Tag Archives: NLE

Blackmagic: Resolve 16.1 in public beta, updates Pocket Cinema Camera

Blackmagic Design has announced DaVinci Resolve 16.1, an updated version of its edit, color, visual effects and audio post software that features updates to the new cut page, further speeding up the editing process.

With Resolve 16, introduced at NAB 2019, now in final release, the Resolve 16.1 public beta is now available for download from the Blackmagic Design website. This new public beta will help Blackmagic continue to develop new ideas while collaborating with users to ensure those ideas are refined for real-world workflows.

The Resolve 16.1 public beta features changes to the bin that now make it possible to place media in various folders and isolate clips from being used when viewing them in the source tape, sync bin or sync window. Clips will appear in all folders below the current level, and as users navigate around the levels in the bin, the source tape will reconfigure in real time. There’s even a menu for directly selecting folders in a user’s project.

Also new in this public beta is the smart indicator. The new cut page in DaVinci Resolve 16 introduced multiple new smart features, which work by estimating where the editor wants to add an edit or transition and then applying it without the editor having to waste time placing exact in and out points. The software guesses what the editor wants to do and just does it — it adds the inset edit or transition to the edit closest to where the editor has placed the CTI.

But a problem can arise in complex edits, where it is hard to know what the software would do and which edit it would place the effect or clip into. That’s the reason for the beta version’s new smart indicator. The smart indicator provides a small marker in the timeline so users get constant feedback and always know where DaVinci Resolve 16.1 will place edits and transitions. The new smart indicator constantly live-updates as the editor moves around the timeline.

One of the most common items requested by users was a faster way to cut clips in the timeline, so now DaVinci Resolve 16.1 includes a “cut clip” icon in the user interface. Clicking on it will slice the clips in the timeline at the CTI point.

Multiple changes have also been made to the new DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, including a new adaptive scroll feature on the search dial, which will automatically slow down a job when editors are hunting for an in point. The live trimming buttons have been renamed to the same labels as the functions in the edit page, and they have been changed to trim in, trim out, transition duration, slip in and slip out. The function keys along the top of the keyboard are now being used for various editing functions.

There are additional edit models on the function keys, allowing users to access more types of editing directly from dedicated keys on the keyboard. There’s also a new transition window that uses the F4 key, and pressing and rotating the search dial allows instant selection from all the transition types in DaVinci Resolve. Users who need quick picture picture-in in-picture effects can use F5 and apply them instantly.

Sometimes when editing projects with tight deadlines, there is little time to keep replaying the edit to see where it drags. DaVinci Resolve 16.1 features something called a Boring Detector that highlights the timeline where any shot is too long and might be boring for viewers. The Boring Detector can also show jump cuts, where shots are too short. This tool allows editors to reconsider their edits and make changes. The Boring Detector is helpful when using the source tape. In that case, editors can perform many edits without playing the timeline, so the Boring Detector serves as an alternative live source of feedback.

Another one of the most requested features of DaVinci Resolve 16.1 is the new sync bin. The sync bin is a digital assistant editor that constantly sorts through thousands of clips to find only what the editor needs and then displays them synced to the point in the timeline the editor is on. The sync bin will show the clips from all cameras on a shoot stacked by camera number. Also, the viewer transforms into a multi-viewer so users can see their options for clips that sync to the shot in the timeline. The sync bin uses date and timecode to find and sync clips, and by using metadata and locking cameras to time of day, users can save time in the edit.

According to Blackmagic, the sync bin changes how multi-camera editing can be completed. Editors can scroll off the end of the timeline and keep adding shots. When using the DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, editors can hold the camera number and rotate the search dial to “live overwrite” the clip into the timeline, making editing faster.

The closeup edit feature has been enhanced in DaVinci Resolve 16.1. It now does face detection and analysis and will zoom the shot based on face positioning to ensure the person is nicely framed.

If pros are using shots from cameras without timecode, the new sync window lets them sort and sync clips from multiple cameras. The sync window supports sync by timecode and can also detect audio and sync clips by sound. These clips will display a sync icon in the media pool so editors can tell which clips are synced and ready for use. Manually syncing clips using the new sync window allows workflows such as multiple action cameras to use new features such as source overwrite editing and the new sync bin.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Besides releasing the DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta, Blackmagic also updated the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. Blackmagic not only upgraded the camera from 4K to 6K resolution, but it changed the mount to the much used Canon EF style. Previous iterations of the Pocket Cinema Camera used a Micro 4/3s mount, but many users chose to purchase a Micro 4/3s-to-Canon EF adapter, which easily runs over $500 new. Because of the mount change in the Pocket Cinema Camera 6K, users can avoid buying the adapter and — if they shoot with Canon EF — can use the same lenses.

Review: Avid Media Composer Symphony 2018 v.12

By Brady Betzel

In February of 2018, we saw a seismic shift in the leadership at Avid. Chief executive officer Louis Hernandez Jr. was removed and subsequently replaced by Jeff Rosica. Once Rosica was installed, I think everyone who was worried Avid was about to be liquidated to the highest bidder breathed a sigh of temporary relief. Still unsure whether new leadership was going to right a tilting ship, I immediately wanted to see a new action plan from Avid, specifically on where Media Composer and Symphony were going.

Media Composer with Symphony

Not long afterward, I was happily reading how Avid was taking lessons from its past transgressions and listening to its clients. I heard Avid was taking tours around the industry and listening to what customers and artists needed from them. Personally, I was asking myself if Media Composer with Symphony would ever be the finishing tool of Avid DS was. I’m happy to say, it’s starting to look that way.

It appears from the outside that Rosica is indeed the breath of fresh air Avid needed. At NAB 2019, Avid teased the next iteration of Media Composer, version 2019, with overhauled interface and improvements, such as a 32-bit float color pipeline workflow complete with ACES color management and a way to deliver IMF packages; a new engine with a distributed processing engine; and a whole new product called Media Composer|Enterprise, all of which will really help sell this new Media Composer. But the 2019 update is coming soon and until then I took a deep dive into Media Composer 2018 v12, which has many features editors, assistants, and even colorists have been asking for: a new Avid Titler, shape-based color correction (with Symphony option), new multicam features and more.

