Tag Archives: MPSE

EIPMA: Focusing on industry mentoring

By Barry Goch

As an instructor, I try to bridge the gap between the technology of yesterday, today and tomorrow. So much of what I do as an industry pro depends on knowing and respecting the past while keeping an eye on the future. I see a digital divide as I guide my students into the world of contemporary post production. For example, it helps them to know the origins of terms like bin, trim and splice.

So when I had the opportunity to learn more about the Entertainment Industry Professionals Mentoring Alliance (EIPMA), I was intrigued. It’s an organization that wants to pay it forward by providing mentors to students and educational institutions. I’m proud to say that I am one of the first beneficiaries. When I was looking for a guest speaker for my UCLA post production class, EIPMA came through in a heartbeat.

I’m happy this organization exists and I want to spread the word to other educators, institutions and facilities. Let’s find out more from EIPMA president Bernard Weiser, who is also VP of the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE).

Bernard Weiser

What inspired you to start the Entertainment Industry Professionals Mentoring Alliance?
The beginning idea for EIPMA started with the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE). The MPSE is a craft society for sound editors and I am vice president. Its main purpose is to bring attention to the craft of sound editing and what sound editors do — both technically and creatively.

A longtime board member and treasurer of the MPSE, Paul Rodriguez, passed away about a year and half ago. We very much looked upon him as a sound ambassador — he went to many events, including NAB, each year, speaking about sound editorial. (You can see him chatting with us and sharing his wisdom during NAB 2017) The MPSE wanted to honor him and came up with the idea of a mentoring program in his name, since he had given so many editors their start in our industry. MPSE President Tom McCarthy began talking about it, and a lot of other organizations started to hear about the idea and said, “You know, we’ve been trying to put a mentorship program together. We’d like to be involved in this.”

How long did it take to get it going?
Literally, in two or three days, this had grown far bigger than the MPSE, far bigger than anything that was imagined. After a month or two of discussion about this, and given my background as an instructor at the UCLA Film School, I was voted president of what is now called EIPMA. In addition to the MPSE, we have many industry organizations involved as members — American Cinema Editors (ACE), Audio Engineering Society, Cinema Audio Society (CAS), Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE), The Recording Academy (Grammy’s), SMPTE and SoundGirls.org (a group of women that does field reporting). All are founding members with more industry organizations poised to come aboard.

It sounds like you have a lot of momentum already for a brand-new organization, and there’s definitely a need for it. There’s definitely a lack of hand-off from the old-school ways to the new-school ways.
We realized that many top industry and veteran professionals have a feeling of wanting to give back. But also, what all of us would see are changes in the industry that create a gap. New people coming in are basically fresh out of school or from some other background, and there’s no real apprenticeship program anymore. So they come in and start working and they really don’t have a background for professional workflows, protocols, and just the way that industry professional life works. Professors and educators see the need for this as well, and that is the core of what we are doing as an organization, to be a conduit between those two points.

How do you envision the rollout of mentoring programs?
We start out with Q&As, setting up a panel especially for high schools that will show the different crafts that are out there. Around the high school level, you have a lot of kids that might be talented and looking toward the craft of storytelling through videos and such, but they just don’t know all of the different fields that are out there. They know there’s writing and there’s directing, but they really don’t know the depths of the different crafts. A Q&A can start to show that, and they can ask professionals how they got started and learn a more detailed perspective of those crafts.

Then, we move to the college level, where these are people who probably are majoring in cinema studies, film studies, television or broadcast, and they have more of a commitment toward what’s going on. So we will do Q&As in the different crafts for them too, but start to proceed a little bit further — and that’s where group mentoring can happen. Also, we can send individual professionals in as a guest lecturers to help cross that divide within the classroom. We look upon it as an aid to the educators, and the way we see this working, in fact, is having educators invite us in so we can help support education from a “real-world” perspective.

Then the third part is graduate and post-graduate students, or what we call “pre-industry individuals,” such as people coming out of the military, which I am very familiar with. One of my first jobs was doing films for the military for three years. There’s great talent in the military. They come out and have no idea where to go or how to pursue a career in entertainment; I really feel we have a role to fill in that area as well. In this third category, we’d start with many of the events I mentioned earlier, but also include one-on-one mentoring, helping people with their own projects, getting them seen, helping them with areas of filmmaking that could be their strength to help them keep going. That’s where job fairs and new contacts leading them toward internships and a much higher level of advice can come into play.

We also want to offer shadowing possibilities for late-college-level, close-to-graduation, college-level and the graduate students. They could come for a couple of days and follow someone skilled in a craft to see what goes on during the day.

L-R, front: At Notre Dame High School are EIPMA board members MPSE/music editor Steven A. Saltzman, MPSE/sound supervisor Christopher B. Reeves, ACE/picture editor Molly Shock and Sound Girls/mastering engineer Jett Galindo.

I have my own experience with the organization. Having Mark Lanza, MPSE, from EIPMA as a guest speaker in my UCLA Extension post production class was magical.
Yeah, by the way, Mark, who is also on the EIPMA board, is one of our first mentors/lecturers. It’s a perfect example. In fact, on May 3, we had a Q&A at Notre Dame High School in the San Fernando Valley, with panelists representing picture editing, sound design/editing, music editing and live field recording.

How is the EIPMA addressing the diversity issue in the industry?
EIPMA recognizes that diversity is an important step in fixing serious issues that have existed for so long in our business. When one sees what diversity has to offer the entertainment industry creatively, I for one fall in love with filmmaking all over again. I see it directly in the students at UCLA who come from around the world, bringing their different cultures, varying social, economic and ethnic backgrounds all into their stories and into their films. And, at the end of the day, this is what it’s all about — storytelling. Diversity opens a huge door to a wide world of fresh stories and with it, the next generation of incredibly talented filmmakers

Where are you in terms of rolling this out, and how can the readers of postPerspective connect with the organization?
What we’re doing this summer is building our database. We have our website, which is EIPMA.org. We invite educators, potential mentors, volunteers, interested businesses, students and individuals interested in the program to come and register their information, and especially their emails, so we can contact them as the program goes forward. In late September, we will have an introductory event at Sony Picture Studios in Culver City. Sound Girls is putting together an event that will happen in a few weeks as well.

