Tag Archives: post production

postPerspective’s ‘SMPTE 2019 Live’ interview coverage

postPerspective was the official production team for SMPTE during its most recent conference in downtown Los Angeles this year. Taking place once again at the Bonaventure Hotel, the conference featured events and sessions all week. (You can watch those interviews here.)

These sessions ranged from “Machine Learning & AI in Content Creation” to “UHD, HDR, 4K, High Frame Rate” to “Mission Critical: Project Artemis, Imaging from the Moon and Deep Space Imaging.” The latter featured two NASA employees and a live talk with astronauts on the International Space Station. It was very cool.

postPerspective’s coverage was also cool and included many sit-down interviews with those presenting at the show (including former astronaut and One More Orbit director Terry Virts as well as Todd Douglas Miller, the director of the Apollo 11 doc), SMPTE executives and long-standing members of the organization.

In addition to the sessions, manufacturers had the opportunity to show their tools on the exhibit floor, where one of our crews roamed with camera and mic in hand reporting on the newest tech.

Whether you missed the conference or experienced it firsthand, these exclusive interviews will provide a ton of information about SMPTE, standards, and the future of our industry, as well as just incredibly smart people talking about the merger of technology and creativity.

Enjoy our coverage!

Abu Dhabi’s twofour54 is now Dolby Vision certified

Abu Dhabi’s twofour54 has become Dolby Vision certified in an effort to meet the demand for color grading and mastering Dolby Vision HDR content. twofour54 is the first certified Dolby Vision facility in the UAE, providing work in both Arabic and English.

“The way we consume content has been transformed by connectivity and digitalization, with consumers able to choose not only what they watch but where, when and how,” says Katrina Anderson, director of commercial services at twofour54. “This means it is essential that content creators have access to technology such as Dolby Vision in order to ensure their content reaches as wide an audience as possible around the world.”

With Netflix, Amazon Prime and others now competing with existing broadcasters, there is a big demand around the world for high-quality production facilities. According to twofour54, Netflix’s expenditure on content creation soared from $4.6 billion in 2015 to $12 billion last year, while other platforms — such as Amazon Prime, Apple TV and YouTube — are also seeking to create more unique content. Consequently, the global demand for production facilities such as those offered by twofour54 is outstripping supply.

“We have seen an increased interest for Dolby Vision in home entertainment due to growing popularity of digital streaming services in Middle East, and we are now able to support studios and content creators with leading-edge tools that are deployed at twofour54 world-class post facility,” explains Pankaj Kedia, managing director of emerging markets for Dolby Laboratories. “Dolby Vision is the preferred HDR mastering workflow for leading studios and a growing number of content creators, and hence this latest offering demonstrates twofour54 commitment to make Abu Dhabi a preferred location for film and TV production.”

Why is this important? For color grading of movies and episodic content, Dolby has created a workflow that generates shot-by-shot dynamic metadata that allows filmmakers to see how their content will look on consumer devices. The colorist can then add “trims” to adjust how the mapping looks and to deliver a better-looking SDR version for content providers serving early Ultra HD (UHD) televisions that are capable only of SDR reproduction.

The colorists at twofour54 use both Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and FilmLight Baselight systems.

Main Image: Engineer Noura Al Ali

Blog: Making post deliverables simple and secure

By Morgan Swift

Post producers don’t have it easy. With an ever-increasing number of platforms for distribution and target languages to cater to, getting one’s content to the global market can be challenging to say the least. To top it all, given the current competitive landscape, producers are always under pressure to reduce costs and meet tight deadlines.

Having been in the creative services business for two decades, we’ve all seen it before — post coordinators and supervisors getting burnt out working late nights, often juggling multiple projects and being pushed to the breaking point. You can see it in their eyes. What adds to the stress is dealing with multiple vendors to get various kinds of post finishing work done — from color grading to master QC to localization.

Morgan Swift

Localization is not the least of these challenges. Different platforms specify different deliverables, including access services like closed captions (CC) and audio description (AD); along with as-broadcast scripts (ABS) and combined continuity spotting lists (CCSL). Each of these deliverables requires specialized teams and tools to execute. Needless to say, they also have a significant impact on the budget — usually at least tens of thousands of dollars (much more for a major release).

It is therefore extremely critical to plan post deliverables well in advance to ensure that you are in complete control of turnaround time (TAT), expected spend and potential cost saving opportunities. Let’s look at a few ways of streamlining the process of creating access services deliverables. To do this, we need to understand the various factors at play.

First of all, we need to consider the amount of effort involved in creating these deliverables. There is typically a lot of overlap, as deliverables like as-broadcast scripts and combined continuity spotting lists are often required for creating closed captions and audio description. This means that it is cheaper to combine the creation of all these deliverables instead of getting them done separately.

The second factor to think about is security. Given that pre-release content is extremely vulnerable to piracy, the days of getting an extra DVD with visible timecode for closed captions should be over. Even the days of sending a non-studio-approved link just to create the deliverables should be over.
Why? Because today, there exist tailor-made solutions that have been designed to facilitate secure localization operations. They enable easy creation of a folder that can be used to send and receive files securely, even by external vendors. One such solution is Clear Media ERP, which was built ground-up by Prime Focus Technologies in order to address these challenges.

There is no additional cost to send and receive videos or post deliverable files if you already have a system like this set up for a show. You can keep your pre-release content completely safe, leveraging the software’s advanced security features which include multi-factor authentication, Okta integration, bulk watermarking, burnt-in watermarks for downloads, secure script and document distribution and more.

With the right tech stack, you can get one beautifully organized and secure location to store all of your Access Services deliverables. Which means your team can finally sit back and focus on what matters the most — creating incredible content.


Morgan Swift  is director of account management at Prime Focus Technologies in Los Angeles.

Production and post boutique Destro opens in LA

Industry veterans Drew Neujahr, Sean McAllen, and Shane McAllen have partnered to form Destro, a live-action and post production boutique based in Los Angeles. Destro has already developed and produced an original documentary series, Seed, which profiles artists and innovators across a range of disciplines. In addition, the team has recently worked on projects for Google, Nintendo and Michelin.

Destro’s primary focus will be producing, directing, and post on live-action projects. However, with the partners’ extensive background in motion and VFX, the team is adept at executing mixed-media pipelines when the occasion calls.

With the launch of original studio projects like Seed, Destro sees an opportunity not only to showcase its own voice but to present a case study to forge symbiotic relationships with brands that have real stories to tell about their teams, products, users, and core values.

“Great ideas don’t always happen at conception,” says Neujahr. “When the weather changes during production or the client rethinks the concept in post, being able to improvise and adjust brings about the best work.”

Neujahr and the McAllen brothers bring a combined 45 years of experience spanning commercial and film production, post production and entertainment branding/marketing.

Neujahr’s experience includes features and marketing as both a producer and a creative. He has directed short films, commercials and the documentary series Western State. As a producer, head of production and executive producer at top motion graphics and visual effects studios in LA, he oversaw spots for Ford, Burger King, Walmart, Nickelodeon, FX and History.

Sean McAllen is a seasoned film and commercial editor who has crafted both short-form and long-form work for Ford, Chevy, Nissan, Toyota, Red Bull, Google and Samsung. He also co-wrote and edited the Emmy-nominated documentary feature Houston We Have a Problem. McAllen got his start co-founding a Tokyo/Los Angeles-based production company, where he directed commercials, broadcast documentaries and entertainment marketing content.

Shane McAllen is a veteran of the film and commercial industry. His feature editing credits include contributions to Iron Man 3 and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. On the commercial side, he has worked on campaigns for BMW, Apple and Nintendo. He is also an accomplished writer, producer and director who has worked on a bevy of projects for Google AR and two product reveals for the Nintendo Switch.

“We all got into this crazy world because we love telling stories,” concludes Sean McAllen. “And we share a mutual respect for each other’s craft. Ultimately, our strength is our approachability. We’re the ones who pick up the phone, answer the emails, make the coffee, and do the work.”

Main Image: (L-R) Sean McAllen, Drew Neujahr, and Shane McAllen

Bonfire adds Jason Mayo as managing director/partner

Jason Mayo has joined digital production company Bonfire in New York as managing director and partner. Industry veteran Mayo will be working with Bonfire’s new leadership lineup, which includes founder/Flame artist Brendan O’Neil, CD Aron Baxter, executive producer Dave Dimeola and partner Peter Corbett. Bonfire’s offerings include VFX, design, CG, animation, color, finishing and live action.

Mayo comes to Bonfire after several years building Postal, the digital arm of the production company Humble. Prior to that he spent 14 years at Click 3X, where he worked closely with Corbett as his partner. While there he also worked with Dimeola, who cut his teeth at Click as a young designer/compositor. Dimeola later went on to create The Brigade, where he developed the network and technology that now forms the remote, cloud-based backbone referred to as the Bonfire Platform.

Mayo says a number of factors convinced him that Bonfire was the right fit for him. “This really was what I’d been looking for,” he says. “The chance to be part of a creative and innovative operation like Bonfire in an ownership role gets me excited, as it allows me to make a real difference and genuinely effect change. And when you’re working closely with a tight group of people who are focused on a single vision, it’s much easier for that vision to be fully aligned. That’s harder to do in a larger company.”

O’Neil says that having Mayo join as partner/MD is a major move for the company. “Jason’s arrival is the missing link for us at Bonfire,” he says. “While each of us has specific areas to focus on, we needed someone who could both handle the day to day of running the company while keeping an eye on our brand and our mission and introducing our model to new opportunities. And that’s exactly his strong suit.”

For the most part, Mayo’s familiarity with his new partners means he’s arriving with a head start. Indeed, his connection to Dimeola, who built the Bonfire Platform — the company’s proprietary remote talent network, nicknamed the “secret sauce” — continued as Mayo tapped Dimeola’s network for overflow and outsourced work while at Postal. Their relationship, he says, was founded on trust.

“Dave came from the artist side, so I knew the work I’d be getting would be top quality and done right,” Mayo explains. “I never actually questioned how it was done, but now that he’s pulled back the curtain, I was blown away by the capabilities of the Platform and how it dramatically differentiates us.

“What separates our system is that we can go to top-level people around the world but have them working on the Bonfire Platform, which gives us total control over the process,” he continues. “They work on our cloud servers with our licenses and use our cloud rendering. The Platform lets us know everything they’re doing, so it’s much easier to track costs and make sure you’re only paying for the work you actually need. More importantly, it’s a way for us to feel connected – it’s like they’re working in a suite down the hall, except they could be anywhere in the world.”

Mayo stresses that while the cloud-based Platform is a huge advantage for Bonfire, it’s just one part of its profile. “We’re not a company riding on the backs of freelancers,” he points out. “We have great, proven talent in our core team who work directly with clients. What I’ve been telling my longtime client contacts is that Bonfire represents a huge step forward in terms of the services and level of work I can offer them.”

Corbett believes he and Mayo will continue to explore new ways of working now that he’s at Bonfire. “In the 14 years Jason and I built Click 3X, we were constantly innovating across both video and digital, integrating live action, post production, VFX and digital engagements in unique ways,” he observes. “I’m greatly looking forward to continuing on that path with him here.”

Technicolor Post opens in Wales 

Technicolor has opened a new facility in Cardiff, Wales, within Wolf Studios. This expansion of the company’s post production footprint in the UK is a result of the growing demand for more high-quality content across streaming platforms and the need to post these projects, as well as the growth of production in Wales.

The facility is connected to all of Technicolor’s locations worldwide through the Technicolor Production Network, giving creatives easy access and to their projects no matter where they are shooting or posting.

The facility, an extension of Technicolor’s London operations, supports all Welsh productions and features a multi-purpose, state-of-the-art suite as well as space for VFX and front-end services including dailies. Technicolor Wales is working on Bad Wolf Production’s upcoming fantasy epic His Dark Materials, providing picture and sound services for the BBC/HBO show. Technicolor London’s recent credits include The Two Popes, The Souvenir, Chernobyl, Black Mirror, Gentleman Jack and The Spanish Princess.

Within this new Cardiff facility, Technicolor is offering 2K digital cinema projection, FilmLight Baselight color grading, realtime 4K HDR remote review, 4K OLED video monitoring, 5.1/7.1 sound, ADR recording/source connect, Avid Pro Tools sound mixing, dailies processing and Pulse cloud storage.

Bad Wolf Studios in Cardiff offers 125,000 square feet of stage space with five stages. There is flexible office space, as well as auxiliary rooms and costume and props storage. Its within

Behind the Title: C&I Studios founder Joshua Miller

While he might run the company, founder/CEO Joshua Miller is happiest creating. He also says there is no job too small: “Nothing is beneath you.”

NAME: Joshua Otis Miller

COMPANY: C&I Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
C&I Studios is a production company and advertising agency. We are located in New York City, Los Angeles, and Fort Lauderdale.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Founder and CEO

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Well, my job is a little weird. While I own and run the company, my passion has always been filmmaking… since I was four years old. I also run the video and film team at the studio, so my job means a lot of things. One day, I can be shooting on a mountain and the next day writing scripts and concepts, or editing, creating feature films or TV shows or managing post production. Since I’m the CEO, I spend a ton of time bringing in new business and adding technology to the company. Every day feels brand new to me, and that is the best part.

Black Violin

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think the thing that surprises most people is that when I’m on set working, I’m not sitting back drinking a mojito. I’m carrying the tripods and the sandbags and setting up the shots. I’m also the one signing everyone’s checks. One of our core beliefs at our company is “nothing is beneath you,” and that means you can do anything — including cleaning toilets —that helps the company grow, and it requires you to drop your ego. In the creative industry that’s a big deal.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is working with my team. I got so sick of the freelance game — it’s so individualized, and everyone is out for themselves. I wanted to start C&I to work with people consistently, dream together, build together and create together. That is by far better than anything else.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job is firing people. That just sucks.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Between 4am and 5am. If you aren’t waking up earlier than everyone else, you aren’t doing it right.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be doing the exact same thing. I could be working at McDonald’s, but I’d be filming with my iPhone or Razer phone and editing. It’s not about the money; you can’t take this thing from me. It’s a part of me, and something I certainly didn’t choose. So, no matter where you put me, this is what will come out. And since Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve is free, this is something I could actually do… I could be working at McDonald’s and shooting for fun on my phone and editing in Resolve’s new cut page, which is magic. That actually sounds awesome. Well, except the McDonald’s part (laughs).

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Again, I don’t feel like I chose it. It’s something that I always felt drawn to. I was interested in cameras since I was very young… tearing apart my parents VHS tapes to see how they worked. I was completely perplexed by the idea that a camera does something and then it goes on this tape, and I see what’s on that tape in this VHS player and on TV. That was something I had to learn and figure out. But the main reason I wanted to really dig into this field is because I remember being in my grandmother’s house watching those VHS tapes with my brothers and my family and everyone is just sitting around, laughing watching old memories. I can’t shake that feeling. People feel warm, vulnerable, close… that is the power you have with a camera and the ability to tell a story. It’s absolutely incredible.

Black Violin

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Right now, I’m working on an incredible music video with Black Violin. We are shooting it in Los Angeles and Miami, and I’m really excited about it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Probably something I’m most proud of is our latest film Christmas Eve. We just poured everything into that film. It’s just magic. We have done a lot of amazing stuff, but that one is really close to me right now.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Camera, computer, speakers (for music — I can’t live without music). Those three things are a must for me to breathe.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m not really into social media, not a big fan of what it has turned us into (off of my soapbox now), but I do follow a ton of film companies and directors. I love following Shane Hurlbut, Blackmagic Design, SmallHD, Red Digital Cinema and Panavision, to name a view.

YOU MENTIONED LOVING MUSIC. DO YOU LISTEN WHILE YOU WORK?
Music is everything. It’s the oil to my car. Without that, I’m toast. Of course, I don’t listen to music when I’m editing, but when I’m on set I love to listen to music. Love the new Chance record. When I’m writing, it’s always either Bon Iver or Michael Giacchino. I love scores and composers.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
To distress, I love the moments in the studio when the staff and I just sit around and get to laugh and just hang out. I have a beautiful family and two wonderful kids, so when I’m not stressing about work I’m giving horsey-back rides to my son, while my daughter tries to explain TikTok to me.

Quick Chat: Element’s Matthew O’Rourke on Vivian partnership

Recently, Boston-based production and post company Element  launched Element Austin — a partnership with production studio Vivian. Element now represents a select directorial roster out of Austin.

We recently reached out to Element executive producer Matthew O’Rourke, who led the charge to get this partnership off the ground.

Can you talk a bit about your partnership with Vivian? How did that come about, and why was this important for Element to do?
I’ve had a relationship with Vivian’s co-owner, Buttons Pham, for almost 10 years. She was my go-to Texas-based resource while I was an executive producer at MMB working on Toyota. She is incredibly resourceful and a great human being. When I joined Element, she became a valued production service partner for our projects in the south (mostly based out of Texas and Atlanta). Our relationship with Vivian was always important to Element since it expands the production support we can offer for our directors and our clients.

Blue Cross Blue Shield

Expanding on that thought. What does Vivian offer that you guys don’t?
They let us have boots on the ground in Austin. They have a strong reputation there and deep resources to handle all levels of work.

How will this partnership work?
Buttons and her business partner Tim Hoppock have become additional executive producers for Element and lead the Element Austin office.

How does the Boston market differ from Austin?
Austin is a growing, vibrant market with tons of amazingly creative people and companies. Lots of production resources are coming in from Los Angeles, but are also developing locally.

Can you point to any recent jobs that resulted from this partnership?
Vivian has been a production services partner for several years, helping us with campaigns for Blue Cross Blue Shield, Subway and more. Since our launch a few weeks ago, we have entered into discussions with several agencies on upcoming work out of the Austin market.