Titling
As an online editor who uses Avid Media Composer with Symphony option about 60% of the time, titling is always a tricky subject. Avid has gone through some rough seas when dealing with how to fix the leaky hole known as the Avid Title Tool. The classic Avid Title Tool was basic but worked. However, if you aligned something in the Title Tool interface to Title Safe zones, it might jump around once you close the Title Tool interface. Fonts wouldn’t always stay the same when working across PC and MacOS platforms. The list goes on, and it is excruciatingly annoying.

Titler

Let’s take a look at some Avid history: In 2002, Avid tried to appease creators and introduced the, at the time, a Windows-only titler: Avid Marquee. While Marquee was well-intentioned, it was extremely difficult to understand if you weren’t interested in 3D lighting, alignment and all sorts of motion graphics stuff that not all editors want to spend time learning. So, most people didn’t use it, and if they did it took a little while for anyone taking over the project to figure out what was done.

In December of 2014, Avid leaned on the New Blue Titler, which would work in projects higher than 1920×1080 resolution. Unfortunately, many editors ran into a very long render at the end, and a lot bailed on it. Most decided to go out of house and create titles in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects. While this all relates to my experience, I assume others feel the same.

In Avid Media Composer 2018, the company has introduced the Avid Titler, which in the Tools menu is labeled: Avid Titler +. It works like an effect rather than a rendered piece of media like in the traditional Avid Title Tool, where an Alpha and a Fill layer worked. This method is similar to how NewBlue or Marquee functioned. However, Avid Titler works by typing directly on the record monitor; adding a title is as easy as marking an in and out point and clicking on the T+ button on the timeline.

You can specify things like kerning, shadow, outlines, underlines, boxes, backgrounds and more. One thing I found peculiar was that under Face, the rotation settings rotate individual letters and not the entire word by default. I reached out to Avid and they are looking into making the entire word rotation option the default in the mini toolbar of Avid Titler. So stay tuned.

Also, you can map your fast forward and rewind buttons to “Go To Next/Previous Event.” This allows you to jump to your next edits in the timeline but also to the next/previous keyframes when in the Effect Editor. Typically, you click on the scrub line in the record window and then you can use those shortcuts to jump to the next keyframe. In the Avid Titler, it would just start typing in the text box. Furthermore, when I wanted to jump out of Effect Editor mode and back into Edit Mode, I usually hit “y,” but that did not get me out of Effects Mode (Avid did mention they are working on updates to the Avid Titler that would solve this issue). The new Avid Titler definitely has some bugs and/or improvements that are needed, and they are being addressed, but it’s a decent start toward a modern title editor.

Shape-based color correction

Color
If you want advanced color correction built into Media Composer, then you are going to want the Symphony option. Media Composer with the Symphony option allows for more detailed color correction using secondary color corrections as well as some of the newer updates, including shape-based color correction. Before Resolve and Baselight became more affordable, Symphony was the gold standard for color correction on a budget (and even not on a budget since it works so well in the same timeline the editors use). But what we are really here for is the 2018 v.12 update of Shapes.

With the Symphony option, you can now draw specific regions on the footage for your color correction to affect. It essentially works similarly to a layer-based system like Adobe Photoshop. You can draw shapes with the same familiar tools you are used to drawing with in the Paint or AniMatte tools and then just apply your brightness, saturation or hue swings in those areas only. On the color correction page you can access all of these tools on the right-hand side, including the softening, alpha view, serial mode and more.

When using the new shape-based tools you must point the drop-down menu to “CC Effect.” From there you can add a bunch of shapes on top of each other and they will play in realtime. If you want to lay a base correction down, you can specify it in the shape-based sidebar, then click shape and you can dial in the specific areas to your or your client’s taste. You can check off the “Serial Mode” box to have all corrections interact with one another or uncheck the box to allow for each color correction to be a little more isolated — a really great option to keep in mind when correcting. Unfortunately, tracking a shape can only be done in the Effect Editor, so you need to kind of jump out of color correction mode, track, and then go back. It’s not the end of the world, but it would be infinitely better if you could track efficiently inside of the color correction window. Avid could even take it further by allowing planar tracking by an app like Mocha Pro.

Shape-based color correction

The new shape-based corrector also has an alpha view mode identified by the infinity symbol. I love this! I often find myself making mattes in the Paint tool, but it can now be done right in the color correction tool. The Symphony option is an amazing addition to Media Composer if you need to go further than simple color correction but not dive into a full color correction app like Baselight or Resolve. In fact, for many projects you won’t need much more than what Symphony can do. Maybe a +10 on the contrast, +5 on the brightness and +120 on the saturation and BAM a finished masterpiece. Kind of kidding, but wait until you see it work.

Multicam
The final update I want to cover is multicam editing and improvements to editing group clips. I cannot emphasize enough how much time this would have saved me as an assistant editor back in the pre-historic Media Composer days… I mean we had dongles, and I even dabbled in the Meridian box. Literally days of grouping and regrouping could have been avoided with the Edit Group feature. But I did make a living fixing groups that were created incorrectly, so I guess this update is a Catch 22. Anyway, you can now edit groups in Media Composer by creating a group, right-clicking on that group and selecting Edit Group. From there, the group will now open in the Record Monitor as a sequence, and from there you can move, nudge and even add cameras to a previously created group. Once you are finished, you can update the group and refresh any sequences that used that group to update if you wish. One issue is that with mixed frame rate groups, Avid says committing to that sequence might produce undesirable effects.

Editing workspace

Cost of Entry
How much does Media Composer cost these days? While you can still buy it outright, it seems a bit more practical to go monthly since you will automatically get updates, but it can still be a little tricky. Do you need PhraseFind and/or ScriptSync? Do you need the Symphony option? Do you need to access shared storage? There are multiple options depending on your needs. If you want everything, then Media Composer Ultimate for $49 per month is what you want. If you want Media Composer and just one add-on, like Symphony, it will cost $19 per month plus $199 per year for the Symphony option. If you want to test the water before jumping in, you can always try Media Composer First.