Bernard Weiser mingling with educators and Avid folks during Avid’s Learning Program reception during NAB.

Tell us about the connection with Avid.
Avid is the only manufacturer involved with us as a member organization and has representatives on our board. At NAB, during Avid Connect weekend, there was a meet and greet with educators from around the world. I gave a talk about what we’re doing. Avid CEO Jeff Rosica fell in love with what we were doing. The next day I met with Avid executives from back east, and we had 100% of their support.

Avid talks about its connection with education. It’s not just making sales. They really want to support the educators and help develop the next generation of filmmakers. They know what that means business-wise but also, they’re also very supportive in doing the right thing. We are thrilled by Avid’s support and commitment.

Main Image: Mark Lanza, MPSE, is on the EIPMA board talking to Barry Goch’s UCLA Extension class.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya

CAS and MPSE honor audio post pros and their work

By Mel Lambert

With a BAFTA win and high promise for the upcoming Oscar Awards, the sound team behind Bohemian Rhapsody secured a clean sweep at both the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) ceremonies here in Los Angeles last weekend.

Paul Massey

The 55th CAS Awards also honored sound mixer Lee Orloff with a Cinema Audio Society Career Achievement Award, while director Steven Spielberg received its Cinema Audio Society Filmmaker Award. And at the MPSE Awards, director Antoine Fuqua accepted the 2019 Filmmaker Award, while supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick secured the MPSE Career Achievement honor.

Re-recording mixer Paul Massey — accepting the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture-Live Action on behalf of his fellow dubbing mixers Tim Cavagin and Niv Adiri, together with production mixer John Casali — thanked Bohemian Rhapsody’s co-executive producer and band members Roger Taylor and Brian May for “trusting me to mix the music of Queen.”

The film topped a nominee field that also included A Quiet Place, A Star is Born, Black Panther and First Man; for several years the CAS winner in the feature-film category also has secured an Oscar Award for sound mixing.

Isle of Dogs secured a CAS Award in the animation category, which also included Incredibles 2, Ralph Breaks the Internet, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and The Grinch. The sound-mixing team included original dialogue mixer Darrin Moore and re-recording mixers Christopher Scarabosio and Wayne Lemmer, together with scoring mixers Xavier Forcioli and Simon Rhodes and Foley mixer Peter Persaud.

Free Solo won a documentary award for production mixer Jim Hurst, re-recording mixers Tom Fleischman and Ric Schnupp, together with scoring mixer Tyson Lozensky, ADR mixer David Boulton and Foley mixer Joana Niza Braga.

Finally, American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace (Part 1) The Man Who Would Be Vogue, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Vote For Kennedy, Vote For Kennedy and Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown (Bhutan) won CAS Awards within various broadcast sound categories.

Steven Spielberg and Bradley Cooper

The CAS Filmmaker Award was presented to Steven Spielberg by fellow director Bradley Cooper. This followed tributes from regular members of Spielberg’s sound team, including production sound mixer Ron Judkins plus re-recording mixers Andy Nelson and Gary Rydstrom, who quipped: “We spent so much money on Jurassic Park that [Steven] had to shoot Schindler’s List in black & white!”

“Through your talent, [sound editors and mixers] allow the audience to see with their ears,” Spielberg acknowledged, while stressing the full sonic and visual impact of a theatrical experience. “There’s nothing like a big, dark theater,” he stated. He added that he still believes that movie theaters are the best environment in which to fully enjoy his cinematic creations.

Upon receiving his Career Achievement Award from sound mixer Chris Noyes and director Dean Parisot, production sound mixer Lee Orloff acknowledged the close collaboration that needs to exist between members of the filmmaking team. “It is so much more powerful than the strongest wall you could build,” he stated, recalling a 35-year career that spans nearly 80 films.

Lee Orloff

Outgoing CAS president Mark Ulano presented the President’s Award to leading Foley mixer MaryJo Lang, while the CAS Student Award went to Anna Wozniewicz of Chapman University. Finalists included Maria Cecilia Ayalde Angel of Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Allison Ng of USC, Bo Pang of Chapman University and Kaylee Yacono of Savannah College of Art and Design.

Finally, the CAS Outstanding Product Awards went to Dan Dugan Sound Design for its Dugan Automixing in the Sound Devices 633 Compact Mixer, and to Izotope for its RX7 Audio Repair Software.

The CAS Awards ceremony was hosted by comedian Michael Kosta.

 

Motion Picture Sound Editors Awards

During the 66th Annual Golden Reels, outstanding achievement in sound editing awards were presented in 23 categories, encompassing feature films, long- and short-form television, animation, documentaries, games, special venue and other media.

The Americans, Atlanta, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Westworld figured prominently within the honored TV series.

Following introductions by re-recording mixer Steve Pederson and supervising sound editor Mandell Winter, director/producer Michael Mann presented the 2019 MPSE Filmmaker Award to Antoine Fuqua, while Academy Award-winning supervising sound editor Ben Wilkins presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to fellow supervising sound editor Stephen H. Flick, who also serves as professor of cinematic arts at the University of Southern California.

Antoine Fuqua

“We celebrate the creation of entertainment content that people will enjoy for generations to come,” MPSE president Tom McCarthy stated in his opening address. “As new formats appear and new ways to distribute content are developed, we need to continue to excel at our craft and provide exceptional soundtracks that heighten the audience experience.”

As Pederson stressed during his introduction to the MPSE Filmmaker Award, Fuqua “counts on sound to complete his vision [as a filmmaker].” “His films are stylish and visceral,” added Winter, who along with Pederson has worked on a dozen films for the director during the past two decades.

“He is a director who trusts his own vision,” Mandell confirmed. “Antoine loves a layered soundtrack. And ADR has to be authentic and true to his artistic intentions. He is a bone fide storyteller.”

