Tag Archives: Picture Shop

Picture Shop buys The Farm Group

Burbank’s Picture Shop has acquired UK-based The Farm Group. The Farm Group was founded in 1998 and currently has four locations in London, as well as facilities in Manchester, Bristol and Los Angeles.

The Farm, London

The Farm also operates the in-house post production teams for BBC Sport in Salford, England; UKTV; and Fremantle Media. This deal marks Picture Shop’s second international acquisition, followed by the deal it made for Vancouver’s Finalé Post earlier this year.

The founders of The Farm, Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn, will stay involved in The Farm Group. In a joint statement, Sargent and Dunn said, “We are delighted that after 20 successful years, we have a new partner. Picture Shop is poised to expand in the international post market and provide the combination of technical, creative and professional excellence to the world’s content creators.”

The duo will also re-invest in the expanded Picture Head Group, which includes Picture Head and audio post company Formosa Group, in addition to Picture Shop.

L-R: The Farm Group’s Nicky Sargent and Vikki Dunn.

Bill Romeo, president of Picture Shop, says, “Based on the amount of content being created internationally, we felt it was important to have a presence worldwide and support our clients’ needs. The Farm, based on its reputation and creative talent, will be able to maintain the philosophy of Picture Shop. It is a perfect fit. Our clients will benefit from our collaborative efforts internationally, as well as benefit from our technology and experience. We will continue to partner and support our clients while maintaining our boutique feel.”

Recent work from The Farm Group includes BBC Two’s Summer of Rockets, Sky One’s Jamestown and Britain’s Got Talent.

 

Whiskey Cavalier DPs weigh in on the show’s look, DITs

While ABC recently cancelled freshman series Whiskey Cavalier, their on-set workflow is an interesting story to tell. The will-they-won’t-they drama featured FBI agent Will Chase (Scott Foley) and CIA operative Frankie Trowbridge (Lauren Cohan) — his codename is Whiskey Cavalier and hers is Fiery Tribune. The two lead an inter-agency team of spies who travel all over the world, periodically saving the world and each other, all while navigating friendship, romance and office politics.

David “Moxy” Moxness

Like many episodic television shows, Whiskey Cavalier used two cinematographers who alternated episodes so that the directors could work side-by-side with a cinematographer while prepping. David “Moxy” Moxness, CSC, ASC, shot the pilot. Moxness had previously worked on shows like Lethal Weapon, Fringe and Smallville and was just finishing another show when Warner Bros. sent him the pilot script.

“I liked it and took a meeting with director Peter Atencio,” explains Moxness. “We had a great meeting and seemed to be on the same page creatively. For me, it’s so much about collaborating on good shows with great people. Whiskey gave me that feeling.” Sid Sidell, ASC, a friend and colleague of Moxness’, was brought on as the second DP.

While Whiskey Cavalier’s plot has its two main characters traveling all over the world, principal photography took place in Prague. Neither cinematographer had worked there previously, although Moxness had passed through on vacation years before. While prepping and shooting the pilot, Moxness developed the look of the show with director Atencio. “Peter and I had the idea of using the color red when our lead character Will Chase was conflicted emotionally to trigger an emotional response for him,” he explains. “This was a combo platter of set dressing, costumes and lighting. We were very precise about not having the color red in frame other than these times. Also, when the team was on a mission, we kept to a cooler palette while their home base, New York, used warmer tones.”

This didn’t always prove to be straightforward. “You still have to adjust to location surroundings — when scouting for the pilot, I realized Prague still had mostly sodium vapor streetlights, which are not often seen in America anymore,” explains Moxness. “This color was completely opposite to what Peter and I had discussed regarding our nighttime palette, and we had a big car chase over a few nights and in different areas. I knew time and resources would in no way allow us to change or adjust this, and that I would have to work backwards from the existing tones. Peter agreed and we reworked that into our game. For our flashbacks, I shot 35mm 4-perf film with an ARRI IIC hand-cranked camera and Kowa lenses. That was fun! We continued all of these techniques and looks during the series.”

DITs
Mission, a UK-based DIT/digital services provider serving Europe, was brought on to work beside the cinematographers. Mission has an ever-expanding roster of DITs and digital dailies lab operators and works with cinematographers from preproduction onward, safeguarding their color decisions as a project moves from production into post.