What trends are you seeing overall for this part of the market?
Creative agencies are looking for reliable resources. Having a physical presence in Austin allows us to better support local clients, but also bring in projects from outside that market and produce efficient, quality work.

Good Company adds director Daniel Iglesias Jr.

Filmmaker Daniel Iglesias Jr., whose reel spans narrative storytelling to avant-garde fashion films with creativity and an eccentric visual style, has signed with full-service creative studio Good Company.

Iglesias’ career started while attending Chapman University’s renowned film school, where he earned a BFA in screen acting. At the same time, Iglesias and his friend Zack Sekuler began crafting images for his friends in the alt-rock band The Neighbourhood. Iglesias’ career took off after directing his first music video for the band’s breakout hit “Sweater Weather,” which reached over 310 million views. He continues working behind the camera for The Neighbourhood and other artists like X Ambassadors and AlunaGeorge.

Iglesias uses elements of surrealism and a blend of avant-garde and commercial compositions, often stemming from innovative camera techniques. His work includes projects for clients like Ralph Lauren, Steve Madden, Skyy Vodka and Chrysler and the Vogue film Death Head Sphinx.

One of his most celebrated projects was a two-minute promo for Margaux the Agency. Designed as a “living magazine,” Margaux Vol 1 merges creative blocking, camera movement and effects to create a kinetic visual catalog that is both classic and contemporary. The piece took home Best Picture at the London Fashion Film Festival, along with awards from the Los Angeles Film Festival, the International Fashion Film Awards and Promofest in Spain.

Iglesias’ first project since joining Good Company was Ikea’s Kama Sutra commercial for Ogilvy NY, a tongue-in-cheek exploration of the boudoir. Now he is working on a project for Paper Magazine and Tiffany.

“We all see the world through our own lens; through film, I can unscrew my lens and pop in onto other people and, by effect, change their point of view or even the depth of culture,” he says. “That’s why the medium excites me — I want to show people my lens.”

We reached out to Iglesias to learn a bit more about how he works.

How do you go about picking the people you work with?
I do have a couple DPs and PDs I like to work with on the regular, depending on the job, and sometimes it makes sense to work with someone new. If it’s someone new that I haven’t worked with before, I typically look at three things to get a sense of how right they are for the project: image quality, taste and versatility. Then it’s a phone call or meeting to discuss the project in person so we can feel out chemistry and execution strategy.

Do you trust your people completely in terms of what to shoot on, or do you like to get involved in that process as well?
I’m a pretty hands-on and involved director, but I think it’s important to know what you don’t know and delegate/trust accordingly. I think it’s my job as a director to communicate, as detailed and effectively as possible, an accurate explanation of the vision (because nobody sees the vision of the project better than I do). Then I must understand that the DPs/PDs/etc. have a greater knowledge of their field than I do, so I must trust them to execute (because nobody understands how to execute in their fields better than they do).

Since Good Company also provides post, how involved do you get in that process?
I would say I edit 90% of my work. If I’m not editing it myself, then I still oversee the creative in post. It’s great to have such a strong post workflow with Good Company.

Harbor adds talent to its London, LA studios

Harbor has added to its London- and LA-based studios. Marcus Alexander joins as VP of picture post, West Coast and Darren Rae as senior colorist. He will be supervising all dailies in the UK.

Marcus Alexander started his film career in London almost 20 years ago as an assistant editor before joining Framestore as a VFX editor. He helped Framestore launch its digital intermediate division, producing multiple finishes on a host of tent-pole and independent titles, before joining Deluxe to set up its London DI facility. Alexander then relocated to New York to head up Deluxe New York DI. With the growth in 3D movies, he returned to the UK to supervise stereo post conversions for multiple studios before his segue into VFX supervising.

“I remember watching It Came from Outer Space at a very young age and deciding there and then to work in movies,” says Alexander. “Having always been fascinated with photography and moving images, I take great pride in thorough involvement in my capacity from either a production or creative standpoint. Joining Harbor allows me to use my skills from a post-finishing background along with my production experience in creating both 2D and 3D images to work alongside the best talent in the industry and deliver content we can be extremely proud of.”

Rae began his film career in the UK in 1995 as a sound sync operator at Mike Fraser Neg Cutters. He moved into the telecine department in 1997 as a trainee. By 1998 he was a dailies colorist working with 16mm and 35mm film. From 2001, Rae spent three years with The Machine Room in London as telecine operator and joined Todd AO’s London lab in 2014 as colorist working on drama and commercials 35mm and 16mm film and 8mm projects for music videos. In 2006 Rae moved into grading dailies at Todd AO parent company Deluxe in Soho London, moving to Company 3 London in 2007 as senior dailies colorist. In 2009, he was promoted to supervising colorist.

Prior to joining Harbor, Rae was senior colorist for Pinewood Digital, supervising multiple shows and overseeing a team of four, eventually becoming head of grading. Projects include Pokemon Detective Pikachu, Dumbo, Solo: A Star Wars Story, The Mummy, Rogue One, Doctor Strange and Star Wars Episode VII — The Force Awakens.

“My main goal is to make the director of photography feel comfortable. I can work on a big feature film from three months to a year, and the trust the DP has in you is paramount. They need to know that wherever they are shooting in the world, I’m supporting them. I like to get under the skin of the DP right from the start to get a feel for their wants and needs and to provide my own input throughout the entire creative process. You need to interpret their instructions and really understand their vision. As a company, Harbor understands and respects the filmmaker’s process and vision, so for me, it’s the ideal new home for me.”

Harbor has also announced that colorists Elodie Ichter and Katie Jordan are now available to work with clients on both the East and West Coasts in North America as well as the UK. Some of the team’s work includes Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, The Irishman, The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner, Maleficent, The Wolf of Wall Street, Anna, Snow White and the Huntsman and Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Review: Boxx’s Apexx A3 AMD Ryzen workstation

By Mike McCarthy

Boxx’s Apexx A3 is based on AMD’s newest Ryzen CPUs and the X570 chipset. Boxx has taken these elements and added liquid CPU cooling, professional GPUs and a compact, solid case to create an optimal third-generation Ryzen system configured for pros. It can support dual GPUs and two 3.5-inch hard drives, as well as the three M.2 slots on the board and anything that can fit into its five PCIe slots. The system I am reviewing came with AMD’s top CPU, the 12-core 3900X running at 3.8GHz, as well as 64GB of DDR4-2666 RAM and a Quadro RTX 4000 GPU. I also tested it with a 40GbE network card and a variety of other GPUs.

I have been curious about AMD’s CPU reboot with Ryzen architecture, but I haven’t used an AMD-based system since the 64-bit Opterons in the HP xw9300s that I had in 2006. That was also around the same time that I last used a system from Boxx, in the form of its HD Pro RT editing systems, based on those same AMD Opteron CPUs. At the time, Boxx systems were relatively unique in that they had large internal storage arrays with eight or 10 separate disks, and those arrays came in a variety of forms.

The three different locations that I worked during that time period had Boxx workstations with IDE-, SATA- and SCSI-based storage arrays. All three types of storage experienced various issues at the locations where I worked with them, but that might have been more a result of unreliable hard drives and relatively new PCI RAID controllers available at that time more than a reflection on Boxx.

Regardless, and for whatever reason, Boxx focused more on processing performance than storage over the next decade, marketing more toward 3D animation and VFX artists (among other users) who do lots of processing on small amounts of data, instead of video editors who do small amounts of processing on large amounts of data. At this point, most large data sets are stored on network appliances or external arrays, although my projects have recently been leaning the other way, using older server chassis with lots of internal drive slots.

Out of the Box
The Apexx system shipped from Boxx in a reasonably sized carton with good foam protection. Compared to the servers I have been using recently, it is tiny and feather-light at 25 pounds. The compact case is basically designed upside down from conventional layouts, with the power supply at the bottom and the card slots at the top. To save space, it fits the 750W power supply directly over the CPU, which is liquid-cooled with a radiator at the front of the case. There are two SATA hard drive bays at the top of the case. The system is based on the X570 Aorus Ultra motherboard, which has three full-length and two x1 PCIe slots, as well as three M.2 slots.

The system has no shortage of USB ports, with four USB 3.0 ports up front next to the headphone and mic connectors, and 10 on the back panel. Of those, three are USB 3.1 Gen2, including one that is a Type-C port. All the rest are Type-A, three more USB 3.0 ports and four USB 2.0 ports. The white USB 3.0 port allows you to update the BIOS from a USB stick if desired, which might come in handy when AMD’s fix to the Zen2 boost frequency issue becomes available. There are also 5.1 analog audio and SPDIF connectors on the board, as well as HDMI out and Wi-Fi antenna ports.

I hooked up my 8K monitor and connected it to my network for initial config and setup. The simplest test I run is Maxon’s Cinebench 15, which returned a GPU score of 207 and a multi-core CPU score of 3169. Both those values are the highest results I have ever gotten with that tool, including from dual-socket systems workstations, although I have not tested the newest generation of Intel Xeons. AMD’s CPUs are well-suited for that particular test, and this is the first true Nvidia Quadro card I have tested from the Turing-based RTX generation.

As this is an AMD X570 board, it supports PCIe 4.0, but that is of little benefit to current GPUs. The one case where the extra bandwidth could currently make a difference is NVMe SSDs playing back high-resolution frames. This system only came with a PCIe 3.0 SSD, but I am hoping to get a newer PCIe 4.0 one to run benchmarks on for a future article. In the meantime, this one is doing just fine for most uses, with over 3GB/sec of read and over 2GB/sec of write bandwidth. This is more than fast enough for uncompressed 4K work.

Using Adobe Tools
Next I installed both the 2018 and 2019 versions of Adobe Premiere Pro and Media Encoder so I could run tests with the same applications I had used for previous benchmarks on other systems, for more accurate comparisons. I have a standard set of sequences I export in AME, which are based on raw camera footage from Red Monstro, Sony Venice and ARRI Alexa LF cameras, exported to HEVC at 8K and 4K, testing both 8-bit and deep color render paths. Most of these renders were also completed faster than on any other system I have tested, and this is “only” a single-socket consumer-level architecture (compared to Threadripper and Epyc).

I did further tests after adding a Mellanox 40GbE network card, and swapping out the Quadro RTX 4000 for more powerful GPUs. I tested a GeForce RTX 2080 TI, a Quadro RTX 6000, an older Quadro P6000 and an AMD Radeon Pro WX 8200. The 2080TI and RTX6000 did allow 8K playback in realtime from RedCineX, but the max resolution, full-frame 8K files were right at the edge of smooth (around 23fps). Any smaller frame sizes were fine at 24p. The more powerful GeForce card didn’t improve my AME export times much if at all and got a 25% lower OpenGL score in Cinebench, revealing that Quadro drivers still make a difference for some 3D applications and that Adobe users don’t benefit much from investing in a GPU beyond a GeForce 2070. The AMD card did much better than in my earlier tests, showing that AMD drivers and software support have improved significantly since then.

Real-World Use
Where the system really stood out is when I started to do some real work with it. The 40GbE connection to my main workstation allowed me to seamlessly open projects that are stored on my internal 40TB array. I am working on a large feature film at the moment, so I used it to export a number of reels and guide tracks. These are 4K sequences of 7K anamorphic Red footage with layers of GPU effects, titles, labels and notes, with over 20 layers of audio as well. Rendering out a 4K DNxHR file of a 20-minute reel takes 140 minutes on my 16-core dual-socket workstation, but this “consumer-level” AMD system kicks them out in under 90 minutes. My watermarked DNxHD guides render out 20% faster than before as well, even over the network. This is probably due to the higher overall CPU frequency, as I have discovered that Premiere doesn’t multi-thread very well.

For AME Render times, lower is better and for Cinebench scores, higher is better.
Comparison system details:
Dell Precision 7910 with the GeForce 2080 TI
Supermicro X9DRi with Quadro P6000
HP Z4 10-core workstation with GeForce 2080TI
Razer Blade 15 with GeForce 2080 TI Max-Q

I also did some test exports in Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve. I am less familiar with that program, so my testing was much more limited, but it exported nearly as fast as Premiere, and the Nvidia cards were only slightly faster than the AMD GPUs in that app. (But I have few previous Resolve tests to use as a point of comparison to other systems.)

As an AMD system, there are a few limitations as compared to a similar Intel model. First of all, there is no support for the hardware encoding available in Intel’s Quick Sync integrated graphics hardware. This lack of support only matters if you have software that uses that particular functionality, such as my Adobe apps. But the system seems fast enough to accomplish those encode and decode tasks on its own. It also lacks a Thunderbolt port, as until recently that was an exclusively Intel technology. Now that Thunderbolt 3 is being incorporated into USB 4.0, it will be more important to have, but it will become available in a wider variety of products. It might be possible to add a USB 4.0 card to this system when the time comes, which would alleviate this issue.

When I first received the system, it reported the CPU as an 800MHz chip, which was the result of a BIOS configuration issue. After fixing that, the only other problem I had was a conflict between my P6000 GPU and my 8K display, which usually work great together. But it won’t boot with that combo, which is a pretty obscure corner case. All other GPU and monitor combinations worked fine, and I tested a bunch. I worked with Boxx technical support on that and a few other minor issues, and they were very helpful, sending me spare parts to confirm that the issues weren’t caused by my own added hardware.

In the End
The system performed very well for me, and the configuration I received would meet the needs of most users. Even editing 8K footage no longer requires stepping up to a dual-socket system. The biggest variation will come with matching a GPU to your needs, as Boxx offers GeForce, Quadro and AMD options. Editors will probably be able to save some money, while those doing true 3D rendering might want to invest in an even more powerful GPU than the Quadro RTX 4000 that this system came with.

All of those options are available on the Boxx website, with the online configuration tool. The test model Boxx sent me retails for about $4,500. There are cheaper solutions available if you are a DIY person, but Boxx has assembled a well-balanced solution in a solid package, built and supported for you. They also sell much higher-end systems if you are in the market for that, but with recent advances, these mid-level systems probably meet the needs of most users. If you are interested in purchasing a system from them, using the code MIKEPOST at checkout will give you a discount.


Mike McCarthy is an online editor/workflow consultant with over 10 years of experience on feature films and commercials. He has been involved in pioneering new solutions for tapeless workflows, DSLR filmmaking and multi-screen and surround video experiences. Check out his site.

Charlieuniformtango names company vets as new partners

Charlieuniformtango principal/CEO Lola Lott has named three of the full-service studio’s most veteran artists as new partners — editors Deedle LaCour and James Rayburn, and Flame artist Joey Waldrip. This is the first time in the company’s almost 25-year history that the partnership has expanded. All three will continue with their current jobs but have received the expanded titles of senior editor/partner and senior Flame artist/partner, respectively. Lott, who retains majority ownership of Charlieuniformtango, will remain principal/CEO, and Jack Waldrip will remain senior editor/co-owner.

“Deedle, Joey and James came to me and Jack with a solid business plan about buying into the company with their futures in mind,” explains Lott. “All have been with Charlieuniformtango almost from the beginning: Deedle for 20 years, Joey for 19 years and James for 18. Jack and I were very impressed and touched that they were interested and willing to come to us with funding and plans for continuing and growing their futures with us.

So why now after all these years? “Now is the right time because while Jack and I still have a passion for this business and we also have employees/talent — that have been with us for over 18 years — who also have a passion be a partner in this company,” says Lott. “While still young, they have invested and built their careers within the Tango culture and have the client bonds, maturity and understanding of the business to be able to take Tango to a greater level for the next 20 years. That was mine and Jack’s dream, and they came to us at the perfect time.”

Charlieuniformtango is a full-service creative studio that produces, directs, shoots, edits, mixes, animates and provides motion graphics, color grading, visual effects and finishing for commercials, short films, full-length feature films, documentaries, music videos and digital content.

Main Image: (L-R) Joey Waldrip, James Rayburn, Jack Waldrip, Lola Lott and Deedle LaCour

Uppercut ups Tyler Horton to editor

After spending two years as an assistant at New York-based editorial house Uppercut, Tyler Horton has been promoted to editor. This is the first internal talent promotion for Uppercut.

Horton first joined Uppercut in 2017 after a stint as an assistant editor at Whitehouse Post. Stepping up as editor he’s cut notable projects, such as a recent Nike campaign “Letters to Heroes,” a series launched in conjunction with the US Open that highlights young athletes meeting their role models, including Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka. He also has cut campaigns for brands such as Asics, Hypebeast, Volvo and MOMA.

“From the beginning, Uppercut was always intentionally a boutique studio that embraced a collaborative of visions and styles — never just a one-person shop,” says Uppercut EP Julia Williams. “Tyler took initiative from day one to be as hands-on as possible with every project and we’ve been proud to see him really grow and refine his own voice.”

Horton’s love of film was sparked by watching sports reels and highlight videos. He went on to study film editing, then hit the road to tour with his band for four years before returning to his passion for film.

Flavor adds Joshua Studebaker as CG supervisor

Creative production house Flavor has added CG supervisor Joshua Studebaker to its Los Angeles studio. For more than eight years, Studebaker has been a freelance CG artist in LA, specializing in design, animation, dynamics, lighting/shading and compositing via Maya, Cinema 4D, Vray/Octane, Nuke and After Effects.

A frequent collaborator with Flavor and its brand and agency partners, Studebaker has also worked with Alma Mater, Arsenal FX, Brand New School, Buck, Greenhaus GFX, Imaginary Forces and We Are Royale in the past five years alone. In his new role with Flavor, Studebaker oversees visual effects and 3D services across the company’s global operations. Flavor’s Chicago, Los Angeles and Detroit studios offer color grading, VFX and picture finishing using tools like Autodesk Lustre and Flame Premium.