Four-time Oscar-nominee Mann stated that the honored director “always elevates everything he touches; he uses sound design and music to its fullest extent. [He is] a director who always pushes the limits, while evolving his art.”

Pre-recorded tributes to Fuqua came from actor Chis Pratt, who starred in The Magnificent Seven (2017). “Nobody deserves [this award] more,” he stated. Actor Mark Wahlberg, who starred in Shooter (2007), and producer Jerry Bruckheimer were also featured.

Stephen Hunter Flick

During his 40-year career in the motion picture industry, while working on some 150 films, Steven H. Flick has garnered two Oscar Award wins for Speed (1994) and Robocop (1987) together with nominations for Total Recall (1990), Die Hard (1988) and Poltergeist (1982).

The award for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Animation Short Form went to Overwatch – Reunion from Blizzard Entertainment, headed by supervising sound editor Paul Menichini. The Non-Theatrical Animation Long Form award was awarded to NextGen from Netflix, headed by supervising sound editors David Acord and Steve Slanec.

The Feature Animation award went to the Oscar-nominated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse from Sony Pictures Entertainment/Marvel, headed by supervising sound editors Geoffrey Rubay and Curt Schulkey. The Non-Theatrical Documentary award went to Searching for Sound — Islandman and Veyasin from Karga Seven Pictures/Red Bull TV, headed by supervising sound editor Suat Ayas. Finally, the Feature Documentary was a tie between Free Solo from National Geographic Documentary Films, headed by supervising sound editor Deborah Wallach, and They Shall Not Grow Old from Wingnut Films/Fathom Events/Warner Bros., headed by supervising sound editors Martin Kwok, Brent Burge, Melanie Graham and Justin Webster.

The Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing — Music Score award also went to Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, with music editors Katie Greathouse and Catherine Wilson, while the Musical award went to Bohemian Rhapsody from GK Films/Fox Studios, with supervising music editor John Warhurst and music editor Neil Stemp. The Dialogue/ADR award also went to Bohemian Rhapsody, with supervising ADR/dialogue editors Nina Hartston and Jens Petersen, while the Effects/Foley award went to A Quiet Place from Paramount Pictures, with supervising sound editors Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl.

The Student Film/Verna Fields Award went to Facing It from National Film and Television School, with supervising sound designer/editor Adam Woodhams.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Report: Sound for Film & TV conference focuses on collaboration

By Mel Lambert

The 5th annual Sound for Film & TV conference was once again held at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, in cooperation with Motion Picture Sound Editors and Cinema Audio Society and Mix Magazine. The one-day event featured a keynote address from veteran sound designer Scott Gershin, together with a broad cross section of panel discussions on virtually all aspects of contemporary sound and post production. Co-sponsors included Audionamix, Sound Particles, Tonsturm, Avid, Yamaha-Steinberg, iZotope, Meyer Sound, Dolby Labs, RSPE, Formosa Group and Westlake Audio, and attracted some 650 attendees.

With film credits that include Pacific Rim and The Book of Life, keynote speaker Gershin focused on advances in immersive sound and virtual reality experiences. Having recently joined Sound Lab at Keywords Studios, the sound designer and supervisor emphasized that “a single sound can set a scene,” ranging from a subtle footstep to an echo-laden yell of terror. “I like to use audio to create a foreign landscape, and produce immersive experiences,” he says, stressing that “dialog forms the center of attention, with music that shapes a scene emotionally and sound effects that glue the viewer into the scene.” In summary he concluded, “It is our role to develop a credible world with sound.”

The Sound of Streaming Content — The Cloverfield Paradox
Avid-sponsored panels within the Cary Grant Theater included an overview of OTT techniques titled “The Sound of Streaming Content,” which was moderated by Ozzie Sutherland, a production sound technology specialist with Netflix. Focusing on sound design and re-recording of the recent Netflix/Paramount Pictures sci-fi film mystery The Cloverfield Paradox from director Julius Onah, the panel included supervising sound editor/re-recording mixer Will Files, co-supervising sound editor/sound designer Robert Stambler and supervising dialog editor/re-recording mixer Lindsey Alvarez. Files and Stambler have collaborated on several projects with director J. J. Abrams through Abram’s Bad Robot production company, including Star Trek: Into Darkness (2013), Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) and 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016), as well as Venom (2018).

The Sound of Streaming Content panel: (L-R) Ozzie Sutherland, Will Files, Robert Stambler and Lindsey Alvarez

“Our biggest challenge,” Files readily acknowledges, “was the small crew we had on the project; initially, it was just Robby [Stambler] and me for six months. Then Star Wars: The Force Awakens came along, and we got busy!” “Yes,” confirmed Stambler, “we spent between 16 and 18 months on post production for The Cloverfield Paradox, which gave us plenty of time to think about sound; it was an enlightening experience, since everything happens off-screen.” While orbiting a planet on the brink of war, the film, starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw, David Oyelowo and Daniel Brühl, follows a team of scientists trying to solve an energy crisis that culminates in a dark alternate reality.

Having screened a pivotal scene from the film in which the spaceship’s crew discovers the effects of interdimensional travel while hearing strange sounds in a corridor, Alvarez explained how the complex dialog elements came into play, “That ‘Woman in The Wall’ scene involved a lot of Mandarin-language lines, 50% of which were re-written to modify the story lines and then added in ADR.” “We also used deep, layered sounds,” Stambler said, “to emphasize the screams,” produced by an astronaut from another dimension that had become fused with the ship’s hull. Continued Stambler, “We wanted to emphasize the mystery as the crew removes a cover panel: What is behind the wall? Is there really a woman behind the wall?” “We also designed happy parts of the ship and angry parts,” Files added. “Dependent on where we were on the ship, we emphasized that dominant flavor.”

