Tag Archives: Nice Shoes Creative

Director Vincent Lin discusses colorful Seagram’s Escapes spot

By Randi Altman

Valiant Pictures, a New York-based production house, recently produced a commercial spot featuring The Bachelor/Bachelorette host Chris Harrison promoting Seagram’s Escapes and its line of alcohol-based fruit drinks. A new addition to the product line is Tropical Rosé, which was co-developed by Harrison and contains natural passion fruit, dragon fruit and rosé flavors.

Valiant’s Vincent Lin directed the piece, which features Harrison in a tropical-looking room — brightened with sunny pinks and yellows thanks to NYC’s Nice Shoes — describing the rosé and signing off with the Seagram’s Escapes brand slogan, “Keep it colorful!”

Here, director Lin — and his DP Alexander Chinnici — talks about the project’s conception, shoot and post.

How early did you get involved? Did Valiant act as the creative agency on this spot?
Valiant has a long-standing history with the Seagram’s Escapes brand team, and we were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to brainstorm a few ideas with them early on for their launch of Seagram’s Escapes Tropical Rosé with Chris Harrison. The creative concept was developed by Valiant’s in-house creative agency, headed by creative directors Nicole Zizila and Steven Zizila, and me. Seagram’s was very instrumental in the creative for the project, and we collaborated to make sure it felt fresh and new — like an elevated evolution of their “Keep It Colorful” campaign rather than a replacement.

Clearly, it’s meant to have a tropical vibe. Was it shot greenscreen?
We had considered doing this greenscreen, which would open up some interesting options, but also it would pose some challenges. What was important for this campaign creatively was to seamlessly take Chris Harrison to the magical world of Seagram’s Escapes Tropical Rosé. A practical approach was chosen so it didn’t feel too “out of this world,” and the live action still felt real and relatable. We had considered putting Chris in a tropical location — either in greenscreen or on location — but we really wanted to play to Chris’ personality and strengths and have him lead us to this world, rather than throw him into it. Plus, they didn’t sign off on letting us film in the Maldives. I tried (smiles).

L-R: Vincent Lin and Alex Chinnici

What was the spot shot on?
Working with the very talented DP Alex Chinnici, he recommended shooting on the ARRI Alexa for many reasons. I’ll let Alex answer this one.

Alex Chinnici: Some DPs would likely answer with something sexier  like, “I love the look!” But that is ignoring a lot of the technical realities available to us these days. A lot of these cameras are wonderful. I can manipulate the look, so I choose a camera based on other reasons. Without an on-set live, color-capable DIT, I had to rely on the default LUT seen on set and through post. The Alexa’s default LUT is my preference among the digital cameras. For lighting and everyone on the set, we start in a wonderful place right off the bat. Post houses also know it so well, along with colorists and VFX. Knowing our limitations and expecting not to be entirely involved, I prefer giving these departments the best image/file possible.

Inherently, the color, highlight retention and skin tone are wonderful right off the bat without having to bend over backward for anyone. With the Alexa, you end up being much closer to the end rather than having to jump through hoops to get there like you would with some other cameras. Lastly, the reliability is key. With the little time that we had, and a celebrity talent, I would never put a production through the risk of some new tech. Being in a studio, we had full control but still, I’d rather start in a place of success and only make it better from there.

What about the lenses?
Chinnici: I chose the Zeiss Master Primes for similar reasons. While sharp, they are not overbearing. With some mild filtration and very soft and controlled lighting, I can adjust that in other ways. Plus, I know that post will beautify anything that needs it; giving them a clean, sharp image (especially considering the seltzer can) is key.

I shot at a deeper stop to ensure that the lenses are even cleaner and sharper, although the Master Primes do hold up very well wide open. I also wanted the Seagram’s can to be in focus as much as possible and for us to be able to see the set behind Chris Harrison, as opposed to a very shallow depth of field. I also wanted to ensure little to no flares, solid contrast, sharpness across the field and no surprises.

Thanks Alex. Back to you Vincent. How did you work with Alex to get the right look?
There was a lot of back and forth between Alex and me, and we pulled references to discuss. Ultimately, we knew the two most important things were to highlight Chris Harrison and the product. We also knew we wanted the spot to feel like a progression from the brand’s previous work. We decided the best way to do this was to introduce some dimensionality by giving the set depth with lighting, while keeping a clean, polished and sophisticated aesthetic. We also introduced a bit of camera movement to further pull the audience in and to compose the shots it in a way that all the focus would be on Chris Harrison to bring us into that vibrant CG world.

