Patrick’s kindness and thoughtfulness in addition to his intelligence and experience are priceless.”

In addition to leading Cutters editors, Casey produced the groundbreaking Always “#LikeAGirl” campaign, Budweiser’s Harry Caray’s Last Call and Whirlpool’s “Care Counts” campaign that won top Cannes Lions, Clio, Effie and Adweek Project Isaac Awards.

NYC’s The-Artery expands to larger space in Chelsea

The-Artery has expanded and moved into a new 7,500-square-foot space in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. Founded by chief creative officer Vico Sharabani, The-Artery will use this extra space while providing visual effects, post supervision, offline editorial, live action and experience design and development across multiple platforms.

According to Sharabani, the new space is not only a response to the studio’s growth, but allows The-Artery to foster better collaboration and reinforce its relationships with clients and creative partners. “As a creative studio, we recognize how important it is for our artists, producers and clients to be working in a space that is comfortable and supportive of our creative process,” he says. “The extraordinary layout of this new space, the size, the lighting and even our location, allows us to provide our clients with key capabilities and plays an important part in promoting our mission moving forward.”

Recent The-Artery projects include 2018’s VR-enabled production for Mercedez-Benz, their work on Under Armour’s “Rush” campaign and Beyonce’s Coachella documentary, Homecoming.

They have also worked on feature films like Netflix’s Beasts of No Nation, Wes Anderson’s Oscar-winning Grand Budapest Hotel and the crime caper Ocean’s 8.

The-Artery’s new studio features a variety of software including Flame, Houdini, Cinema 4D, 3ds Max, Maya, the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of tools, Avid Media Composer, Shotgun for review and approval and more.

The-Artery features a veteran team of talented team of artists and creative collaborators, including a recent addition — editor and former Mad River Post owner Michael Elliot. “Whether they are agencies, commercial and film directors or studios, our clients always work directly with our creative directors and artists, collaborating closely throughout a project,” says Sharabani.

Main Image: Vico Sharabani (far right) and team in their new space.

Picture Shop acquires Vancouver-based Finalé

Picture Shop has acquired Finalé Post in Vancouver. Burbank-based Picture Shop, which provides finishing and VFX work for episodic television, including The Walking Dead, NCIS, Hawaii Five-0 and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, had been looking to make an expansion into the Vancouver market. The company will be branded Finalé, a Picture Shop company.

“Having a Vancouver-based location has always been a strategy of ours, but it was very important to find the right company,” says Picture Shop president Bill Romeo. “We are thrilled to incorporate Finalé into the Picture Shop family. With the amount of content being produced, our goal is to always have strategic locations that support our clients’ needs but still maintain our company’s philosophy — creating an experience with the highest level of service and a creative partnership with our clients.”

Launched in 1988 by Finalé CEO and industry veteran Don Thompson, Finalé is located in the center of Vancouver and has served most major studios. Finalé offers a host of post production services, ranging from digital dailies and color, through 4K HDR finishing and editorial. It also offers mobile dailies and editorial rentals in Toronto and other major Canadian production centers. Finalé’s credits include Descendants 3, iZombie, Tomorrowland and The Magicians.

Main Image: ( L-R) Picture Shop’s Tom Kendall and Robert Glass, Finalé’s Don Thompson, Picture Shop’s Bill Romeo and Finalé’s Andrew Jha.

 

Atto’s FibreBridge now part of NetApp’s MetroCluster

Atto Technology has teamed with NetApp to offer Atto FibreBridge 7600N as a key component in the MetroCluster continuous data availability solution. Atto FibreBridge 7600N storage controller enables synchronous site-to-site replication up to 300km by providing low latency 32Gb Fibre Channel connections to NetApp flash and disk systems while maintaining high resiliency. FibreBridge 7600N supports up to 1.2 million IOPS and 6,400MB/s per controller.

NetApp MetroCluster enhances the built-in high availability and non-disruptive operations of NetApp systems with Ontap software, providing an additional layer of protection for the entire storage and host environment.

The Atto XstreamCore FC 7600 is a hardware protocol converter that connects 32Gb Fibre Channel ports to 12Gb SAS. It allows post and production houses to free up server resources normally used for handling storage activity and distribute storage connections across up to 64 servers with less than four micro seconds of latency. XstreamCore FC 7600 offers the flexibility needed for modern media production, allowing streaming of uncompressed HD, 4K and larger video, adding shared capabilities to direct attached storage and remotely locating direct attached disk or tape devices. This is a major advantage in workflow management, system architecting and layout of production facilities.

FibreBridge 7600N is one of Atto XstreamCore storage controller products, just one of Atto’s broad portfolio of connectivity solutions widely tested and certified for compatibility with all operating systems and platforms.

Goldcrest Post hires industry vet Dom Rom as managing director

Domenic Rom, a veteran of the New York post world, has joined Goldcrest Post as managing director. In this new role, he will oversee operations, drive sales and pursue growth strategies for Goldcrest, a provider of post services for film and television. Rom was most recently president/GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services in LA.

“Domenic is a visionary leader who brings a client-centric approach toward facility management, and understands the industry’s changing dynamics,” says Goldcrest Films owner/executive director Nick Quested. “He inspires his team to perform at a peak level and deliver the quality services our clients expect.”

In his previous position, Rom led Deluxe’s global services for television, including its subsidiaries Encore and Level 3. Prior to that, he was managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which included East Coast operations for Encore, Company 3 and Method. He was SVP at Technicolor Creative Services for three years and an executive at Postworks for 11. Rom began his career as a colorist at DuArt Film Labs, eventually becoming executive VP in charge of its digital and film labs.

Rom says that he looks forward to working with Goldcrest Post’s management team, including head of production Gretchen McGowan and head of picture Jay Tilin. “We intend to be a very client-oriented facility,” he notes. “When clients walk in the door, they should feel at home, feel that this is their place. Jay and Gretchen both get that. We will work together very closely to ensure Goldcrest is a solid, responsive facility.”

He is also very happy about being back in New York City. “New York is my home,” says Rom. “When I decided to come back to the city just walking around town made me feel alive again. The New York market is so tight, the energy so high it just felt right. The people are real, the clients are amazing and the work is equal to anywhere in the world. I don’t regret a second of the past few years… I expanded my knowledge of other markets and made life-long friendships all over the world. At the end of the day though, my family and my work family are in New York.”

Recent projects for Goldcrest include the Netflix series Russian Doll and the independent features Sorry to Bother You, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Native Son and High Flying Bird.

EP Nick Strange Thye joins The Underground in New York

The Underground in New York City has hired executive producer Nick Strange Thye, who joins the boutique content company after four years at The Mill. Thye’s appointment comes on the heels of veteran production executive Hugh Broder being named as The Underground’s managing director/executive producer at the beginning of the year.

“Nick has an amazing depth of experience and knowledge in production and post production, both in the US market and overseas,” explains Broder. “I’m very excited to have him as a partner as we continue to expand and build our capabilities.”

Thye was most recently senior producer at The Mill, overseeing a range of projects, including spots for the NFL for Super Bowl 50, Cadillac for The Oscars and Samsung for the Olympics, as well as ads for Adidas, the US Marine Corps and PlayStation 4. He’s collaborated with such agencies as Johannes Leonardo, BBDO, Droga5, Rokkan and BBH. Thye, who’s from Denmark, previously worked in Europe as an international executive producer for several companies, including Chimney Group.

At The Underground, he’ll work closely with Broder as well as creative director/lead Flame artist Nic Seresin. Recent projects at the studio include extensive post production on a new Hyundai campaign for Innocean as well as a soon-to-be-released short film for Aston Martin.

“I believe in the flexibility of boutique companies,” says Thye. “They represent the future for this industry. The business is changing to be more project-based, and The Underground has the ability to build the right team for each project. Because of my European background, I have a lot of experience doing this, and I’m eager to put that expertise to work here.”

The Underground is part of the P2P Group, which also includes P2P Retouching, a leading presence in the beauty industry for the past two decades. The expansion of the umbrella group is a concerted effort led by company owner Ben Bettenhausen.

 

Little’s dailies-to-ACES finishing workflow via FotoKem

FotoKem’s Atlanta and Burbank facilities both worked on the post production — from digital dailies through finishing with a full ACES finish — for Universal Pictures’ and Legendary Entertainment’s film, Little.