For a good breakdown of the Media Composer pricing structure, check out KeyCode Media  page (a certified reseller). Another great link with tons of information organized into easily digestible bites is this. Additionally, www.freddylinks.com is a great resource chock full of everything else Avid, written by Avid technical support specialist Fredrik Liljeblad out of Sweden.

Group editing

Summing Up
In the end, I use and have used Media Composer with Symphony for over 15 years, and it is the most reliable nonlinear editor supporting multiple editors in a shared network environment that I have used. While Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple Final Cut Pro X and Blackmagic Resolve are offering fancy new features and collaboration modes, Avid seems to always hold stabile when I need it the most. These new improvements and a UI overhaul (set to debut in May), new leadership from Rosica, and the confidence of Rosica’s faithful employees all seem to be paying off and getting Avid back on the track they should have always been on.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Arvato to launch VPMS MediaEditor NLE at NAB

First seen as a technology preview at IBC 2018, Arvato’s MediaEditor is a browser-based desktop editor aimed at journalistic editing and content preparation workflows. MediaEditor projects can be easily exported and published in various formats, including square and vertical video, or can be opened in Adobe Premiere with VPMS EditMate for craft editing.

MediaEditor, which features a familiar editing interface, offers simple drag-and-drop transitions and effects, as well as basic color correction. Users can also record voiceovers directly into a sequence, and the system enables automatic mixing of audio tracks for quicker turnaround. Arvato will add motion graphics for captioning and pre-generated graphics in an upcoming version of MediaEditor.

MediaEditor is a part of Arvato Systems’ Video Production Management Suite (VPMS) enterprise MAM solution. Like other products in the suite, it can be independently deployed and scaled, or combined with other products for workflows across the media enterprise. MediaEditor can also be used with Vidispine-based systems, and VPMS and Vidispine clients can access their material through MediaEditor whether on-premise or via the cloud. MediaEditor takes advantage of the advanced VPMS streaming technology allowing users to work anywhere with high-quality, responsive video playback, even on lower-speed connections.

A Sneak Peek: Avid shows its next-gen Media Composer

By Jonathan Moser

On the weekend of NAB and during Avid Connect, I found myself sitting in a large meeting room with some of the most well-known editors and creatives in the business. To my left was Larry Jordan, Steve Audette was across from me, Chris Bovè and Norman Hollyn to my right, and many other luminaries of the post world filled the room. Motion picture, documentary, boutique, commercial and public broadcasting masters were all represented here… as well as sound designers and producers. It was quite humbling for me.

We’d all been asked to an invite-only meeting with the leading product designers and engineers from Avid Technology to see the future of Media Composer… and to do the second thing we editors do best: bitch. We were asked to be as tough, critical and vocal as we could about what we’re about to see. We were asked to give them a thumbs up or thumbs down on their vision and execution of the next generation of Media Composer as they showed us long-needed overhauls and redesigns.

Editors Chris Bové and Avid’s Randy Martens getting ready for the unveil.

What we were shown is the future of the Media Composer, and based on what I saw, its future is bright. You think you’ve heard that before? Maybe, but this time is different. This is not vaporware, smoke and mirrors or empty promises… I assure you, this is the future.

The Avid team, including new Avid CEO Jeff Rosica, was noticeably open and attentive to the assembled audience of seasoned professionals invited to Avid Connect… a far cry from the halcyon days of the ‘90s and 2000s when Media Composer ruled the roost, and sat complacently on its haunches. Too recently, the Avid corporate culture was viewed by many in the post community as arrogant and tone deaf to its users’ criticisms and requests. This meeting was a far cry from that.

What we were shown was a redefined, reenergized and proactive attitude from Avid. Big corporations aren’t ordinarily so open about such big changes, but this one directly addressed decades of users’ concerns and suggestions.

By the way, this presentation was separate from the new NAB announcements of tiered pricing, new feature rollouts and enhanced interoperability for Media Composer. Avid invited us here not for approval, but for appraisal… for our expertise and feedback and to help steer them in the right direction.

As a life-long Avid user who has often questioned the direction of where the company was headed, I need to say this once more: this time is different.

These are real operational changes that we got to see in an open, informed — and often questioned and critiqued — environment. We editors are a tough crowd, but team Avid was ready, listening, considering and feeding back new ideas. It was an amazingly open and frank give and take from a company that once was shut off from such possibilities.

In her preliminary introduction, Kate Ketcham, manager of Media Composer product management, gave the assembled audience a pretty brutal and honest assessment of Media Composer’s past (and oft repeated) failings and weaknesses —a task usually reserved for us editors to tell Avid, but this time it was Avid telling us what we already knew and they had come to realize. Pretty amazing.

The scope of her critique showed us that, despite popular opinion, Avid HAS been listening to us all along: they got it. They acknowledged the problems, warts and all, and based on the two-hour presentation shown through screenshots and demos, they’re intent on correcting their mistakes and are actively doing so.

Addressing User Concerns
Before the main innovations were shared, there was an initial concern from the editors that Avid be careful not to “throw out the baby with the bathwater” in its reinvention. Media Composer’s primary strength — as well as one of its most recognized weaknesses among newer editors — has been its consistency of look and feel, as well as its logical operational methodology and dependable media file structural organization. Much was made of one competitor’s historical failure to keep consistency and integrity of the basic and established editing paradigms (such as two-screen layout, track-based editing, reasonably established file structure, etc.) in a new release.

We older editors depend on a certain consistency. Don’t abandon the tried and true, but still “get us into this century” was the refrain from the assembled. The Avid team addressed these concerns clearly and reassuringly — the best, familiar and most trusted elements of Media Composer would stay, but there will now be so much more under the hood. Enough to dynamically attract and compel newer users and adoptees.

The company has spent almost a year doing research, redesign and implementation; this is a true commitment, and they are pledging to do this right. Avid’s difficult and challenging task in reimagining Media Composer was to make the new iteration steadfast, efficient and dependable (something existing users expect), yet innovative, attractive, flexible, workflow-fluid and intuitive enough for the newer users who are used to more contemporary editing and software. It’s a slippery and problematic slope, but one the Avid team seemed to navigate with an understanding of the issues.

