Tag Archives: music videos

Behind the Title: Film Editor Edward Line

By Randi Altman

This British editor got his start at Final Cut in London, honing his craft and developing his voice before joining Cartel in Santa Monica.

NAME: Edward Line

COMPANY: Cartel

WHAT KIND OF COMPANY IS CARTEL?
Cartel is an editorial and post company based in Santa Monica. We predominantly service the advertising industry but also accommodate long-form projects and other creative content. I joined Cartel as one of the founding editors in 2015.

CAN YOU GIVE US SOME MORE DETAIL ABOUT YOUR JOB?
I assemble the raw material from a film shoot into a sequence that tells the story and communicates the idea of a script. Sometimes I am involved before the shoot and cut together storyboard frames to help the director decide what to shoot. Occasionally, I’ll edit on location if there is a technical element that requires immediate approval for the shoot to move forward.

Edward Line working on Media Composer

During the edit, I work closely with the directors and creative teams to realize their vision of the script or concept and bring their ideas to life. In addition to picture editing, I incorporate sound design, music, visual effects and graphics into the edit. It’s a collaboration between many departments and an opportunity to validate existing ideas and try new ones.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THE FILM EDITOR TITLE?
A big part of my job involves collaborating with others, working with notes and dealing with tricky situations in the cutting room. Part of being a good editor is having the ability to manage people and ideas while not compromising the integrity and craft of the edit. It’s a skill that I’m constantly refining.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love being instrumental in bringing creative visions together and seeing them realized on screen, while being able to express my individual style and craft.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Tight deadlines. Filming with digital formats has allowed productions to shoot more and specify more deliverables. However, providing the editor proportional time to process everything is not always a consideration and can add pressure to the process.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I am a morning person so I tend to be most productive when I have fresh eyes. I’ve often executed a scene in the first few hours of a day and then spent the rest of the day (and night) fine-tuning it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I have always had a profound appreciation for design and architecture, and in an alternate universe, I could see myself working in that world.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I’ve always had ambitions to work in filmmaking and initially worked in TV production after I graduated college. After a few years, I became curious about working in post and found an entry-level job at the renowned editorial company Final Cut in London. I was inspired by the work Final Cut was doing, and although I’d never edited before, I was determined to give editing a chance.

CoverGirl

I spent my weekends and evenings at the office, teaching myself how to edit on Avid Media Composer and learning editing techniques with found footage and music. It was during this experimental process, that I fell in love with editing and I never looked back.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In the past year I have edited commercials for CoverGirl, Sephora, Bulgari, Carl’s Jr. and Smartcar. I have also cut a short film called Dad Was, which will be submitted to festivals in 2020.

HOW HAVE YOU DEVELOPED NEW SKILLS WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE OR FORMAT?
Cutting music videos allowed me to hone my skills to edit musical performance while telling visual stories efficiently. I learned how to create rhythm and pace through editing and how to engage an audience when there is no obvious narrative. The format provided me with a fertile place to develop my individual editing style and perfect my storytelling skills.

When I started editing commercials, I learned to be more disciplined in visual storytelling, as most commercials are rarely longer than 60 seconds. I learned how to identify nuances in performance and the importance of story beats, specifically when editing comedy. I’ve also worked on numerous films with VFX, animation and puppetry. These films have allowed me to learn about the potential for these visual elements while gaining an understanding of the workflow and process.

More recently, I have been enjoying cutting dialogue in short films. Unlike commercials, this format allows more time for story and character to develop. So when choosing performances, I am more conscious of the emotional signals they send to the audience and overarching narrative themes.

Sephora

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s tough to narrow this down to one project…

Recently, I worked on a commercial for the beauty retailer Sephora that promoted its commitment to diversity and inclusivity. The film Identify As We is a celebration of the non-binary community and features a predominantly transgender cast. The film champions ideas of being different and self expression while challenging traditional perceptions of beauty. I worked tirelessly with the director and creative team to make sure we treated the cast and footage with respect while honoring the message of the campaign.