Files explained that the theatrical mix for The Cloverfield Paradox in Dolby Atmos immersive surround took place at producer Abrams’ Bad Robot screening theater, with a temporary Avid S6 M40 console. Files also mixed the first Atmos film, Brave, back in 2013. “J. J. [Abrams] was busy at the time,” Files said, “but wanted to be around and involved,” as the soundtrack took shape. “We also had a sound-editorial suite close by,” Stambler noted. “We used several Futz elements from the Mission Control scenes as Atmos Objects,” added Alvarez.

“But then we received a request from Netflix for a near-field Atmos mix,” that could be used for over-the-top streaming, recalled Files. “So we lowered the overall speaker levels, and monitored on smaller speakers to ensure that we could hear the dialog elements clearly. Our Atmos balance also translated seamlessly to 5.1- and 7.1-channel delivery formats.”

“I like mixing in Native Atmos because you can make final decisions with creative talent in the room,” Files concluded. “You then know that everything will work in 5.1 and 7.1. If you upmix to Atmos from 7.1, for example, the creatives have often left by the time you get to the Atmos mix.”

The Sound and Music of Director Damien Chazelle’s First Man
The series of “Composers Lounge” presentations held in the Anthony Quinn Theater, sponsored by SoundWorks Collection and moderated by Glenn Kiser from The Dolby Institute, included “The Sound and Music of First Man” with sound designer/supervising sound editor/SFX re-recording mixer Ai-Ling Lee, supervising sound editor Mildred latrou Morgan, SFX re-recording mixer Frank Montaño, dialog/music re-recording mixer Jon Taylor, composer Justin Hurwitz and picture editor Tom Cross. First Man takes a close look at the life of the astronaut Neil Armstrong, and the space mission that led him to become the first man to walk on the Moon in July 1969. It stars Ryan Gosling, Claire Foy and Jason Clarke.

Having worked with the film’s director, Damien Chazelle, on two previous outings — La La Land (2016) and Whiplash (2014) — Cross advised that he likes to have sound available on his Avid workstation as soon as possible. “I had some rough music for the big action scenes,” he said, “together with effects recordings from Ai-Ling [Lee].” The latter included some of the SpaceX rockets, plus recordings of space suits and other NASA artifacts. “This gave me a sound bed for my first cut,” the picture editor continued. “I sent that temp track to Ai-Ling for her sound design and SFX, and to Milly [latrou Morgan] for dialog editorial.”

A key theme for the film was its documentary style, Taylor recalled, “That guided the shape of the soundtrack and the dialog pre-dubs. They had a cutting room next to the Hitchcock Theater [at Universal Studios, used for pre-dub mixes and finals] so that we could monitor progress.” There were no Temp Mixes on this project.

“We had a lot of close-up scenes to support Damien’s emotional feel, and used sound to build out the film,” Cross noted. “Damien watched a lot of NASA footage shot on 16 mm film, and wanted to make our film [immersive] and personal, using Neil Armstrong as a popular icon. In essence, we were telling the story as if we had taken a 16 mm camera into a capsule and shot the astronauts into space. And with an Atmos soundtrack!”

“We pre-scored the soundtrack against animatics in March 2017,” commented Hurwitz. “Damien [Chazelle] wanted to storyboard to music and use that as a basis for the first cut. I developed some themes on a piano and then full orchestral mock-ups for picture editorial. We then re-scored the film after we had a locked picture.” “We developed a grounded, gritty feel to support the documentary style that was not too polished,” Lee continued. “For the scenes on Earth we went for real-sounding backgrounds, Foley and effects. We also narrowed the mix field to complement the narrow image but, in contrast, opened it up for the set pieces to surround the audience.”

“The dialog had to sound how the film looked,” Morgan stressed. “To create that real-world environment I often used the mix channel for dialog in busy scenes like mission control, instead of the [individual] lavalier mics with their cleaner output. We also miked everybody in Mission Control – maybe 24 tracks in all.” “And we secured as many authentic sound recordings as we could,” Lee added. “In order to emphasize the emotional feel of being inside Neil Armstrong’s head space, we added surreal and surprising sounds like an elephant roar, lion growl or animal stampede to these cockpit sequences. We also used distortion and over-modulation to add ‘grit’ and realism.”

“It was a Native Atmos mix,” advised Montaño. “We used Atmos to reflect what the picture showed us, but not in a gimmicky way.” “During the rocket launch scenes,” Lee offered, “we also used the Atmos full-range surround channels to place many of the full-bodied, bombastic rocket roars and explosions around the audience.” “But we wanted to honor the documentary style,” Taylor added, “by keeping the music within the front LCR loudspeakers, and not coming too far out into the surrounds.”

“A Star Is Born” panel: (L-R) Steve Morrow, Dean Zupancic and Nick Baxter

The Sound of Director Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born
A subsequent panel discussion in the “Composers Lounge” series, again moderated by Kiser, focused on “The Sound of A Star Is Born,” with production sound mixer Steve Morrow, music production mixer Nick Baxter and re-recording mixer Dean Zupancic. The film is a retelling of the classic tale of a musician – Jackson Maine, played by Cooper – who helps a struggling singer find fame, even as age and alcoholism send his own career into a downward spiral. Morrow re-counted that the director’s costar, Lady Gaga, insisted that all vocals be recorded live.

“We arranged to record scenes during concerts at the Stagecoach 2017 Festival,” the production mixer explained. “But because these were new songs that would not be heard in the film until 18 months later, [to prevent unauthorized bootlegs] we had to keep the sound out of the PA system, and feed a pre-recorded band mix to on-stage wedges or in-ear monitors.” “We had just a handful of minutes before Willie Nelson was scheduled to take the stage,” Baxter added, “and so we had to work quickly” in front of an audience of 45,000 fans. “We rolled on the equipment, hooked up the microphones, connected the monitors and went for it!”

To recreate the sound of real-world concerts, Baxter made impulse-response recordings of each venue – in stereo as well as 5.1- and 7.1- channel formats. “To make the soundtrack sound totally live,” Morrow continued, “at Coachella Festival we also captured the IR sound echoing off nearby mountains.” Other scenes were shot during Lady Gaga’s “Joanne” Tour in August 2017 while on a stop in Los Angeles, and others in the Palm Springs Convention Center, where Cooper’s character is seen performing at a pharmaceutical convention.