From producer Will Packer (Girls Trip, Night School, the Ride Along franchise) and director/co-writer Tina Gordon (Peeples, Drumline), Little tells the story of a tech mogul (Girls Trip’s Regina Hall) who is transformed into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin) and must rely on her long-suffering assistant (Insecure’s Issa Rae) just as the future of her company is on the line.

Martin, who stars in the TV series Black-ish, had the idea for the film when she was 10 and acts as an executive producer on the film.

Principal photography for Little took place last summer in the Atlanta area. FotoKem’s Atlanta location provided digital dailies, with looks developed by FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold alongside cinematographer Greg Gardiner (Girls Trip, Night School), who shot with Sony F55 cameras.

Cinematographer Greg Gardiner on set.

“Greg likes a super-clean look, which we based on Sony color science with a warm and cool variant and a standard hero LUT,” says Arnold. “He creates the style of every scene with his lighting and photography. We wanted to maximize his out-of-the-camera look and pass it through to the grading process.”

Responding to the sharp growth of production in Georgia, FotoKem entered the Atlanta market five years ago to offer on-the-ground support for creatives. “FotoKem Atlanta is an extension of our Burbank team with colorists and operations staff to provide the upfront workflow required for file-based dailies,” says senior VP Tom Vice of FotoKem’s creative services division.

When editor David Moritz and the editorial team moved to Los Angeles, FotoKem sent EDLs to its nextLAB dailies platform, the facility’s proprietary digital file management system, where shots for VFX vendors were transcoded as ACES EXR files with full color metadata. Non-VFX shots were also automatically pulled from nextLAB for conform. The online was completed in Blackmagic Resolve.

The DI and the film conform happened concurrently, with Arnold and Gardiner working together daily. “We had a full ACES pipeline, with high dynamic range and high bit rate, which both Greg and I liked,” Arnold says. “The film has a punchy, crisp chromatic look, but it’s not too contemporary in style or hyper-pushed. It’s clean and naturalistic with an extra chroma punch.”

Gordon was also a key part of the collaboration, playing an active role in the DI, working closely with Gardiner to craft the images. “She really got into the color aspect of the workflow,” notes Arnold. “Of course, she had a vision for the movie and fully embraced the way that color impacts the story during the DI process.”

Arnold’s first pass was for the theatrical grade and the second for the HDR10 grade. “What I like about ACES is the simplicity of transforming to different color spaces and working environments. And the HDR grade was a quicker process,” he says. “HDR is increasingly part of our deliverables, and we’re seeing a lot more ACES workflows lately, including work on trailers.”

FotoKem’s deliverables included a DCP, DCDM and DSM for the theatrical release; separations and .j2k files for HDR10 archiving; and ProRes QuickTime files for QC.

Idris Elba and Gary Reich talk about creating Netflix’s Turn Up Charlie

By Iain Blair

Idris Elba has always excelled at playing uber-cool, uber-controlled characters — often villains and troubled souls, such as drug lord Stringer Bell on HBO’s The Wire, detective John Luther on the BBC’s Luther, and the war lord in the harrowing feature film Beasts of No Nation. No wonder everyone thinks he’d be perfect as the next uber-sexy Bond.

But there’s another, hidden side to the charismatic star. The actor has long been heavily involved in post production. Additionally, he moonlights as a DJ, the inspiration for his new Netflix show Turn Up Charlie. He trashes his super-cool image by starring as the titular Charlie, a decidedly uncool, struggling DJ and eternal bachelor, who finally gets a shot at success when he reluctantly becomes a “manny” to his famous best friend’s problem-child daughter.

The show also serves as a showcase for Elba’s self-described “nerdy” side behind the camera, his love of producing and his hands-on involvement in every aspect of post. The eight-part series is co-produced by Elba’s Green Door Pictures and Gary Reich’s Brown Eyed Boy Productions, with Elba and Reich serving as executive producers alongside Tristram Shapeero, who directs the series with Matt Lipsey.

And in a serious show of support for the show and its star, Netflix (which for the first time beat HBO in Emmy noms last year) officially launched an Emmy “For Your Consideration” campaign, with a screening and panel discussion featuring Elba.

Prior to the event, I spoke with the Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated Elba (whose credits also include the Avengers and Thor franchises, American Gangster, Star Trek Beyond, Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, The Office and The Jungle Book) about his latest project, his real-life moonlighting gig as a DJ, his love of post and his upcoming role in Cats. We also spoke with his Turn Up Charlie co-creator Reich.

Let’s talk about post production on the show. How involved are you, considering you’re also starring and co-producing?
Idris Elba: We did it at The Farm in London, and I’m pretty involved in every aspect of post, though I’m not sitting in the edit suite all day long looking at every frame. But I really love the whole process, especially editing and, of course, the sound and music because of my background as a DJ. So I’ll be there checking the edits and how it’s being put together.

Then I’ll be there for all the sound mix stuff and also for the final grade, which I love too. I’m super-nerdy in that way, and I find it very satisfying to be involved in post. For most actors, post is this whole hidden, secret world that you never see or get involved in, but I’ve always been fascinated by how it all comes together… how you can manipulate a performance or the sound to totally change a scene and how it works and affects the audience. It’s really the most creative part of making a TV show or a movie, and hopefully I’ll be more and more involved in it all.

People think of you as an actor first and foremost, but you’ve been involved in producing and post for quite a while.
Elba: Yeah, I’ve always been interested in it, learning stuff as I go, and watching directors and how post works. When I directed my first film, Yardie, a couple of years ago, it was a real education, and I loved every minute of it — being involved in all the editing and working on all the elements that go into the sound mix and music. I’ve been involved in production with a lot of the shows I’ve done, like Luther and Five by Five and now this one, and I really enjoy it.

Gary, any surprises working with Idris? And what was the schedule like?
Gary Reich: For someone so busy across so many different mediums, it was amazing how he was always able to give 100% in the moment. He’s like a powerful lighthouse — when he shines on you and your production, you get a dazzling 150% of him. As a co-executive producer, he was involved across many surprisingly small details, as well as the larger picture. We edited at The Farm, and the offline was what you’d expect — a week for each half-hour episode. The music was extremely complex, so once the pictures were locked, there was a long process of auditioning tracks.

Who edited, and what were the main challenges?
Reich: Gary Dollner edited block 1 (Episodes 1-4) with the block 1 director, Tristram Shapeero. Pete Drinkwater edited block 2 (Episodes 5-8) with the block 2 director, Matt Lipsey. The main challenges were that Idris wanted us to approach the edit like a DJ, where the rhythm of each episode’s scene-to-scene transitions would be similar to what a DJ achieves mixing between tracks. Luckily, our editors more than rose to that challenge.

Talk about the importance of sound and music for you and Idris on this. Where did you mix?
Reich: We also mixed at The Farm. Sound and music were extremely key to the show as it is, after all, a show about, created by and scored by a DJ. The score was composed by DJ James Lavelle, so Idris and he had various meetings in the edit where it was clear they spoke the same language. It was important to Idris that the character themes were all electronic rather than acoustic, even the very emotional beats. James and his team adapted accordingly, and we have some amazing new sounds in the show.

Also, one of the key series arcs was a track that Idris’ character Charlie had had a big one-off hit with in the ’90s, that then gets remixed across three episodes by our female Calvin Harris character, played by Piper Perabo, and then gets dropped at the Latitude Festival. It was key that we were authentic, as we showed the track coming together at different stages across different scenes. The mix was all done at The Farm.

I noticed some VFX credits. What was involved, who did them?
Reich: We had a lot of mobile phone and some Skype screens that needed shots compositing in, and some posters too, as well as needing to build a nightclub onto the back of a beach bar. They were all done by The Farm.

Who was the colorist and what was involved?
Reich: Perry Gibbs was the colorist. Because we shot on anamorphic lenses, but also had to use the Red cameras in order to meet certain Netflix technical requirements, there were challenges in the grade, but they were worth it, as the end result was particularly deep.

Idris, Charlie is a major U-turn from your usual self-assured characters. You co-created this show with Gary for yourself, so is this actually the real you?
Elba: (Laughs). Yeah, it is the closest to the real me. I’m not anything like Luther or the other characters I’m best known for. I’m closer to Charlie than anything else. I really wanted to show what the real world of DJs is like, and we spent a lot of time in post working on the music. But the truth is, no one really cares about what DJs go through as long as the music’s good, so I needed to add some heart and other elements to it, and it gradually became more about parenting and all those challenges. I’m a parent, so I brought all those experiences and stories to it and merged the two worlds. It ended up being a bit about the world of music and a lot about people.