How did you work with Nice Shoes colorist Chris Ryan to make sure the look stayed on point? 
Nice Shoes is always one of our preferred partners, and Chris Ryan was perfect for the job. Our creatives, Nicole and Steven, had worked with him a number of times. As with all jobs, there are certain challenges and limitations, and we knew we had to work fast. Chris is not only detail oriented, creative and a wizard with color correction, but also able to work efficiently.

He worked on a FilmLight Baselight system off the Alexa raw files. The color grading really brought out the saturation to further reinforce the brand’s slogan, “Keep It Colorful,” but also to manage the highlights and whites so it felt inviting and bright throughout, but not at all sterile.

What about the VFX? Can you talk about how that was accomplished? 
Much like the camera work, we wanted to continue giving dimensionality to the spot by having depth in each of our CG shots. Not only depth in space but also in movement and choreography. We wanted the CG world to feel full of life and vibrant in order to highlight key elements of the beverage — the flavors, dragonfruit and passionfruit — and give it a sense of motion that draws you in while making you believe there’s a world outside of it. We wanted the hero to shine in the center and the animation to play out as if a kaleidoscope or tornado was pulling you in closer and closer.

We sought the help of creative production studio Taylor James tto build the CG elements. We chose to work with a core of 3ds Max artists who could do a range of tasks using Autodesk 3ds Max and Chaos Group’s V-Ray (we also use Maya and Arnold). We used Foundry Nuke to composite all of the shots and integrate the CGI into the footage. The 3D asset creation, animation and lighting were constructed and rendered in Autodesk Maya, with compositing done in Adobe After Effects.

One of the biggest challenges was making sure the live action felt connected to the CG world, but with each still having its own personality. There is a modern and clean feel to these spots that we wanted to uphold while still making it feel fun and playful with colors and movement. There were definitely a few earlier versions that we went a bit crazy with and had to scale down a bit.

Does a lot of your work feature live action and visual effects combined?
I think of VFX like any film technique: It’s simply a tool for directors and creatives to use. The most essential thing is to understand the brand, if it’s a commercial, and to understand the story you are trying to tell. I’ve been fortunate to do a number of spots that involve live-action and VFX now, but truth be told, VFX almost always sneaks its way in these days.

Even if I do a practical effect, there are limitless possibilities in post production and VFX. Anything from simple cleanup to enhancing, compositing, set building and extending — it’s all possible. It’d be foolish not to consider it as a viable tool. Now, that’s not to say you should rely solely on VFX to fix problems, but if there’s a way it can improve your work, definitely use it. For this particular project, obviously, the CG was crucial to let us really be immersed in a magical world at the level of realism and proximity we desired.

Anything challenging about this spot that you’d like to share?
Chris Harrison was terrible to work with and refused to wear a shirt for some reason … I’m just kidding! Chris was one of the most professional, humblest and kindest celebrity talents that I’ve had the pleasure to work with. This wasn’t a simple endorsement for him; he actually did work closely with Seagram’s Escapes over several months to create and flavor-test the Tropical Rosé beverage.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Colorist Chat: Nice Shoes’ Maria Carretero on Super Bowl ads, more

This New York-based colorist, who worked on four Super Bowl spots this year, talks workflow, inspiration and more.

Name: Maria Carretero

Company: Nice Shoes

What kind of services does Nice Shoes offer?
Nice Shoes is a creative studio with color, editorial, animation, VFX, AR and VR services. It’s a full-service studio with offices in NYC, Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis and Toronto, as well as remote locations throughout North America.

Michelob Ultra’s Jimmy Works It Out

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think people are surprised when they discover that there is a visual language in every single visual story that connects your emotions through all the imagery that we’ve collected in our brains. This work gives us the ability to nudge the audience emotionally over the course of a piece. Color grading is rooted in a very artistic base — core, emotional aspects that have been studied in art and color theory that make you explore cinematography in such an interesting way.