As this is still in the development stage, I can’t reveal particulars (I really wish I could because there were a ton), but I can give an overview of the types of implementation they’ve been developing. Also, this initial presentation deals only with one stage of the redesign of Media Composer — the user interface changes — with much more to come within the spectrum of change.

Rebuilding the Engine
I was assured by the Avid design team that most of the decades-old Media Composer code has been completely rewritten, updated and redesigned with current innovations and implementations similar to those of the competition. This is a fully realized redesign.

Flexibility and customization are integrated throughout. There are many UI innovations, tabbed bins, new views and newer and more efficient access to enhanced tools. Media Composer has entirely new windowing and organizational options that goes way beyond mere surface looks and feels, yet it is much different than the competition’s implementations. You can now customize the UI to incredible lengths. There are new ways of viewing and organizing media, source and clip information and new and intuitive (and graphical) ways of creating workspaces that get much more usable information to the editor than before.

The Avid team examined weaknesses of the existing Media Composer environment and workflow: clutter, too many choices onscreen at once; screens that resize mysteriously, which can throw concentration and creative flow off-base; looking at what causes oft-repeated actions and redundant keystrokes or operations that could be minimized or eliminated altogether; finding ways of changing how Media Composer handles screen real estate to let the editor see only what they need to see when they need it.

Gone are the windows covering other windows and other things that might slow users down. Avid showed us how attention was paid to making Media Composer more intuitive to new editors by shrinking the learning curve. The ability for more contextual help (without getting in the way of editing) has been addressed.

There are new uses of dynamic thumbnails, color for immediate recognition of active operations and window activation, different ways of changing modalities — literally changing how we looked at timelines, how we find media. You want tabbed bins? You want hover scrubbing? You want customization of workspaces done quickly and efficiently? Avid looked at what do we need to see and what we don’t. All of these things have been addressed and integrated. They have addressed the difficulties of handling effect layering, effect creation, visualization and effect management with sleek but understandable solutions. Copying complex multilayered effects will now be a breeze.

Everything we were shown answered long-tolerated problems we’ve had to accept. There were no gimmicks, no glitz, just honesty. There was method to the madness for every new feature, implementation and execution, but after feedback from us, many things were reconsidered or jettisoned. Interruptions from this critical audience were fast and furious: “Why did you do that?” “What about my workflow?” “Those palette choices don’t work for me.” “Why are those tools buried?” This was a synergy and free-flow of information between company and end-users unlike anything I’ve ever seen.

There was no defensiveness from Avid; they listened to each and every critique. I could see they were actively learning from us and that they understood the problems we were pointing out. They were taking notes, asking more questions and adding to their change lists. Editors made suggestions, and those suggestions were added and actively considered. They didn’t want blind acceptance. We were informing them, and it was really amazing to see.

Again, I wish I could be more specific about details and new implementations — all I can say is that they really have listened to the complaints and are addressing them. And there is much more in the works, from media ingest and compatibility to look and feel and overall user experience.

When Jeff Rosica stopped in to observe, talk and listen to the crowd, he explained that while Avid Technology has many irons in the fire, he believes that Media Composer (and Pro Tools) represent the heart of what the company is all about. In fact, since his tenure began, he has redeployed tremendous resources and financial investment to support and nurture this rebirth of Media Composer.

Rosica promised to make sure Avid would not repeat the mistakes made by others several years ago. He vowed to continue to listen to us and to keep what makes Media Composer the dependable powerhouse that it has been.

As the presentation wound down, a commitment was made by the Avid group to continue to elicit our feedback and keep us in the loop throughout all phases of the redevelopment.

In the end, this tough audience came away optimistic. Yeah, some were still skeptical, but others were elated, expectant and heartened. I know I was.

And I don’t drink Kool-Aid. I hate it in fact.

There is much more in development for MC at Avid in terms of AI integration, facial recognition, media ingest, export functionality and much more. This was just a taste of many more things to come, so stand by.

(Special thanks for access to Marianna Montague, David Colantuoni, Tim Claman, Randy Fayan, and Randy Martens of Avid Technology. If I’ve missed anyone, thank you and apologies.)


Jonathan Moser is a six-time Emmy winning freelance editor/producer based in New York. You can email him at flashcutter@yahoo.com.

Michael Kammes’ 5 Things – Video editing software

By Randi Altman

Technologist Michael Kammes is back with a new episode of 5 Things, which focuses on simplifying film, TV and media technology. The web series answers, according to Kammes, the “five burning tech questions” people might have about technologies and workflows in the media creation space. This episode tackles professional video editing software being used (or not used) in Hollywood.

Why is now the time to address this segment of the industry? “The market for NLEs is now more crowded than it has been in over 20 years,” explains Kammes. “Not since the dawn of modern NLEs have there been this many questions over what tools should be used. In addition, the massive price drop of NLEs, coupled with the pricing shift (monthly/yearly, as opposed to outright) has created more confusion in the market.”

In his video, Kammes focuses on Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere, Apple Final Cut Pro, Lightworks, Blackmagic Resolve and others.

Considering its history and use on some major motion pictures, (such as The Wolf of Wall Street), why hasn’t Lightworks made more strides in the Hollywood community? “I think Lightworks has had massive product development and marketing issues,” shares Kammes. “I rarely see the product pushed online, at user groups or in forums.  EditShare, the parent company of LightWorks, also deals heavily in storage, so one can only assume the marketing dollars are being spent on larger ticket items like professional and enterprise storage over a desktop application.”

What about Resolve, considering its updated NLE tools and the acquisition of audio company Fairlight? Should we expect to see more Resolve being used as a traditional NLE? “I think in Hollywood, adoption will be very, very slow for creative editorial, and unless something drastic happens to Avid and Adobe, Resolve will remain in the minority. For dailies, transcodes or grading, I can see it only getting bigger, but I don’t see larger facilities adopting Resolve for creative editorial. Outside of Hollywood, I see it gaining more traction. Those outlets have more flexibility to pivot and try different tools without the locked-in TV and feature film machine in Hollywood.”

Check it out:

My NAB 2017 top five

By Brady Betzel

So once again, I didn’t go to NAB. I know, I should go, but to be honest I get caught up in my day job and my family, so usually I forget about NAB until the week before and by that time it’s too late to pull off. I’m hoping to go next year, like really hoping I make plans.