Many people probably don’t know that you actually started out as a DJ in London before you got into acting.
Elba: Right, and partly thanks to this, I seem to be getting a lot more exposure for my DJ’ing these days, especially after doing “the wedding” [Elba was asked by Prince Harry to DJ at his wedding to Meghan Markle], and now I’ll be DJ’ing at Coachella, and then I’m doing the Electric Daisy Carnival in Vegas and some other gigs. So if the acting thing falls apart, I’m all set!

DJ’ing was really my first love, and by the time I was 13, 14, I was DJ’ing for house parties and whatnot, and then I met my drama teacher, and DJ’ing went out the window. But the truth is, I kept DJ’ing alongside my acting career, and I just love doing it. It grounds me, and I love music. What I chose not to do is market my DJ’ing as part of my acting career, but recently it’s become this crazy crossroads of all this stuff happening, what with this show and Coachella and so on. It all looks like a brilliant marketing plan, but it’s not. I’m just not that clever!

When you get back to London, you’ll keep filming Tom Hooper’s movie adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Cats, which is due out later this year. What can you tell us about it?
Elba: I can’t reveal too much, but it’s going great. I get to play another villain, Macavity, which is always fun for me. Tom’s got a really interesting look and take on it, and he’s assembled this amazing cast: Taylor Swift, who I got on great with, and Jennifer Hudson and James Corden. He’s so funny. And Ian McKellen. It’s going to be pretty special.

Aren’t you playing another villain in Hobbs & Shaw, the Fast & Furious spinoff due out in August?
Elba: Yeah, I play Brixton Lore, this cyber-enhanced criminal mastermind who’s going at it with Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham. Director David Leitch did Atomic Blonde and Deadpool 2, and we did some really wild stuff. I’m really excited about it. It’s been a busy year.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Colorist Peter Doyle joins Warner Bros. De Lane Lea’s picture services division

World-renown and respected supervising colorist Peter Doyle, whose large body of work includes The Lord of the Rings trilogy, has joined London’s Warner Bros. De Lane Lea’s (WBDLL) new picture services division. Doyle brings with him extensive technical and creative expertise acquired over a 40-year career.

Doyle has graded 12 of the 100 highest-grossing films of all time including the Harry Potter film series. His recent credits include Darkest Hour (see our interview with him here), The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and both Fantastic Beasts films.

Doyle will be working alongside BAFTA-winning colorist Asa Shoul (Mission Impossible: Fallout, Baby Driver, Amazon’s Tin Star), who joined WBDLL at the end of last year. The additions of Doyle and Shoul beef up WBDLL’s picture division to match the studio’s sound facilities De Lane Lea.

Speaking of joining the company, Doyle says, “I first worked with Warner Bros. on The Matrix in 1999. Since then, grading and delivering films to Warner Bros. for filmmakers such as Tim Burton, David Yates, Dick Zanuck and David Heyman has always felt like a partnership. Warner Bros. always brought tremendous passion to the projects and a deep desire to best represent the creative intent of the filmmakers. WBDLL represents a third-generation post facility; it’s been conceived with the philosophy that origination and delivery are part of the same process. It’s managed by a newly assembled crew that over the course of their careers have answered some of the most complex post production challenges the industry has devised. WBDLL is an environment and indeed a concept I feel London has needed for many years.”

The new facilities at WBDLL include two 4K HDR FilmLight Baselight X grading theatres, Autodesk Flame online suites, digital dailies facilities, dark fiber connectivity and a mastering and QC department. WBDLL has additional facilities based at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, including a 50-seat 4K screening room, 4K VFX review theater and in-facility and on-location digital dailies, offering clients a full end-to-end service.

WBDLL has been the choice for many large features including Dumbo, Wonder Woman, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Fantastic Beasts, Early Man, Mission Impossible: Fallout and Outlaw King. Its roster of high-end TV clients include Netflix, Amazon, Starz, BBC and ITV.

Last year the company announced it was cementing its future in Soho by moving to the purpose-built Ilona Rose House in 2021, which is currently under construction.

Collaboration company Pix acquires Codex

Pix has reached an agreement to acquire London-based Codex, in a move that will enable both companies to deliver a range of new products and services, from streamlined camera capture to post production finishing.

The Pix System  is a collaboration tool that provides industry pros with secure access to production content on mobile devices, laptops or TVs from offices, homes or while traveling. They won an Oscar for its technology in 2019.

Codex products include recorders and media processing systems that transfer digital files and images from the camera to post, and tools for color dynamics, dailies creation, archiving, review and digital asset management.

“Our clients have relied on Pix to protect their material and ideas throughout all phases of production. In Codex, we found a group that similarly values relationships with attention to critical details,” explains Pix founder/CEO Eric Dachs. “Codex will retain its distinct brand and culture, and there is a great deal we can do together for the benefit of our clients and the industry.”

Over the years, Pix and Codex have seen wide industry adoption, delivering a proven record of contributing value to their clients. Introduced in 2003, Pix soon became a trusted and widely used secure communication and content management provider. The Pix System enables creative continuity and reduces project risk by ensuring that ideas are accurately shared, stored, and preserved throughout the entire production process.

“Pix and Codex are complementary, trusted brands used by leading creatives, filmmakers and studios around the world,” says Codex managing director Marc Dando. “The integration of both services into one simplified workflow will deliver the industry a fast, secure, global collaborative ecosystem.”

With the acquisition of Codex, Pix will expand its servicing reach across the globe. Pix founder Dachs will remain as CEO, and Dando will take on the role of chief design officer at Pix, with a focus on existing and new products.

NAB 2019: An engineer’s perspective

By John Ferder

Last week I attended my 22nd NAB, and I’ve got the Ross lapel pin to prove it! This was a unique NAB for me. I attended my first 20 NABs with my former employer, and most of those had me setting up the booth visits for the entire contingent of my co-workers and making sure that the vendors knew we were at each booth and were ready to go. Thursday was my “free day” to go wandering and looking at the equipment, cables, connectors, test gear, etc., that I was looking for.

This year, I’m part of a new project, so I went with a shopping list and a rough schedule with the vendors we needed to see. While I didn’t get everywhere I wanted to go, the three days were very full and very rewarding.

Beck Video IP panel

Sessions and Panels
I also got the opportunity to attend the technical sessions on Saturday and Sunday. I spent my time at the BEITC in the North Hall and the SMPTE Future of Cinema Conference in the South Hall. Beck TV gave an interesting presentation on constructing IP-based facilities of the future. While SMPTE ST2110 has been completed and issued, there are still implementation issues, as NMOS is still being developed. Today’s systems are and will for the time being be hybrid facilities. The decision to be made is whether the facility will be built on an IP routing switcher core with gateways to SDI, or on an SDI routing switcher core with gateways to IP.

Although more expensive, building around an IP core would be more efficient and future-proof. Fiber infrastructure design, test equipment and finding engineers who are proficient in both IP and broadcast (the “Purple Squirrels”) are large challenges as well.

A lot of attention was also paid to cloud production and distribution, both in the BEITC and the FoCC. One such presentation, at the FoCC, was on VFX in the cloud with an eye toward the development of 5G. Nathaniel Bonini of BeBop Technology reported that BeBop has a new virtual studio partnership with Avid, and that the cloud allows tasks to be performed in a “massively parallel” way. He expects that 5G mobile technology will facilitate virtualization of the network.

VFX in the Cloud panel

Ralf Schaefer, of the Fraunhofer Heinrich-Hertz Institute, expressed his belief that all devices will be attached to the cloud via 5G, resulting in no cables and no mobile storage media. 5G for AR/VR distribution will render the scene in the network and transmit it directly to the viewer. Denise Muyco of StratusCore provided a link to a virtual workplace: https://bit.ly/2RW2Vxz. She felt that 5G would assist in the speed of the collaboration process between artist and client, making it nearly “friction-free.” While there are always security concerns, 5G would also help the prosumer creators to provide more content.

Chris Healer of The Molecule stated that 5G should help to compress VFX and production workflows, enable cloud computing to work better and perhaps provide realtime feedback for more perfect scene shots, showing line composites of VR renders to production crews in remote locations.

The Floor
I was very impressed with a number of manufacturers this year. Ross Video demonstrated new capabilities of Inception and OverDrive. Ross also showed its new Furio SkyDolly three-wheel rail camera system. In addition, 12G single-link capability was announced for Acuity, Ultrix and other products.