I’m also particularly proud of a short film that I edited called Wale. The film was selected for over 30 film festivals across the globe and won several awards. The culmination of the film’s success was receiving a BAFTA nomination and being shortlisted for the 91st Academy Awards for Best Live Action Short Film.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I work on Avid Media Composer, but I have recently started to flirt with Adobe Premiere. I think it’s good to be adaptable, and I’d hate to restrict my ability to work on a project because of software.

Wale

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? IF SO, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU ASKED TO DO?
Yes, I usually incorporate other elements such as sound design, music and visual effects into my edits as they can be instrumental to the storytelling or communication of an idea. It’s often useful for the creative team and other film departments to see how these elements contribute to the final film, and they can sometimes inform decisions in the edit.

For example, sound can play a major part in accenting a moment or providing a transition to another scene, so I often spend time placing sound effects and sourcing music during the edit process. This helps me visualize the scene in a broader context and provides new perspective if I’ve become overfamiliar with the footage.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
No surprises, but my smartphone! Apart from the obvious functions, it’s a great place to review edits and source music when I’m on the move. I’ve also recently purchased a Bluetooth keyboard and Wacom tablet, which make for a tidy work area.

I’m also enjoying using my “smart thermostat” at home which learns my behavior and seems to know when I’m feeling too hot or cold.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Once I have left the edit bay, I decompress by listening to music on the way home. Once home, I take great pleasure from cooking for myself, friends and family.

Nomad adds editor Jojo King to its New York roster

Editorial house Nomad has expanded its New York roster with the addition of editor Jojo King. King brings a diverse resume and has cut music videos for Janelle Monae’s new single Pynk and Moses Sumney’s Worth It, as well as films and spots for Vogue, Tommy Hilfiger, Adidas Originals, Marc Jacobs and Victoria’s Secret.

He recently edited a music video for indie star Lykke Li (directed by Iconoclast’s Anton Tammi) and wrapped jobs with Droga5 and Johannes Leonardo. Adobe Premiere is his editing tool of choice.

“Jojo coming on was perfect timing,” explains Nomad executive producer/partner Jennifer Lederman. “When we expanded Nomad New York, we were determined to make it a place that focuses on the creativity of our team. We just celebrated our one-year anniversary in our new space, and we’ve grown our VFX and support staff a lot in the past year, so it was the ideal time to add on a new editor. We got so lucky that Jojo found us, as he brings a new style to our offerings. He combines this intense artistry with the narrative arc, which leads to his cuts being fun and surprising. He brings that artistic sensibility into our office every day, and his reel is something I love to show.”

Nomad also has offices in Santa Monica and London.

Ross Cooper joins Golden’s roster of directors

LA’s Golden, which is made up of live-action directors and a collective of designers and visual effects artists, has added director Ross Cooper to its roster. Formerly known as OneInThree, Cooper’s resume is chock full of commercial and music video work.

Cooper studied graphic design at Central Saint Martins in London, but his interest in original visual ideas evolved while pursuing a Master’s degree from London’s Royal College of Art. After winning two Silver D&ADs in interaction design and architecture for the live video installation The Last Clock, Cooper began shooting videos for bands like Two Door Cinema Club, Wild Beasts and The Teenagers. He went on to receive a number of nominations as an up-and-coming filmmaker at the Music Video Awards, including Best New Director, Best Art Direction and Best Budget Video.

Cooper stepped into the commercial world with a recreation of his VV Brown video for the song “Leave!” made for French bank BNP Paribas. The spot featured a rotating cardboard box that revealed a different stylized diorama with every spin. Since that time, Cooper has continued to hone his in-camera perspective to visual effects and trompe l’oeil, crafting ads for brands including Ford, O2, Trident and Betway.

Quick Chat: Wildchild editor Richard Cooperman

By Randi Altman

As a young man, Wildchild editor Richard Cooperman loved watching movies, so much so that he decided to study film at Toronto’s Ryerson University, where he focused on direction and shot composition. It wasn’t until he was interning at a post house, which housed a music video company, that he became fascinated with the creative process of editing. “Watching directors edit… I was amazed how selecting a shot, its length and placement could evoke so many different emotions,” explains Cooperman.