Flavor creative director Jason Cook also has a long history of working with Studebaker and deep respect for his talent. “What I love most about Josh is that he is both technical and a really amazing artist and designer. Adding him is a huge boon to the Flavor family, instantly elevating our production capabilities tenfold.”

Flavor has always emphasized creativity as a key ingredient, and according to Studebaker, that’s what attracted him. “I see Flavor as a place to grow my creative and design skills, as well as help bring more standardization to our process in house,” he explained. “My vision is to help Flavor become more agile and more efficient and to do our best work together.”

Michael Engler on directing Downton Abbey movie

By Iain Blair

If, like millions of other fans around the world, you still miss watching the Downton Abbey series, don’t despair. The acclaimed show is back as a new feature film, still showcasing plenty of drama, nostalgia, glamour and good British values with every frame.

So sit back in a comfy armchair, grab a cup of tea (assuming you don’t have servants to fetch it for you) and forget about the stresses of modern life. Just let Downton Abbey take you back to a simpler time of relative innocence and understated elegance.

Director Michael Engler

The film reunites the series’ cast (including Hugh Bonneville, Jim Carter, Michelle Dockery, Elizabeth McGovern, Maggie Smith) and also adds some new members. The film starts with a simple but effective plot device, a visit to the Great House from the most illustrious guests the Crawley family could ever hope to entertain — their Majesties King George V and Queen Mary. With a dazzling parade and lavish dinner to orchestrate, Mary (Dockery), now firmly at the reins of the estate, faces the greatest challenge to her tenure as head of Downton.

At the film’s helm was TV and theater director Michael Engler, whose diverse credits include 30 Rock, Empire, Deadwood, Nashville, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and several episodes of the series Downton Abbey.

I recently talked to him about making the film, its durable appeal and the workflow.

You directed one episode in the fifth season of the TV show and then a few in the final season. How daunting was it making a film of such a beloved show?
It was very daunting, especially as people have such high expectations. They love it so much, so you feel you really have to deliver. You can’t disappoint them. But basically, you’re pretty lucky in life and in your career when those are your big problems. Then you also have the advantage of this amazing cast, who know their characters so well, and Julian (Fellowes, the series creator), who loves writing these characters. We’ve all developed such a good working rhythm together, and all that really helped so much. Because of the huge fan base, it’s not like so many projects where you’re trying to get audiences to pay attention. They’re already very invested in it, and I’d far rather have that than the worry of directing an unknown project.

What were the big differences between shooting the series and the movie?
The big one was the need to ramp it up, even though the TV series was always ambitious cinematically, and we knew that the template would be a good one to build on. The DNA of the show was a good foundation. For instance, one of the things we discovered very quickly, even shooting intimate scenes of a few people in a bedroom or a drawing room, it would be full-scale. We could hold the shots longer and see everyone’s reactions in a big wide shot. We didn’t have to emphasize plot points with a lot of cutting as you’d do in TV. We could let the rooms play in full size for a while, and that automatically made it all feel bigger and richer. It almost feels like you’re in those rooms, and you get the whole visual sweep of their grandeur.

Then the royal visit gave us some tremendous opportunities with all the lavish set pieces — the arrival, the banquet, the parade, the ball — to really show them fully and showcase the huge scale of them. In the series, more often than not, you’d imply the sheer scale of such events and focus more on details and pieces of them. I think the series was more realistic and objective in many ways, more “on the ground” and real and undecorated. It is more understated. The film is far more sweeping, with more camera movement. It’s elevated for the big screen.

Was it a plus being an American? Did it give you a fresh perspective?
I was already such a big fan when I began working on the series, and I’d seen many of the episodes several times, so I did feel I knew it and understood it well. But then there was a lot of the protocol and etiquette that I didn’t know, so I studied and learned as much as I could and consulted with a historical advisor. After that, I quickly felt very much at home in this world.

How tough was it juggling so many familiar characters — along with some new ones?
That was difficult, but mainly because of all the filming logistics and schedules. We had people flying in from all over — India, New York, California — maybe just for a day or two, so it was a big logistical puzzle to make it work out.

The film looks gorgeous. You used DP Ben Smithard, who shot Blinded by the Light and Goodbye Christopher Robin. Can you talk about how you collaborated with him on the look?
We wanted it to have a big, rich film feel and look, so we shot it in 6K. And Ben does such beautiful work with the lighting, which really helped take the edge off the digital look. He’s just so good at capturing the romance of all those great sweeping period films and the very different look between upstairs — which is all elegant, sparkly and light-filled — and downstairs, which is rougher, less refined and darker. There are a lot of tonal shifts, so we worked on all those visual contrasts, both in camera and in post and the DI.

L-R: Cinematographer Ben Smithard, director Michael Engler and producer Gareth Neame.

Where did you post?
We did all the editing at Hireworks in London with editor Mark Day and his team, and sound at Hackenbacker Studios and Abbey Road Studios, where we recorded with an orchestra twice as big as any we had on the series, which also elevated all the sound and music. Framestore did all the VFX.

Do you like the post process?
I absolutely love it. I like shooting, but it’s so stressful because of the ticking clock and a huge crew waiting while we fix something and the light is going down. Then you get into post, and it’s stress-free in that sense, and you can look at what you have and start playing with it and really be creative. You can leave for a few days and have a fresh perspective on it. You can’t do that on the set.

Talk about editing with Mark Day. How did that work?
We didn’t start cutting until after we wrapped, and we experimented quite a lot, trying to find the best way to tell all the stories. For instance, we took one scene that was originally early on, and moved it five scenes later, and it changed the entire meaning of it. So we tried a lot of that sort of thing. Then there are all the other post elements that work on a subconscious level, especially once you cut in all the tiny background sounds — voices in the distance, footsteps and so on, that help create and add to the reality of the visuals.

What were the big editing challenges?
The big one was taking the rhythms of the series and adjusting them for the film. In the series, it was far more broken up because all the different stories didn’t have to be finished by the end of an episode. There would be some cliffhangers while some would be resolved, so we could hop around a lot and break up scenes. But on this we found it was far more effective to stay with a storyline and let longer arcs play out and finish. That way the audiences would know exactly where they were if we left one story, went to another and then came back. Mark was very clear about that, keeping the main story moving forward all the time, while juggling all the side stories.

What was involved in all the visual effects?
More than you’d think. We had a big set piece at King’s Cross train station, which we actually shot at a tiny two-track station in the north of England. Framestore then created everything around it and built the whole world, and they did an amazing job. Then we had the big military parade, and they did a lot of work on the surroundings and the pub overlooking it. And, of course, we had a ton of cleanup and replacement background work, as it’s a period piece.

Talk about the importance of sound in this film.
As they say, it’s half the movie, and our supervising sound editor Nigel Heath was so thorough and detailed in his work. He also really understands how sound can help storytelling. In the scene where Molesley embarrasses himself, we played around with it a lot, thinking maybe it needed some music and so on. But when Nigel started on it, he kept it totally silent except for the sound of a ticking clock — and it was so perfect. It made the moment and silence that much more vivid, along with underscoring how time was dragging on. It heightened the whole thing. Sound is also so important downstairs in the house, where you feel this constant activity and work going on in every room, and all the small sounds and noises add so much weight and reality.

Where did you do the DI and how important is it to you?
We did the digital intermediate at Molinare with Gareth Spensley, and it’s hugely important to me, though the DP’s more involved. I let them do their work and then went through it with them and gave my notes, and we got quite detailed.

Did the film turn out the way you hoped?
Much better! I was worried it might feel too disjointed and not unified enough since there were so many plotlines and characters and tones to deal with. But in the end it all flowed together so well.

How do you explain the huge global appeal of Downton Abbey?
I think that, apart from the great acting and fascinating characters, the themes are so universal. It’s like a workplace drama and a family drama with all the complex relationships, and you get romance, emotion, suspense, comedy and then all the great costumes and beautiful locations. The nostalgia appeals to so many people, and the Brits do these period dramas just better than anyone else.

What’s next? Would you do another Downton movie?
I’d love to, if it happens. They’re all such lovely people to work with. Making movies is hard, but this was just such a wonderful experience.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

FotoKem expands post services to Santa Monica

FotoKem is now offering its video post services in Santa Monica. This provides an accessible location for those working on the west side of LA, as well as access to the talent from its Burbank and Hollywood studios.

Designed to support an entire pipeline of services, the FotoKem Santa Monica facility is housed just off the 10 freeway, above FotoKem’s mixing and recording studio Margarita Mix. For many projects, color grading, sound mixing and visual effects reviews often take place in multiple locations around town. This facility offers showrunners and filmmakers a new west side post production option. Additionally, the secure fiber network connecting all FotoKem-owned locations ensures feature film and episodic finishing work can take place in realtime among sites.

FotoKem Santa Monica features a DI color grading theater, episodic and commercial color suite, editorial conform bay and a visual effects team — all tied to the comprehensive offerings at FotoKem’s main Burbank campus, Keep Me Posted’s episodic finishing facility and Margarita Mix Hollywood’s episodic grading suites. FotoKem’s entire roster of colorists are available to collaborate with filmmakers to ensure their vision is supported throughout the process. Recent projects include Shazam!, Vice, Aquaman, The Dirt, Little and Good Trouble.


Senior colorist Maria Carretero joins Nice Shoes

NYC-based post studio Nice Shoes has hired senior colorist Maria Carretero, who comes to Nice Shoes with nearly two decades of global experience in color grading under her belt. Her portfolio includes a wide range of feature films, short films, music videos and commercials for brands like Apple, Jeep, Porsche, Michael Kors, Disney and Marriott, among many others. She will be based at Nice Shoes’ NYC studio, also working across Nice Shoes’s Boston, Chicago, Toronto and Minneapolis spaces and through its network of remote partnerships globally.

She comes to Nice Shoes from Framestore in Chicago, where she spent nearly two years establishing relationships with agencies such as BBDO, FCB, DDB, Leo Burnett Chicago and Media Arts Lab LA.

Carretero is originally from Spain, where she received an education in fine arts. She soon discovered the creative possibilities in digital color grading, quickly establishing a career for herself as an international artist. Her background in painting, coupled with her natural eye for nuanced visuals, are the tools that help her maximize her clients’ creative visions. Carretero’s ability to convey a brand story through her work has earned her a long list of awards, including Cannes Lions and a Clio.

Carretero’s recent work includes Jeep’s Recalculating, Disney’s You Can Fly and Bella Notte, Porsche’s The Fix and Avocados From Mexico’s Top Dog spot for Super Bowl 2019.

“Nice Shoes brings together the expertise backed by 20 years of experience with a personal approach that really celebrates female talent and collaboration,” adds Carretero. “I’m thrilled to be joining a team that truly supports the creative exploration process that color takes in storytelling. I’ve always wanted to live in New York. Throughout my whole life, I visited this city again and again and was fascinated by the diversity, the culture, and incredible energy that you breathe in as you walk the city’s streets.”

AJA adds HDR Image Analyzer 12G and more at IBC

AJA will soon offer the new HDR Image Analyzer 12G, bringing 12G-SDI connectivity to its realtime HDR monitoring and analysis platform developed in partnership with Colorfront. The new product streamlines 4K/Ultra HD HDR monitoring and analysis workflows by supporting the latest high-bandwidth 12G-SDI connectivity. The HDR Image Analyzer 12G will be available this fall for $19,995.

HDR Image Analyzer 12G offers waveform, histogram and vectorscope monitoring and analysis of 4K/Ultra HD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content for broadcast and OTT production, post, QC and mastering. It also features HDR-capable monitor outputs that not only go beyond HD resolutions and offer color accuracy but make it possible to configure layouts to place the preferred tool where needed.

“Since its release, HDR Image Analyzer has powered HDR monitoring and analysis for a number of feature and episodic projects around the world. In listening to our customers and the industry, it became clear that a 12G version would streamline that work, so we developed the HDR Image Analyzer 12G,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

AJA’s video I/O technology integrates with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1-RU chassis to bring HDR Image Analyzer 12G users a comprehensive toolset to monitor and analyze HDR formats, including PQ (Perceptual Quantizer) and hybrid log gamma (HLG). Additional feature highlights include:

● Up to 4K/Ultra HD 60p over 12G-SDI inputs, with loop-through outputs
● Ultra HD UI for native resolution picture display over DisplayPort
● Remote configuration, updates, logging and screenshot transfers via an integrated web UI
● Remote Desktop support
● Support for display referred SDR (Rec.709), HDR ST 2084/PQ and HLG analysis
● Support for scene referred ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, Red and Sony camera color spaces
● Display and color processing lookup table (LUT) support
● Nit levels and phase metering
● False color mode to easily spot pixels out of gamut or brightness
● Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
● Data analyzer with pixel picker
● Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
● File-based error logging with timecode
● Reference still store

At IBC 2019, AJA also showed new products and updates designed to advance broadcast, production, post and pro AV workflows. On the stand were the Kumo 6464-12G for routing and the newly shipping Corvid 44 12G developer I/O models. AJA has also introduced the FS-Mini utility frame sync Mini-Converter and three new OpenGear-compatible cards: OG-FS-Mini, OG-ROI-DVI and OG-ROI-HDMI. Additionally, the company previewed Desktop Software updates for Kona, Io and T-Tap; Ultra HD support for IPR Mini-Converter receivers; and FS4 frame synchronizer enhancements.

Behind the Title: Chapeau CD Lauren Mayer-Beug

This creative director loves the ideation process at the start of a project when anything is possible, and saving some of those ideas for future use.

COMPANY: LA’s Chapeau Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Chapeau provides visual effects, editorial, design, photography and story development fluidly with experience in design, web development, and software and app engineering.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It often entails seeing a job through from start to finish. I look at it like making a painting or a sculpture.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Perhaps just how hands-on the process actually is. And how analog I am, considering we work in such a tech-driven environment.

Beats

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Thinking. I’m always thinking big picture to small details. I love the ideation process at the start of a project when anything is possible. Saving some of those ideas for future use, learning about what you want to do through that process. I always learn more about myself through every ideation session.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Letting go of the details that didn’t get addressed. Not everything is going to be perfect, so since it’s a learning process there is inevitably something that will catch your eye.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
My mind goes to so many buckets. A published children’s book author with a kick-ass coffee shop. A coffee bean buyer so I could travel the world.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always skewed in this direction. My thinking has always been in the mindset of idea coaxer and gatherer. I was put in that position in my mid-20s and realized I liked it (with lots to learn, of course), and I’ve run with it ever since.

IS THERE A PROJECT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s hard to say. Every project is really so different. A lot of what I’m most proud of is behind the scenes… the process that will go into what I see as bigger things. With Chapeau, I will always love the Facebook projects, all the pieces that came together — both on the engineering side and the fun creative elements.

Facebook

What I’m most excited about is our future stuff. There’s a ton on the sticky board that we aim to accomplish in the very near future. Thinking about how much is actually being set in motion is mind-blowing, humbling and — dare I say — makes me outright giddy. That is why I’m here, to tell these new stories — stories that take part in forming the new landscape of narrative.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
Anything Adobe. My most effective tool is the good-old pen to paper. That works clearly in conveying ideas and working out the knots.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I’m always looking for inspiration and find it everywhere, as many other creatives do. However, nature is where I’ve always found my greatest inspiration. I’m constantly taking photos of interesting moments to save for later. Oftentimes I will refer back to those moments in my work. When I need a reset I hike, run or bike. Movement helps.

I’m always going outside to look at how the light interacts with the environment. Something I’ve become known for at work is going out of my way to see a sunset (or sunrise). They know me to be the first one on the roof for a particularly enchanting magic hour. I’m always staring at the clouds — the subtle color combinations and my fascination with how colors look the way they do only by context. All that said, I often have my nose in a graphic design book.

The overall mood realized from gathering and creating the ever-popular Pinterest board is so helpful. Seeing the mood color wise and texturally never gets old. Suddenly, you have a fully formed example of where your mind is at. Something you could never have talked your way through.

Then, of course, there are people. People/peers and what they are capable of will always amaze me.

Behind the Title: Bindery editor Matt Dunne

Name: Matt Dunne

Company: Bindery

Can you describe your company?
Bindery is an indie film and content studio based in NYC. We model ourself after independent film studios, where we tackle every phase of a project from concept all the way through finishing. Our work varies from branded web content and national broadcast commercials to shorts and feature films.

What’s your job title?
Senior Editor

What does that entail?
I’m part of all things post at Bindery. I get involved early on in projects to help ensure we have a workflow set up, and if I’m the editor I’ll often get a chance to work with the director on conceptualizing the piece. When I get to go on set I’m able to become the hub of the production side. I’ll work with the director and DP to make sure the image is what they want and

I’ll start assembling the edit as they are shooting. Most of my time is spent in an edit suite with a director and clients working through their concept and really bringing their story to life. An advantage of working with Bindery is that I’m able to sit and work with directors before they shoot and sometimes even before a concept is locked. There’s a level of trust that’s developed and we get to work through ideas and plan for anything that may come up later on during the post process. Even though post is the last stage of a film project, it needs to be involved in the beginning. I’m a big believer in that. From the early stages to the very end, I get to touch a lot of projects.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I’m a huge tech nerd and gear head, so with the help of two other colleagues I help maintain the post infrastructure of Bindery. When we expanded the office we had to rewire everything and I recently helped put a new server together. That’s something I never imagined myself doing.