ARRI AMIRA (Photo by Cotch Diaz)

ARRI showed a cinematic multicam system built using the AMIRA camera with a DTS FCA fiber camera adapter back and a base station controllable by Sony RCP1500 or Skaarhoj RCP. The Sony panel will make broadcast-centric people comfortable, but I was very impressed with the versatility of the Skaarhoj RCP. The system is available using either EF, PL, or B4 mount lenses.

During the show, I learned from one of the manufacturers that one of my favorite OLED evaluation monitors is going to be discontinued. This was bad news for the new project I’ve embarked on. Then we came across the Plura booth in the North Hall. Plura as showing a new OLED monitor, the PRM-224-3G. It is a 24.5-inch diagonal OLED, featuring two 3G/HD/SD-SDI and three analog inputs, built-in waveform monitors and vectorscopes, LKFS audio measurement, PQ and HLG, 10-bit color depth, 608/708 closed caption monitoring, and more for a very attractive price.

Sony showed the new HDC-3100/3500 3xCMOS HD cameras with global shutter. These have an upgrade program to UHD/HDR with and optional processor board and signal format software, and a 12G-SDI extension kit as well. There is an optional single-mode fiber connector kit to extend the maximum distance between camera and CCU to 10 kilometers. The CCUs work with the established 1000/1500 series of remote control panels and master setup units.

Sony’s HDC-3100/3500 3xCMOS HD camera

Canon showed its new line of 4K UHD lenses. One of my favorite lenses has been the HJ14ex4.3B HD wide-angle portable lens, which I have installed in many of the studios I’ve worked in. They showed the CJ14ex4.3B at NAB, and I even more impressed with it. The 96.3-degree horizontal angle of view is stunning, and the minimization of chromatic aberration is carried over and perhaps improved from the HJ version. It features correction data that support the BT.2020 wide color gamut. It works with the existing zoom and focus demand controllers for earlier lenses, so it’s  easily integrated into existing facilities.

Foot Traffic
The official total of registered attendees was 91,460, down from 92,912 in 2018. The Evertz booth was actually easy to walk through at 10a.m. on Monday, which I found surprising given the breadth of new interesting products and technologies. Evertz had to show this year. The South Hall had the big crowds, but Wednesday seemed emptier than usual, almost like a Thursday.

The NAB announced that next year’s exhibition will begin on Sunday and end on Wednesday. That change might boost overall attendance, but I wonder how adversely it will affect the attendance at the conference sessions themselves.

I still enjoy attending NAB every year, seeing the new technologies and meeting with colleagues and former co-workers and clients. I hope that next year’s NAB will be even better than this year’s.

Main Image: Barbie Leung.


John Ferder is the principal engineer at John Ferder Engineer, currently Secretary/Treasurer of SMPTE, an SMPTE Fellow, and a member of IEEE. Contact him at john@johnferderengineer.com.

The Kominsky Method‘s post brain trust: Ross Cavanaugh and Ethan Henderson

By Iain Blair

As Bette Davis famously said, “Old age ain’t no place for sissies!” But Netflix’s The Kominsky Method proves that in the hands of veteran sitcom creator Chuck Lorre — The Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men and many others — there’s plenty of laughs to be mined from old age… and disease, loneliness and incontinence.

The show stars Michael Douglas as divorced, has-been actor and respected acting coach Sandy Kominsky and Alan Arkin as his longtime agent Norman Newlander. The story follows these bickering best friends as they tackle life’s inevitable curveballs while navigating their later years in Los Angeles, a city that values youth and beauty above all. Both comedic and emotional, The Kominsky Method won Douglas a Golden Globe.

Ethan Henderson and Ross Cavanaugh

The single-camera show is written by Al Higgins, David Javerbaum and Lorre, who also directed the first episode. Lorre, Higgins and Douglas executive produce the series, which is produced by Chuck Lorre Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television.

I recently spoke with associate producer Ross Cavanaugh and post coordinator Ethan Henderson about posting the show.

You are currently working on Season 2?
Ross Cavanaugh: Yes, and we’re moving along quite quickly. We’re already about three-quarters of the way through the season shooting-wise, out of the eight-show arc.

Where do you shoot, and what’s the schedule like?
Cavanaugh: We shoot mainly on the lot at Warner Bros. and then at various locations around LA. We start prepping each show one week before we start shooting, and then we get dailies the day after the first shooting day.

Our dailies lab is Picture Shop, which is right up the street in Burbank and very convenient for us. So getting footage from the set to them is quick, and they’re very fast at turning the dailies around. We usually get them by midnight the same day we drop them off,  then our editors start cutting fairly quickly after that.

Where do you do all the post?
Cavanaugh: Mainly at Picture Shop, who are very experienced in TV post work. They do all the post finishing and some of the VFX stuff — usually the smaller things, like beauty fixes and cleanup. They also do all the final color correction since DP Anette Haellmigk really wanted to work with colorist George Manno. They’ve been really great.

Ethan Henderson: We’re back and forth from the lot to Picture Shop, and once we get more heavily involved in all the post, I spend a lot of time there while we are onlining the show, coloring and doing the VFX drop-ins, and when we start the final deliverables process, since everything for Netflix comes out of there.

What are the big challenges of post production on this show, and how closely do you work with Chuck Lorre?
Cavanaugh: As with any TV show, you’re always on a very tight deadline, and there are a lot of moving parts to deal with very quickly. While our prolific showrunner Chuck Lorre is busy with all the projects he has going — especially with all the writing — he always makes time for us. He’s very passionate about the cut and is extremely on top of things.

I’d say the challenges on this show are actually fairly minimal. Basically, we ran a pretty tight ship on the first season, and now I’d say it’s a well-oiled machine. We haven’t had any big problems or surprises in post, which can happen.

Let’s talk about editing. You had two editors for Season 1 in Matthew Barbato and Gina Sansom. I assume that’s because of the time factor. How does that work?
Cavanaugh: Each editor has their own assistant editor — that was true in Season One (Matthew with Jack Cunningham and Gina with Barb Steele) and in Season two (Steven Lang with Romeo Rubio and Gina with Rahul Das). They cut separately and work on an odds-and-evens schedule, each doing every other episode. We all get together to watch screenings of the Director’s Cut, usually in the editorial bay.

What are the big editing challenges?
Cavanaugh: We have a pretty big cast, and there’s a ton of jokes and stuff going on all the time. In addition to Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin, the actors are so experienced. They give such great performances — there’s a lot of material for the editors to cut from. To be honest, the scripts are all so tight that I think one of the challenges is knowing when to cut out a joke, to serve the pacing of an episode.

This isn’t a VFX-driven show, but there are some visual effects shots. Can you explain?
Cavanaugh: We do a lot of driving scenes and use 24frame.com, who have this really good wraparound HD projection technology, so we pretty much shoot all our car scenes on the stage.

Henderson: Once in a while, we’ll pick up some exterior or establishing shots on a freeway using doubles in the cars. All the plates are picked ahead of time. Occasionally, for the sake of continuity, we’ll have to replace a plate in the background and put a different section of the plate in because too many cars ran by, and it didn’t match up in the edit.

That’s one of the things that comes up every so often. The other big thing is that both of the leads wear glasses, so reflections of crew and equipment can become an issue; we have to deal with all that and clean it up.

Cavanaugh: We don’t use many big VFX shots, and we can’t reveal much about what happens in the new season, but sometimes there’s stuff like the scene in season one where one of the characters threw some firecrackers at Michael Douglas’ feet. We obviously weren’t going to throw real ones at Michael Douglas, although I think he’d have sucked it up if we’d done it that way! We were shooting in a residential neighborhood at night and we couldn’t set off real ones because they are very loud, so we ended up doing it all with VFX. FuseFx handled the workload for the heavier VFX work.

Henderson: There was a big shot in the pilot where we did a lot of shot extensions in a restaurant where Sandy Kominsky (Douglas) and Nancy Travis’ character are having coffee. It was this big sweeping pan down over the city.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music?
Cavanaugh: They both play a key role, and we have a great team that includes music editor Joe Deveau, supervising sound editor Lou Thomas, and sound mixers Yuri Reese and Bill Smith. The sound recording quality we get on set is always great, so that means we only need very minimal ADR. The whole sound mix is done here on the lot at Warners.

