Tag Archives: Nutmeg Post

Nutmeg Post rebrands as Nutmeg, expands creative services

Nutmeg Post has rebranded its company to Nutmeg, a creative marketing, production and post company. With the expanded portfolio of services, Nutmeg now develops advertising, promotional and original content from concept through production to ultimate completion. They are also focusing on interactive, identity and social media projects.

“The new brand represents the future,” says Nutmeg managing director Jon Adelman. “We’ve always been known for our creative expertise. Those services have grown, matured and proven so successful that we are now a full-fledged creative partner. Our new interactive division adds services that were missing from our toolbox.”

Founded in 1979, Nutmeg has remained independently owned and has thrived in an industry that can be tough on post houses. The studio started as an sound house, but over the years added mixing and post services, building out its other post offerings to include color grading and visual effects.

Leading Nutmeg’s new initiatives are creative director Dave Rogan, an industry vet with two decades of broadcast, digital, packaging, print and corporate branding experience, and interactive executive producer David Buivid, a digital marketing strategist who has guided the creation of work in entertainment, consumer packaged goods, B2B and technology verticals.

“Nutmeg is known for our post work,” says Rogan, “but we are so much more now, with agency-grade creative development, production and interactive, along with all aspects of post production.”

Dolby Audio at NAB 2016

By Jonathan Abrams

Dolby, founded over 50 years ago as an audio company, is elevating the experience of watching movies and TV content through new technologies in audio and video, the latter of which is a relatively new area for the company’s offerings. This is being done with Dolby AC-4 and Dolby Atmos for audio, and Dolby Vision for video. In this post, the focus will be on Dolby’s audio technologies.

Why would Dolby create AC-4? Dolby AC-3 is over 20 years old, and as a function of its age, it does not do new things well. What are those new things and how will Dolby AC-4 elevate your audio experience?

First, let’s define some acronyms, as they are part of the past and present of Dolby audio in broadcasting. OTA stands for Over The Air, as in what you can receive with an antenna. ATSC stands for Advanced Television Systems Committee, an organization based in the US that standardized HDTV (ATSC 1.0) in the US 20 years ago and is working to standardize Ultra HDTV broadcasts as ATSC 3.0. Ultra HD is referred to as UHD.

Now, some math. Dolby AC-3, which is used with ATSC 1.0, uses up to 384 kbps for 5.1 audio. Dolby AC-4 needs only 128 kbps for 5.1 audio. That increased coding efficiency, along with a maximum bit rate of 640 kbps, leaves 512 kbps to work with. What can be done with that extra 512 kbps?

If you are watching sporting events, Dolby AC-4 allows broadcasters to provide you with the option to select which audio stream you are listening to. You can choose which team’s audio broadcast to listen to, listen to another language, hear what is happening on the field of play, or listen to the audio description of what is happening. This could be applicable to other types of broadcasts, though the demos I have heard, including one at this year’s NAB Show, have all been for sporting events.

Dolby AC-4 allows the viewer to select from three types of dialog enhancement: none, low and high. The dialog enhancement processing is done at the encoder, where it runs a sophisticated dialog identification algorithm and then creates a parametric description that is included as metadata in the Dolby AC-4 bit stream.

What if I told you that after implementing what I described above in a Dolby AC-4 bit stream that there were still bits available for other audio content? It is true, and Dolby AC-4 is what allows Dolby Atmos, a next-generation, rich, and complex object audio system, to be inside ATSC 3.0 audio streams in the US, At my NAB demo, I heard a clip of Mad Max: Fury Road, which was mixed in Dolby Atmos, from a Yamaha sound bar. I perceived elements of the mix coming from places other than the screen, even though the sound bar was where all of the sound waves originated from. Whatever is being done with psychoacoustics to make the experience of surround sound from a sound bar possible is convincing.

The advancements in both the coding and presentation of audio have applications beyond broadcasting. The next challenge that Dolby is taking on is mobile. Dolby’s audio codecs are being licensed to mobile applications, which allows them to be pushed out via apps, which in turn removes the dependency from the mobile device’s OS. I heard a Dolby Atmos clip from a Samsung mobile device. While the device had to be centered in front of me to perceive surround sound, I did perceive it.

Years of R&D at Dolby have yielded efficiencies in coding and new ways of presenting audio that will elevate your experience. From home theater, to mobile, and once broadcasters adopt ATSC 3.0, Ultra HDTV.

Check out my coverage of Dolby’s Dolby Vision offerings at NAB as well.

Jonathan S. Abrams is the Chief Technical Engineer at Nutmeg, a creative marketing, production and post resource.

Emmy-winning audio pro Brian Beatrice joins Nutmeg Post

Emmy Award-winning sound designer and engineer Brian Beatrice has joined New York’s Nutmeg Post.

Before joining Nutmeg, Beatrice worked at audioEngine, Bionic and Tonic. He began his career in 1997 at National Video Center and Recording Studios in New York.

Beatrice is known for his short-form work for Nickelodeon, Food Network, USA Network, Syfy Channel and truTV, as well as commercials for Baron and Baron, Publicis, Anomaly and Consulate.

In addition, Beatrice’s work on long-form programs includes WNET/PBS’s Nature, Secrets of the Dead, Wide Angle and National Geographic Channel’s Secret Service series. Documentary credits include work for PBS, VH1, Lifetime and The History Channel. He has also worked on numerous independent films. He won an Emmy for his work on Christmas in Yellowstone, an hour-long documentary that airs seasonally on PBS.

“Nutmeg provides all of the services and resources that clients demand today. You can work here on any format, with an experienced and dedicated in-house support staff ready to help,” he says. “We make it easy for clients by offering mixing, editing, graphics and color grading all under one roof, while realizing significant cost savings along the way. This is a great time to be at Nutmeg.”

In his spare time, Beatrice is actively engaged in various exploratory studio projects, enjoys composing original music and tours with his acclaimed band.

Meet Nutmeg Post’s Chief Technical Engineer Jonathan Abrams

NAME: Jonathan Abrams

COMPANY: Nutmeg Post (They are also on Facebook and Twitter.)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Nutmeg is a full-service creative, marketing and promotions resource. We have a history of post-production specialization that spans more than three decades, and we have now expanded our services to include all phases of creative, production and post — from concept to completion.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Chief Technical Engineer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Working alongside two other people to design and implement new systems, upgrade and Continue reading