“For scenes filmed at the Glastonbury Festival in the UK in front of 110,000 people,” Morrow recalled, “we had been allocated just 10 minutes to record parts for two original songs — ‘Maybe It’s Time’ and ‘Black Eyes’ — ahead of Kris Kristofferson’s set. But then we were told that, because the concert was running late, we only had three minutes. So we focused on securing 30 seconds of guitar and vocals for each song.”

During a scene shot in a parking lot outside a food market where Lady Gaga’s character sings acapella, Morrow advised that he had four microphones on the actors: “Two booms, top and bottom, for Bradley Cooper’s voice, and lavalier mikes; we used the boom track when Lady Gaga (as Ally) belted out. I always had my hand on the gain knob! That was a key scene because it established for the audience that Ally can sing.”

Zupancic noted that first-time director Cooper was intimately involved in all aspects of post production, just as he was in production. “Bradley Cooper is a student of film,” he said. “He worked closely with supervising sound editor Alan Robert Murray on the music and SFX collaboration.” The high-energy Atmos soundtrack was realized at Warner Bros Studio Facilities’ post production facility in Burbank; additional re-recording mixers included Michael Minkler, Matthew Iadarola and Jason King, who also handled SFX editing.

An Avid session called “Monitoring and Control Solutions for Post Production with Immersive Audio” featured the company’s senior product specialist, Jeff Komar, explaining how Pro Tools with an S6 Controller and an MTRX interface can manage complex immersive audio projects, while a MIX Panel entitled “Mixing Dialog: The Audio Pipeline,” moderated by Karol Urban from Cinema Audio Society, brought together re-recording mixers Gary Bourgeois and Mathew Waters with production mixer Phil Palmer and sound supervisor Andrew DeCristofaro. “The Business of Immersive,” moderated by Gadget Hopkins, EVP with Westlake Pro, addressed immersive audio technologies, including Dolby Atmos, DTS and Auro 3D; other key topics included outfitting a post facility, new distribution paradigms and ROI while future-proofing a stage.

A companion “Parade of Carts & Bags,” presented by Cinema Audio Society in the Barbra Streisand Scoring Stage, enabled production sound mixers to show off their highly customized methods of managing the tools of their trade, from large soundstage productions to reality TV and documentaries.

Finally, within the Atmos-equipped William Holden Theater, the regular “Sound Reel Showcase,” sponsored by Formosa Group, presented eight-minute reels from films likely to be in consideration for a Best Sound Oscar, MPSE Golden Reel and CAS Awards, including A Quiet Place (Paramount) introduced by Erik Aadahl, Black Panther introduced by Steve Boeddecker, Deadpool 2 introduced by Martyn Zub, Mile 22 introduced by Dror Mohar, Venom introduced by Will Files, Goosebumps 2 introduced by Sean McCormack, Operation Finale introduced by Scott Hecker, and Jane introduced by Josh Johnson.

Main image: The Sound of First Man panel — Ai-Ling Lee (left), Mildred latrou Morgan & Tom Cross.

All photos copyright of Mel Lambert


Mel Lambert has been involved with production industries on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

 

MPSE to present John Paul Fasal with Career Achievement Award

The Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) will present sound designer and sound recordist John Paul Fasal with its 2018 MPSE Career Achievement Award. A 30-year veteran of the sound industry, Fasal has contributed to more than 150 motion pictures and is best known for his work in field recording.

Among his many credits are Top Gun, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Interstellar, The Dark Knight, American Sniper and this year’s Dunkirk. Fasal will receive his award at the MPSE Golden Reel Awards ceremony, February 18, 2018 in Los Angeles.

“John is a master of his craft, an innovator who has pioneered many new recording techniques, and a restless, creative spirit who will stop at nothing to capture the next great sound,” says MPSE president Tom McCarthy.

The MPSE Career Achievement Award recognizes “sound artists who have distinguished themselves by meritorious works as both an individual and fellow contributor to the art of sound for feature film, television and gaming and for setting an example of excellence for others to follow.”

Fasal joins a distinguished list of sound innovators, including 2017 Career Achievement recipient Harry Cohen, Richard King, John Roesch, Skip Lievsay, Randy Thom, Larry Singer, Walter Murch and George Watters II.

“Sound artists typically work behind the scenes, out of the limelight, and so to be recognized in this way by my peers is humbling,” says Fasal. “It is an honor to join the past recipients of this award, many of whom are both colleagues and friends.”

Fasal began his career as a musician and songwriter, but gravitated toward post production sound in the 1980s. Among his first big successes was Top Gun for which he recorded and designed many of the memorable jet aircraft sound effects. He has been a member of the sound teams on several films that have won Academy Awards in sound categories, including Inception, The Dark Knight, Letters From Iwo Jima, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, The Hunt for Red October and Pearl Harbor.

Fasal has worked as a sound designer and recordist throughout his career, but in recent years has increasingly focused on field recording. He enjoys especially high regard for his ability to capture the sounds of planes, ships, automobiles and military weaponry. “The equipment has changed dramatically over the course of my career, but the philosophy behind the craft remains the same,” he says. “It still involves the layering of sounds to create a sonic picture and help tell the story.”

 

CAS and MPSE bestow craft honors to audio pros, filmmakers

By Mel Lambert

While the Academy Awards spotlight films released during the past year, members of the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) focus on both film and TV productions.

The 53rd CAS Awards — held at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel on February 18, and hosted once again by comedian Elayne Boosler — celebrated the lifetime contributions of production mixer John Pritchett with the CAS Career Achievement Award for his multiple film credits. The award was presented by re-recording mixer Scott Millan, CAS, and actor/producer Jack Black, with a special video tribute from actor/director/producer Tom Hanks. Quoting seasoned sound designer Walter Murch, Millan shared, “Dialog is the backbone of a film.”

“Sound mixing is like plastic surgery,” Black advised. “You only notice it when it’s done badly.”