Our composer, Jeff Cardoni, worked with Chuck on Young Sheldon, and he’s really on top of getting all the new cues for the show. We basically have two versions of our main title sequence music cues — one is very bombastic and in-your-face, and the other is a bit more subtle — and it’s funny how it broke down in the first season. The guy who cut the pilot and the odd episodes went with the more bombastic version, while the second editor on the even episodes preferred the softer cues, so I’ll be curious to see how all that breaks down in the new season.

How important is all the coloring on this?
Cavanaugh: Very important. After we do all the online, we ship it over to George at Picture Shop and spend about a day and a half on it. The DP either comes in or gets a file, and she gives her notes. Then we’ll play it for Chuck. We’re in the HDR world with Dolby Vision, and it makes it look so beautiful — but then we have to do the standard pass on it as well.

I know you can’t reveal too much about the new season, but what can fans expect?
Henderson: They’re getting a continuation of these two characters’ journey together — growing old and everything that comes with that. I think it feels like a very natural extension of the first season.

Cavanaugh: In terms of the post process, I feel like we’re a Swiss watch now. We’re ticking along very smoothly. Sometimes post can be a nightmare and full of problems, so it’s great to have it all under control.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

HP shows off new HP Z6 and Z8 G4 workstations at NAB

HP was at NAB demoing their new HP Z6 and Z8 G4 workstations, which feature Intel Xeon scalable processors and Intel Optane DC persistent memory technology to eliminate the barrier between memory and storage for compute-intensive workflows, including machine learning, multimedia and VFX. The new workstations offer accelerated performance with a processor-architecture that allows users to work faster and more efficiently.

Intel Optane DC allows users to improve system performance by moving large datasets closer to the CPU so it can be assessed, processed and analyzed in realtime and in a more affordable way. This will allow for no data loss after a power cycle or application closure. Once applications are written to take advantage of this new technology, users will benefit from accelerated workflows and little or no downtime.

Targeting 8K video editing in realtime and for rendering workflows, the HP Z6 G4 workstation is equipped with two next-generation Intel Xeon processors providing up to 48 total processor cores in one system, Nvidia and AMD graphics and 384GB of memory. Users can install professional-grade storage hardware without using standard PCIe slots, offering the ability to upgrade over time.

Powered by up to 56 processing cores and up to 3TB of high-speed memory, the HP Z8 G4 workstation can run complex 3D simulations, supporting VFX workflows and handling advanced machine learning algorithms. They are certified for some of the most-used software apps, including Autodesk Flame and DaVinci Resolve.

HP’s Remote Graphics Software (RGS), included with all HP Z workstations, enables remote workstation access from any Windows, Linux or Mac device.

Avid is collaborating with HP to test RGS with Media Composer|Cloud VM.

The HP Z6 G4 workstation with new Intel Xeon processors is available now for the base price of $2,372. The HP Z8 G4 workstation starts at $2,981.

NAB 2019: First impressions

By Mike McCarthy

There are always a slew of new product announcements during the week of NAB, and this year was no different. As a Premiere editor, the developments from Adobe are usually the ones most relevant to my work and life. Similar to last year, Adobe was able to get their software updates released a week before NAB, instead of for eventual release months later.

The biggest new feature in the Adobe Creative Cloud apps is After Effects’ new “Content Aware Fill” for video. This will use AI to generate image data to automatically replace a masked area of video, based on surrounding pixels and surrounding frames. This functionality has been available in Photoshop for a while, but the challenge of bringing that to video is not just processing lots of frames but keeping the replaced area looking consistent across the changing frames so it doesn’t stand out over time.

The other key part to this process is mask tracking, since masking the desired area is the first step in that process. Certain advances have been made here, but based on tech demos I saw at Adobe Max, more is still to come, and that is what will truly unlock the power of AI that they are trying to tap here. To be honest, I have been a bit skeptical of how much AI will impact film production workflows, since AI-powered editing has been terrible, but AI-powered VFX work seems much more promising.

Adobe’s other apps got new features as well, with Premiere Pro adding Free-Form bins for visually sorting through assets in the project panel. This affects me less, as I do more polishing than initial assembly when I’m using Premiere. They also improved playback performance for Red files, acceleration with multiple GPUs and certain 10-bit codecs. Character Animator got a better puppet rigging system, and Audition got AI-powered auto-ducking tools for automated track mixing.

Blackmagic
Elsewhere, Blackmagic announced a new version of Resolve, as expected. Blackmagic RAW is supported on a number of new products, but I am not holding my breath to use it in Adobe apps anytime soon, similar to ProRes RAW. (I am just happy to have regular ProRes output available on my PC now.) They also announced a new 8K Hyperdeck product that records quad 12G SDI to HEVC files. While I don’t think that 8K will replace 4K television or cinema delivery anytime soon, there are legitimate markets that need 8K resolution assets. Surround video and VR would be one, as would live background screening instead of greenscreening for composite shots. No image replacement in post, as it is capturing in-camera, and your foreground objects are accurately “lit” by the screens. I expect my next major feature will be produced with that method, but the resolution wasn’t there for the director to use that technology for the one I am working on now (enter 8K…).

AJA
AJA was showing off the new Ki Pro Go, which records up to four separate HD inputs to H.264 on USB drives. I assume this is intended for dedicated ISO recording of every channel of a live-switched event or any other multicam shoot. Each channel can record up to 1080p60 at 10-bit color to H264 files in MP4 or MOV and up to 25Mb.

HP
HP had one of their existing Z8 workstations on display, demonstrating the possibilities that will be available once Intel releases their upcoming DIMM-based Optane persistent memory technology to the market. I have loosely followed the Optane story for quite a while, but had not envisioned this impacting my workflow at all in the near future due to software limitations. But HP claims that there will be options to treat Optane just like system memory (increasing capacity at the expense of speed) or as SSD drive space (with DIMM slots having much lower latency to the CPU than any other option). So I will be looking forward to testing it out once it becomes available.

Dell
Dell was showing off their relatively new 49-inch double-wide curved display. The 4919DW has a resolution of 5120×1440, making it equivalent to two 27-inch QHD displays side by side. I find that 32:9 aspect ratio to be a bit much for my tastes, with 21:9 being my preference, but I am sure there are many users who will want the extra width.

Digital Anarchy
I also had a chat with the people at Digital Anarchy about their Premiere Pro-integrated Transcriptive audio transcription engine. Having spent the last three months editing a movie that is split between English and Mandarin dialogue, needing to be fully subtitled in both directions, I can see the value in their tool-set. It harnesses the power of AI-powered transcription engines online and integrates the results back into your Premiere sequence, creating an accurate script as you edit the processed clips. In my case, I would still have to handle the translations separately once I had the Mandarin text, but this would allow our non-Mandarin speaking team members to edit the Mandarin assets in the movie. And it will be even more useful when it comes to creating explicit closed captioning and subtitles, which we have been doing manually on our current project. I may post further info on that product once I have had a chance to test it out myself.

Summing Up
There were three halls of other products to look through and check out, but overall, I was a bit underwhelmed at the lack of true innovation I found at the show this year.

Full disclosure, I was only able to attend for the first two days of the exhibition, so I may have overlooked something significant. But based on what I did see, there isn’t much else that I am excited to try out or that I expect to have much of a serious impact on how I do my various jobs.

It feels like most of the new things we are seeing are merely commoditized versions of products that may originally have been truly innovative when they were initially released, but now are just slightly more fleshed out versions over time.

There seems to be much less pioneering of truly new technology and more repackaging of existing technologies into other products. I used to come to NAB to see all the flashy new technologies and products, but now it feels like the main thing I am doing there is a series of annual face-to-face meetings, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Until next year…


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

AJA intros Ki Pro Go, Corvid 44 12G and more at NAB

AJA was at NAB this year showing the new Ki Pro Go H.264 multichannel HD/SD recorder/player, as well as 14 openGear converter cards featuring DashBoard software support, two new IP video transmitters that bridge HDMI and 3G-SDI signals to SMPTE ST 2110 and the Corvid 44 12G I/O card for AJA Developers. AJA also introduced updates featuring improvements for its FS-HDR HDR/WCG converter, desktop and mobile I/O products, AJA Control Room software, HDR Image Analyzer and the Helo recorder/streamer.

Ki Pro Go is a genlock-free, multichannel H.264 HD and SD recorder/player with a flexible architecture. This portable device allows users to record up to four channels of pristine HD and SD content from SDI and HDMI sources to off-the-shelf USB media via 4x USB 3.0 ports, with a fifth port for redundant recording. The Ki Pro Go will be available in June for $3,995.