Moxness and Sidell hadn’t worked with Mission before, but a colleague of Moxness’ had spoken to him about the experience of working with Mission on a project the year before. This intrigued Moxness, so he was waiting for a chance to work with them.

“When Whiskey chose to shoot in Prague I immediately reached out to Mission’s managing director, Mark Purvis,” explains Moxness. “Mark was enthusiastic about setting us up on Whiskey. After a few conversations to get to know each other, Mark suggested DIT Nick Everett. Nick couldn’t have been a better match for me and our show.”

Interestingly, Sidell had often worked without a DIT before his time on Whiskey Cavalier. He says, “My thoughts on the DP/DIT relationship changed drastically on Whiskey Cavalier. By choice, before Whiskey, I did the majority of my work without a DIT. The opportunity to work alongside Nick Everett and his Mission system changed my view of the creative possibilities of working with a DIT.”

Gear
Whiskey Cavalier was shot with the ARRI Alexa Mini and primarily ARRI Master Prime lenses with a few Angenieux zooms. Both Moxness and Sidell had worked with the Mini numerous times before, finding it ideal for episodic television. The post workflow was simple. On set, Everett used Pomfort’s LiveGrade to set the look desired by the cinematographers. Final color was done at Picture Shop in Los Angeles by senior colorist George Manno.

Moxy (behind camera) and director/EP Peter Atencio (to his right) on the Prague set.

“There are a few inherent factors shooting episodic television that can, and often do, handcuff the DP with regards to maintaining their intended look,” says Moxness. “The shooting pace is very fast, and it is not uncommon for editorial, final color and sometimes even dailies to happen far away from the shooting location. Working with a properly trained and knowledgeable DIT allows the DP to create a desired look and get it into and down the post pipeline to maintain that look. Without a proper solid roadmap, others start to input their subjective vision, which likely doesn’t match that of the DP. When shooting, I feel a strong responsibility to put my thumbprint on the work as I was hired to do. If not, then why was I chosen over others?”

Since successfully working on Whiskey Cavalier in Prague, Mission has set up a local office in Prague, led by Mirek Sochor and dedicated to Mission’s expansion into Central Europe.

And Moxness will be heading back to Prague to shoot Amazon’s The Wheel of Time.

 

Picture Shop acquires Vancouver-based Finalé

Picture Shop has acquired Finalé Post in Vancouver. Burbank-based Picture Shop, which provides finishing and VFX work for episodic television, including The Walking Dead, NCIS, Hawaii Five-0 and Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, had been looking to make an expansion into the Vancouver market. The company will be branded Finalé, a Picture Shop company.

“Having a Vancouver-based location has always been a strategy of ours, but it was very important to find the right company,” says Picture Shop president Bill Romeo. “We are thrilled to incorporate Finalé into the Picture Shop family. With the amount of content being produced, our goal is to always have strategic locations that support our clients’ needs but still maintain our company’s philosophy — creating an experience with the highest level of service and a creative partnership with our clients.”

Launched in 1988 by Finalé CEO and industry veteran Don Thompson, Finalé is located in the center of Vancouver and has served most major studios. Finalé offers a host of post production services, ranging from digital dailies and color, through 4K HDR finishing and editorial. It also offers mobile dailies and editorial rentals in Toronto and other major Canadian production centers. Finalé’s credits include Descendants 3, iZombie, Tomorrowland and The Magicians.

Main Image: ( L-R) Picture Shop’s Tom Kendall and Robert Glass, Finalé’s Don Thompson, Picture Shop’s Bill Romeo and Finalé’s Andrew Jha.

 

The Kominsky Method‘s post brain trust: Ross Cavanaugh and Ethan Henderson

By Iain Blair

As Bette Davis famously said, “Old age ain’t no place for sissies!” But Netflix’s The Kominsky Method proves that in the hands of veteran sitcom creator Chuck Lorre — The Big Bang Theory, Two and a Half Men and many others — there’s plenty of laughs to be mined from old age… and disease, loneliness and incontinence.

The show stars Michael Douglas as divorced, has-been actor and respected acting coach Sandy Kominsky and Alan Arkin as his longtime agent Norman Newlander. The story follows these bickering best friends as they tackle life’s inevitable curveballs while navigating their later years in Los Angeles, a city that values youth and beauty above all. Both comedic and emotional, The Kominsky Method won Douglas a Golden Globe.