So there or not, I was paying close attention to the announcements that came out of new products, and even updates to older products. Let’s be real, other than doing some face-to-face networking, you can really get the same if not more info by lurking online. Below are five announcements that really got my attention.

Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve 14
Blackmagic saw that this year’s Resolve update from 12.5.5 to 14 is so good they skipped 13. There was a significant drop in the DaVinci Resolve Studio price from $999 to $299, while adding features that many of the top NLE/color correction software dogs are lacking.

The beauty of Resolve is that it is first and foremost an industry-proven color correction powerhouse, one that is used on many of the top movies and television shows in the industry.

They are also expanding their footprint laterally to encompass professional audio as well as professional video. In Resolve 14, Blackmagic has added a Fairlight audio page to allow for a much more Pro Tools-like editing experience within the same Resolve app we have all grown to become extremely excited about. In my mind that means that at a professional facility, or your own garage, you can have a editor/colorist sitting with a re-recording engineer to review a movie or a show with the client at the same time.

The Fairlight page within Resolve 14.

As long as you have two separate workstations, the colorist and audio mixer can be addressing notes on the same sequence inside of Resolve 14 because of the newly updated collaboration enhancements. The Audio mixer or colorist could then refresh their sequence to update it with any changes the other had made and see them immediately reflected.

I haven’t gotten my hands on this update in a proper environment to test out the collaboration functionality, but the timeline comparison and review features seem like a godsend to anyone who does any sort of conform work. It is the beginning of Blackmagic’s path toward Avid Media Composer’s lock on the industry with their sequence and project sharing.

On Twitter, Blackmagic’s director of DaVinci software engineering, Rohit Gupta answered my question about whether EDLs and AAFs will fall in line with the timeline review. He said it will work “irrespective of how you create the timeline. So it will work with EDL/AAF too.”

Clip, sequence and bin locking are the future for collaborative workflow inside of Resolve. I would love to see how someone uses these features in a large collaborative environment of 10 or more editors, sound editors and colorists. How does Resolve 14 handle multiple sequence updates and multiple people knocking on a bin? How does Resolve work on something like an Avid Nexis?

Moving on, while I’m not an audio guy I do realize that Fairlight is a big player in the pro audio industry, maybe not as sizable a footprint as Avid Pro Tools in the United States, but it still has its place. So Blackmagic inserting Fairlight technology, including hardware compatibility, into Resolve 14 is remarkable.

The Resolve 14 update seems to have been focused on everything but the color correction tools. Except for the supposed major speed boost and options like face tracking, Blackmagic is putting all its eggs into the general NLE basket. It doesn’t bother me that much to be honest, and I think Blackmagic is picking up where a few other NLE players are leaving off. I just hope they don’t spread Resolve so thin that it loses its core audience. But again, with the price of Resolve 14 Studio coming in at $299 it’s becoming the major player in the post nonlinear editor, color correction, and now audio finishing market.

Keep in mind, Resolve 14 is technically still in beta so you will most likely run into bugs, probably mostly under the Fairlight tab, so be careful if you plan on using this version in time-critical environments.

You can find all of Blackmagic’s NAB 2017 updates at www.blackmagicdesign.com, including a new ATEM Studio Pro HD switcher, UltraStudio HD Mini with Thunderbolt 3 and even a remote Bluetooth camera control app for the Ursa Mini Pro.

SmallHD Focus
There was a lot of buzz online about SmallHD’s Focus monitor. It’s an HDMI-based external touchscreen monitor that is supposedly two to three times brighter than your DSLR’s monitor. People online were commenting about how bright the monitor actually was and about the $499 price tag. It looks like it will be released in June, and I can’t wait to see it.

In addition to being a bright external monitor it has a built-in waveform, false color, focus assist, 3D LUTs, Pixel Zoom and many more features. I really like the feature that offers auxiliary power out to power your camera with the Focus’ Sony L Series battery. You can check it out here.

Atomos Sumo
Another external monitor that was being talked about was the 1,200-nit Atomos 19-inch Sumo, a self-proclaimed “on-set and in-studio 4Kp60 HDR 19-inch monitor-recorder.” It boasts some heavy specs, like the ability to record 4K 12bit Raw and 10-bit ProRes/DNxHR — plus it’s 19 inches!

What’s really smart is that it can double as an HDR grading monitor back in the edit suite. It will map color formats Log, PQ and HLG with its AtomHDR engine. Technically, it supports Sony SLog2/SLog3, Canon CLog/CLog 2, Arri Log C, Panasonic Vlog, JVC JLog, Red LogFilm Log formats and Sony SGamut/SGamut3/SGamut3.cine, Canon Cinema, BT2020, DCI P3, DCI P3+, Panasonic V Gamut and Arri Alexa Wide Gamut color gamuts. While the Sumo will record in 4K, it’s important to note that the monitor is actually a 10-bit, 1920×1080 resolution monitor with SDI and HDMI inputs and outputs.

The Atomos Sumo is available for pre-order now for $2,495. Get the complete list of specs here.

Avid Everywhere
This year, Avid Media Composer editors saw a roadmap for future updates like an updated Title Tool that is higher than HD compatible (finally!), an advanced color correction mode and Avid Everywhere based on the MediaCentral platform.

If you’ve ever seen an app like Avid Media Composer work through the cloud, you will probably agree how amazing it is. If you haven’t, essentially you will log in to Media Composer via a web browser or a light on machine app that runs all of the hard processing on the server that you are logging in to. The beauty of this is that you can essentially log in wherever you want and edit. Since the hard work is being done on the other end you can log in using a laptop or even a tablet that has decent Internet speed and edit high-resolution media. Here comes that editing on the beach job I was wanting. You can check out all of the Avid Everywhere updates here.

In addition Avid announced Media Composer First — a free version of Media Composer. They also released an updated IO – DNxIQ, essentially with the Thunderbolt 3 update along with a live cross-convert .

Sony a9
With all eyes on Sony to reveal the most anticipated full frame cameras in prosumer history — a7RIII and a7SIII — we are all surprised when they unveiled the 24.4MP a9. The a9 is Sony’s answer to heavy weights Canon and Nikon professional full-frame cameras that have run the markets for years.