He called editing his first project “a joyous, rewarding experience” and from that moment on he knew he had found his calling. “I would go on to edit hundreds of music videos and collaborate with major artists. That same sense of style, design, rhythm and experimentation would carry me over into the commercial world.”

Cooperman cut this spot for Thierry Mugler.

Cooperman is known for his distinctive storytelling style, whether it’s high-end fashion and beauty work, music videos or car commercials. We decided to throw some questions at Cooperman to find out more.

How has editing changed since you started in the business?
As far as technology, I’ve seen it go from tape to Avid to Final Cut and now to Premiere. I think the biggest change for editors is the increasing amount of footage we look through since production companies started shooting digital over film. What was once five to seven hours of dailies can now be 10 to 30 hours. That, coupled with tighter deadlines, has made the selecting process more challenging.

You have a diverse resume, working in music videos, fashion and car spots. Can you talk about how you approach each? Do you have a favorite type of project to work on?
My first step is always about organization. Watching and selecting, while not the sexiest part of the process, might be the most important. It’s like the painter, assembling all the colors on the palette. Even though I do work in different genres, I don’t tend to categorize the music videos/commercials I work on as fashion/beauty or automotive, but find a commonality between them — a visual/audio assault on the senses.

Lexus

Lexus

Two great examples of this can be found in spots for the Lexus IS brand (via Team One) that I had the pleasure of working on. The launch video Changing Lanes, directed by Melina Matsoukas (AICE winner for Best Editing), sees the IS as powerful, raw and sexy. Images of the car intercut with rapid, multilayered fashion/art/music video imagery are combined with aggressive title design and intense sound design. In Crowd, directed by Jonas Åkerlund, we see the IS car elegantly romanced in a succession of edits that seductively brings together the young hero lovers. Each edit is designed to intensely separate them from the crowd as they bask in a glowing light of beauty and luxury.

One of the many benefits of working in music videos was the opportunity to collaborate with so many visionary and talented music video directors that crossed over into commercials, bringing their unique styles and sensibilities. Such was the case with the ethereal Thierry Mugler Alien perfume ad, directed by Floria Sigismondi. This one depicts the awakening of a sun goddess.

Dove

Fashion and beauty sensibility can be applied to many brands, as in my recent collaboration with director Karina Taira on the latest campaign for Dove Chocolates out of BBDO. Shot on location in Chile, Taira captured stunning landscape visuals coupled with beautiful photography of a woman enjoying the most sensual chocolate experience.

How early do you like to get involved in the project?
I like to get involved as early on in the creative process as possible to hear everyone’s thoughts and ideas. This way I can start thinking about a mood and how music and sound design will shape the piece.

What’s your ideal collaboration with a director/client?
The ideal is to have a strong collaborative relationship with the director. To build a shorthand and to forge a trusting relationship. It’s been the basis of most of my creative projects.

What is your editing system of choice? Do you work on different systems?
I started on Avid, but I am always looking for ways to enhance the process, so I learned Final Cut, which proved to have many helpful tools for my style of editing. Recently, I started editing on Adobe Premiere, which is quite similar to Final Cut.

Favorite plug-ins?
My favorite tool is not a plug-in, but the composite mode, which can be found in Final Cut Pro and Premiere. It lets you quickly see different composites of the same shot without any rendering or keying. I use it a lot to create multi-layered graphical imagery.

Do you have any tips/advice for some young editors starting out in the business?
Being from Canada, I always say be polite! (Laughs). In all seriousness, stay true to your style and point of view. It is the reason they are choosing to work with you. Develop your own voice and constantly strive to push and learn new techniques. Watch a lot of films. Classic films. You will find they craft scenes in unexpected ways. It still inspires me. Always strive for excellence!

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You can check out Cooperman’s reel here.

Director/CD Chris Dooley enrolls at Brand New School

Chris Dooley has joined Brand New School as director/creative director. He joins this bi-coastal integrated production company from National TV, a design and animation studio he co-founded. Prior to that, he helped launch the US division of the UK production company Not To Scale.