Ethan Henderson and Ross Cavanaugh

The single-camera show is written by Al Higgins, David Javerbaum and Lorre, who also directed the first episode. Lorre, Higgins and Douglas executive produce the series, which is produced by Chuck Lorre Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television.

I recently spoke with associate producer Ross Cavanaugh and post coordinator Ethan Henderson about posting the show.

You are currently working on Season 2?
Ross Cavanaugh: Yes, and we’re moving along quite quickly. We’re already about three-quarters of the way through the season shooting-wise, out of the eight-show arc.

Where do you shoot, and what’s the schedule like?
Cavanaugh: We shoot mainly on the lot at Warner Bros. and then at various locations around LA. We start prepping each show one week before we start shooting, and then we get dailies the day after the first shooting day.

Our dailies lab is Picture Shop, which is right up the street in Burbank and very convenient for us. So getting footage from the set to them is quick, and they’re very fast at turning the dailies around. We usually get them by midnight the same day we drop them off,  then our editors start cutting fairly quickly after that.

Where do you do all the post?
Cavanaugh: Mainly at Picture Shop, who are very experienced in TV post work. They do all the post finishing and some of the VFX stuff — usually the smaller things, like beauty fixes and cleanup. They also do all the final color correction since DP Anette Haellmigk really wanted to work with colorist George Manno. They’ve been really great.

Ethan Henderson: We’re back and forth from the lot to Picture Shop, and once we get more heavily involved in all the post, I spend a lot of time there while we are onlining the show, coloring and doing the VFX drop-ins, and when we start the final deliverables process, since everything for Netflix comes out of there.

What are the big challenges of post production on this show, and how closely do you work with Chuck Lorre?
Cavanaugh: As with any TV show, you’re always on a very tight deadline, and there are a lot of moving parts to deal with very quickly. While our prolific showrunner Chuck Lorre is busy with all the projects he has going — especially with all the writing — he always makes time for us. He’s very passionate about the cut and is extremely on top of things.

I’d say the challenges on this show are actually fairly minimal. Basically, we ran a pretty tight ship on the first season, and now I’d say it’s a well-oiled machine. We haven’t had any big problems or surprises in post, which can happen.

Let’s talk about editing. You had two editors for Season 1 in Matthew Barbato and Gina Sansom. I assume that’s because of the time factor. How does that work?
Cavanaugh: Each editor has their own assistant editor — that was true in Season One (Matthew with Jack Cunningham and Gina with Barb Steele) and in Season two (Steven Lang with Romeo Rubio and Gina with Rahul Das). They cut separately and work on an odds-and-evens schedule, each doing every other episode. We all get together to watch screenings of the Director’s Cut, usually in the editorial bay.

What are the big editing challenges?
Cavanaugh: We have a pretty big cast, and there’s a ton of jokes and stuff going on all the time. In addition to Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin, the actors are so experienced. They give such great performances — there’s a lot of material for the editors to cut from. To be honest, the scripts are all so tight that I think one of the challenges is knowing when to cut out a joke, to serve the pacing of an episode.

This isn’t a VFX-driven show, but there are some visual effects shots. Can you explain?
Cavanaugh: We do a lot of driving scenes and use 24frame.com, who have this really good wraparound HD projection technology, so we pretty much shoot all our car scenes on the stage.

Henderson: Once in a while, we’ll pick up some exterior or establishing shots on a freeway using doubles in the cars. All the plates are picked ahead of time. Occasionally, for the sake of continuity, we’ll have to replace a plate in the background and put a different section of the plate in because too many cars ran by, and it didn’t match up in the edit.

That’s one of the things that comes up every so often. The other big thing is that both of the leads wear glasses, so reflections of crew and equipment can become an issue; we have to deal with all that and clean it up.

Cavanaugh: We don’t use many big VFX shots, and we can’t reveal much about what happens in the new season, but sometimes there’s stuff like the scene in season one where one of the characters threw some firecrackers at Michael Douglas’ feet. We obviously weren’t going to throw real ones at Michael Douglas, although I think he’d have sucked it up if we’d done it that way! We were shooting in a residential neighborhood at night and we couldn’t set off real ones because they are very loud, so we ended up doing it all with VFX. FuseFx handled the workload for the heavier VFX work.

Henderson: There was a big shot in the pilot where we did a lot of shot extensions in a restaurant where Sandy Kominsky (Douglas) and Nancy Travis’ character are having coffee. It was this big sweeping pan down over the city.