A FS-HDR v3.0 firmware update features enhanced coloring tools and support for multichannel Dynamic LUTs, plus other improvements. The release includes a new integrated Colorfront Engine Film Mode offering a rich grading and look creation toolset with optional ACES colorspace, ASC color decision list controls and built-in look selection. It’s available in June as a free update.

Developed with Colorfront, the HDR Image Analyzer v1.1 firmware update features several new enhancements, including a new web UI that simplifies remote configuration and control from multiple machines, with updates over Ethernet offering the ability to download logs and screenshots. New remote desktop support provides facility-friendly control from desktops, laptops and tablets on any operating system. The update also adds new HDR monitoring and analysis tools. It’s available soon as a free update.

The Desktop Software v15.2 update offers new features and performance enhancements for AJA Kona and Io products. It offers psupport for Apple ProRes capture and playback across Windows, Linux and macOS in AJA Control Room, at up to 8K resolutions, while also adding new IP SMPTE ST 2110 workflows using AJA Io IP and updates for Kona IP, including ST 2110-40 ANC support. The free Desktop Software update will be available in May.

The Helo v4.0 firmware update introduces new features that allow users to customize their streaming service and improve monitoring and control. AV Mute makes it easy to personalize the viewing experience with custom service branding when muting audio and video streams, while Event Logging enables encoder activity monitoring for simpler troubleshooting. It’s available in May as a free update.

The new openGear converter cards combine the capabilities of AJA’s mini converters with openGear’s high-density architecture and support for DashBoard, enabling industry-standard configuration, monitoring and control in broadcast and live event environments over a PC or local network on Windows, macOS or Linux. New models include re-clocking SDI distribution amplifiers, single-mode 3G-SDI fiber converters plus Multi-Mode variants and an SDI audio embedder/ disembedder. The openGear cards are available now, with pricing dependent upon the model.

AJA’s new IPT-10G2-HDMI and IPT-10G2-SDI mini converters are single-channel IP video transmitters for bridging traditional HDMI and 3G-SDI signals to SMPTE ST 2110 for IP-based workflows. Both models feature dual 10 GigE SFP+ ports for facilities using SMPTE ST 2022-7 for redundancy in critical distribution and monitoring. They will be available soon for $1,295.

The Corvid 44 12G is an 8-lane PCIe 3.0 video and audio I/O card featuring support for 12G-SDI I/O in a low-profile design for workstations and servers and 8K/UltraHD2/4K/UltraHD high frame rate, deep color and HDR workflows. Corvid 44 12G also facilitates multichannel 12G-SDI I/O, enabling either 8K or multiple 4K streams of input or output. It is compatible across macOS, Windows and Linux and used in high-performance applications for imaging, post, broadcast and virtual production. Corvid 44 12G cards will be available soon.

Facilis Launches Hub shared storage line

Facilis Technology rolled out its new Hub Shared Storage line for media production workflows during the NAB show. Facilis Hub includes new hardware and an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive designed to provide block-level virtualization and multi-connectivity performance.

“Hub Shared Storage is an all-new product based on our Hub Server that launched in 2017. It’s the answer to our customers’ requests for a more compact server chassis, lower-cost hybrid (SSD and HDD) options and integrated cloud and LTO archive features,” says Jim McKenna, VP of sales and marketing at Facilis. “We deliver all of this with new, more powerful hardware, new drive capacity options and a new look to both the system and software interface.”

The Facilis shared storage network allows both block-mode Fibre Channel and Ethernet connectivity simultaneously with the ability to connect through either method with the same permissions, user accounts and desktop appearance. This expands user access, connection resiliency and network permissions. The system can be configured as a direct-attached drive or segmented into various-sized volumes that carry individual permissions for read and write access.

Facilis Object Cloud
Object Cloud is an integrated disk-caching system for cloud and LTO backup and archive that includes up to 100TB of cloud storage for an annual fee. The Facilis Virtual Volume can display cloud, tape and spinning disk data in the same directory structure on the client desktop.

“A big problem for our customers is managing multiple interfaces for the various locations of their data. With Object Cloud, files in multiple locations reside in the same directory structure and are tracked by our FastTracker asset tracking in the same database as any active media asset,” says McKenna. “Object Cloud uses Object Storage technology to virtualize a Facilis volume with cloud and LTO locations. This gives access to files that exist entirely on disk, in the Cloud or on LTO, or even partially on disk and partially in the cloud.”

Every Facilis Hub Shared Storage server comes with unlimited seats in the Facilis FastTracker asset tracking application. The Object Cloud Software and Storage package is available for most Facilis servers running version 7.2 or higher.

Behind the Title: Nice Shoes animator Yandong Dino Qiu

This artist/designer has taken to sketching people on the subway to keep his skills fresh and mind relaxed.

NAME: Yandong Dino Qiu

COMPANY: New York’s Nice Shoes

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Nice Shoes is a full-service creative studio. We offer design, animation, VFX, editing, color grading, VR/AR, working with agencies, brands and filmmakers to help realize their creative vision.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Designer/Animator

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Helping our clients to explore different looks in the pre-production stage, while aiding them in getting as close as possible to the final look of the spot. There’s a lot of exploration and trial and error as we try to deliver beautiful still frames that inform the look of the moving piece.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Not so much for the title, but for myself, design and animation can be quite broad. People may assume you’re only 2D, but it also involves a lot of other skill sets such as 3D lighting and rendering. It’s pretty close to a generalist role that requires you to know nearly every software as well as to turn things around very quickly.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Photoshop, After Effects,. Illustrator, InDesign — the full Adobe Creative Suite — and Maxon Cinema 4D.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Pitch and exploration. At that stage, all possibilities are open. The job is alive… like a baby. You’re seeing it form and helping to make new life. Before this, you have no idea what it’s going to look like. After this phase, everyone has an idea. It’s very challenging, exciting and rewarding.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Revisions. Especially toward the end of a project. Everything is set up. One little change will affect everything else.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
2:15pm. Its right after lunch. You know you have the whole afternoon. The sun is bright. The mood is light. It’s not too late for anything.

Sketching on the subway.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a Manga artist.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
La Mer. Frontline. Friskies. I’ve also been drawing during my commute everyday, sketching the people I see on the subway. I’m trying to post every week on Instagram. I think it’s important for artists to keep to a routine. I started up with this at the beginning of 2019, and there’ve been about 50 drawings already. Artists need to keep their pen sharp all the time. By doing these sketches, I’m not only benefiting my drawing skills, but I’m improving my observation about shapes and compositions, which is extremely valuable for work. Being able to break down shapes and components is a key principle of design, and honing that skill helps me in responding to client briefs.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
TED-Ed What Is Time? We had a lot of freedom in figuring out how to animate Einstein’s theories in a fun and engaging way. I worked with our creative director Harry Dorrington to establish the look and then with our CG team to ensure that the feel we established in the style frames was implemented throughout the piece.

TED-Ed What Is Time?

The film was extremely well received. There was a lot of excitement at Nice Shoes when it premiered, and TED-Ed’s audience seemed to respond really warmly as well. It’s rare to see so much positivity in the YouTube comments.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Wacom tablet for drawing and my iPad for reading.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I take time and draw for myself. I love that drawing and creating is such a huge part of my job, but it can get stressful and tiring only creating for others. I’m proud of that work, but when I can draw something that makes me personally happy, any stress or exhaustion from the work day just melts away.

Quick Chat: Lord Danger takes on VFX-heavy Devil May Cry 5 spot

By Randi Altman

Visual effects for spots have become more and more sophisticated, and the recent Capcom trailer promoting the availability of its game Devil May Cry 5 is a perfect example.

 The Mike Diva-directed Something Greater starts off like it might be a commercial for an anti-depressant with images of a woman cooking dinner for some guests, people working at a construction site, a bored guy trimming hedges… but suddenly each of our “Everyday Joes” turns into a warrior fighting baddies in a video game.

Josh Shadid

The hedge trimmer’s right arm turns into a futuristic weapon, the construction worker evokes a panther to fight a monster, and the lady cooking is seen with guns a blazin’ in both hands. When she runs out of ammo, and to the dismay of her dinner guests, her arms turn into giant saws. 

Lord Danger’s team worked closely with Capcom USA to create this over-the-top experience, and they provided everything from production to VFX to post, including sound and music.