Actor/director Jon Favreau received the CAS Filmmaker Award from actor/writer Seth McFarlane, film composer John Debney and CAS president Mark Ulano. Clips from the directors’ key offerings, including The Jungle Book, Chef, Cowboys & Aliens, Iron Man and Iron Man 2, were followed by pre-recorded congratulations from Stan Lee and Ed Asner. “Production and post production are invisible arts,” said Favreau. “Because if you do it right, it’s invisible. If you want to look good on the set you need to understand sound.”

Presenters Robert Forster and Melissa Hoffman flanking winners of the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture for La La Land.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Live Action went to the team behind La La Land: production mixer Steven Morrow, CAS; re-recording mixers Andy Nelson, CAS, and Ai-Ling Lee, scoring mixer Nicholai Baxter, ADR mixer David Betancourt and Foley mixer James Ashwill. “It was a blast to work with Andy Nelson and the Fox Sound Department,” said Lee. The film’s director, Damien Chazelle, also was on hand to support his award-winning crew. Other nominees included Doctor Strange, Hacksaw Ridge, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story and Sully.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Animated went to Finding Dory and original dialogue mixer Doc Kane, CAS, re-recording mixers Nathan Nance and Michael Semanick, CAS, scoring mixer Thomas Vicari, CAS, and Foley mixer Scott Curtis. “I’ve got the best job in the world,” Kane offered, “recording all these talented people.”

 

Kevin O’Connell and Angela Sarafyan flanking Dennis Hamlin and Peter Horner, winners of the CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Documentary.

During a humorous exchange with his co-presenter Angela Sarafyan, an actress who starred in HBO’s Westworld series, re-recording mixer Kevin O’Connell, CAS, was asked why the 21-time Oscar-nominee had not — as yet — received an Academy Award. Pausing briefly to collect his thoughts, O’Connell replied that he thought the reasons were three-fold. “First, because I do not work at Skywalker Sound,” he said, referring to Disney Studios’ post facility in Northern California, which has hosted a number of nominated sound projects. “Secondly, I do not work on musicals,” he continued, referring to the high number of Oscar and similar nominations this year for La La Land. “And third, because I do not sit next to Andy Nelson,” an affectionate reference to the popular re-recording engineer’s multiple Oscar wins and current nomination for La La Land. (For O’Connell it seems the 21st time is the charm. He walked away from this year’s Oscar with a statuette for his work on Hacksaw Ridge.)

O’Connell and Sarafyan then presented the first-ever CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Motion Picture — Documentary to the team that worked on The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and The Silk Road Ensemble: production mixers Dimitri Tisseyre and Dennis Hamlin, plus re-recording mixer Peter Horner.

The CAS Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing Television Movie or Miniseries went to The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story and production mixer John Bauman, re-recording mixers Joe Earle, CAS, and Doug Andham, CAS, ADR mixer Judah Getz and Foley mixer John Guentner. The award for Television Series — 1-Hour went to Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards and production mixers Ronan Hill, CAS, and Richard Dyer, CAS, re-recording mixers Onnalee Blank, CAS, and Mathew Waters, CAS, and Foley mixer Brett Voss, CAS. “Game of Thrones was a great piece of art to work on,” said Blank.

L-R:Game of Thrones: Battle of the Bastards team — Onnalee Blank, Brett Voss, and Matthew Waters, with Karol Urban and Clyde Kusatsu.

The award for Television Series — 1/2-Hour went to Modern Family: The Storm and production mixer Stephen A. Tibbo, CAS, and re-recording mixers Dean Okrand, CAS, and Brian R. Harman, CAS. The award for Television Non-Fiction, Variety or Music Series or Specials went to Grease Live! and production mixer J. Mark King, music mixer Biff Dawes, playback and SFX mixer Eric Johnston and Pro Tools playback music mixer Pablo Munguía.

The CAS Student Recognition Award went to Wenrui “Sam” Fan from Chapman University. Outstanding Product Awards went to Cedar Audio for its DNS2 Dynamic Noise Suppression Unit and McDSP for its SA-2 dialog processor.

Other presenters included Nancy Cartwright (The Simpsons), Robert Forster (Jackie Brown), Janina Gavankar (Sleepy Hollow), Clyde Kusatsu (SAG/AFTRA VP and Madame Secretary), Rhea Seehorn (Better Call Saul) and Nondumiso Tembe (Six).

MPSE
Held on February 19 at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, opening remarks for the 64th MPSE Golden Reel Awards came from MPSE president Tom McCarthy. “Digital technology is creating new workflows for our sound artists. We need to take the initiative and drive technology, and not let technology drive us,” he said, citing recent and upcoming MPSE Sound Advice confabs. “The horizons for sound are expanding, particularly virtual reality. Immersive formats from Dolby, Auro, DTS and IMAX are enriching the cinematic experience.”

Scott Gershin, MPSE Filmmaker Award recipient Guillermo Del Toro and Tom McCarthy.

The annual MPSE Filmmaker Award was presented to writer/director Guillermo del Toro by supervising sound editor/sound designer Scott Gershin, who has worked with him for the past 15 years on such films as Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008) and Pacific Rim (2013). “Sound editing is an opportunity in storytelling,” the director offered. “There is always a balance we need to strike between sound effects and music. It’s a delicate tango. Sound design and editing is a curatorial position. I always take that partnership seriously in my films.”

Referring to recent presidential decisions to erect border walls and tighten immigration controls, del Torro was candid in his position. “I’m a Mexican,” he stated. “Giving me this award [means] that the barriers people are trying to erect between us are false,” he stressed, to substantial audience applause.

Supervising sound editor/sound designer Wiley Stateman and producer Shannon McIntosh presented the MPSE Career Achievement Award to supervising sound editor/sound designer Harry Cohen, who has worked on more than 150 films, including many directed by Quentin Tarantino, who made a surprise appearance to introduce the award recipient. “I aspired to be a performing musician,” Cohen acknowledged, “and was 31 when I became an editor. Sound design is a craft. You refine the director’s creativity through your own lens.” He also emphasized the mentoring process within the sound community, “which leads to a free flow of information.”