Editors also become a sounding board for creatives. I think it’s partially because we are good listeners and partially because we have couches in our suites. People like to come in and riff an idea or work through something out loud, even if you aren’t the editor on that project. I think half of being a good editor is just being able to listen.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Working in an open environment that nurtures ideas and creativity. I love working with people that want to push their product and encourage one another to do the same. It’s really special getting to play a role in it all.

What’s your least favorite?
I think anything that takes me away from the editing process. Any sort of hardware or software issue will completely kill your momentum and at times it can be difficult to get that back.

What’s your most productive time of the day?
Early in the morning. I’m usually walking around the post department checking the stations, double checking processes that took place overnight or maintaining the server. Opposite that I’ve always felt very productive late at night. If I’m not actively editing in the office, then I’m usually rolling the footage back in my head that I screened during the day to try and piece it together away from the computer.

If you didn’t have this Job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be running a dog sanctuary for senior and abused dogs.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I first fell in love with post production when I was a kid. It was when Jurassic Park was in theaters and Fox would run these amazing behind-the-scene specials. There was this incredible in-depth coverage of how things in the film industry are done. I was too young to see the movie but I remember just devouring the content. That’s when I knew I wanted to be part of that scene.

Neurotica

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I recently got to help finish a pilot for a series we released called Neurotica. We were lucky enough to premiere it at Tribeca this past season, and getting to see that on the big screen with the people who helped make it was a real thrill for me.

I also just finished cutting a JBL spot where we built soundscapes for Yankees player Aaron Judge and captured him as he listened and was taken on a journey through his career, past and present. The original concept was a bit different than the final deliverable, but because of the way it was shot we were able to re-conceptualize the piece in the edit. There was a lot of room to play and experiment with that one.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? Can you elaborate?
Absolutely. With every job there comes a different approach and tools you need to use. If I’m cutting something more narrative focused I’ll make sure I have the script notes up, break my project out by scene and spend a lot of time auditioning different takes to make a scene work. Docu-style is a different approach entirely.

I’ll spend more time prepping that by location or subject and then break that down further. There’s even more back and forth when cutting doc. On a scripted project you have an idea of what the story flow is, but when you’re tasked with finding the edit you’re very much jumping around the story as it evolves. Whether it’s comedy, music or any type of genre, I’m always getting a chance to flex a different editing muscle.

1800 Tequila

What is the project you are most proud of?
There are a few, but one of my favorite collaborative experiences was when we worked with Billboard and 1800 Tequila to create a branded documentary series following Christian Scott aTunde Adjuh. It was five episodes shot in New York, Philadelphia and New Orleans, and the edit was happening simultaneously with production.

As the crew traveled and mapped out their days, I was able to screen footage, assemble and collaborate with the director on ideas that we thought could really enhance the piece. I was on the phone with him when they went back to NOLA for the last shoot and we were writing story beats that we needed to gather to make Episode 1 and 2 work more seamlessly now that the story had evolved. Being able to rework sections of earlier episodes before we were wrapped with production was an amazing opportunity.

What do you use to edit?
Software-wise I’m all in on the Adobe Creative Suite. I’ve been meaning to learn Resolve a bit more since I’ve been spending more and more time with it as a powerful tool in our workflow.

What is your favorite plugin?
Neat Video is a denoiser that’s really incredible. I’ve been able to work with low-light footage that would otherwise be unusable.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Since Bindery is involved in every stage of the process, I get this great opportunity to work with audio designers and colorists to see the project all the way through. I love learning by watching other people work.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My phone. I think that’s a given at this point. A great pair of headphones, and a really comfortable chair that lets me recline as far back as possible for those really demanding edits.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I met my wife back in college and we’ve been best friends ever since, so spending any amount of time with her helps to wash away the stress. We also just bough our first house in February, so there’s plenty of projects for me to focus all of my stress into.

Whiskytree experiences growth, upgrades tools

Visual effects and content creation company Whiskytree has gone through a growth spurt that included a substantial increase in staff, a new physical space and new infrastructure.

Providing content for films, television, the Web, apps, game and VR or AR, Whiskytree’s team of artists, designers and technicians use applications such as Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Autodesk Arnold, Gaffer and Foundry Nuke on Linux — along with custom tools — to create computer graphics and visual effects.

To help manage its growth and the increase in data that came with it, Whiskytree recently installed Panasas ActiveStor. The platform is used to store and manage Whiskytree’s computer graphics and visual effects workflows, including data-intensive rendering and realtime collaboration using extremely large data sets for movies, commercials and advertising; work for realtime render engines and games; and augmented reality and virtual reality applications.

“We recently tripled our employee count in a single month while simultaneously finalizing the build-out of our new facility and network infrastructure, all while working on a 700-shot feature film project [The Captain],” says Jonathan Harb, chief executive officer and owner of Whiskytree. “Panasas not only delivered the scalable performance that we required during this critical period, but also delivered a high level of support and expertise. This allowed us to add artists at the rapid pace we needed with an easy-to-work-with solution that didn’t require fine-tuning to maintain and improve our workflow and capacity in an uninterrupted fashion. We literally moved from our old location on a Friday, then began work in our new facility the following Monday morning, with no production downtime. The company’s ‘set it and forget it’ appliance resulted in overall smooth operations, even under the trying circumstances.”

In the past, Whiskytree operated a multi-vendor storage solution that was complex and time consuming to administer, modify and troubleshoot. With the office relocation and rapid team expansion, Whiskytree didn’t have time to build a new custom solution or spend a lot of time tuning. It also needed storage that would grow as project and facility needs change.

Projects from the studio include Thor: Ragnarok, Monster Hunt 2, Bolden, Mother, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Downsizing, Warcraft and Rogue One: A Star Wars.

Nvidia and Asus offer first laptop with Quadro RTX 6000 GPU

In another new addition to the Nvidia RTX Studio of laptops, the Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 GPU will power the Asus ProArt StudioBook One, making it the first laptop to offer the Nvidia Quadro RTX 6000 in a mobile solution so creatives can run complex workloads regardless of location.

The Quadro RTX 6000 within the ProArt StudioBook One provides creatives a similar high-end experience as a deskside workstation. The ProArt StudioBook One is able to handle massive datasets and accelerate compute-intensive workflows, such as creating 3D animations, rendering photoreal product designs, editing 8K video, visualizing volumetric geophysical datasets and conducting walk-throughs of photoreal building designs in VR.

RTX Studio systems, which integrate Nvidia Quadro RTX or GeForce RTX GPUs, offer advanced features — like realtime raytracing, AI and 8K Red video acceleration — to creative and technical professionals.

The Asus ProArt StudioBook One combines performance and portability with the power of Quadro RTX 6000 and features of the new Nvidia “ACE” reference design system, including:
• 24GB of ultra-fast GPU memory to tackle large scenes, models, datasets and complex multi-app workflows.
• Nvidia Turing architecture RT Cores and Tensor Cores to deliver realtime raytracing, advanced shading and AI-enhanced tools to accelerate professional workflows.
• Advanced thermal cooling solution featuring ultra-thin titanium vapor chambers.
• Enhanced Nvidia Optimus technology for seamless switching between the discrete and integrated graphics based on application use with no need to restart applications or reboot the system.
• Slim 300W high-density, high-efficiency power adapter for charging and power at half the size of traditional 300W power adapters.
• Professional 4K 120Hz Pantone-validated display with 100% Adobe RGB color coverage, color accuracy and factory calibration.

In other Nvidia-related news, Acer announced its latest additions to the ConceptD series of laptops, including the ConceptD Pro models featuring Quadro GPUs.

In addition to the Asus ProArt StudioBook One, Nvidia announced 11 additional RTX Studio laptops and desktops from Acer, Asus, HP and MSI, bringing the total number of RTX Studio systems to 39.

Nigel Bennett upped to managing director at UK’s Molinare

Molinare has promoted Nigel Bennett to the role of managing director. He joined the studio earlier this year from Pinewood Studios, where over a 20-year period he worked his way up from re-recording mixer to group director of creative services, a position that he held since 2014.

Bennett’s responsibilities include growing revenue across feature film, TV drama, feature documentaries and reality TV. Over the coming months he will work with the existing senior team at Molinare to implement a new business growth and investment plan with the full support of Molinare’s shareholders, Saphir Capital and Next Wave Partners.

Bennett replaces Julie Parmenter, who has left the company after seven years. While at Molinare, Parmenter was integral to maintaining the successful Molinare brand, subsequent acquisition of Hackenbacker and expansion into Hoxton.

Fred Raskin talks editing and Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

By Amy Leland

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood is marketed in a style similar to its predecessors — “the ninth film from Quentin Tarantino.” It is also the third film with Fred Raskin, ACE, as Tarantino’s editor. Having previously edited Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight, as well as working as assistant editor on the Kill Bill films, Raskin has had the opportunity to collaborate with a filmmaker who has always made it clear how much he values collaboration.

On top of this remarkable director/editor relationship, Raskin has also lent his editing hand to a slew of other incredibly popular films, including three entries in the Fast & Furious saga and both Guardians of the Galaxy films. I had the chance to talk with him about his start, his transition to editor and his work on Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. A tribute to Hollywood’s golden age, the film stars Brad Pitt as the stunt double for a faded actor, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, as they try to find work in a changing industry.

Fred Raskin

How did you get your start as an editor?
I went to film school at NYU to become a director, but I had this realization about midway through that that I might not get a directing gig immediately upon graduation, so perhaps I should focus on a craft. Editing was always my favorite part of the process, and I think that of all the crafts, it’s the closest to directing. You’re crafting performances, you’re figuring out how you’re going to tell the story visually… and you can do all of this from the comfort of an air-conditioned room.

I told all of my friends in school, if you need an editor for your projects, please consider me. While continuing to make my own stuff, I also cut my friends’ projects. Maybe a month after I graduated, a friend of mine got a job as an assistant location manager on a low-budget movie shooting in New York. He said, “Hey, they need an apprentice editor on this movie. There’s no pay, but it’s probably good experience. Are you interested?” I said, “Sure.” The editor and I got along really well. He asked me if I was going to move out to LA, because that’s really where the work is. He then said, “When you get out to LA, one of my closest friends in the world is Rob Reiner’s editor, Bob Leighton. I’ll introduce the two of you.”

So that’s what I did, and this kind of ties into Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, because when I made the move to LA, I called Bob Leighton, who invited me to lunch with his two assistants, Alan Bell and Danny Miller. We met at Musso & Frank. So the first meeting that I had was at this classic, old Hollywood restaurant. Cut to 23 years later, and I’m on the set of a movie that’s shooting at Musso & Frank. It’s a scene between Al Pacino and Leonardo DiCaprio, arguably the two greatest actors of their generations, and I’m editing it. I thought back to that meeting, and actually got kind of emotional.

So Bob’s assistants introduced me to people. That led to an internship, which led to a paying apprentice gig, which led to me getting into the union. I then spent nine years as an assistant editor before working my way up to editor.

When you were starting out, were there any particular filmmakers or editors who influenced the types of stories you wanted to tell?
Growing up, I was a big genre guy. I read Fangoria magazine and gravitated to horror, action and sci-fi. Those were the kinds of movies I made when I was in film school. So when I got out to LA, Bob Leighton got a pretty good sense as to what my tastes were, and he gave me the numbers of a couple of friends of his, Mark Goldblatt and Mark Helfrich, who are huge action/sci-fi editors. I spoke with them, and that was just a real thrill because I was so familiar with their work. Now we are all colleagues, and I pinch myself regularly.

 You have edited many action and VFX films. Has that presented particular challenges to your way of working as an editor?
The challenges, honestly, are more ones of time management because when you’re on a big visual effects movie, at a certain point in the schedule you’re spending two to four hours a day watching visual effects. Then you have to make adjustments to the edit to accommodate for how things look when the finished visual effects come in. It’s extremely time-consuming, and when you’re not only dealing with visual effects, but also making changes to the movie, you have to figure out a way to find time for all of this.

Every project has its own specific set of challenges. Yes, the big Marvel movies have a ton of visual effects, and you want to make sure that they look good. The upside is that Marvel has a lot of money, so when you want to experiment with a new visual effect or something, they’re usually able to support your ideas. You can come up with a concept while you’re sitting behind the Avid and actually get to see it become a reality. It’s very exciting.

Let’s talk about the world of Tarantino. A big part of his legacy was his longtime collaboration with editor Sally Menke, who tragically passed away. How were you then brought in? I’m assuming it has something to do with your assistant editor credit on Kill Bill?
Yes. I assisted Sally for seven years. There were a couple of movies that we worked on together, and then she brought me in for the Kill Bill movies. And that’s when I met Quentin. She taught me how an editing room is supposed to work. When she finished a scene, she would bring me and the other assistants into the room and get our thoughts. It was a welcoming, family-like environment, which I think Quentin really leaned into as well.

While he’s shooting, Quentin doesn’t come into the editing room. He comes in during post, but during production, he’s really focused on shooting the movie. On Kill Bill, I didn’t meet him until a few weeks after the shoot ended. He started coming in, and whenever he and Sally worked on a scene together, they would bring us in and get our thoughts. I learned pretty quickly that the more feedback you’re able to give, the more appreciated it will be. Quentin has said that at least part of the reason why he went with me on Django Unchained was because I was so open with my comments. Also, as the whole world knows, Quentin is a huge movie lover. We frequently would find ourselves talking about movies. He’d be walking through the hall, and we’d just strike up a conversation, and so I think he saw in me a kindred spirit. He really kept me in the family after Kill Bill.

I got my first big editing break right after Kill Bill ended. I cut a movie called Annapolis, which Justin Lin directed. I was no longer on Quentin’s crew, but we still crossed paths a lot. Over the years we’d just bump into each other at the New Beverly Cinema, the revival house that he now owns. We’d talk about whatever we’d seen lately. So he always kept me in mind. When he and Sally finished the rough cuts on Death Proof and Inglourious Basterds, he invited me to come to their small friends-and-family screenings, which was a tremendous honor.

On Django, you were working with a director who had the same collaborator in Sally Menke for such a long time. What was it like in those early days working on Django?
It was without question the most daunting experience that I have gone through in Hollywood. We’re talking about an incredibly talented editor, Sally, whose shoes I had to attempt to fill, and a filmmaker for whom I had the utmost respect.

Some of the western town stuff was shot at movie ranches just outside of LA, and we would do dailies screenings in a trailer there. I made sure that I sat near him with a list of screening notes. I really just took note of where he laughed. That was the most important thing. Whatever he laughed at, it meant that this was something that he liked. There was a PA on set when they went to New Orleans. I stayed in LA, but I asked her to write down where he laughs.

I’m a fan of his. When I went to see Reservoir Dogs, I remember walking out of the theater and thinking, “Well, that’s like the most exciting filmmaker that I’ve seen in quite some time.” Now I’m getting the chance to work with him. And I’ll say because of my fandom, I have a pretty good sense as to his style and his sense of humor. I think that that all helped me when I was in the process of putting the scenes together on Django. I was very confident in my work when I started showing him stuff on that movie.

Now, seven years later, you are on your third film with him. Have you found a different kind of rhythm working with him than you had on that first film?
I would say that a couple of little things have changed. I personally have gained some confidence in how I approach stuff with him. If there was something that I wasn’t sure was working, or that maybe I felt was extraneous, in Django, I might have had some hesitation about expressing it because I wouldn’t want to offend him. But now both of us are coming from the perspective of just wanting to make the best movie that we possibly can. I’m definitely more open than I might have been back then.

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood has an interesting blend of styles and genres. The thing that stands out is that it is a period piece. Beyond that, you have the movies and TV shows within the movie that give you additional styles. And there is a “horror movie” scene.
Right, the Spahn Ranch sequence.

 That was so creepy! I really had that feeling the whole time of, “They can’t possibly kill off Brad Pitt’s character this early, can they?
That’s the idea. That’s what you’re supposed to be feeling.

When you are working with all of those overlapping styles, do you have to approach the work a different way?
The style of the films within the film was influenced by the movies of the era to some degree. There wasn’t anything stylistically that had us trying to make the movie itself feel like a movie from 1969. For example, Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Rick Dalton, is playing the heavy on a western TV show called Lancer in the movie. Quentin referred to the Lancer stuff as, “Lancer is my third western, after Django and The Hateful Eight.” He didn’t direct that show as though it was a TV western from the late ’60s. He directed it like it was a Quentin Tarantino western from 2019. Quentin’s style is really all his own.

There are no rules when you’re working on a Quentin Tarantino movie because he knows everything that’s come before, and he is all about pushing the boundaries of what you can do — which is both tremendously exciting and a little scary, like is this going to work for everyone? The idea that we have a narrator who appears once in the first 10 minutes of the movie and then doesn’t appear again until the last 40 minutes, is that something that’s going to throw people off? His feeling is like, yeah, there are going to be some people out there who are going to feel that it’s weird, but they’re also going to understand it. That’s the most important thing. He’s a firm believer in doing whatever we need to do to tell the story as clearly and as concisely as possible. That voiceover narration serves that purpose. Weird or not.

You said before that he doesn’t come into the edit during production. What is your work process during production? Are you beginning the rough cut? And if so, are you sending him things, or are you really not collaborating with him on that process at all until post begins?
This movie was shot in LA, so for the first half of the shoot, we would do regular dailies screenings. I’d sit next to him and write down whatever he laughed at. That process that began on Django has continued. Then I’ll take those notes. Then I assemble the material as we’re shooting, but I don’t show him any of it. I’m not sending him cuts. He doesn’t want to see cuts. I don’t think he wants the distractions of needing to focus on editing.