Can you talk about the importance of sound and music?
Cavanaugh: They both play a key role, and we have a great team that includes music editor Joe Deveau, supervising sound editor Lou Thomas, and sound mixers Yuri Reese and Bill Smith. The sound recording quality we get on set is always great, so that means we only need very minimal ADR. The whole sound mix is done here on the lot at Warners.

Our composer, Jeff Cardoni, worked with Chuck on Young Sheldon, and he’s really on top of getting all the new cues for the show. We basically have two versions of our main title sequence music cues — one is very bombastic and in-your-face, and the other is a bit more subtle — and it’s funny how it broke down in the first season. The guy who cut the pilot and the odd episodes went with the more bombastic version, while the second editor on the even episodes preferred the softer cues, so I’ll be curious to see how all that breaks down in the new season.

How important is all the coloring on this?
Cavanaugh: Very important. After we do all the online, we ship it over to George at Picture Shop and spend about a day and a half on it. The DP either comes in or gets a file, and she gives her notes. Then we’ll play it for Chuck. We’re in the HDR world with Dolby Vision, and it makes it look so beautiful — but then we have to do the standard pass on it as well.

I know you can’t reveal too much about the new season, but what can fans expect?
Henderson: They’re getting a continuation of these two characters’ journey together — growing old and everything that comes with that. I think it feels like a very natural extension of the first season.

Cavanaugh: In terms of the post process, I feel like we’re a Swiss watch now. We’re ticking along very smoothly. Sometimes post can be a nightmare and full of problems, so it’s great to have it all under control.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Breathing life into The Walking Dead with VFX

By Karen Moltenbrey

Zombies used to have a short life span, awakening sometime during October, just in time for Halloween, before once again stumbling back into obscurity for another year. But thanks to the hit series The Walking Dead and its spin-off Fear the Walking Dead, the popularity of these monsters is infectious, turning them — and the shows — into cult phenomenon.

The Walking Dead’s rise in popularity started almost immediately with the series’ US debut, on October 31, 2010, on AMC. The storyline began when Rick Grimes, a sheriff deputy, awakens from a coma to find the world overrun by zombies. He and other survivors in the Atlanta area then band together to fight off these so-called “walkers,” as well as other tribes of survivors intent on ensuring their own survival in this post-apocalyptic world, no matter the cost.

In mid-2015, the show gave rise to the companion series Fear the Walking Dead. Fear, a prequel to The Walking Dead, takes place at the start of the zombie apocalypse and follows a different set of characters as they struggle to survive on the West Coast.

And the series’ visual effects are, well, to die for. Literally.

Burbank’s Picture Shop began creating the effects for Walk starting last season and is now in the midst of Season 9 (The studio splits the lion’s share of the work on the show with Goodbye Kansas Studios). Picture Shop provides visual effects for Fear, as well (Season 4, Episodes 1 through 8).

According to Christian Cardona, senior visual effects supervisor at Picture Shop, the crux of the work for both series includes character “kill” effects and environment augmentations. “We do a lot of what we call ‘walker kills.’ What that usually requires is weapon extensions, whereby the weapon gets inserted into the walkers, and then the ensuing wounds. We have to track the wounds onto the practical walkers and then also do blood sims during those kills,” he explains. “That accounts for probably 50 to 60 percent of the work.”

The only way to kill a walker is to damage its brain or destroy its body. Therefore, each episode contains its fair share of bodily damage to the zombies (and, sometimes, to the humans trying to keep them and the adversarial tribes at bay).

Cardona notes that it took the group a few episodes to nail down the blood aesthetic the producers were looking for — the look of the blood as well as how it should flow from a walker’s mouth. “Throughout the season, we’ve definitely zeroed in on that and have really gotten a good system down, where now it takes us just a fraction of the time,” he says.

Nevertheless, the work has to be exact. “The client wants everything to be photoreal; they don’t want it to look like anything was added. With that said, they scrutinize every shot, frame by frame and pixel by pixel, so we definitely have to do our due diligence and make sure our work adheres to their standard,” Cardona says. “And they will art direct every drop of blood. They know what they want, and we make sure we deliver that.”

The Walking Dead

There is indeed consistency in the overall look of the blood and wounds, as well as the walkers themselves in each of the shows, although there was one scene in Walk whereby the walkers were stuck in a toxic sludge. As a result, their skin was more pale and saggy. “It was a unique scenario where we could change their appearance and the look of the blood for that episode to illustrate that these walkers were different,” recalls Cardona.