Dooley has directed campaigns for Coca-Cola, Nike, Volvo, British Airways and Amex. His recent projects include an animated and interactive film for Martini announcing its partnership with Formula 1, the launch video introducing the Virgin Hotels brand and UnitedHealthcare’s “Health in Numbers” campaign.

Outside the advertising space, Dooley has directed music videos, including Naturally and A Year Without Rain for Selena Gomez, Neon Lights for Demi Lovato and Land of a Thousand Words for the Scissor Sisters.

He has lectured at the AIGA Y16 Conference, AIGA Move 3 Conference, 3×3 lecture series, served on the D&AD jury and taught Advanced Typography at Art Center College of Design.

So you want to be a music video director?

By Alex Topaller

So you want to be a music video director? That’s a terrible idea. No, really. Don’t do it.

Stop right now and choose something else while you can, before we find ourselves discussing this very moment in two years when I can pompously say, “See! I was right! Now you understand that it’s more of a complicated love affair than a career!”

Are you still here, dear reader?

You are? Huge mistake, but oh well. Since I can’t change your mind, I can at least fulfill my civic duty by arming you with a few pointers before sending you into the reverberating tunnels of Continue reading

/Wildchild/ adds editor Julia Knight

New York — /Wildchild/ continues its 2014 expansion with the signing of editor Julia Knight, who works in commercials, music videos and fashion film. She was most recently at Cut + Run, but has spent time at Trim Editing, Speade Editing, Swordfish Editing and The Mill.

Knight has cut for well-known brands including BMW, Nike, Ford, Lancome, L’Oreal, and promos for the BBC. She has also edited music videos for Coldplay, John Legend, James Black, Beyoncé and Paul McCartney, including the Queenie Eye video shot at Abbey Road Studios.

Her recent commercial work includes spots for Toyota, Guinness, and MOD/Army. She has collaborated with directors such as Jake Nava, Wiz, Arno Salters, Tim Pope, and Simon Aboud. Knight has also handled numerous fashion films, editing work for Armani, Rick Owens and Issey Miyake.

“Julia is that rare talent who can tell a story in any genre,” explains /Wildchild/ (ww.wildchildpost.com) founder Yvette Piñeyro. “She brings a fantastic versatility to our roster making her invaluable as we continue to grow into new markets.”

 

This week’s #PostChat: ‘Working with Relatives’ featuring The Diamond Brothers

By Randi Altman

As anyone who has attended a family Thanksgiving can attest, spending time with relatives can be challenging, but it can also be wonderful. No one knows you better, no one trusts you more.

Navigating the ups and downs that come with working closely with someone, especially a Continue reading

/Wildchild/ boosts edit staff

New York — /Wildchild/ has added editors Richard Mettler and Stewart Shevin to its team.

Mettler edits commercials, music videos, and motion pictures, having most recently completed the music video for Beyoncé’s single, Mine, featuring Drake and directed by Pierre Debusschere. He has also worked with directors Laurent Chanez, Sean Ellis, Tim Richardson, Joe Wright, Sean Thonson, Steve Ayson, Pierluca De Carlo and Anthony Atanasio. Other recent projects include spot work for Cartier, Nike, Mercedes, Cadillac, L’oreal, Maybelline, Volkswagen, Lenscrafters and MasterCard. He has also edited Sundance the 2013 World Cinema Audience Award-winner and BAFTA-nominated motion picture Metro Manila, as well as the short films Brace and Tribeca Film Festival nominee Space Cadet.

Shevin joins /Wildchild/ (www.wildchildpost.com) after a recent stint at Beast Editorial. Over the years he has edited projects for Toyota, Philips, Ford, Chevy, Navy and Discover Card, to name a few. He is an AICE (Association of Independent Creative Editors) and AICP (Association of Independent Commercial Producers) award winner, most recently for his work on King Condoms Protect Yourself and Stopthetraffick.org Hide and Seek.

Outside of his editorial work, Shevin directed the Of Note spec for The New York Times. Shevin has been board member and Chapter President of the AICE for eight years.