The remaining Golden Reel Awards comprised several dozen categories encompassing feature films, long- and short-form TV, animation, documentaries and other media.

The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Music Score award went to Warcraft: The Beginning and music editors Michael Bauer and Peter Myles. The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Music, Musical Feature award went to La La Land music editor Jason Ruder.

The Hacksaw Ridge team included (L-R) Michelle Perrone, Kimberly Harris, Justine Angus, Jed Dodge, Robert Mackenzie Liam Price and Tara Webb.

The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — Dialog/ADR award went to director Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge and supervising sound editor Andy Wright, supervising ADR editors Justine Angus and Kimberly Harris, dialog editor Jed Dodge and ADR editor Michele Perrone. The Best Sound Editing In Feature Film — FX/Foley Award also went to Hacksaw Ridge and supervising sound editors Robert Mackenzie, Foley editor Steve Burgess and Alex Francis, plus sound effects editors Liam Price, Tara Webb and Steve Burgess.

The MPSE Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Animation Award went to Albert  supervising sound editor Jeff Shiffman, MPSE, dialogue editors Michael Petak and Anna Adams, Foley editor Tess Fournier, music editor Brad Breeck plus SFX editors Jessey Drake, MPSE, Tess Fournier and Jeff Shiffman, MPSE. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Documentary Short-Form award to Sonic Sea and supervising sound editor Trevor Gates, dialog editor Ryan Briley and SFX editors Ron Aston and Christopher Bonis. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Television Documentary Long-Form award went to My Beautiful Broken Brain supervising sound editor Nick Ryan, dialog editor Claire Ellis and SFX editor Tom Foster. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Animation — Feature Film award went to Moana supervising sound editor Tim Nielsen, supervising dialog editor Jacob Riehle, Foley editors Thom Brennan and Matthew Harrison, music editors Earl Ghaffari and Dan Pinder, plus SFX editors Jonathan Borland, Pascal Garneau and Lee Gilmore. The Best Sound & Music Editing: Documentaries — Feature Film award to The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and The Silk Road Ensemble and supervising sound editor Pete Horner, sound designer Al Nelson and SFX editor Andre Zweers.

The Verna Fields Award in Sound Editing in Student Films was a tie, with $1,500 checks being awarded to Fishwitch, directed by Adrienne Dowling from the National Film and Television School, and Icarus by supervising sound editor/sound designer Zoltan Juhasz from Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Chapman University.

The MPSE Best Sound & Music Editing: Special Venue award went to supervising sound editor/sound designer Jamey Scott for his work on director Patrick Osborne’s Pearl, a panoramic virtual reality presentation — and which has also been nominated in the Oscars Best Animated Short Category. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Music Score award went to music editor David Klotz for his work on Stranger Things, Chapter Three: Holly Jolly. “The show’s composers — Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein — were an inspiration to work with,” said Klotz, “as was the sound team at Technicolor.” The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Music, Musical award was another tie between music editor Jason Tregoe Newman and Bryant J. Fuhrmann for Mozart in the Jungle — Now I Will Sing and music editor Jamieson Shaw for The Get Down — Raise Your Words, Not Your Voice.

The winning Westworld team included Thomas E. de Gorter (center), Matthew Sawelson, Geordy Sincavage, Michael Head, Mark R. Allen and Marc Glassman.

The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — Dialog/ADR award went to the team from Penny Dreadful III, including supervising sound editor Jane Tattersall, supervising dialogue editor David McCallum, dialog editor Elma Bello, and ADR editors Dale Sheldrake and Paul Conway. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Short Form — FX/Foley award went to Westworld — Trompe L’Oeil supervising sound editors Thomas E. de Gorter, MPSE, and Matthew Sawelson, MPSE, Foley editors Geordy Sincavage and Michael Head, and sound designers Mark R. Allen, MPSE, and Marc Glassman, MPSE. The same post team won The Best Sound Editing In Television: Long Form — FX/Foley award for Westworld — The Bicameral Mind. The Best Sound Editing In Television: Long Form — Dialog/ADR award went to The Night Of — Part 1 The Beach and supervising sound editor Nicholas Renbeck, and dialog editors Sara Stern, Luciano Vignola and Odin Benitez.

Presenters included actor Erich Riegelmann, actress Julie Parker, Avid director strategic solutions Rich Nevens, SFX editor Liam Price, producer/journalist Geoff Keighley, Formosa Interactive VP of creative services Paul Lipson, CAS president Mark Ulano, actress Andrene Ward-Hammond, supervising sound editors Mark Lanza and Bernard Weiser, picture editor Sabrina Plisco, and Technicolor VP/head of theatrical Sound Jeff Eisner.

MPSE president McCarthy offered that the future for entertainment sound has no boundaries. “It is impossible to predict what new challenges will be presented to practitioners of our craft in the years to come,” he said. “It is up to all of us to meet those challenges with creativity, professionalism and skill. MPSE membership now extends around the world. We are building a global network of sound professionals in order to help artists collaborate and share ideas with their peers.”

A complete list of MPSE Golden Reel Awards can be found on its website.

Main Image (L-R): John Debney, CAS Filmmaker Award recipient Jon Favreau, Seth MacFarlane and Mark Ulano. 

CAS images – Alex J. Berliner/ABImages
MPSE Images – Chris Schmitt Photography


Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Industry pros gather to discuss sound design for film and TV

By Mel Lambert

The third annual Mix Presents Sound for Film and Television conference attracted some 500 production and post pros to Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, California, last week to hear about the art of sound design.

Subtitled “The Merging of Art, Technique and Tools,” the one-day conference kicked off with a keynote address by re-recording mixer Gary Bourgeois, followed by several panel discussions and presentations from Avid, Auro-3D, Steinberg, JBL Professional and Dolby.

L-R: Brett G. Crockett, Tom McCarthy, Gary Bourgeois and Mark Ulano.