The Walking Dead
In Walk, the majority of the hero walkers — either individuals or those in small groups – are actors with prosthetic makeup, or in some cases, practical models. But when there are more than two dozen or so walkers in a shot, they are CG creations.

Whether a practical or digital walker is used for the show often depends on the action in the scene. Walker kills are prevalent throughout the series, as it is in Fear, and often this involves a decapitation or a scalping, “because in order to kill the walkers, they have to be either shot in the head or stabbed,” Cardona points out. “Oftentimes when that happens, we have to cut from the person with the makeup and prosthetics and replace the entire head digitally before chopping it off for the scene.”

Season 8 Episode 14 featured a practical walker with a broken body strapped to a dolly cart, its head locked in position on the cart. As a form of torture, the cart was wheeled close enough for the walker to bite a victim. Initially, the walker was practical, but Picture Shop artists ended up replacing it with a CG model.

“The client wasn’t really happy with the practical version on set. It looked rubbery, like an animatronic walker, which it was. It needed to be fleshier, a little more real,” says Cardona. “The blood and wounds felt too dry, and the muscles had to contract.”

Fear the Walking Dead

In fact, Cardona describes that sequence as one of the more challenging from Season 8. “It was close to the camera and had to be photoreal. It wasn’t just one shot, either; there were over a dozen shots in the scene, with multiple angles and long takes.”

The team used the practical cart walker’s head in the shots but replaced the body and arms, which also had been locked to the cart, requiring intricate match-moving. “We had to be spot on and tight, so there was a lot of soft tracking as well, since the camera was moving everywhere,” recalls Cardona. “And then we had to get that walker to look photoreal.”

Compounding this scene even more was the fact that the main character shoots the cart walker, requiring the addition of bullet hits and resulting wounds.

Zombie Nation
For the upcoming Season 9 (premiering October 7), Picture Shop began using a new system for generating large crowds of walkers. According to Cardona, the animators introduced Golaem’s population tool into the pipeline to help with the mass crowd simulations for the walker herds that will appear during the season. Previously, the artists used the particle system in Autodesk’s Maya for this task, “but we needed something that was more robust, something created specifically to do this kind of effect, especially on a TV schedule and with a TV pipeline and workflow,” he adds.

During this past off-season, the artists began establishing a system that would source the walker assets the group had created for Season 8 and in the off-season to prepare for Season 9. “We were modeling walkers and using some of the walkers from Season 8, and standardizing them all with the same T-pose so we could easily swap out rigs and customize and create a lot of variations with textures, changing their clothes, skin color and hair,” explains Cardona. “So when we have to create walker herds, we can easily get five or six variations from a single walker. We end up with a lot of variations in our herd sims without having to create a brand-new walker every time.”

And make no mistake, there will be more herds of walkers in Season 9 than viewers have seen in previous seasons.

The Walking Dead

Other VFX
On average, Picture Shop created 40 to 50 VFX shots per episode during Season 8 of The Walking Dead, with a typical turnaround time of two to three weeks. In addition to the kills and their associated effects, the group also built set extensions. For instance, most of Season 8 (and 7) revolved around what is called “the Sanctuary,” an old factory that is now home to The Saviors, with whom Grimes and his group must interact. The first two floors were practically built, and then Picture Shop extended the structure digitally by another 12 stories. At one point, a gun fight ensues, which called for the CG artists to break out all the windows — another visual effect.

“The group didn’t move far from their location in Season 8, so the need for additional set extensions wasn’t as high as it had been in earlier seasons,” adds Cardona.

Episode 8 of Walk — which has the tribes fighting each other more so than the walkers — did start off with a bang, however. In the first episode of the season, Daryl, Grimes’ trusted lieutenant, shoots a box of explosives, ripping a CG walker in half — work that Cardona describes as “challenging.” In another shot, an RPG blows up another tribe member; in it, the actor had to be swapped out for a digital double that had been projection modeled.

Cardona has seen an evolution in the effects Picture Shop is providing for Walk in particular. Some of the more interesting effects will be coming in Season 9, he teases. “We’ve been working on some of the stuff over the summer and have spent time in R&D on one effect in particular — something new that the audience hasn’t seen before,” he says.

In the upcoming season, nature is taking over, and there will be overgrown vegetation on all the buildings and structures. “With that said, we are doing an effect whereby we take a murder of crows and have them swarm similar to the murmuration of starlings, which wheel and dart through the sky in tight, fluid formations,” says Cardona. “This is something you will see through the course of the season.”

