Tag Archives: post production supervisor

Behind the Title: Post supervisor Chloe Blackwell

NAME: Chloe Blackwell

COMPANY: UK-based Click Post Production

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
I provide bespoke post solutions, which include consultancy and development courses for production companies. I’m also currently working on an online TV series full time. More on that later!

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Post Production Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Each job that I take on is quite different, so my role will evolve to suit each company’s needs.

Usually my job starts at the early stages of production, so I will meet with the editorial team to work out what they are looking to achieve visually. From this I can ascertain how their post will work most effectively, and work back from their delivery dates to put an edit and finishing schedule together.

For every shoot I will oversee the rushes being ingested and investigate any technical issues that crop up. Once the post production phase starts, I will be in charge of managing the offline. This includes ensuring editors are aware of deadlines and working with executives and/or directors and producers to ensure smooth running of their show.

This also requires me to liaise with the post house, keeping them informed of production’s requirements and schedules, and trouble shooting any obstacles that inevitably crop up along the way.

I also deal directly with the broadcaster, ensuring delivery requirements are clear, ironing out any technical queries from both sides and ensuring the final masters are delivered in timely manner. This also means that I have to be meticulous about quality control of the final product, as any errors can cause huge delays. As the post supervisor managing the post production budget, efficiently is vital. I keep a constant eye on spending and keep the production team up to date with cost reports.

Alternatively, I also offer my services as a consultant, if all a production needs is some initial support. I’m also in the process of setting up courses for production teams that will help them gain a better understanding of the new 4KHDR world, and how they can work to realistic timing and budgets.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of decisions I have to make on a daily basis. There are so many different ways of doing things, from converting frame rates, working with archive and creating the workflows for editorial to work with.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I think I have the best job in the world! I am one of the very few people on any production that sees the show from early development, right through to delivery. It’s a very privileged position.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My role can be quite intensive, so there is usually a real lack of downtime.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
As I have quite a long commute, I find that first thing in the morning is my most productive time. From about 6am I have a few hours of uninterrupted work I can do to set my day up to run smoothly.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would have joined the military!

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
As cheesy as it sounds, post production actually found me! I was working for a production company very early in my career, and I was going to be made redundant. Luckily, I was a valued member of the company and was re-drafted into their post production team. At first I thought it was a disaster, however with lots of help, I hit my stride and fell in love with the job.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
For the last three years I have been working on The Grand Tour for Amazon Prime.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
That’s a hard question as I have worked on so many.

But The Grand Tour has been the most technically challenging. It was the first ever 4K HDR factual entertainment show! Coupled with the fact that it was all shot at 23.98 with elements shot as live. It was one of those jobs where you couldn’t really ask people for advice because it just hadn’t been done.

However, I am also really proud of some of the documentaries I have made, including Born to be Different, Power and the Women’s World and VE day.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My coffee machine, my toaster and the Avid Media Composer.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
All of them…I have to! Part of being in post is being aware of all the new technologies, shows and channels/online platforms out there. You have to keep ahead of the times.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, I love music! I have an eclectic, wide-ranging taste, which means I have a million playlists on Spotify! I love finding new music and playing it for Jess (Jessica Redman, my post production coordinator). We are often shimmying around the office. It keeps the job light, especially during the most demanding days.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I am fortunate enough to be able to take my dog Mouse with me to work. She keeps me sane and keeps me calm, whilst also providing those I work with, with a little joy too!

I am also an obsessive reader, so any down time I get I am often found curled up under a blanket with a good book.

My passion for television really knows no bounds, so I watch TV a lot too! I try to watch at least the first episode of all new TV programs. I rarely get to go to the cinema, but when I do it’s such a treat to watch films on the big screen.

PostChat: VFX/post supervisor Eric Alba

By Randi Altman

This week’s PostChat, the weekly Twitter conversation about post production, featured veteran VFX/post supervisor Eric Alba. Jesse Averna (@dr0id), one of the hosts of PostChat, interviewed  Alba about “the relationship between editors and the visual effects departments and how the demands of Alba’s job have changed over the years from more practical to more CGI and maybe now back to more practical.”

Alba’s diverse background makes him ideally suited for this type of discussion. Alba (@alba) started in post and found his way to VFX, and his story is one of inspiration. He got his start as a videotape operator in a VTR machine room. From there learned all aspects of post Continue reading