On this movie, there were only two occasions when he did come into the editing room during production. The movie takes place over the course of three days, and at the end of the second day, the characters are watching Rick on the TV show The F.B.I., which was a real show and that episode was called “All the Streets Are Silent.” The character of Michael Murtaugh was played in the original episode by a young Burt Reynolds. They found a location that matched pretty perfectly and reshot only the shots that had Burt Reynolds in them. They reshot with Leonardo DiCaprio, as Rick Dalton, playing that character. He had to come into the editing room to see how it played and how it matched, and it matched remarkably well. I think that people watching the movie probably assume that Quentin shot the whole thing, or that we used some CG technology to get Leo into the shots. But no, they just figured out exactly the shots that they needed to shoot, and that was all the new material. The rest was from the original episode.

 The other time he came into the edit during production was the sequence in which Bruce Lee and Cliff have their fight. The whole dialogue scene that opens that sequence, it all plays out in one long take. So he was very excited to see how that shot played out. But one of the things that we had spoken about over the course of working together is when you do a long take, the most important thing is what that cut is going to be at the end of the long take. How can we make that cut the most impactful? In this case, the cut is to Cliff throwing Bruce Lee into the car. He wanted to watch the whole scene play out, and then see how that cut worked. When I showed it to him, I had my finger on the stop button so that after that cut, I would stop it so he wouldn’t see anything more and wouldn’t get tempted to get sucked into maybe giving notes. I reached to stop, but he was like, “No, no, no let it play out.” He watched the fight scene, and he was like, “That’s fantastic.” He was very happy.

Once you were in post, what were some of the particular challenges of this film?
One of the really important things is how integral sound was to the process of making this movie. First there were the movies and shows within the movie. When we’re watching the scenes from Bounty Law, the ‘50s Western that Rick starred in, it wasn’t just about the 4×3, black and white photography, but also how we treated the sound. Our sound editorial team and our sound mixing team did an amazing job of getting that stuff to sound like a 16-millimeter print. Like, they put just the right amount of warble into the dialogue, and it makes it feel very authentic. Also, all the Bounty Law stuff is mono, not this wide stereo thing that would not be appropriate for the material from that era.

And I mentioned the Spahn Ranch sequence, when for 20 minutes the movie turns into an all-out horror movie. One of Quentin’s rules for me when I’m putting my assembly together is that he generally does not want me cutting with music. He frequently has specific ideas in his head about what the music is going to be, and he doesn’t want to see something that’s not the way he imagined it. That’s going to take him out of it, and he won’t be able to enjoy the sequence.

When I was putting the Spahn Ranch sequence together, I knew that I had to make it suspenseful without having music to help me. So, I turned to our sound editors, Wylie Stateman and Leo Marcil, and said, “I want this to sound like The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, like I want to have low tones and creaking wood and metal wronks. Let’s just feel the sense of dread through this sequence.” They really came through.

And what ended up happening is, I don’t know if Quentin’s intention originally was to play it without music, but ultimately all the music in the scene comes from what Dakota Fanning’s character, Squeaky, is watching on the TV. Everything else is just sound effects, which were then mixed into the movie so beautifully by Mike and Chris Minkler. There’s just a terrific sense of dread to that sequence, and I credit the sound effects as much as I do the photography.

This film was cut on Avid. Have you always cut on Avid? Do you ever cut on anything else?
When I was in film school, I cut on film. If fact, I took the very first Avid class that NYU offered. That was my junior year, which was long before there were such things as film options or anything. It was really just kind of the basics, a basic Avid Media Composer.

I’ve worked on Final Cut Pro a few times. That’s really the only other nonlinear digital editing system that I’ve used. I’ve never actually used Premiere.

At this point my whole sound effects and music library is Avid-based, and I’m just used to using the Avid. I have a keyboard where all of my keys are mapped, and I find, at this point, that it’s very intuitive for me. I like working with it.

This movie was shot on film, and we printed dailies from the negative. But the negative was also scanned in at 4K, and then those 4K scans were down-converted to DNx115, which is an HD resolution on the Avid. So we were editing in HD, and we could do screenings from that material when we needed to. But we would also do screenings on film.

Wow, so even with your rough cuts, you were turning them around to film cuts again?
Yeah. Once production ended, and Quentin came into the editing room, when we refined a scene to his liking, I would immediately turn that over to my Avid assistant, Chris Tonick. He would generate lists from that cut and would turn it over to our film assistants, Bill Fletcher and Andrew Blustain. They would conform the film print to match the edit that we had in the Avid so that we were capable of screening the movie on film whenever we wanted to. There was always going to be a one- or two-day lag time, depending on when we finished cutting on the Avid. But we were able to get it up there pretty quickly.

Sometimes if you have something like opticals or titles, you wouldn’t be able to generate those for film quickly enough. So if we wanted to screen something immediately, we would have to do it digitally. But as long as we had a couple of days, we would be able to put it up on film, and we did end up doing one of our test screenings on 35 millimeter, which was really great. It added one more layer of authenticity to the movie, getting to see it projected on film.

For a project of this scope, how many assistants do you work with, and how do you like to work with those assistants?
Our team consists of post production supervisor Tina Anderson, who really oversees everything. She runs the editing room. She figures out what we’re going to need. She’s got this long list of items that she goes down every day, and makes sure that we are prepared for whatever is going to come our way. She’s really remarkable.

My first assistant Chris Tonick is the Avid assistant. He cut a handful of scenes during production, and I would occasionally ask him to do some sound work. But primarily during production, he was getting the dailies prepped — getting them into the Avid for me and laying out my bins the way I like them.

In post, we added an Avid second named Brit DeLillo, who would help Chris when we needed to do turnovers for sound or visual effects, music, all of those people.

Then we had our film crew, Bill Fletcher and Andrew Blustain. They were syncing dailies during production, and then they were conforming the film print during post.

Last, but certainly not least, we had Alana Feldman, our post PA, who made sure we had everything we needed.

And honestly, for everybody on the crew, their most important role beyond the work that they were hired to do, was to be an audience member for us whenever we finished a scene. That tradition I experienced as an assistant working under Sally is the tradition that we’ve continued. Whenever we finish a sequence, we bring the whole crew up and show them the scene. We want people to react. We want to hear how they’re responding. We want to know what’s working and what isn’t working. Being good audience members is actually a key part of the job.

L-R: Quentin Tarantino, post supervisor Tina Anderson, first assistant editor (Film) Bill Fletcher, Fred Raskin, 2nd assistant editor (Film) Andrew Blustain, 2nd assistant editor (Avid) Brit DeLillo, post assistant Alana Feldman, producer Shannon McIntosh, 1st assistant editor (Avid) Chris Tonick, assistant to producer Ryan Jaeger and producer David Heyman

When you’re looking for somebody to join your team as an assistant, what are you looking for?
There are a few things. One obvious thing, right off the bat, is someone who is personable. Is this someone I’m going to want to have lunch with every day for months on end? Generally, especially working on a Quentin Tarantino movie, somebody with a good knowledge of film history who has a love of movies is going to be appreciated in that environment.

The other thing that I would say honestly  — and this might sound funny — is having the ability to see the future. And I don’t mean that I need psychic film assistants. I mean they need to be able to figure out what we’re going to need later on down the line and be prepared for it.

If I turn over a sequence, they should be looking at it and realizing, oh, there are some visual effects in here that we’re going to have to address, so we have to alert the visual effects companies about this stuff, or at least ask me if it’s something that I want.

If there were somebody who thought to themselves, “I want a career like Fred Raskin’s. I want to edit these kinds of cool films,” what advice would you give them as they’re starting out?
I have three standard pieces of advice that I give to everyone. My experience, I think, is fairly unique. I’ve been incredibly fortunate to get to work with some of my favorite filmmakers. The way my story unfolded … not everybody is going to have the opportunities I’ve had.

But my standard pieces of advice are, number one — and I mentioned this earlier — be personable. You’re working with people you’re going to share space with for many months on end. You want to be the kind of person with whom they’re going to want to spend time. You want to be able to get along with everyone around you. And you know, sometimes you’ve got some big personalities to deal with, so you have to be the type who can navigate that.

Then I would say, watch everything you possibly can. Quentin is obviously an extreme example, but most filmmakers got into this business because they love movies. And so the more you know about movies, and the more you’re able to talk about movies, the more those filmmakers are going to respect you and want to work with you. This kind of goes hand in hand with being personable.

The other piece of advice — and I know this sounds like a no-brainer — if you’re going for an interview with a filmmaker, make sure you’ve familiarized yourself with that person’s work. Be able to talk with them about their movies. They’re going to appreciate that you took the time to explore their work. Everybody wants to talk about the work they’ve done, so if you’re able to engage them on that level, I think it’s going to reflect well on you.

Absolutely. That’s great advice.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Behind the Title: Element EP Kristen Kearns

NAME: Kristen Kearns

COMPANY: Boston’s Element Productions

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Element has been in business for 20 years. We handle production and post production for video content on all platforms.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Producer / COO

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I oversee the office operations and company culture, and I work with clients on their production and post projects. I handle sales and bidding and work with our post and production talent to keep growing and expanding their creative goals.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I wear a lot of hats. I think people are always surprised by how much I have to juggle. From hiring employees, approving bills, bidding projects and collaborating with directors on treatments.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
We love Slack, Box and Google Apps. Collaboration is such a big part of what we do, and we could not function as seamlessly as we do without these awesome tools.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The people. I love who I work with.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When we work really hard on bidding a project and we don’t win. I understand this is a competitive business, but it is still really hard to lose after you put so much time and energy into a bid.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I love the mornings. I like the quiet before everyone comes in. I get into the office early and take that time to think through my day and my priorities. Or, sometimes I use the time to brainstorm and think through business challenges or business goals for the overall growth of the company.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I am a bit obsessed with The Home Edit. If you don’t follow them on Instagram, you should. Their stories are hilarious. Anyway, I would want to work for them. Crazy lives all wrapped up in tidy cabinets.

Alzheimer’s Association

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We recently launched a project for a local bank that featured a Yeti, a unicorn and a Sasquatch. Projects like this are what keep my job interesting and challenging. I had to do a bunch of research on costumes and prosthetics.

We also just wrapped on a short film for the Alzheimer’s Association. Giving back is a really important part of our company culture. We were so moved by the story of this couple and their struggles with this debilitating disease. I was really proud to be a part of this production.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am proud of a lot of the work that we do, but I would say most recently we worked on a multi-platform project with Dunkin’ that really stretched our producing skills. The idea was very innovative, with the goal being to power a home entirely on coffee grounds.

We connected all the dots of the projects, from finding a biofuel manufacturer to the builder in Nashville, and documented the entire process. The project manifested itself into a live event in New York City before traveling to the coast of Massachusetts to be listed as an Airbnb.

Dunkin

NAME PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I recently went to Washington, DC, with my family, and the National Museum of American History had an exhibit “Within These Walls.” It highlighted the evolution of one home, and with it the changing technology. I remember being really taken aback by the laundry exhibit. I think we all take for granted the time and convenience it saves us. Can you imagine if we had to spend hours dunking and ringing out clothes? It has actually given us more freedom and convenience to pursue passions and interests. I could live without my phone or a television, but trap me with a bucket and a clothesline and I would lose my mind.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I grew up in a dance studio, so I actually find that I work better with some sort of music in the background. The office has a Sonos system, so we all take turns playing music.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Immersing myself in art and culture. Whether it is going to a museum to view artwork, seeing a band or heading to a movie to truly appreciate other people’s creativity. It is the best way for me to unwind as I enjoy the talent and art of others.

Company 3 buys Sixteen19, offering full-service post in NYC

Company 3 has acquired Sixteen19, a creative editorial, production and post company based in New York City. The deal includes Sixteen19’s visual effects wing, PowerHouse VFX, and a mobile dailies operation with international reach.

The acquisition helps Company 3 further serve NYC’s booming post market for feature film and episodic TV. As part of the acquisition, industry veterans and Sixteen19 co-founders Jonathan Hoffman and Pete Conlin, along with their longtime collaborator, EVP of business development and strategy Alastair Binks, will join Company 3’s leadership team.

“With Sixteen19 under the Company 3 umbrella, we significantly expand what we bring to the production community, addressing a real unmet need in the industry,” says Company 3 president Stefan Sonnenfeld. “This infusion of talent and infrastructure will allow us to provide a complete suite of services for clients, from the start of production through the creative editing process to visual effects, final color, finishing and mastering. We’ve worked in tandem with Sixteen19 many times over the years, so we know that they have always provided strong client relationships, a best-in-class team and a deeply creative environment. We’re excited to bring that company’s vision into the fold at Company 3.”

Sonnenfeld will continue to serve as president of Company 3, and oversee operations of Sixteen19. As a subsidiary of Deluxe, Company 3 is part of a broad portfolio of post services. Bringing together the complementary services and geographic reach of Company3, Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX, will expand Company 3’s overall portfolio of post offerings and reach new markets in the US and internationally.

Sixteen19’s New York location includes 60 large editorial suites; two 4K digital cinema grading theaters; and a number of comfortable spaces, open environments and many common areas. Sixteen19’s mobile dailies services will add a perfect companion to Company 3’s existing offerings in that arena. PowerHouse VFX includes dedicated teams of experienced supervisors, producers and artists in 2D and 3D visual effects and compositing.

“The New York film community initially recognized the potential for a Company 3 and Sixteen19 partnership,” says Sixteen19’s Hoffman. “It’s not just the fact that a significant majority of the projects we work on are finished at Company 3, it’s more that our fundamental vision about post has always been aligned with Stefan’s. We value innovation; we’ve built terrific creative teams; and above all else, we both put clients first, always.”

Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX will retain their company names.

Review: LaCie mobile, high Speed 1TB SSD

By Brady Betzel

With the flood of internal and external hard drives hitting the market at relatively low prices, it is sometimes hard to wade through the swamp and find the drive that is right for your workflow. In terms of external drives, do you need a RAID? USB-C? Is Thunderbolt 3 the same as USB-C? Should I save money and go with a spinning drive? Are spinning drives even cheaper than SSD drives these days? All of these questions are valid and, hopefully, I will answer them.

For this review, I’m taking a look at the LaCie Mobile SSD  which comes in three versions: 500GB, 1TB and 2TB, costing around $129.95, $219.95 and $399.95, respectively. According to LaCie’s website the mobile SSD drives are exclusive to Apple, but with some searching on Amazon you can find all three available as well and at lower prices than I’ve mentioned. The 1TB version I am seeing for $152.95 is being sold on Amazon through LaCie, so I assume the warranty still holds up.

I was sent the 1TB version of the LaCie Mobile SSD for review and testing. Along with the drive itself, you will get two connection cables: a (USB 3.0 speed) USB-A to USB-C cable, as well as a (USB 3.1 Gen2 speed) GenUSB-C to USB-C cable. For clarity, USB-C is the type of connection — the oval-like shape and technology used to transfer data. While USB-C will work on Thunderbolt 3 connections, Thunderbolt 3 only connections will not work on USB-C connections. Yes, that is super-confusing considering they look the same. But in the real world, Thunderbolt 3 is more Mac OS-based while USB-C is more Windows-based. You can find rare Thunderbolt 3 connections on Windows-based PCs, but you are more likely to find USB-C. That being said, the LaCie Mobile SSD is compatible with both USB-C and Thunderbolt 3, as well as USB 3.0. Keep in mind you will not get the high transfer speed with the USB 3.0 to USB-C cable. You will only get that with the (USB 3.1 Gen 2) USB-C to USB-C cable. The drive comes formatted as exFAT, which is immediately compatible with both Mac OS and Windows.

So, are spinning drives worth the cheaper price? In my opinion, no. Spinning drives are more fragile when moved around a lot and they transfer at much slower speeds. Advertised speeds vary from about 130MB/s for spinning drives to 540MB/s for SSDs, so for today what amounts to $100 more will give you a significant speed increase.

A very valuable piece of the LaCie Mobile SSD purchase is the limited three-year warranty and three years of data recovery services for free. No matter how your data becomes corrupted, Seagate will try and recover it — Seagate became LaCie’s parent company in 2014. Each product is eligible for one in-lab data recovery attempt and can be turned around in as little as two days, depending on the type of recovery. The recovered media will then be sent back to you on a storage device as well as be available to you from a cloud-based account that will be hosted online for 60 days. This is a great feature that’s included in the price.

The drive itself is small, measuring approximately .35” x 3” x 3.8” and weighing only .22 lbs. The outside has sharp lines much in the vein of a faceted diamond. It feels solid and great to carry. The color is about the same as a MacBook Pro, space gray and is made of aluminum.

Transfer SpeedsAlright, let’s get to the nitty-gritty: transfer speeds. I tested the LaCie Mobile SSD on both a Windows-based PC with USB-C and an iMac Pro with Thunderbolt 3/USB-C. On the Windows PC, I initially connected the drive to a port on the front of my system and I was only getting around 150MB/s write speed (about the speed of USB 3.0). Immediately, I knew something was wrong, so I connected to a USB-C port that was in a PCI-e slot in the rear of my PC. On that port I was getting 440.9MB/s write speed and 516.3MB/s read speeds. Moral of the story, make sure your USB-C ports are not just for charging or simply the USB-C connector running at USB 3.0 speeds.

On the iMac Pro, I was getting write speeds of 487.2MB/s and read speeds of 523.9MB/s. This is definitely on par with the correct Windows PC transfer speeds. The retail packaging on the LaCie Mobile SSD states a 540MB/s speed (doesn’t differentiate between read or write), but much like retail miles-per-gallon readouts on car sales brochures, you have to take their numbers with a few grains of salt. And while I have previoulsy tested drives (not from LaCie) that would initially transfer at a high rate and drop down, the LaCie Mobile SSD drive sustained the high speed transfer rates.