With a pretty amazing blackout-free continuous shooting ability alongside an Ethernet port and dual SD card slots, the a9 is a beauty. While I am not a huge fan of Sony’s menu setup, I am really interested to see the footage and images come out on the web; there is something great about Sony’s images and video in my eyes. Besides my personal thoughts, there is also a five-axis in-body stabilization, UHD (3840×2160) video recording across the entire width of the sensor and even Super 35 recording. Check out more info here .

In the end, NAB 2017 was a little lackluster in terms of barn-burner hardware and software releases, however I feel that Blackmagic has taken the cake with the DaVinci Resolve 14 release. Keep in mind Blackmagic is also releasing updates to products like the Ursa Mini Pro, new Hyperdeck Studio Mini and updates to the ultra-competitive Blackmagic Video Assist, adding ever-valuable scopes.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Avid Media Composer 8.5 and 8.6

By Brady Betzel

It seems that nonlinear editing systems, like Adobe Premiere, Apple FCP X, Lightworks, Vegas and Blackmagic Resolve are being updated almost weekly. At first, I was overjoyed with the frequent updates. It got to the point where I would see a new codec released on a Monday and by Friday you could edit with it (maybe a slight exaggeration, but pretty close to the truth). Unfortunately, this didn’t always mean the updates would work.

One thing that I have learned over the last decade is that reliable software is worth its weight in gold, and one NLE that has always been reliable in my work is Avid Media Composer. While Media Composer isn’t updated weekly, it has been picking up steam and has really given its competitors a run for their money.

With Avid Media Composer’s latest updates, including 8.5 and all the way through 8.6.1, we are seeing the true progression of THE gold standard in nonlinear editing software. From the changes that editors have been requesting for years, like the ability to add a new track to the timeline by simply dragging a clip, all the way to selecting all clips with the same source clip color in the timeline (an online editor’s dream — or maybe just mine), Media Composer is definitely heading in the right direction. Once they fix options, such as the Title Tool, I am sure many others will be in the same boat I am. Even with Adobe’s latest update news of Team Projects, I think Avid’s project sharing will remain on top, but don’t get me wrong, I love the competition and believe it’s healthy for the industry in general.

Digging In
So how great are the latest updates in Media Composer? Well, I am going to touch on a few that really make our lives as editors easier and more efficient, including the new Source Browser; custom-sized project creation Preset Manager; Audio Channel Grouping; grouping clips by audio waveform; and many more.

For simplicity’s sake I won’t be pointing out which update contained exactly what, so let’s just assume that you and I are both talking about 8.6.1. Even though 8.6.2 was released, it was subsequently pulled down because of a bad installer and replaced by 8.6.3. Long story short, I did this review right before 8.6.3 was released so I am sticking to 8.6.1. You can find the read me file for any 8.6.3 related bug fixes and feature updates, including Realtime EQ and Audio Suite Effects.

Source Browser
Let’s take a look at the new Source Browser first. If you have worked in Premiere Pro before then you are basically familiar with what the Source Browser does. Simply put, it’s a live access point from within Media Composer where you can either link to media (think AMA) or import media (the traditional way). The Source Browser is great because you can always leave it open if you want, or close it and reopen it whenever you want. One thing I found funny is that there was not a default shortcut to open the Source Browser — you have to manually map it.

Nonetheless, it’s a fast way to load media into your Source Monitor without bringing the media into a bin. It even has a Favorites tab to keep all of the media you access on a regular basis in the same place — a good spot for transition effects, graphics, sound effects and even music cues that you find yourself using a lot. The Source Browser can be found under the Tools menu. While I’ve seen some complaints about the menu reorganization and the new Source Browser, I like what Avid has done. The updated layout and optimized menu items seem to be a good fit for me, it will just take a little time to get used to.

Up next is my favorite update to Media Composer since I discovered the Select Right and Select Left commands without Filler and how to properly use the extend edit function: selecting clips in the timeline based on source color. If you’ve ever had to separate clips onto different video and audio tracks, you will understand the monotony and pain that a lot of assistant editors and conforming editors have to go through. Let’s say you have stock footage mixed in with over two hours of shot footage and you want to quickly raise all of the clips onto their own video layer. Previously, you would have to move each clip individually using the segment tool (or shift + click a bunch of clips), but now you can select every clip with the same source color at once.

Color Spaces

First, you should (or at least I recommend that you should) enable Source Color in your timeline, but you don’t have to for this to work. Second, you use either the red or yellow segment tools or alt (option) + click from left to right over the clip with the color that you want to select throughout the timeline. Once the clip is selected you will right click on the clip. Under the Select menu, click on Clips with the Same Source Color. Every clip with that same color will be selected and you can Shift + CTRL drag the clips to a new track. Make this a shortcut and holy cow — imagine the time you will save!

Immediately, I think of trouble shots that might need a specific color correction or image restoration applied to them like a dead pixel that appears throughout a sequence. In the bin, color the trouble clips one color, select them all in the timeline and bam you are ready to go, quickly and easily. This update is a game changer for me. Under the Select menu you will see a few other options like Offline Clips, Select Clips with No Source Color, Select Clips with Same Local Color, and even Reverse Selection.

Audio
Now let’s jump into the audio updates. First off is the nesting of audio effects. I mean come on! How many times have I wanted to apply a Vari-Fi effect at the end of a music cue and add D-Verb on top of it?! Now I can create all sorts of slow down promo/sizzle reel madness that a mixer will hate me for without locking myself into a decision!

I tried this a few times expecting my Media Composer to crash, but it worked like a champ. Previously, as a workaround, I had to mixdown the Vari-Fi audio (locking me into that audio with no easy way of going back) and apply the D-Verb to the audio mixdown. This isn’t the cleanest workflow but it guaranteed my Vari-Fi would make it into the mix. Now I guess I will have to trust the mixer to not strip my audio effects off of the AAF we send them.