We reached out to Lord Danger founder/EP Josh Shadid to learn more about their collaboration with Capcom, as well as their workflow.

How much direction did you get from Capcom? What was their brief to you?
Capcom’s fight-games director of brand marketing, Charlene Ingram, came to us with a simple request — make a memorable TV commercial that did not use gameplay footage but still illustrated the intensity and epic-ness of the DMC series.

What was it shot on and why?
We shot on both Arri Alexa Mini and Phantom Flex 4k using Zeiss Super Speed MKii Prime lenses, thanks to our friends at Antagonist Camera, and a Technodolly motion control crane arm. We used the Phantom on the Technodolly to capture the high-speed shots. We used that setup to speed ramp through character actions, while maintaining 4K resolution for post in both the garden and kitchen transformations.

We used the Alexa Mini on the rest of the spot. It’s our preferred camera for most of our shoots because we love the combination of its size and image quality. The Technodolly allowed us to create frame-accurate, repeatable camera movements around the characters so we could seamlessly stitch together multiple shots as one. We also needed to cue the fight choreography to sync up with our camera positions.

You had a VFX supervisor on set. Can you give an example of how that was beneficial?
We did have a VFX supervisor on site for this production. Our usual VFX supervisor is one of our lead animators — having him on site to work with means we’re often starting elements in our post production workflow while we’re still shooting.

Assuming some of it was greenscreen?
We shot elements of the construction site and gardening scene on greenscreen. We used pop-ups to film these elements on set so we could mimic camera moves and lighting perfectly. We also took photogrammetry scans of our characters to help rebuild parts of their bodies during transition moments, and to emulate flying without requiring wire work — which would have been difficult to control outside during windy and rainy weather.

Can you talk about some of the more challenging VFX?
The shot of the gardener jumping into the air while the camera spins around him twice was particularly difficult. The camera starts on a 45-degree frontal, swings behind him and then returns to a 45-degree frontal once he’s in the air.

We had to digitally recreate the entire street, so we used the technocrane at the highest position possible to capture data from a slow pan across the neighborhood in order to rebuild the world. We also had to shoot this scene in several pieces and stitch it together. Since we didn’t use wire work to suspend the character, we also had to recreate the lower half of his body in 3D to achieve a natural looking jump position. That with the combination of the CG weapon elements made for a challenging composite — but in the end, it turned out really dramatic (and pretty cool).

Were any of the assets provided by Capcom? All created from scratch?
We were provided with the character and weapons models from Capcom — but these were in-game assets, and if you’ve played the game you’ll see that the environments are often dark and moody, so the textures and shaders really didn’t apply to a real-world scenario.

Our character modeling team had to recreate and re-interpret what these characters and weapons would look like in the real world — and they had to nail it — because game culture wouldn’t forgive a poor interpretation of these iconic elements. So far the feedback has been pretty darn good.

In what ways did being the production company and the VFX house on the project help?
The separation of creative from production and post production is an outdated model. The time it takes to bring each team up to speed, to manage the communication of ideas between creatives and to ensure there is a cohesive vision from start to finish, increases both the costs and the time it takes to deliver a final project.

We shot and delivered all of Devil May Cry’s Something Greater in four weeks total, all in-house. We find that working as the production company and VFX house reduces the ratio of managers per creative significantly, putting more of the money into the final product.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Western Digital adds NVMe to its WD Blue solid state drive

Western Digital has added an NVMe model to its WD Blue solid state drive (SSD) portfolio. The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD offers three times the performance of its SATA counterpart and is optimized for multitasking and resource-heavy applications, providing near-instant access to files and programs.

Using the scalable in-house SSD architecture of the WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD, the new WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD is also built on Western Digital’s 3D NAND technology, firmware and controller, and delivers sequential read and write speeds up to 1,700MB/s and 1,450MB/s respectively (for 500GB model) with efficient power consumption as low as 2.7W.

Targeting evolving workflows, the WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD features high sustained write performance over SATA, as well as other emerging technologies on the market today, to give that performance edge.

“Content transitioning from 4K and 8K means it’s a perfect time for video and photo editors, content creators, heavy data users and PC enthusiasts to transition from SATA to NVMe,” says Eyal Bek, VP, data center and client computing, Western Digital. “The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD will enable customers to build high-performance laptops and PCs with fast speeds and enough capacity in a reliable, rugged and slim form factor.”

The WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD will be available in 250GB and 500GB capacities in a single-sided M.2 2280 PCIe Gen3 x2 form factor. Pricing is $54.99 USD for 250GB (model WDS250G1B0C) and $77.99 USD for 500GB (model WDS500G1B0C).

Vickie Sornsilp joins 1606 Studio as head of production

San Francisco-based 1606 Studio, formerly Made-SF, has hired veteran post producer Vickie Sornsilp to head of production. Sornsilp, whose background includes senior positions with One Union Recording and Beast Editorial, will oversee editorial and post finishing projects for the studio, which was launched last month by executive producer Jon Ettinger, editor/director Doug Walker and editors Brian Lagerhausen and Connor McDonald.

“Vickie represents what 1606 Studio is all about…family,” says Ettinger. “She trained under me at the beginning of her career and is now ready to take on the mantle of head of production. Our clients trust her to take care of business. I couldn’t be prouder to welcome her to our team.”

A graduate of San Francisco’s Academy of Art University, Sornsilp began her career as a copywriter with agency DDB. She got her start in post production in 2014 with Beast Editorial, where she produced work for such brands as Amazon, Clorox, Doritos, HP, Round Table Pizza, Mini Cooper, Toyota, Visa, Walmart and Yahoo! She joined One Union Recording as executive producer in 2018.

Sornsilp is excited to reunite with 1606 Studio’s founders. “It feels like coming home,” she says. “Jon, Doug, Brian and Connor are legends in the business and I look forward to doing more great work with them.”

Launched under the interim name Made-SF, the company is rebranding as 1606 Studio in anticipation of moving into permanent facilities in April at 1606 Stockton Street in San Francisco’s historic North Beach neighborhood. Currently undergoing a build-out, that site will feature five Adobe Premiere editorial suites, two motion graphics suites, and two Flame post finishing suites with room for further expansion.

“We want to underscore that we are a San Francisco-centric company,” explains Walker. “Service companies from outside the area have been moving into the city to take advantage of the boom in advertising and media production. We want to make it clear that we’re already here and grounded in the community.”

Signiant intros Jet SaaS solution for large, automated, fast file transfers
 

Signiant will be at NAB next month showing Jet, its new SaaS solution that makes it easy to automate and accelerate the transfer of large files between geographically dispersed locations. Targeted at simple “lights-out” use cases, Signiant Jet meets the growing need to replace scripted FTP with a faster, more reliable and more secure alternative.

Jet uses Signiant’s innovative SaaS platform, which also underpins the company’s Media Shuttle solution. Jet’s feature set and price point allow small- and mid-sized companies to easily automate system-to-system workflows, as well as recurring data exchange with partners.

Like all Signiant products, Jet uses a proprietary transport protocol that optimizes network performance for fast, reliable movement of large files under all network conditions. Coupled with enterprise-grade security and features tuned for media professionals, Signiant products are designed to enable the global flow of content, within and between companies, in a hybrid cloud world. The Signiant portfolio is now comprised of the following offerings:

• Manager+Agents – advanced enterprise software for complex networks and workflows
• Jet – SaaS solution for simple system-to-system automated file transfer
• Media Shuttle – SaaS solution that enables the sending and sharing of large files
• Flight – SaaS solution for transfers to and from AWS and/or Azure public cloud services

Media companies can deploy a single Signiant product to solve a specific problem or combine them for managing access to content that is located in various storage types worldwide. Signiant products interoperate with each other, as well as with third-party products in the media technology ecosystem.

Digital services company Mission hires Mirek Sochor

UK-based Mission, which provides DIT and digital lab/dailies services, has hired Mirek Sochor as manager for Central Europe. Sochor joins Mission from Universal Production Partners (UPP) in Prague where he was the associate producer and supervisor of the film and TV services department. UPP is one of the biggest post facilities in mainland Europe.

Sochor’s recent credits include Crazy Rich Asians, Carnival Row and Genius. Additionally, in 2013 he was named by the Czech Republic’s Minister of Culture as an advising expert in economical and technological aspects in the field of technical development and innovation in cinematography, and in the field of preserving the national film heritage and making it accessible to the public.