Summing Up
In the end, the size and design of the LaCie Mobile SSD will be one of the larger factors in determining if you buy this drive. It’s small. Like real small, but it feels sturdy. I don’t think anyone can argue that the LaCie Rugged drives (the ones that are orange-rubber encased) are a staple of the post industry. I really wish LaCie kept that tradition and added a tiny little orange rubberized edge. Not only does it feel safer for some reason, but it is a trademark that immediately says, “I’m a professional.”

Besides the appearance, the $152.95 price tag for a 1TB SSD drive that can easily fit into your shirt pocket without being noticed is pretty reasonable. At $219.95 I might say keep looking around. In addition, if you aren’t already an Adobe Creative Cloud subscriber you will get a free 30-day trial (normally seven days) included with purchase.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Shipping + Handling adds Jerry Spivack, Mike Pethel, Matthew Schwab

VFX creative director Jerry Spivack and colorists Michael Pethel and Matthew Schwab have joined LA’s Shipping + Handling, Spot Welders‘ VFX, color grading, animation, and finishing arm/sister company.

Alongside executive producer Scott Friske and current creative director Casey Price, Spivack will help lead the company’s creative team. As the creative director/co-founder at Ring of Fire, Spivack was responsible for crafting and spearheading VFX on commercials for brands including FedEx, Nike and Jaguar; episodic work for series television including Netflix’s Wormwood and 12 seasons of FX’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia; promos for NBC’s The Voice and The Titan Games; and feature films such as Sony Pictures’ Spider-Man 2, Bold Films’ Drive and Warner Bros.’ The Bucket List.

Colorist Pethel was a founding partner of Company 3 and for the past five years has served client and director relationships under his BeachHouse Color brand, which he will continue to maintain. Pethel’s body of work includes campaigns for Carl’s Jr., Chase, Coke, Comcast/Xfinity, Hyundai, Jeep, Netflix and Southwest Airlines.

Commenting on the move, Pethel says, “I’m thrilled to be joining such a fantastic group of highly regarded and skilled professionals at Shipping + Handling. There is so much creativity here; the people are awesome to work with and the technology they are able to offer clientele at the facility is top-notch.”

Schwab formally joins the Shipping + Handling roster after working closely with the company over the past two years on multiple campaigns for Apple, Acura, QuickBooks and many others. Aside from his role at Shipping + Handling, Schwab will also continue his work through Roving Picture Company. Having worked with a number of internationally recognized brands, Schwab has collaborated on projects for Amazon, Honda, Mercedes-Benz, National Geographic, Netflix, Nike, PlayStation and Smirnoff.

“It’s exciting to be part of a team that approaches every project with such energy. This partnership represents a shared commitment to always deliver outstanding color and technical results for our clients,” says Schwab.

“Pethel is easily amongst the best colorists in our industry. As a longtime client of his, I have a real understanding of the professionalism he brings to every session. He is a delight in the room and wickedly talented. Schwab’s talent has just been realized in the last few years, and we are pleased to offer his skill to our clients. If our experience working with him over the last couple of years is any indication, we’re going to make a lot of clients happy he’s on our roster,” adds Friske.

Spivack, Pethel and Schwab will operate out of Shipping + Handling’s West Coast office on the creative campus it shares with its sister company, editorial post house Spot Welders.

Image: (L-R) Mike Pethel, Matthew Schwab, Jerry Spivack

 

Quick Chat: Bonfire Labs’ Mary Mathaisell

Over the course of nearly 30 years, San Francisco’s Bonfire Labs has embraced change. Over the years, the company evolved from an editorial and post house to a design and creative content studio that leverages the best aspects of the agency and production company models without adhering to either one.

This hybrid model has worked well for product launches for Google, Facebook, Salesforce, Logitech and many others.

The latest change is in the company’s ownership, with the last of the original founders stepping down and a new management partnership taking over — led by executive producer Mary Mathaisell, managing director Jim Bartel and head of strategy and creative Chris Weldon.

We spoke with Mathaisell to get a better sense of Bonfire Labs’ past, present and future.

Can you give us some history of Bonfire Labs? When did you join the company? How/why did you first get into producing?
I’ve been with Bonfire Labs for seven years. I started here as head of production. After being at several large digital agencies working on campaigns and content for brands like Target, Gap, LG and PayPal, I wanted to build something more sustainable than just another campaign and was thrilled that Bonfire was interested in growing into a full-service creative company with integrated production.

Prior to working at AKQA and Publicis, I worked in VFX and production as well as design for products and interfaces, but my primary focus and love has always been commercial production.

The studio has evolved from a traditional post studio to creative strategy and content company. What were the factors that drove those changes?
Bonfire Labs has always been smart about staying small and strategic about the kind of work and clients to focus on. We have been able to change based on both the kind of work we want to be doing and what the market needs. With a giant need for content, especially video content, we have decided to staff and service clients as experts across all the phases of creative development and production and finishing. Instead of going to an agency and a production company and post houses, our clients can work directly with us on everything from concept to finishing.

Silicon Valley is clearly a big client base for you. What are they generally coming to you for? Are the content needs in high tech different from other business sectors?
Our clients usually have a new product, feature or brand that they want the world to know about. We work on product launches, brand awareness campaigns, product education, event content and social content. Most of our work is for technology companies, but every company these days has a technology component. I would say that speed to market is one key differentiator for our clients. We are often building stories as we are in production, so we get a lot done with our clients through creative collaboration and by not following the traditional rules of an agency or a production company.

Any specific trends that you’re seeing recently from your clients? New areas that Bonfire is looking to explore, either new markets for your talents or technology you’re looking to explore further?
Rapid brand prototyping is a new service we are offering to much excitement. Because we have experience across so many technology brands and work closely with our clients, we can develop a language and brand voice faster than most traditional agencies. Technology brands are evolving so quickly that we often start working on content creation before a brand has defined itself or transitioned to its next phase. Rapid brand prototyping allows brands to test content and grow the brand simultaneously.

Blade Shadow

Can you talk about some projects that you have done recently that challenged you and the team?
We rolled out a launch film for a new start-up client called Blade Shadow. We are working with Salesforce to develop trailblazer stories and anthem films for its .org branch, which focuses on NGOs, education and philanthropy.

The company is undergoing a transition with some of the original partners. Can you talk about that a bit as well?
The original founders have passed the torch to the group of people who have been managing and producing the work over the past five to 15 years. We have six new owners, three managing partners and three associate partners. Jim Bartel is the managing director; Chris Weldon is the head of strategy and creative, and I’m the executive producer in charge of content development and production. The three of us make up the management team.

The three of us make up the management team. Sheila Smith (head of production) Robbie Proctor (head of editorial) and Phil Spitler (creative technology lead) are associate partners as they contribute to and lead so much of our work and process and have been part of the company for over 10 years each.

 

Behind the Title: Compadre’s Mika Saulitis

This creative started writing brand campaigns for his favorite oatmeal at eight years old.

NAME: Mika Saulitis

COMPANY: Culver City, California’s Compadre

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re a creative marketing agency. I could get into the nuts and bolts of our process and services, but what we specialize in is pretty simple: building a brand’s story, telling that story and spreading that story everywhere people can fall in love with it.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Creative Strategy

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The short answer is that I oversee brand strategy and integrated marketing campaigns. The longer answer is that our creative strategy team’s primary goal is to take complex insights and business challenges and develop simple, clear creative solutions. Sometimes that’s renaming a company or developing a new brand position, or conceiving a big “hook” for a 360 marketing campaign and rippling it out across on-air, social, experiential, and brand partnerships.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Identifying the unique differentiator of a brand or product and figuring out how to express that in a succinct, unexpected way.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Proofreading 150-page presentations.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
9am. Once that coffee hits, I’m off to the races.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I always wanted to be a garbage man growing up, so if they still ride along on the back of the truck, probably that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I started writing ads for my favorite oatmeal to convert my classmates when I was eight years old, so I’ve been a marketer at heart for pretty much my whole life.

Freeform

Freeform

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
We just developed a brand campaign for Freeform that rejects dated societal norms. Our concept, “It’s Not Us, It’s You,” was a breakup letter to society; we shot real people, as well as the network’s talent, and empowered them to speak their piece and break up with all the things that suck about societal standards.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Noise-canceling headphones, Apple TV and my bike. That was technology at one point, right?

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I’m not ashamed to admit that Flo Rida gets my creative juices flowing.

THIS IS A HIGH STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS.
Golf is my ultimate stress reliever. Being surrounded by trees, chirping birds and the occasional “fore” puts me at ease.

The Umbrella Academy‘s Emmy-nominated VFX supe Everett Burrell

By Iain Blair

If all ambitious TV shows with a ton of visual effects aspire to be cinematic, then Netflix’s The Umbrella Academy has to be the gold standard. The acclaimed sci-fi, superhero, adventure mash-up was just Emmy-nominated for its season-ending episode “The White Violin,” which showcased a full range of spectacular VFX. This included everything from the fully-CG Dr. Pogo to blowing up the moon and a mansion to the characters’ varied superpowers. Those VFX, mainly created by movie powerhouse Weta Digital in New Zealand and Spin VFX in Toronto, indeed rival anything in cinema. This is partly thanks to Netflix’s 4K pipeline.

The Umbrella Academy is based on the popular, Eisner Award-winning comics and graphic novels created and written by Gerard Way (“My Chemical Romance”), illustrated by Gabriel Bá, and published by Dark Horse Comics.

The story starts when, on the same day in 1989, 43 infants are born to unconnected women who showed no signs of pregnancy the day before. Seven are adopted by Sir Reginald Hargreeves, a billionaire industrialist, who creates The Umbrella Academy and prepares his “children” to save the world. But not everything went according to plan. In their teenage years, the family fractured and the team disbanded. Now, six of the surviving members reunite upon the news of Hargreeves’ death. Luther, Diego, Allison, Klaus, Vanya and Number Five work together to solve a mystery surrounding their father’s death. But the estranged family once again begins to come apart due to divergent personalities and abilities, not to mention the imminent threat of a global apocalypse.

The live-action series stars Ellen Page, Tom Hopper, Emmy Raver-Lampman, Robert Sheehan, David Castañeda, Aidan Gallagher, Cameron Britton and Mary J. Blige. It is produced by Universal Content Productions for Netflix. Steve Blackman (Fargo, Altered Carbon) is the executive producer and showrunner, with additional executive producers Jeff F. King, Bluegrass Television, and Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg from Dark Horse Entertainment.

Everett Burrell

I spoke with senior visual effects supervisor and co-producer Everett Burrell (Pan’s Labyrinth, Altered Carbon), who has an Emmy for his work on Babylon 5, about creating the VFX and the 4K pipeline.

Congratulations on being nominated for the first season-ending episode “The White Violin,” which showcased so many impressive visual effects.
Thanks. We’re all really proud of the work.

Have you started season two?
Yes, and we’re already knee-deep in the shooting up in Canada. We shoot in Toronto, where we’re based, as well as Hamilton, which has this great period look. So we’re up there quite a bit. We’re just back here in LA for a couple of weeks working on editorial with Steve Blackman, the executive producer and showrunner. Our offices are in Encino, in a merchant bank building. I’m a co-producer as well, so I also deal a lot with editorial — more than normal.

Have you planned out all the VFX for the new season?
To a certain extent. We’re working on the scripts and have a good jump on them. We definitely plan to blow the first season out of the water in terms of what we come up with.

What are the biggest challenges of creating all the VFX on the show?
The big one is the sheer variety of VFX, which are all over the map in terms of the various types. They go from a completely animated talking CG chimpanzee Dr. Pogo to creating a very unusual apocalyptic world, with scenes like blowing up the moon and, of course, all the superpowers. One of the hardest things we had to do — which no one will ever know just watching it — was a ton of leaf replacement on trees.

Digital leaves via Montreal’s Folks.

When we began shooting, it was winter and there were no leaves on the trees. When we got to editorial we realized that the story spans just eight days, so it wouldn’t make any sense if in one scene we had no leaves and in the next we had leaves. So we had to add every single leaf to the trees for all of the first five episodes, which was a huge amount of work. The way we did it was to go back to all the locations and re-shoot all the trees from the same angles once they were in bloom. Then we had to composite all that in. Folks in Montreal did all of it, and it was very complicated. Lola did a lot of great work on Hargreeves, getting his young look for the early 1900s and cleaning up the hair and wrinkles and making it all look totally realistic. That was very tricky too.

Netflix is ahead of the curve thanks to its 4K policy. Tell us about the pipeline.
For a start, we shoot with the ARRI Alexa 65, which is a very robust cinema camera that was used on The Revenant. With its 65mm sensor, it’s meant for big-scope, epic movies, and we decided to go with it to give our show that great cinema look. The depth of field is like film, and it can also emulate film grain for this fantastic look. That camera shoots natively at 5K — it won’t go any lower. That means we’re at a much higher resolution than any other show out there.

And you’re right, Netflix requires a 4K master as future-proofing for streaming and so on. Those very high standards then trickle down to us and all the VFX. We also use a very unique system developed by Deluxe and Efilm called Portal, which basically stores the entire show in the cloud on a server somewhere, and we can get background plates to the vendors within 10 minutes. It’s amazing. Back in the old days, you’d have to make a request and maybe within 24 or 48 hours, you’d get those plates. So this system makes it almost instantaneous, and that’s a lifesaver.

   
Method blows up the moon.

How closely do you work with Steve Blackman and the editors?
I think Steve said it best:”There’s no daylight between the two of us” We’re linked at the hip pretty much all the time. He comes to my office if he has issues, and I go to his if we have complications; we resolve all of it together in probably the best creative relationship I’ve ever had. He relies on me and counts on me, and I trust him completely. Bottom line, if we need to write ourselves out of a sticky situation, he’s also the head writer, so he’ll just go off and rewrite a scene to help us out.

How many VFX do you average for each show?
We average between 150 and 200 per episode. Last season we did nearly 2,000 in total, so it’s a huge amount for a TV show, and there’s a lot of data being pushed. Luckily, I have an amazing team, including my production manager Misato Shinohara. She’s just the best and really takes care of all the databases, and manages all the shot data, reference, slates and so on. All that stuff we take on set has to go into this massive database, and just maintaining that is a huge job.

Who are the main VFX vendors?
The VFX are mainly created by Weta in New Zealand and Spin VFX in Toronto. Weta did all the Pogo stuff. Then we have Folks, Lola, Marz, Deluxe Toronto, DigitalFilm Tree in LA… and then Method Studios in Vancouver did great work on our end-of-the-world apocalyptic sequence. They blew up the moon and had a chunk of it hitting the Earth, along with all the surrounding imagery. We started R&D on that pretty early to get a jump on it. We gave them storyboards and they did previz. We used that as a cut to get iterations of it all. There were a lot of particle simulations, which was pretty intense.

Weta created Dr. Pogo

What have been the most difficult VFX sequences to create?
Just dealing with Pogo is obviously very demanding, and we had to come up with a fast shortcut to dealing with the photo-real look as we just don’t have the time or budget they have for the Planet of the Apes movies. The big thing is integrating him in the room as an actor with the live actors, and that was a huge challenge. We used just two witness cameras to capture our Pogo body performer. All the apocalyptic scenes were also very challenging because of the scale, and then those leaves were very hard to do and make look real. That alone took us a couple of months. And we might have the same problem this year, as we’re shooting in the summer through fall, and I’m praying that the leaves don’t start falling before we wrap.

What have been the main advances in technology that have really helped you pull off some of the show’s VFX?
I think the rendering and the graphics cards are the big ones, and the hardware talks together much more efficiently now. Even just a few years ago, and it might have taken weeks and weeks to render a Pogo. Now we can do it in a day. Weta developed new software for creating the texture and fabric of Pogo’s clothes. They also refined their hair programs.

 

I assume as co-producer that you’re very involved with the DI?
I am… and keeping track of all that and making sure we keep pushing the envelope. We do the DI at Company 3 with colorist Jill Bogdanowicz, who’s a partner in all of this. She brings so much to the show, and her work is a big part of why it looks so good. I love the DI. It’s where all the magic happens, and I get in there early with Jill and take care of the VFX tweaks. Then Steve comes in and works on contrast and color tweaks.By the time Steve gets there, we’re probably 80% of the way there already.

What can fans expect from season two?
Bigger, better visual effects. We definitely pay attention to the fans. They love the graphic novel, so we’re getting more of that into the show.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Post vet Chris Peterson joins NYC’s Chimney North

Chimney’s New York studio has hired Chris Peterson as its new EP of longform entertainment, building on the company’s longform credits, which include The Dead Don’t Die, Atomic Blonde, Chappaquiddick, The Wife and Her.

Chimney is a full-service company working in feature films, television, commercials, digital media, live events and business-to-business communications. The studio has offices in 11 cities and eight countries worldwide.

In his new role, Peterson will be using his expertise in film finance, tax credit maximization and technical workflows to grow Chimney’s feature film and television capabilities. He brings over 20 years of experience in production and post, including a stint at Mechanism Digital and Post Factory, NY.

Peterson’s resume is diverse and spans the television, film, technology, advertising, music, video game and XR industries. Projects include the Academy Award-winning feature Spotlight, the Academy Award-winning documentary OJ: Made in America, and the Grammy-nominated Roger Waters: The Wall. For E! Entertainment’s travel series Wild On, he produced shows in Argentina, Brazil, Trinidad and across the United States. He was also a post producer on Howard Stern on Demand.

“Chimney combines the best of both worlds: a boutique feel and global resources,” says Peterson. “Add to that the company’s expertise in financing and tax credits, and you have a unique resource for producers and filmmakers.”