Digging a bit further into the audio updates for Media Composer 8.5 and 8.6, I found the ability to add up to 64 tracks of audio and, more specifically, 64 voices. Sixty-four voices can be laid out in these possible combinations: 64 mono tracks, 32 stereo tracks, 10-5.1 tracks plus four mono tracks or even eight 7.1 tracks.

Nested Audio

Let’s be honest — from one editor to another — do we really need to use all 64 tracks of audio? I urge you to use this sparingly, and only if you have to. No one wants to be scrolling through 64 tracks of audio. I am hesitant to totally embrace this, because while it is an incredible update to Media Composer, it allows for editors to be sloppy, and nobody has time for that. Also, older versions of Media Composer won’t be able to open your sequence as they are not backwards compatible with this.

My second favorite update in Media Composer is Audio Groups. I am a pretty organized (a.k.a. obsessive-compulsive editor), and with my audio I typically lay out voiceover and ADR on tracks 1-2, dialogue on 3-6, sound effects on 7-12 and music on 13-16.

These have to be fluid, and I find that these fit my screen real estate well. They keep my audio edit as tidy as possible, although now with 64 tracks I can obviously expand. But one thing that always sucked was having to mute each track individually or all at once. Now, in the Audio Mixer you can easily create groups of audio tracks that can be enabled and disabled with one click instead of individually selecting each audio track. For instance, I can group all of my music tracks together to toggle them off and on with one check box. In the Audio Mixer there is a small arrow on the upper left that you will twirl down, select the audio tracks that you want to group, such as tracks 13-16 for music, right click, click Create New Group, name it and there you go — audio track selection glory.

Audio Ducking

Last in the audio updates is Audio Ducking. When I think of Audio Ducking I think of having a track of voiceover or ADR over the top of a music bed. Typically, I would go through and either add audio keyframes where I need to lower the music bed or create add edits, lower the audio in the mixer, apply a dissolve between edits and repeat throughout the segment.

Avid has really stepped its game up with Audio Ducking because now I can specify which of my dialogue tracks I want Avid to calculate for when my music bed is playing. You can even twirl down the advanced settings, adjust threshold and hold time for the dialogue tracks, as well as attenuation and ramp time for the music bed tracks. I tried it and it worked. I won’t go as far as to say that you should just use that instead of doing your own music edits, but it is an interesting feature that may help a few people.

Wait, There’s More
There were a few straggling updates I didn’t touch on you will want to check out. Avid has added support for HDR color spaces, such as RGB DCI-P3, RGB 2020 and many more. Once I get my hands on some sweet HDR footage (and equipment to monitor it) I will dabble in that space.

Also, you can now group footage by audio waveform. While grouping by audio waveform is an awesome addition, especially if you have previously used Red Giant’s PluralEyes and feel left out because they discontinued AAF support, it lacks a few adjustments that I find absolutely necessary when working with hours upon hours of footage. For instance, I would love to be able to manually sync clips that don’t have audio loud enough for Avid to discern properly and create a group. Even more so, for all grouping I would really love to be able to adjust the group after it has been created. If after the group was created I could alter it inside of a sequence that would immediately reflect my changes in the group itself, I —along with about one million other editors and assistant editors — would jump for joy.

Lastly, the Effects Tab has been improved with its Quick Find search-ability. Type in the effect you are looking for and it will pop up. This is another game-changing feature to me.

Summing Up
For a while there I thought Avid was satisfied to stay the course in 1080p land, but luckily that isn’t the case. They have added resolution independence, custom project resolutions, and while they have added features to Media Composer — like Source Browser and the ever-improving Frame Flex — they kept their project sharing and rock solid media management at the top level.

Even after all of these updates I mentioned, there are still some features that I would love to see. Those include built-in composite modes in the Effects Pallette; editable groups; an improved Title Tool that will work in 4K and higher resolutions without going to a third-party for support; updated Symphony Color Correction tools; smart mix-downs that can inherit alpha channels; the ability to disable video layers but still see all the layers above and below; and many more.

If I had to use just one word to describe Media Composer, I would say reliable. I love reliability more than fancy features. And now that you heard my Media Composer review, you can commence trolling on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Brady Betzel is an online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Earlier this year, Brady was nominated for an Emmy for his work on Disney’s Unforgettable Christmas Celebration.

EditShare launches Flow Story at IBC, promotes Peter Lambert

At IBC, EditShare is launching its new Flow Story, a professional remote editing application. A module of the EditShare Flow media asset management solution, Flow Story offers advanced proxy editing and roundtrip workflow support with professional editing features and functions courtesy of the Lightworks NLE engine.

Flow Story allows users to work remotely with secure access to on-premises storage and media assets via an Internet connection. Flow Story lets users assemble content, add voiceovers and collaborate with other NLEs for finishing, delivery or playout of packages. Direct access to on-premises storage accelerates content exchange within the safety of a secure network.

Feature Highlights
• Wide Format Support — Flow Story supports hundreds of formats, including ProRes, Avid DNxHD, AVC-Intra and XDCAM, through to 4K and beyond, such as Red R3D, XAVC, Cinema DNG and DPX. As well as working with low-resolution proxy files, users can import and publish many popular formats to the EditShare storage server.
• Voiceover — Simple-to-use VO tools let users finalize packages at their desk or out in the field. Flow Story auto-detects and enables any connected audio input device. Users can upload newly created voiceover files and clips they have created locally.
• Edit While Capture — Flow Story’s Edit While Capture feature allows any format (including Long GOP) to be accessed during recording using EditShare Flow MAM or Geevs Ingest servers. This is ideal for fast turnaround environments such as live events and sports highlights.
• Realtime collaboration — When connected to any EditShare Flow Database, Flow Story has real time collaboration with other Flow users, such as Flow Browse and AirFlow. Projects, clips, sequences, markers and metadata are all updated and synchronized in realtime.
• NLE Integration — Flow Story supports industry-standard NLEs (and DAWs) such as Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere, Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve and Avid Pro Tools. A creative hub, Flow Story facilitates collaboration among editors through AAF, an interchange file format that advances round-trip workflows.
• Work Offline — Flow Story is purpose-built with remote editing in mind. While you only need a regular Internet connection to access your content, that is not always possible. Flow Story can work in a standalone mode, accessing existing Flow projects in motion. Flow Story projects are synchronized via Internet.
• Advanced realtime effects, including Color, Titles and DVEs — Using the power of the graphics card, all the realtime effects can be played back remotely or locally without the need for rendering or flattening.
• Third-party integration with Audio Network — Browse the selection of Audio Network music directly from within Flow Story. Stream MP3 audio files directly over sequences, add search criteria that best suits requirements, then register or sign in to purchase directly. The full quality track is then downloaded and available within the project.