 

The Walking Dead

For this work, the artists built and rigged a crow in Maya and generated various animation cycles, which were cached out and used as a particle simulation within Side Effects’ Houdini.

While creating this effect was not nearly as time-consuming as setting up the crowd simulation in Golaem, “it was something unique, and we had to figure out an approach that gave us the flexibility to art direct and change [the results] quickly,” Cardona notes. “And, it’s an effect that has nothing to do with walkers, but it tells a big part of the story of what is happening to the world around them.”

In terms of the other overall effects in Walk and Fear, the Picture Shop artists use primarily Autodesk’s 3ds Max, although Maya is also used, albeit mainly for the Golaem crowd work. Yet once the sim is complete, the artists cache the results and bake out all the animation within Maya, then export it into Max. Rendering is done in Chaos’ V-Ray for 3ds Max.

In addition, the artists use Pixologic’s ZBrush for a lot of the organic modeling, mostly for the walkers. For effects, the crew usually turns to Houdini.

The effects that Picture Shop delivers for The Walking Dead are unique — in terms of the blood and gore — from other shows the studio works on, such as Hawaii Five-0 and MacGyver, which call for more traditional VFX, like muzzle flashes and explosions, as well as set extensions. “It’s more hard-surface modeling stuff, whereas Walk, for the most part, is a lot more organic,” Cardona adds. “And the tone is completely different, obviously.”

Monster Mash
Picture Shop performs the same type of work for Fear as it does for Walk — mostly weapon extensions and walker kills. Cardona notes there is a cohesiveness in the effects between the two shows, especially now that the timeline of both stories is nearly the same. Fear started at the beginning of the apocalypse, when the walkers were “fresher, and the blood kills were a little bigger, because the thinking was that there would be more blood present in the walkers at that point,” he explains.

Insofar as the general walker kills are concerned, the actors never really make a physical impact with their stabbing motions, so oftentimes their hands are not in the right positions or the reaction time of the walker is off. In these instances, it is up to the VFX artists to digitally rectify the action and reaction — for instance, separating and repositioning the actor’s arm, stabilizing it, then tracking on the weapon that is placed in their hand, as well as stabilizing the walker, adding the wound, and then adding the weapon extension. This holds true for both series.

“Sometimes this can be challenging because the camera is also moving, so it requires significant roto work, and we have to deconstruct the shot and reconstruct it back again,” says Cardona. “There are plenty of these types of shots we have to do for both Walk and Fear.”

For the tracking on this and other work, the studio uses Andersson Technologies’ SynthEyes; for the planar tracking, Boris FX’s Mocha, formerly from Imagineer Systems.

According to Cardona, the overall look of the walkers has changed throughout the course of the Fear seasons. In Walk, they are more decayed, whereas in Fear, they still look like humans for the most part, not as skeletal. But, that has now changed, and with a more cohesive look between the walkers is a more cohesive look with some of the VFX, particularly the blood effects going forward.

However, there is one big difference between the two shows. Walk is still shot on film, 16mm, while Fear is shot digitally, so the graininess is quite heavy with Walk. “It affects our tracking because there is so much noise. Often we would de-grain [the footage] to do the tracking, and then add the grain back in. Also, any time we have a bluescreen shot where we have to pull keys, it’s a problem,” says Cardona.

Indeed, honing the effects on The Walking Dead gives the artists a leg up when it comes to Fear. Another advantage: Picture Shop performs the color and finishing for both shows, as well, which can result in some emergency VFX work for the crew, especially during a time crunch. In fact, the colorists at the facility created the custom 16mm grain pattern that the artists use now during the tracking process. It was generated by the colorists when the client was considering migrating Walk to digital format but then decided to retain the current structure.

Another plus: The Walking Dead executives are also located in the same building as Picture Shop, several floors up. “They just moved here, and it’s convenient for everyone. We can do spot sessions with VFX producer Jason Sax or showrunner Angela Kang (who recently took over that role from Scott Gimple).”

At Comic-Con San Diego a few weeks ago, the series was a fan favorite, and online there is talk about plans for upcoming seasons. So, it appears these walkers still have a lot of life left in them, if fans — and the digital artists — have their way.


Karen Moltenbrey is a longtime writer and editor in the CG and post industries.