For the past eight years, Peterson has been board secretary of the Post New York Alliance, which was co-founded by Chimney North America CEO Marcelo Gandola. The PNYA is a trade association that lobbied for and passed the first post-only tax credit, which was recently extended for two years. Peterson is also a member of SMPTE.

Behind the Title: Amazon senior post exec Frank Salinas

NAME: Frank Salinas

COMPANY: Amazon Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re Amazon.com….Look us up. Small e-commerce bookstore turned global marketplace, cloud storage services and content maker and broadcaster.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Post Production Executive

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
My core responsibility is to support and shepherd our series, specials and/or episodes in partnership with our production company from preproduction to delivery.

From the early stages of conceptualizing and planning our productions through color grading, mixing, QC, mastering, publishing and broadcast/launch, it’s my responsibility to oversee that our timelines are met and our commitments to our customers are kept.

Our customers expect the highest standards for quality. I work closely and in tandem with all the other departments to assure that our content is ready for distribution on time, under budget and to the utmost standards. Meaning we are shooting at the highest quality, localizing (whether subtitles or dubbing) in all the languages we are distributing to and that the quality is upheld throughout that process.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m making it a point of getting involved in the post production process before cameras are chosen or scripts are ever finalized to assure we have a clear runway and a set workflow for success.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Being on set or leading into that moment before going on set and having a plan and a strategy in motion and being able to watch it be executed. It almost never plays out as you predicted, but having the knowledge and the confidence to adjust, and being fluid in that moment, is my favorite part of the job.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job would have to be the extraneous meetings that go into making a series. It’s part of the process but I’m not a big fan of meetings

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
My most productive part of the day would likely be my 90-minute drive into the office. This is when I can create my “to-do’s list” for that day, and then the two to three hours I have in the morning before anyone arrives. This allows me to tackle the list without interruption. That and the few times I have the opportunity to run in the morning. It’s those times that allow me to clear my head and process my thoughts linearly.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
If I wasn’t a post executive, I’d likely be a real estate agent or TV/film agent. I get a lot of joy whenever I’m able to make someone happy by being able to pair them with something or someone that fits them perfectly — whatever it is that they are looking for. Finding that perfect marriage between that person and that thing they are needing or wanting brings me a lot of happiness.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I’ve enjoyed television and the film medium for as long as I can remember. From the moment I saw my first episode of The Twilight Zone and realized that you could really leave your audience asking the question of “Is this real?” or “What if? I thought there was something so powerful about that.

Lorena

CAN YOU NAME A RECENT PROJECT YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The documentary Lorena; Last One Laughing Mexico;This Is Football, premiering early August; Gymkhana; The Jonas Brothers film Chasing Happiness; The live Prime Day concert 2019;
The series Carnival Row (launching 8/31); and the All or Nothing series, just to name a few.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a few, but most of them stem from my time at 25/7 Productions. Ultimate Beastmaster, The Briefcase and Strong all hold a special place in my heart, not only because I was able to work on them with people whom I consider my family but because we created something that positively changed peoples lives and expanded their way of thinking

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I’m going to list four since I’m a techy through and through…

My phone. It’s my safety blanket and my window to the world.

My laptop, which is just a larger window or blanket.

My car. Although it’s basic in nature and not pretentious at all, it allows me to be mobile but still allows me a safe place to work. For the amount of time I spend in my car it’s really become my mobile office.

My headphones. Whether I’m running in my neighborhood or traveling on a plane, the joy I get from listening to music and podcasts is absolute. I love music.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram and Facebook are the two I find myself on, and I tend to follow things that I’m passionate about. My sports teams — the Dodgers, Lakers and Kings — and I love architecture and food so I tend to follow those publications that showcase great photos of both.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I love music… almost all of it. Classic rock, reggae, pop, hip-hop, rap, house, country, jazz, Latin, punk. Everything but Phish or Grateful Dead? I just don’t get it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
My love for running, cooking or eating great food, traveling and being with my family helps to remind me that it’s only TV. I constantly need to be reminded that what we are doing, while important, is also just entertainment.

Behind the Title: Cinematic Media head of sound Martin Hernández

This audio post pro’s favorite part of the job is the start of a project — having a conversation with the producer and the director. “It’s exciting, like any new relationship,” he says.

Name: Martin Hernández

Job Title: Supervising Sound Editor

Company: Mexico City’s Cinematic Media

Can you describe Cinematic Media and your role there?
I lead a new sound post department at Cinematic Media, Mexico’s largest post facility focused on television and cinema. We take production sound through the full post process: effects, backgrounds, music editing… the whole thing. We finish the sound on our mix stages.

What would surprise people most about what you do?
We want the sound to go unnoticed. The viewer shouldn’t be aware that something has been added or is unnatural. If the viewer is distracted from the story by the sound, it’s a lousy job. It’s like an actor whose performance draws attention to himself. That’s bad acting. The same applies to every aspect of filmmaking, including sound. Sound needs to help the narrative in a subjective and quiet way. The sound should be unnoticed… but still eloquent. When done properly, it’s magical.

Hernandez has been working on Easy for Netflix.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Entering the project for the first time and having a conversation with the team: the producer and the director. It’s exciting, like any new relationship. It’s beautiful. Even if you’re working with people you’ve worked with before, the project is newborn.

My second favorite part is the start of sound production, when I have a picture but the sound is a blank page. We must consider what to add. What will work? What won’t? How much is enough or too much? It’s a lot like cooking. The dish might need more of this spice and a little less of that. You work with your ingredients, apply your personal taste and find the right flavor. I enjoy cooking sound.

What’s your least favorite part of the job?
Me.

What do you mean?
I am very hard on myself. I only see my shortcomings, which are, to tell you the truth, many. I see my limitations very clearly. In my perception of things, it is very hard to get where I want to go. Often you fail, but every once in a while, a few things actually work. That’s why I’m so stubborn. I know I am going to have a lot of misses, so I do more than expected. I will shoot three or four times, hoping to hit the mark once or twice. It’s very difficult for me to work with me.

What is your most productive time of the day?
In the morning. I’m a morning person. I work from my own place, very early, like 5:30am. I wake up thinking about things that I left behind in the session. It’s useless to remain in bed, so I go to my studio and start working on these ideas. It’s amazing how much you can accomplish between 6am and 9am. You have no distractions. No one’s calling. No emails. Nothing. I am very happy working in the mornings.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing?
That’s a tough question! I don’t know anything else. Probably, I would cook. I’d go to a restaurant and offer myself as an intern in the kitchen.

For most people I know, their career is not something they’ve chosen; it was embedded in them when they were born. It’s a matter of realizing what’s there inside you and embracing it. I never, in my wildest dreams, expected to be doing this work.

When I was young, I enjoyed watching films, going to the movies, listening to music. My earliest childhood memories are sound memories, but I never thought that would be my work. It happened by accident. Actually, it was one accident after another. I found myself working with sound as a hobby. I really liked it, so I embraced it. My hobby then became my job.

So you knew early on that audio would be your path?
I started working in radio when I was 20. It happened by chance. A neighbor told me about a radio station that was starting up from scratch. I told my friend from school, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu, the director. Suddenly, we’re working at a radio station. We’re writing radio pieces and doing production sound. It was beautiful. We had our own on-air, live shows. I was on in the mornings. He did the noon show. Then he decided to make films and I followed him.

Easy

What are some of your recent projects?
I just finished a series for Joe Swanberg, the third season of Easy. It’s on Netflix. It’s the fourth project I’ve done with Joe. I’ve also done two shows here in Mexico. The first one is my first full-time job as supervisor/designer for Argos, the company lead by Epigmenio Ibarra. Yankee is our first series together for Netflix, and we’re cutting another one to be aired later in the year. It’s a very exciting for me.

Is there a project that you’re most proud of?
I am very proud of the results that we’ve been getting on the first two series here in Mexico. We built the sound crew from scratch. Some are editors I’ve worked with before, but we’ve also brought in new talent. That’s a very joyful process. Finding talent is not easy, but once you do, it’s very gratifying. I’m also proud of this work because the quality is very good. Our clients are happy, and when they’re happy, I’m happy.

What pieces of technology can you not live without?
Avid Pro Tools. It’s the universal language for sound. It allows me to share sound elements and sessions from all over the world, just like we do locally, between editing and mixing stages. The second is my converter. We are using the Red system from Focusrite. It’s a beautiful machine.

This is a high-stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Keep working.

Veteran episodic colorist Scott Klein joins Light Iron

Colorist Scott Klein has joined post house Light Iron, which has artists working on feature films, episodic series and music videos at its Los Angeles- and New York-based studios. Klein brings with him 40 years of experience supervising a variety of episodic series.

“While Light Iron was historically known for its capabilities with feature films, we have developed an equally strong episodic division, and Scott builds upon our ongoing commitment to providing the talent and technology necessary for supporting all formats and distribution platforms,” says GM Peter Cioni of Light Iron.

Klein’s list of credits include Fox’s Empire, HBO’s Deadwood: The Movie and Showtime’s Ray Donovan. He also collaborated on the series Bosch, True Blood, The Affair, Halt and Catch Fire, Entourage and The Sopranos. Klein is also an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC). He will be working on Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

“I really enjoy the artistic collaboration with filmmakers,” he says. “It is great to be part of a facility with such a pure passion for supporting the creative through technology. Colorists need strong technology that serves as a means to best express the feelings being conveyed in the images and further enhance the moods that draw audiences into a story.”

Also joining Klein are his colleagues and fellow colorists Daniel Yang, Jesús Borrego and Ara Thomassian. They join Light Iron after working together at Warner Bros. and then Technicolor.

In addition to growing its team of artists to support the expanding market and client needs, Light Iron has also expanded its physical footprint with a second Hollywood-based location a short distance from its flagship facility. A full breadth of creative finishing services for feature films and episodic series is available at both locations. Light Iron also has locations in Atlanta, Albuquerque, Chicago and New Orleans.

 

CVLT hires Katya Pavlova as head of post

Bi-coastal video production studio CVLT has added Katya Pavlova as head of post production. She will be based in the studio’s New York location.

Pavlova joins the team after six years at The Mill, where she produced projects that include David Bowie’s Life on Mars music video remake directed by photographer Mick Rock, as well as Steven Klein’s augmented reality experience for W Magazine’s cover, featuring an interactive 3D digital portrait of Katy Perry.

In her new role, Pavlova will focus on growing CVLT’s post production operation and developing new partnerships. She brings career expertise in a broad range of editorial, VFX, design and CG disciplines across digital and broadcast. In her time as a producer at The Mill, she worked on variety of work for brands including Netflix, Facebook, Ralph Lauren, Jimmy Choo and Vogue.

“We have seen post production needs shift focus from traditional media channels to multi-platform requirements, including emerging technology like augmented reality and crafting short-form videos for social media and mobile audiences. At CLVT, I intend to adapt our team to execute post on advanced AR projects as well as quick turnaround videos for social channels.”

Picture Shop buys The Farm Group

Burbank’s Picture Shop has acquired UK-based The Farm Group. The Farm Group was founded in 1998 and currently has four locations in London, as well as facilities in Manchester, Bristol and Los Angeles.

The Farm, London

The Farm also operates the in-house post production teams for BBC Sport in Salford, England; UKTV; and Fremantle Media. This deal marks Picture Shop’s second international acquisition, followed by the deal it made for Vancouver’s Finalé Post earlier this year.

The founders of The Farm, Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn, will stay involved in The Farm Group. In a joint statement, Sargent and Dunn said, “We are delighted that after 20 successful years, we have a new partner. Picture Shop is poised to expand in the international post market and provide the combination of technical, creative and professional excellence to the world’s content creators.”

The duo will also re-invest in the expanded Picture Head Group, which includes Picture Head and audio post company Formosa Group, in addition to Picture Shop.

L-R: The Farm Group’s Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn.

Bill Romeo, president of Picture Shop, says, “Based on the amount of content being created internationally, we felt it was important to have a presence worldwide and support our clients’ needs. The Farm, based on its reputation and creative talent, will be able to maintain the philosophy of Picture Shop. It is a perfect fit. Our clients will benefit from our collaborative efforts internationally, as well as benefit from our technology and experience. We will continue to partner and support our clients while maintaining our boutique feel.”

Recent work from The Farm Group includes BBC Two’s Summer of Rockets, Sky One’s Jamestown and Britain’s Got Talent.

 

London’s Media Production Show: technology for content creation

By Mel Lambert

The fourth annual Media Production Show, held June 11-12 at Olympia West, London, once again attracted a wide cross section of European production, broadcast, post and media-distribution pros. According to its organizers, the two-day confab drew 5,300 attendees and “showcased the technology and creativity behind content creation,” focusing on state-of-the-art products and services. The full program of standing room-only discussion seminars covered a number of contemporary topics, while 150-plus exhibitors presented wares from the media industry’s leading brands.

The State of the Nation: Post Production panel.

During a session called “The State of the Nation: Post Production,” Rowan Bray, managing director of Clear Cut Pictures, said that “while [wage and infrastructure] costs are rising, our income is not keeping up.” And with salaries, facility rent and equipment amortization representing 85% of fixed costs, “it leaves little over for investment in new technology and services. In other words, increasing costs are preventing us from embracing new technologies.”

Focusing on the long-term economic health of the UK post industry, Bray pointed out that few post facilities in London’s Soho area are changing hands, which she says “indicates that this is not a healthy sector [for investment].”

“Several years ago, a number of US companies [including Technicolor and Deluxe] invested £100 million [$130 million] in Soho; they are now gone,” stated Ian Dodd, head of post at Dock10.

Some 25 years ago, there were at least 20 leading post facilities in London. “Now we have a handful of high-end shops, a few medium-sized ones and a handful of boutiques,” Dodd concluded. Other panelists included Cara Kotschy, managing director of Fifty Fifty Post Production.

The Women in Sound panel

During his keynote presentation called “How we made Bohemian Rhapsody,” leading production designer Aaron Haye explained how the film’s large stadium concert scenes were staged and supplemented with high-resolution CGI; he is currently working on Charlie’s Angels (2019) with director/actress Elizabeth Banks.

The panel discussion “Women in Sound” brought together a trio of re-recording mixers with divergent secondary capabilities and experience. Participants were Emma Butt, a freelance mixer who also handles sound editorial and ADR recordings; Lucy Mitchell, a freelance sound editor and mixer; plus Kate Davis, head of sound at Directors Cut Films. As the audience discovered, their roles in professional sound differ. While exploring these differences, the panel revealed helpful tips and tricks for succeeding in the post world.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

New Boxx workstation features Intel Xeon W-3200 processor

Boxx Technologies, which makes computer workstations, rendering systems and servers, has introduced the Apexx W4L workstation featuring new Intel Xeon W-3200 series processors. This new single-socket processor provides performance increases over previous Intel Xeon W technology. Boxx’s Apexx W4L is purpose-built for rendering, simulation and other GPU-accelerated compute applications.

A new single-socket solution, 28-core (56 thread) Intel Xeon W-3200 processors offer up to 4.6GHz with Intel Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0, 64 processor PCIe lanes for more I/O throughput for networking, graphics and storage, and new Intel Deep Learning Boost for accelerated AI performance.

In addition to the new Intel processor technology, Apexx W4L features up to 1TB of memory and four Nvidia or AMD professional GPUs, making the workstation ideal for GPU-intensive workloads, including media and entertainment.

Pricing starts at $7,395 and you can expect two to three weeks for delivery.

 

Post vet Jason Mayo named COO of Chimney North America

Chimney Group has hired industry veteran Jason Mayo as chief operating officer for North America. He will be based in the studio’s New York office. Mayo joins at a time of significant growth for Chimney Group, an independently-owned Stockholm-based creative and post company with studios in 11 cities and eight countries worldwide.

“What attracted me is Chimney being able to leverage their full power of resources around the globe. We need to make budgets and schedules work harder for our clients, and having a 24/7 production and post pipeline is a powerful package we can offer clients on a global scale,” says Mayo.

He joins from Postal TV, where he was managing director. Before that, Mayo was managing director/partner at NYC’s Click 3X. He helped grow the studio from a 20-person VFX boutique to a fully integrated digital production company with a staff of over 75 full-time designers, animators, live-action directors, producers, developers, editors, colorists and VFX artists.

The Chimney Group’s recent foray into the North American market includes the opening of studios in New York and Los Angeles and the hiring of over 35 people, including the recent addition of chief client officer Kristen Martini. Mayo will work closely with North American CEO Marcelo Gandola to bring the Swedish operational and creative model to the States, delivering brand strategy as well as full-service production and post capabilities to multiple verticals.

“The work we are doing for our clients is increasingly global and full-service in nature,” says Gandola. “Jason has a great track record building companies and is an ideal operational leader for us to build a team to serve Chimney’s global clientele in the US market.”

Dell adds to Precision workstation line, targets M&E

During the Computex show, Dell showed new Precision mobile workstations featuring the latest processors, next-gen graphics, new display options and longer battery life. These systems are designed demanding data- and graphics-intensive workloads.

Dell Precision workstations are ISV-certified and come with Dell Precision Optimizer software that automatically tailors the system’s settings to get the best software performance from the workstation. The compact design of the new 5000 and 7000 series models offer a combination of extreme battery life, powerful processor configurations and large storage options. Starting at 3.9 pounds, the Dell Precision 5540 comes with Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core eight-core processors.

With a 15.6-inch InfinityEdge display inside a 14-inch chassis, the Precision 5540 houses up to 4TB of storage and up to 64GB of memory, which helps pros to quickly access, transfer and store large 3D, video and multimedia files. Editors and designers will also benefit from contrast ratios, touch capability and picture quality with up to a UHD, 100% Adobe color gamut display or the new OLED display with 100% DCI-P3 color gamut.