In Other Editshare news, Peter Lambert has been named worldwide sales director. An industry business development executive with more than 25 years of experience, including his start at the BBC as an audio engineer, Lambert recently held the director of sales position for EditShare’s APAC region.

“Since coming on board to manage our Asia Pacific regional business, Peter has been instrumental in rebuilding the channel and has been a steady advocate for building up our technical, sales and administrative staff in the region. Peter has brought order and stability to our business in the region, and largely as a result of his efforts we have seen substantial growth and stronger client relations,” says Andy Liebman, CEO, EditShare. Responsible for the company’s overall sales strategy and reseller partner program, Lambert’s appointment is effective immediately.

Mocha now plug-in for NLEs, BCC 10 integrates Mocha 5

The big news from Boris FX/Imagineer at IBC this year was that the soon-to-be-released Mocha Pro planar tracking and roto masking technology will be available as a plug-in for Avid, Adobe and OFX. This brings all of the tools from Mocha Pro to these NLEs — no more workarounds needed. This Mocha Pro 5 plug-in, which will be available in a month, incorporates a new effects panel for integrated keying, grain, sharpening and skin smoothing as well as new Python scripting support and more.

“Avid editors have always asked us for the Mocha planar tracking tools on their timeline. Now with the Imagineer/Boris FX collaboration, we are bringing the full Mocha Pro to Avid,” explains Ross Shain, CMO at BorisFX/Imagineer. “Media Composer and Symphony users will be able to handle more complex effects and finishing tasks, without importing/exporting footage. Just drop the Mocha Pro plug-in on your clip and you immediately have access to the same powerful tracking, stabilization and object removal tools used in high-end feature film visual effects.”

The availability of this plugin coincides with the Mocha Pro 5 release.

In other company news, Boris FX’s upcoming Boris Continuum Complete (BCC) 10 will have Mocha planar tracking and masking embedded. This is inside every BCC 10 plug-in and can be used for isolating areas of the effect with Mocha masks. The first version to ship will be BCC 10 for Avid in a few weeks.

Besides integrating Mocha Pro 5, BCC 10 will also offer a new Beauty Studio skin-retouching filter, new 3D titling and animation tools, import of Maxon Cinema 4D models, new image restoration filters, new transitions and more host support.

Vidcheck heading to NAB with ‘Vidapps’ for After Effects, Premiere

Video processed with Adobe After Effects or Premiere Pro will soon be able to take advantage of Vidcheck’s intelligent “Vidapps-Video” plug-in to correct RGB gamut and YUV levels within the NLE.

Uk-based Vidcheck, which makes automated quality control software with patented intelligent video and audio correction, will be at NAB this year showing the latest version of its Vidchecker and Vidfixer product suites. These have been extended to include a range of video applications (Vidapps) for Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro, enabling users to check and automatically correct video and audio errors without leaving the Adobe environment.

This means that users of Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro can correct illegal video levels to broadcast safe parameters using Vidcheck’s patented algorithms which correct the video without clamping it. (Clamping being an antiquated means of achieving broadcast safe content that can cause undesirable degradations of the resulting picture).

Vidcheck’s Vidapps-Video provides checking and correction as part of the edit process and is designed to be used as the last stage of post production, immediately before the media is rendered. This approach means the user can be confident that the rendered media will fully comply with the specified requirements before it leaves the Adobe environment.

As part of using Vidapps, an XML report can be generated and saved as a record that QC corrections were done and, if required, be forwarded to the client for the media file. The report can also be ‘skinned’ with the logo and colors of the post house/video editor to make it highly specific and identifiable to them.

Additional Vidapps plug-ins are currently available for audio and photosensitive epilepsy (PSE) checking, and others are in development for introduction later in 2015.

Vidcheck’s core Vidchecker and Vidfixer AQC products are scalable from low-cost versions for post production to sophisticated Vidchecker/Vidfixer Grid systems suitable for larger enterprises. In addition to watch folder automation, Vidcheck’s API has been integrated into many MAM and workflow engine solutions across the industry for seamless addition of complex AQC into any workflow.

Radical/Outpost’s Evan Schechtman talks latest FCP X updates, NLE trends

By Randi Altman

As you might have heard, Apple has updated its Final Cut Pro to version 10.1.4, with what they call “key stability improvements.”

That includes the Pro Video Formats 2.0 software update, which provides native support for importing, editing and exporting MXF files with Final Cut Pro X. While the system already supported import of MXF files from video cameras, this update extends the format support to a broader range of files and workflows.

In addition the native MXF support, there is also an option to export AVC-Intra MXF files.  There are fixes for past issues with automatic library backups. It also fixes a problem where clips Continue reading

Review: Lightworks V.12.0.i NLE from Editshare

By Brady Betzel

There are more NLE choices for editors these days than ever before: Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple Final Cut Pro, Autodesk Smoke, Blackmagic Resolve 11, Sony Vegas… and Lightworks. Remember that one? It has (quietly) been around for as long as Media Composer, and thanks to Editshare it has been given a new life.

Lightworks has been around and in use by some for approximately 25 years! For me it’s been that elusive NLE that I’ve occasionally heard about but have never used and have never seen any other editors use (although it’s the tool of choice for Martin Scorsese’s editor Thelma Schoonmaker), so when asked to review it my interest was piqued.

Recently, Lightworks (@ESLightworks) has been doing a free public beta test for its forthcoming Continue reading

Cool Tool: The AATranslator

We recently reached out to sound engineer/head of production Cory Choy, who helps run Silver Sound Studios (www.silversound.us) in NYC, and asked him about gear he uses as part of his day-to-day workflow. He was happy to share his experience with a lesser-known tool by an Australian-based company, called AATranslator.

Continue reading