What system do you work on?
We use FilmLight Baselight as our primary system, but the team is also versed in Blackmagic Resolve.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Sometimes. If you have a solid relationship with the DP or the director, they end up consulting you about palettes, optics and references, so you become an active part of the creativity in the film, which is very cool. I love when I can get involved in projects from the beginning.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
My favorite moment is when you land on the final look and you see that the whole film is making visual sense and you feel that the story, the look and the client are all aligned — that’s magic!

Any least favorites?
No, I love coloring. Sometimes the situation becomes difficult because there are technical issues or disagreements, but it’s part of the work to push through those moments and make things work

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would probably be a visual artist… always struggling to keep the lights on. I’m kidding! I have so much respect for visual artists, I think they should be treated better by our society because without art there is no progress.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I was a visual artist for seven years. I was part of Nives Fernandez’s roster, and all that I wanted at that time was to try to tell my stories as an artist. I was freelancing in VFX to get some money that helped me survive, and I landed on the VFX side, and from there to color was a very easy switch. When I landed in Deluxe Spain 16 years ago and started to explore color, I quickly fell in love.

It’s why I like to say that color chose me.

Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network

You recently worked on a number of Super Bowl spots. Can you talk a bit about your work on them, and any challenges relating to deadlines?
This year I worked on four Super Bowl spots Michelob Ultra PureGold: 6 for 6 Pack, Michelob Ultra: Jimmy Works It Out, Walmart: United Towns and Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network.

Working on these kinds of projects is definitely a really interesting experience. The deadlines are tight, the pressure is enormous, but at the same time, the amount of talent and creativity involved is gigantic, so if you survive (laughs) you always will be a better professional. As a colorist I love to be challenged. I love dealing with difficult situations where all your resources and your energy is being put to the test.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
Thousands! Technical understanding, artistic involvement, there are so many… But definitely trying to create something new, special, different; embracing the challenges and pushing beyond the boundaries are the keys to delivering good work.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
I like working with both. Debating with any kind of artist is the best. It’s really great to be surrounded by someone that uses a common “language.” As I mentioned earlier, I love when there’s the opportunity to get the conversation going at the beginning of a project so that there’s more opportunity for collaboration, debate and creativity.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look? Photos, films, etc.?
Every single bit of information is useful. I love when they verbalize what they’re going for using stories, feelings — when you can really feel they’re expressing personality with the film.

Where do you find inspiration? Art? Photography?
I find inspiration in living! There are so many things that surround us that can be a source of inspiration. Art, landscapes, the light that you remember from your childhood, a painting, watching someone that grabs your attention on a train. New York is teeming with more than enough life and creativity to keep any artist going.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
The Tracker, Spotify and FaceTime.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
I have a sense of humor and lots of red wine (smiles).

Nice Shoes Creative Studio animates limited-edition Twizzlers packages

Twizzlers and agency Anomaly recently selected 16 artists to design a fun series of limited edition packages for the classic candy. Each depicts various ways people enjoy Twizzlers. New York’s Nice Shoes Creative Studio, led by creative director Matt Greenwood, came on board to introduce these packages with an animated 15-second spot.

Three of the limited edition packages are featured in the fast-paced spot, bringing to life the scenarios of car DJing, “ugly crying” at the movies, and studying in the library, before ending on a shot that incorporates all of the 16 packages. Each pack has its own style, characters, and color scheme, unique to the original artists, and Nice Shoes was careful to work to preserve this as they crafted the spot.

“We were really inspired by the illustrations,” explains Greenwood. “We stayed close to the original style and brought them into a 3D space. There’s only a few seconds to register each package, so the challenge was to bring all the different styles and colors together within this time span. Select characters and objects carry over from one scene into the next, acting as transitional elements. The Twizzlers logo stays on-screen throughout, acting as a constant amongst the choreographed craziness.”

The Nice Shoes team used a balance of 3D and 2D animation, creating a CG pack while executing the characters on the packs with hand-drawn animation. Greenwood proposed taking advantage of the rich backgrounds that the artists had drawn, animating tiny background elements in addition to the main characters in order to “make each pack feel more alive.”

The main Twizzlers pack was modeled, lit, animated and rendered in Autodesk Maya which was composited in Adobe After Effects together with the supporting elements. These consisted of 2D hand-drawn animations created in Photoshop and 3D animated elements made with Mason Cinema 4D.