The Dell Precision 7540 15-inch mobile workstation comes with a range of 15.6-inch display options, including a UHD HDR 400 display. It supports up to 8K resolution and playback of HDR content via single DisplayPort 1.4. The Precision 7540 can accelerate heavy workflows with up to 3200MHz SuperSpeed memory or up to 128GB of 2666MHz ECC memory.

For creatives whose process requires an even more immersive experience, the new Dell Precision 7740 has a 17.3-inch screen and is Dell’s most powerful and scalable mobile workstation. VR- and AI-ready, it is designed to help users bring their most data-heavy, graphic-intensive ideas to life while keeping applications running smoothly.

The Precision 7740 has been updated to feature up to the latest Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core eight-core processors and comes with up to 128GB of ECC memory and a large PCIe SSD storage capacity (up to 8TB). Nvidia Quadro RTX graphics offer realtime raytracing with AI-based graphics acceleration. Additional options include next-generation AMD Radeon Pro GPUs. It is available with a range of display options, including a new 17.3-inch UltraSharp UHD IGZO display featuring 100% Adobe color gamut.

Along with the new Precision mobile workstation models, Dell has also updated its Precision 3000 series towers and the Precision 1U rack workstation. The 3930 1U rack workstation has been updated with Intel Xeon E or 9th Gen Intel Core processor options. The solution now offers up to 128GB of memory and up to one double-width 295W of Nvidia Quadro or AMD Radeon Pro professional graphics support.

The next-gen Dell Precision 3630 and 3431 towers improve response time with up to 128GB or 64GB of 2666MHz ECC or non-ECC memory, respectively, and both offer scalable storage options. All workstations have a range of operating system options, including Windows 10 Pro, Red Hat and Ubuntu Linux.

The Dell Precision 5540, 7540 and 7740 mobile workstations will be available on Dell.com in early July. Starting prices are $1339, $1149 and $1409, respectively. The Dell Precision 3630 tower workstation will be available on dell.com in mid-July starting at $609.

The Dell Precision 3431 Tower workstation will be available on their site in June starting at $609. The Dell Precision 3930 Rack will be available on their site in mid-July starting at $879.

Phil Kubel named director of HPA

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) has appointed Phil Kubel as the organization’s director. He will be the Burbank-based presence of the HPA management team, managing the organization’s day-to-day business as well as supporting strategic planning, membership development and program development.

After his graduation from USC, Kubel worked in a number of production-related positions. In 2003 he became one of the founding members of HRTV, a national television network that featured equestrian and horse racing content. Kubel was instrumental in the design, engineering and production build of the studios and broadcast facility at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, California. He went on to oversee day-to-day operations of all digital media, production and technology initiatives at HRTV, including creating the subscription-based HRTV.com.

In addition to Kubel’s technical portfolio, he served as VP of post production for HRTV and was the creative force behind the documentary series Inside Information, which earned 10 Emmy wins.

In 2015, Kubel was named VP/EP for a new digital media initiative for The Stronach Group. Under Stronach Digital, he oversaw the launch of XBTV, which is now an industry-leading multi-media horse racing product that provides insight and analysis for wagering customers.

“It’s an exciting time to be joining HPA,” notes Kubel. “We have a rare opportunity to use our accumulated knowledge and relationships to support industry growth by connecting the players and leading the conversation. I look forward to continuing the vision of HPA and developing it as a world-class resource for production professionals.”

He will report to HPA’s executive director, Barbara Lange.

Sonnet adds new card and adapter to 10GbE line

Sonnet Technologies is offering the Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card and the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter, the latest products in the company’s line of 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) network adapters.

Solo10G SFP+ adapters add fast 10GbE network connectivity to a wide range of computers, enabling users to easily connect to 10GbE-enabled network infrastructure and storage systems via LC fiber optic cables (sold separately). Both products include a 10GBase-SR (short-range) SFP+ transceiver (the most commonly used optical transceiver), enabling 10Gb connectivity at distances up to 300 meters.

The Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card is a low-profile x4 PCIe 3.0 adapter card that offers Mac, Windows and Linux users an easy-to-install and easy-to-manage solution for adding 10GbE fiber network connectivity to computers with PCIe card slots. This card is also suited for use in a multi-slot Thunderbolt-to-PCIe card expansion system connected to a Mac. The Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter is a compact, rugged, bus-powered, fanless Thunderbolt 3 adapter for Mac and Windows computers with Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Sonnet’s Solo10G SFP+ products offer Mac users a plug-and-play experience with no driver installation required; Windows and Linux use only requires a simple driver installation. Both products are configured using operating system settings, so there’s no separate management program to install or run.

With its broad OS support and small form factor, the Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card allows companies to standardize on a single adapter and deploy it across platforms with ease. For users with Thunderbolt 3-equipped Mac and Windows computers, the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter is a simple external solution for adding 10GbE fiber network connectivity. From its replaceable captive cable to its bus-powered operation, the Thunderbolt 3 adapter is highly portable.

Solo10G SFP+ products were engineered with security features essential to today’s users. Incorporating encryption in hardware, the Sonnet network adapters are protected against malicious firmware modification. Any unauthorized attempt to modify the firmware to enable covert computer access renders them inoperable. These security features prevent the Solo10G SFP+ adapters from being reprogrammed, except by a manufacturer’s update using a secure encryption key.

Measuring a compact 3.1 inches wide by 4.9 inches deep by 1.1 inches tall — less than half the size of every other adapter in its class — the Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter features an aluminum enclosure that effectively cools the circuitry and eliminates the need for a fan, enabling silent operation. Unlike every other 10GbE fiber Thunderbolt adapter available, Sonnet’s Solo10G SFP+ adapter requires no power adapter and instead is powered by the computer to which it’s connected.

The Solo10G SFP+ PCIe card and Solo10G SFP+ Thunderbolt 3 Edition adapter are available now for $149 and $249, respectively.

Cutters Studios promotes Heather Richardson, Patrick Casey

Cutters Studios has promoted Heather Richardson to executive producer and Patrick Casey to head of production. Richardson’s oversight will expand into managing and recruiting talent, and in maintaining and building the company’s client base. Casey will focus on optimizing workflows, project management and bidding processes.

Richardson joined Cutters in 2015, after working as a producer for visual effects studio A52 in LA and for editorial company Cosmo Street in both LA and New York for more than 10 years. On behalf of Cutters, she has produced Super Bowl spots for Lifewtr, Nintendo and WeatherTech, and campaigns including Capital One, FCA North America (Fiat, Dodge Ram, and Jeep), Gatorade, Google, McDonald’s and Modelo.

“I’ve been fortunate to have worked with some excellent executive producers during my career, and I’m honored and excited for the opportunity to expand the scope of my role on behalf of Cutters Studios, and alongside Patrick Casey,” says Richardson. “Patrick’s kindness and thoughtfulness in addition to his intelligence and experience are priceless.”

In addition to leading Cutters editors, Casey produced the groundbreaking Always “#LikeAGirl” campaign, Budweiser’s Harry Caray’s Last Call and Whirlpool’s “Care Counts” campaign that won top Cannes Lions, Clio, Effie and Adweek Project Isaac Awards.

NYC’s The-Artery expands to larger space in Chelsea

The-Artery has expanded and moved into a new 7,500-square-foot space in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood. Founded by chief creative officer Vico Sharabani, The-Artery will use this extra space while providing visual effects, post supervision, offline editorial, live action and experience design and development across multiple platforms.

According to Sharabani, the new space is not only a response to the studio’s growth, but allows The-Artery to foster better collaboration and reinforce its relationships with clients and creative partners. “As a creative studio, we recognize how important it is for our artists, producers and clients to be working in a space that is comfortable and supportive of our creative process,” he says. “The extraordinary layout of this new space, the size, the lighting and even our location, allows us to provide our clients with key capabilities and plays an important part in promoting our mission moving forward.”

Recent The-Artery projects include 2018’s VR-enabled production for Mercedez-Benz, their work on Under Armour’s “Rush” campaign and Beyonce’s Coachella documentary, Homecoming.

They have also worked on feature films like Netflix’s Beasts of No Nation, Wes Anderson’s Oscar-winning Grand Budapest Hotel and the crime caper Ocean’s 8.

The-Artery’s new studio features a variety of software including Flame, Houdini, Cinema 4D, 3ds Max, Maya, the Adobe Creative Cloud suite of tools, Avid Media Composer, Shotgun for review and approval and more.

The-Artery features a veteran team of talented team of artists and creative collaborators, including a recent addition — editor and former Mad River Post owner Michael Elliot. “Whether they are agencies, commercial and film directors or studios, our clients always work directly with our creative directors and artists, collaborating closely throughout a project,” says Sharabani.

Main Image: Vico Sharabani (far right) and team in their new space.

Picture Shop acquires Vancouver-based Finalé

Picture Shop has acquired Finalé Post in Vancouver. Burbank-based Picture Shop, which provides finishing and VFX work for episodic television, including The Walking Dead, NCIS, Hawaii Five-0 and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, had been looking to make an expansion into the Vancouver market. The company will be branded Finalé, a Picture Shop company.

“Having a Vancouver-based location has always been a strategy of ours, but it was very important to find the right company,” says Picture Shop president Bill Romeo. “We are thrilled to incorporate Finalé into the Picture Shop family. With the amount of content being produced, our goal is to always have strategic locations that support our clients’ needs but still maintain our company’s philosophy — creating an experience with the highest level of service and a creative partnership with our clients.”

Launched in 1988 by Finalé CEO and industry veteran Don Thompson, Finalé is located in the center of Vancouver and has served most major studios. Finalé offers a host of post production services, ranging from digital dailies and color, through 4K HDR finishing and editorial. It also offers mobile dailies and editorial rentals in Toronto and other major Canadian production centers. Finalé’s credits include Descendants 3, iZombie, Tomorrowland and The Magicians.

Main Image: ( L-R) Picture Shop’s Tom Kendall and Robert Glass, Finalé’s Don Thompson, Picture Shop’s Bill Romeo and Finalé’s Andrew Jha.

 

Atto’s FibreBridge now part of NetApp’s MetroCluster

Atto Technology has teamed with NetApp to offer Atto FibreBridge 7600N as a key component in the MetroCluster continuous data availability solution. Atto FibreBridge 7600N storage controller enables synchronous site-to-site replication up to 300km by providing low latency 32Gb Fibre Channel connections to NetApp flash and disk systems while maintaining high resiliency. FibreBridge 7600N supports up to 1.2 million IOPS and 6,400MB/s per controller.

NetApp MetroCluster enhances the built-in high availability and non-disruptive operations of NetApp systems with Ontap software, providing an additional layer of protection for the entire storage and host environment.

The Atto XstreamCore FC 7600 is a hardware protocol converter that connects 32Gb Fibre Channel ports to 12Gb SAS. It allows post and production houses to free up server resources normally used for handling storage activity and distribute storage connections across up to 64 servers with less than four micro seconds of latency. XstreamCore FC 7600 offers the flexibility needed for modern media production, allowing streaming of uncompressed HD, 4K and larger video, adding shared capabilities to direct attached storage and remotely locating direct attached disk or tape devices. This is a major advantage in workflow management, system architecting and layout of production facilities.

FibreBridge 7600N is one of Atto XstreamCore storage controller products, just one of Atto’s broad portfolio of connectivity solutions widely tested and certified for compatibility with all operating systems and platforms.

Goldcrest Post hires industry vet Dom Rom as managing director

Domenic Rom, a veteran of the New York post world, has joined Goldcrest Post as managing director. In this new role, he will oversee operations, drive sales and pursue growth strategies for Goldcrest, a provider of post services for film and television. Rom was most recently president/GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services in LA.

“Domenic is a visionary leader who brings a client-centric approach toward facility management, and understands the industry’s changing dynamics,” says Goldcrest Films owner/executive director Nick Quested. “He inspires his team to perform at a peak level and deliver the quality services our clients expect.”

In his previous position, Rom led Deluxe’s global services for television, including its subsidiaries Encore and Level 3. Prior to that, he was managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which included East Coast operations for Encore, Company 3 and Method. He was SVP at Technicolor Creative Services for three years and an executive at Postworks for 11. Rom began his career as a colorist at DuArt Film Labs, eventually becoming executive VP in charge of its digital and film labs.

Rom says that he looks forward to working with Goldcrest Post’s management team, including head of production Gretchen McGowan and head of picture Jay Tilin. “We intend to be a very client-oriented facility,” he notes. “When clients walk in the door, they should feel at home, feel that this is their place. Jay and Gretchen both get that. We will work together very closely to ensure Goldcrest is a solid, responsive facility.”

He is also very happy about being back in New York City. “New York is my home,” says Rom. “When I decided to come back to the city just walking around town made me feel alive again. The New York market is so tight, the energy so high it just felt right. The people are real, the clients are amazing and the work is equal to anywhere in the world. I don’t regret a second of the past few years… I expanded my knowledge of other markets and made life-long friendships all over the world. At the end of the day though, my family and my work family are in New York.”

Recent projects for Goldcrest include the Netflix series Russian Doll and the independent features Sorry to Bother You, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Native Son and High Flying Bird.

EP Nick Strange Thye joins The Underground in New York

The Underground in New York City has hired executive producer Nick Strange Thye, who joins the boutique content company after four years at The Mill. Thye’s appointment comes on the heels of veteran production executive Hugh Broder being named as The Underground’s managing director/executive producer at the beginning of the year.

“Nick has an amazing depth of experience and knowledge in production and post production, both in the US market and overseas,” explains Broder. “I’m very excited to have him as a partner as we continue to expand and build our capabilities.”

Thye was most recently senior producer at The Mill, overseeing a range of projects, including spots for the NFL for Super Bowl 50, Cadillac for The Oscars and Samsung for the Olympics, as well as ads for Adidas, the US Marine Corps and PlayStation 4. He’s collaborated with such agencies as Johannes Leonardo, BBDO, Droga5, Rokkan and BBH. Thye, who’s from Denmark, previously worked in Europe as an international executive producer for several companies, including Chimney Group.

At The Underground, he’ll work closely with Broder as well as creative director/lead Flame artist Nic Seresin. Recent projects at the studio include extensive post production on a new Hyundai campaign for Innocean as well as a soon-to-be-released short film for Aston Martin.

“I believe in the flexibility of boutique companies,” says Thye. “They represent the future for this industry. The business is changing to be more project-based, and The Underground has the ability to build the right team for each project. Because of my European background, I have a lot of experience doing this, and I’m eager to put that expertise to work here.”

The Underground is part of the P2P Group, which also includes P2P Retouching, a leading presence in the beauty industry for the past two decades. The expansion of the umbrella group is a concerted effort led by company owner Ben Bettenhausen.

 

Little’s dailies-to-ACES finishing workflow via FotoKem

FotoKem’s Atlanta and Burbank facilities both worked on the post production — from digital dailies through finishing with a full ACES finish — for Universal Pictures’ and Legendary Entertainment’s film, Little.

From producer Will Packer (Girls Trip, Night School, the Ride Along franchise) and director/co-writer Tina Gordon (Peeples, Drumline), Little tells the story of a tech mogul (Girls Trip’s Regina Hall) who is transformed into a 13-year-old version of herself (Marsai Martin) and must rely on her long-suffering assistant (Insecure’s Issa Rae) just as the future of her company is on the line.

Martin, who stars in the TV series Black-ish, had the idea for the film when she was 10 and acts as an executive producer on the film.

Principal photography for Little took place last summer in the Atlanta area. FotoKem’s Atlanta location provided digital dailies, with looks developed by FotoKem colorist Alastor Arnold alongside cinematographer Greg Gardiner (Girls Trip, Night School), who shot with Sony F55 cameras.

Cinematographer Greg Gardiner on set.

“Greg likes a super-clean look, which we based on Sony color science with a warm and cool variant and a standard hero LUT,” says Arnold. “He creates the style of every scene with his lighting and photography. We wanted to maximize his out-of-the-camera look and pass it through to the grading process.”

Responding to the sharp growth of production in Georgia, FotoKem entered the Atlanta market five years ago to offer on-the-ground support for creatives. “FotoKem Atlanta is an extension of our Burbank team with colorists and operations staff to provide the upfront workflow required for file-based dailies,” says senior VP Tom Vice of FotoKem’s creative services division.

When editor David Moritz and the editorial team moved to Los Angeles, FotoKem sent EDLs to its nextLAB dailies platform, the facility’s proprietary digital file management system, where shots for VFX vendors were transcoded as ACES EXR files with full color metadata. Non-VFX shots were also automatically pulled from nextLAB for conform. The online was completed in Blackmagic Resolve.

The DI and the film conform happened concurrently, with Arnold and Gardiner working together daily. “We had a full ACES pipeline, with high dynamic range and high bit rate, which both Greg and I liked,” Arnold says. “The film has a punchy, crisp chromatic look, but it’s not too contemporary in style or hyper-pushed. It’s clean and naturalistic with an extra chroma punch.”

Gordon was also a key part of the collaboration, playing an active role in the DI, working closely with Gardiner to craft the images. “She really got into the color aspect of the workflow,” notes Arnold. “Of course, she had a vision for the movie and fully embraced the way that color impacts the story during the DI process.”

Arnold’s first pass was for the theatrical grade and the second for the HDR10 grade. “What I like about ACES is the simplicity of transforming to different color spaces and working environments. And the HDR grade was a quicker process,” he says. “HDR is increasingly part of our deliverables, and we’re seeing a lot more ACES workflows lately, including work on trailers.”

FotoKem’s deliverables included a DCP, DCDM and DSM for the theatrical release; separations and .j2k files for HDR10 archiving; and ProRes QuickTime files for QC.