At Mission, he will head business and production in Central Europe, spearheading the company’s expansion into Prague and beyond. For the last few months Mission’s DIT Nick Everett has been supporting cinematographers David Moxness, ASC, and Sid Sidell, ASC, on the ABC TV series Whiskey Cavalier. ABC’s Whiskey Cavalier stars Scott Foley and Lauren Cohan.

Mark Purvis, Mission’s managing director, saw the opportunities in Prague and other locations in Central Europe, explaining, “We are strongly committed to providing the same high level of support to productions as we have in the United Kingdom, with a focus on streamlining workflows, adding the best staff in key locations and continually training our technicians to better service our clients.”

Mission continues to grow, with offices in London and Wales and an ever-expanding roster of world-class DITs and digital dailies lab operators. They have recently worked on feature films Yesterday, Mary Queen of Scots and Downton Abbey, TV shows A Discovery of Witches, His Dark Materials and Whiskey Cavalier plus many more. They are a key partner to many cinematographers, working with them from pre-production onwards, safeguarding their color decisions as a project moves from production into post.

Netflix hires Leon Silverman to enhance global post operation

By Adrian Pennington

Veteran postproduction executive Leon Silverman was pondering the future when Netflix came calling. The former president of Laser Pacific has spent the last decade building up Disney’s in-house digital post production wing as general manager, but will be taking on what is arguably one of the biggest jobs in the industry — director, post operations and creative services at Netflix.

“To tell you the truth, I wasn’t looking for a new job. I was looking to explore the next chapter of my life,” said Silverman, announcing the news at the HPA Tech Retreat last month.

“The fact is, if there is any organization or group of people anywhere that can bring content creators together with creative technology innovation in service of global storytelling, it is Netflix. This is a real opportunity to work closely with the creative community and with partners to create a future industry worthy of its past.”

That final point is telling. Indeed, Silverman’s move from one of the titans of Hollywood to the powerhouse of digital is symbolic of an industry passing the baton of innovation.

“In some ways, moving to Netflix is a culmination of everything I have been trying to achieve throughout my career,” says Silverman. “It’s about the intersection of technology and creativity, that nexus where art and science meet in order to innovate new forms of storytelling. Netflix has the resources, the vision and the talent to align these goals.”

L-R: Leon Silverman and Sean Cooney

Silverman will report to Sean Cooney, Netflix, director worldwide post production. During his keynote at the HPA Tech Retreat, Cooney introduced Silverman and his new role. He noted that the former president of the HPA (2008-2016) had built and run some of the most cutting-edge facilities on the planet.

“We know that there is work to be done on our part to better serve our talent,” says Cooney. “We were looking for someone with a deep understanding of the industry’s long and storied history of entertainment creation. Someone who knows the importance of working closely with creatives and has a vision for where things are going in the future.”

Netflix global post operation is centered in LA where it employs the majority of its 250 staff and will oversee delivery of 1,000 original pieces of programming this year. But with regional content increasingly important to the growth of the organization, Cooney and Silverman’s tricky task is to streamline core functions like localization, QC, asset management and archive while increasing output from Asia, Latin America and Europe.

“One of the challenges is making sure that the talent we work with feel they are creatively supported even while we operate on a such a large scale,” explains Cooney. “We want to continue to provide a boutique experience even as we expand.”

There’s recognition of the importance to Netflix of its relationship with dozens of third-party post houses, freelance artists and tech vendors.

“Netflix has spent a lot of time cultivating deep relationships in the post community, but as we get more and more involved in upstream production we want to focus on reducing the friction between the creative side of production and the delivery side,” says Silverman. “We need to redesign our internal workflows to really try to take as much as friction out of the process as possible.”

Netflix: Black Mirror – Bandersnatch

While this makes sense from a business point of view, there’s a creative intent too. Bandersnatch, the breakthrough interactive drama from the Black Mirror team, could not have been realized without close collaboration from editorial all the way to user interface design.

“We developed special technology to enable audience interaction but that had to work in concert with our engineering and product teams and with editorial and post teams,” says Cooney.

Silverman likens this collapse of the traditional role of post into the act of production itself as “Post Post.” It’s an industry-wide trend that will enable companies like Netflix to innovate new formats spanning film, TV and immersive media.

“We are at a time and a place where the very notion of a serial progression from content inception to production to editorial then finish to distribution is anachronistic,” says Silverman. “It’s not that post is dead, it’s just that ‘post’ is not ‘after’ anything as much as it has become the underlying fabric of content creation, production and distribution. There are some real opportunities to create a more expansive, elegant and global ability to enable storytellers of all kinds to make stories of all kinds — wherever they are.”


UK-based Adrian Pennington is a professional journalist and editor specializing in the production, the technology and the business of moving image media.

Posting director Darren Lynn Bousman’s horror film, St. Agatha

Atlanta’s Moonshine Post helped create a total post production pipeline — from dailies to finishing — for the film St. Agatha, directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Saw II, Saw III, Saw IV, Repo the Genetic Opera). 

The project, from producers Seth and Sara Michaels, was co-edited by Moonshine’s Gerhardt Slawitschka and Patrick Perry and colored by Moonshine’s John Peterson.

St. Agatha is a horror film that shot in the town of Madison, Georgia. “The house we needed for the convent was perfect, as the area was one of the few places that had not burned down during the Civil War,” explains Seth Michaels. “It was our first time shooting in Atlanta, and the number one reason was because of the tax incentive. But we also knew Georgia had an infrastructure that could handle our production.”

What the producers didn’t know during production was that Moonshine Post could handle all aspects of post, and were initially brought in only for dailies. With the opportunity to do a producer’s cut, they returned to Moonshine Post.

Time and budget dictated everything, and Moonshine Post was able to offer two editors working in tandem to edit a final cut. “Why not cut in collaboration?” suggested Drew Sawyer, founder of Moonshine Post and executive producer. “It will cut the time in half, and you can explore different ideas faster.”

“We quite literally split the movie in half,” reports Perry, who, along with Slawitschka, cut on Adobe Premiere “It’s a 90-minute film, and there was a clear break. It’s a little unusual, I will admit, but almost always when we are working on something, we don’t have a lot of time, so splitting it in half works.”

Patrick Perry

Gerhardt Slawitschka

“Since it was a producer’s cut, when it came to us it was in Premiere, and it didn’t make sense to switch over to Avid,” adds Slawitschka. “Patrick and I can use both interchangeably, but prefer Premiere; it offers a lot of flexibility.”

“The editors, Patrick and Gerhardt, were great,” says Sara Michaels. “They watched every single second of footage we had, so when we recut the movie, they knew exactly what we had and how to use it.”

“We have the same sensibilities,” explains Gerhardt. “On long-form projects we take a feature in tandem, maybe split it in half or in reels. Or, on a TV series, each of us take a few episodes, compare notes, and arrive at a ‘group mind,’ which is our language of how a project is working. On St. Agatha, Patrick and I took a bit of a risk and generated a four-page document of proposed thoughts and changes. Some very macro, some very micro.”

Colorist John Peterson, a partner at Moonshine Post, worked closely with the director on final color using Blackmagic’s Resolve. “From day one, the first looks we got from camera raw were beautiful.” Typically, projects shot in Atlanta ship back to a post house in a bigger city, “and maybe you see it and maybe you don’t. This one became a local win, we processed dailies, and it came back to us for a chance to finish it here,” he says.

Peterson liked working directly with the director on this film. “I enjoyed having him in session because he’s an artist. He knew what he was looking for. On the flashbacks, we played with a variety of looks to define which one we liked. We added a certain amount of film grain and stylistically for some scenes, we used heavy vignetting, and heavy keys with isolation windows. Darren is a director, but he also knows the terminology, which gave me the opportunity to take his words and put them on the screen for him. At the end of the week, we had a successful film.”

John Peterson

The recent expansion of Moonshine Post, which included a partnership with the audio company Bare Knuckles Creative and a visual effects company Crafty Apes, “was necessary, so we could take on the kind of movies and series we wanted to work with,” explains Sawyer. “But we were very careful about what we took and how we expanded.”

They recently secured two AMC series, along with projects from Netflix. “We are not trying to do all the post in town, but we want to foster and grow the post production scene here so that we can continue to win people’s trust and solidify the Atlanta market,” he says.

Uncork’d Entertainment’s St. Agatha was in theaters and became available on-demand starting February 8. Look for it on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, Fandango Now, Xbox, Dish Network and local cable providers.