“Once we had the timing, size and placement of the main pack locked, I looked at which shapes would make sense to bring into a 3D space,” says Greenwood. “For example, the pink ribbons and cars from the ‘DJ’ illustration worked well as 3D objects, and we had time to add touches of detail within these elements.”

The characters on the packs themselves were animated with After Effects and applied as textures within the pack artwork. “The flying books and bookcases were rendered with Sketch and Toon in Cinema 4D, and I like to take advantage of that software’s dynamics simulation system when I want a natural feel to objects falling onto surfaces. The shapes in the end mnemonic are also rendered with Sketch and Toon and they provide a ‘wipe’ to get us to the end lock-up,” says Greenwood.

The final step during the production was to add a few frame-by-frame 2D animations (the splashes or car exhaust trail, for example) but Nice Shoes Creative Studio waited until everything was signed off before they added these final details.

“The nature of the illustrations allowed me to try a few different approaches and as long as everything was rendered flat or had minimal shading, I could combine different 2D and 3D techniques,” he concludes.

Project Arachnid short targets online images of child sexual abuse

Early this year, the Canadian Centre for Child Protection (CCCP) launched Project Arachnid, a new tool that detects and helps remove images of child sexual abuse on the Internet. The centre, which operates in partnership with police forces across Canada, recently posed questions to 128 adults who had been sexually exploited as children and whose abuse had been recorded on camera. Almost three-quarters of respondents said they were worried about being recognized years later, because the images continue to spread online.

To bring to life how Project Arachnid helps victims break the endless cycle of abuse, the organization enlisted agency No Fixed Address and Nice Shoes Creative Studio to craft a brief, but powerful animated short film that features a B&W hand-drawn look.

“It was very important to us to find a way to reflect the gravity of the matter, but not make people look away. We didn’t want the problem to seem insurmountable,” says Shawn James, creative director at No Fixed Address.

Nice Shoes creative directors Gary Thomas and Matt Greenwood, along with design director Stefan Woronko, developed style frames, taking the piece into an illustrative, textured direction inspired by Manga, graphic novels and the work of Frank Miller and Edward Gorey.

As the teams explored the concept, they quickly found they were on the same page, and worked closely to animate the dramatic and powerful story. “We felt the narrative should drive the visuals and presented a solution where only simple animation was needed to emphasize the story,” says Thomas, adding that they were brought in almost from the beginning. “We had reference from the creative team, but we really came back with the look and feel, and worked closely with the team to refine elements.”

Nice Shoes used Adobe Photoshop for all the illustrations in order to get a handmade quality. Everything was assembled in Adobe After Effects. “We composited the scenes and gave it a paper-like, distressed texture,” says Thomas. “We used Maxon Cinema 4D to do the spiders and globe sequences. We had a great character animator, Rob Findlay, come in for a few days and add the animated touches to the characters.”

In terms of challenges, Thomas says the only major one was a quick turnaround of three weeks. “The piece was tied to a big media launch for the CCCP, so we had a firm deadline to work with. It wasn’t really onerous, because we were careful at the outset to do as much as we could at the beginning to make sure the creatives at No Fixed Address were part of the process, and they in turn were able to keep their clients at CCCP in the loop.”

NAB Day 1: badges, bearings and lighting

By Adrian Winter

I landed in Vegas just past noon, and arrived without incident at the Flamingo, America’s premier bird-themed Hotel and Casino. After a smooth check-in, I made my way over to the Las Vegas Convention Center for a look around before my first session of the week.

Not many people have arrived for the show yet, or if they have, they are not hanging around the convention center. This actually made it somewhat difficult to get my bearings, as there Continue reading

Blog: My three goals for NAB 2015

This VFX supervisor shares his NAB game plan.

By Adrian Winter

It has been about four or five years since I was at an NAB Show, so I am very much looking forward to this year’s trip. In the past, my plan has been to fly out for just a day or two, walk the floor and then take a redeye home. This year I will be there for almost the entire week, and have plans to take in as many demos and seminars as I manage to squeeze in.

I have three areas of focus for the convention:

The Big players
Adobe, Autodesk, The Foundry and FilmLight always have a big presence at NAB, and I’ll be checking in with them to see what they have in the pipeline. I also plan to swing by a few of my other favorite exhibitor booths to see if I come across any gems. Continue reading