During his keynote, Bourgeois advised, “Sound editors and re-recording mixers should be aware of the talent they bring to the project as storytellers. We need to explore the best ways of using technology to be creative and support the production.” He concluded with some more sage advice: “Do not let the geek take over! Instead,” he stressed, “show the passion we have for the final product.”

Other highlights included a “Sound Inspiration Within the Storytelling Process” panel organized by MPSE and moderated by Carolyn Giardina from The Hollywood Reporter. Panelists included Will Files, Mark P. Stoeckinger, Paula Fairfield, Ben L. Cook, Paul Menichini and Harry Cohen. The discussion focused on where sound designers find their inspiration and the paths they take to create unique soundtracks.

CAS hosted a sound-mixing panel titled “Workflow for Musicals in Film and Television Production” that focused on live recording and other techniques to give musical productions a more “organic” sound. Moderated by Glen Trew, the panel included music editor David Klotz, production mixer Phil Palmer, playback specialist Gary Raymond, production mixer Peter Kurland, re-recording mixer Gary Bourgeois and music editor Tim Boot.

Sound Inspiration Within the Storytelling Process panel (L-R): Will Files, Ben L. Cook, Mark P. Stoeckinger, Carolyn Giardina, Harry Cohen, Paula Fairfield and Paul Menichini.

Sponsored by Westlake Pro, a panel called “Building an Immersive Room: Small, Medium and Large” covered basic requirements of system design and setup — including console/DAW integration and monitor placement — to ensure that soundtracks translate to the outside world. Moderated by Westlake Pro’s CTO, Jonathan Deans, the panel was made up of Bill Johnston from Formosa Group, Nathan Oishi from Sony Pictures Studios, Jerry Steckling of JSX, Brett G. Crockett from Dolby Labs, Peter Chaikin from JBL and re-recording mixers Mark Binder and Tom Brewer.

Avid hosted a fascinating panel discussion called “The Sound of Stranger Things,” which focused on the soundtrack for the Netflix original series, with its signature sound design and ‘80s-style, synthesizer-based music score. Moderated by Avid’s Ozzie Sutherland, the panel included sound designer Craig Henighan, SSE Brad North, music editor David Klotz and sound effects editor Jordan Wilby. “We drew our inspiration from such sci-fi films as Alien, The Thing and Predator,” Henighan said. Re-recording mixers Adam Jenkins and Joe Barnett joined the discussion via Skype from the Technicolor Seward stage.

The Barbra Streisand Scoring Stage.

A stand-out event was the Production Sound Pavilion held on the Barbra Streisand Scoring Stage, where leading production sound mixers showed off their sound carts, with manufacturers also demonstrating wireless, microphone and recorder technologies. “It all starts on location, with a voice in a microphone and a clean recording,” offered CAS president Mark Ulano. “But over the past decade production sound has become much more complex, as technologies and workflows evolved both on-set and in post production.”

Sound carts on display included Tom Curley’s Sound Devices 788t recorder and Sound Devices CL9 mixer combination; Michael Martin’s Zaxcom Nomad 12 recorder and Zaxcom Mix-8 mixer; Danny Maurer’s Sound Devices 664 recorder and Sound Devices 633 mixer; Devendra Cleary’s Sound Devices 970, Pix 260i and 664 recorders with Yamaha 01V and Sound Devices CL-12 mixers; Charles Mead’s Sound Devices 688 recorder with CL-12 mixer; James DeVotre’s Sound Devices 688 recorder with CL-12 Alaia mixer; Blas Kisic’s Boom Recorder and Sound Devices 788 with Mackie Onyx 1620 mixer; Fernando Muga’s Sound Devices 788 and 633 recorders with CL-9 mixer; Thomas Cassetta’s Zaxcom Nomad 12 recorder with Zaxcom Oasis mixer; Chris Howland’s Boom Recorder, Sound Devices and 633 recorders, with Mackie Onyx 1620 and Sound Devices CL-12 mixers; Brian Patrick Curley’s Sound Devices 688 and 664 recorders with Sound Devices CL-12 Alaia mixer; Daniel Powell’s Zoom F8 recorder/mixer; and Landon Orsillo’s Sound Devices 688 recorder.

Lon Neumann

CAS also organized an interesting pair of Production Sound Workshops. During the first one, consultant Lon Neumann addressed loudness control with an overview of loudness levels and surround sound management of cinema content for distribution via broadcast television.

The second presentation, hosted by Bob Bronow (production mixer on Deadliest Catch) and Joe Foglia (Marley & Me, Scrubs and From the Earth to the Moon), covered EQ and noise reduction in the field. While it was conceded that, traditionally, any type of signal processing on location is strongly discouraged — such decisions normally being handled in post — the advent of multitrack recording and isolated channels means that it is becoming more common for mixers to use processing on the dailies mix track.

New for this year was a Sound Reel Showcase that featured short samples from award-contending and to-be-released films. The audience in the Dolby Atmos- and Auro 3D-equipped William Holden Theatre was treated to a high-action sequence from Mel Gibson’s new film, Hacksaw Ridge, which is scheduled for release on November 4. It follows the true story of a WWII army medic who served during the harrowing Battle of Okinawa and became the first conscientious objector to be awarded the Medal of Honor. The highly detailed Dolby Atmos soundtrack was created by SSE/sound designer/recording mixer Robert Mackenzie working at Sony Pictures Studios with dialogue editor Jed M. Dodge and ADR supervisor Kimberly Harris, with re-recording mixers Andy Wright and Kevin O’Connell.

Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

All photos by Mel Lambert.

 

Quick Chat: Sony’s Tom McCarthy talks about new MPSE role

By Randi Altman

Tom McCarthy is an Oscar-winning sound supervisor (Bram Stoker’s Dracula) and industry veteran who comes from a line of industry veterans. In addition to his role as EVP of post production facilities at Sony Pictures Studios, he was recently elected president of the MPSE (Motion Picture Sound Editor).

So why did this already busy man take on this additional role? Well, as he explains it, it is a way to give back to an industry he loves and that is in his blood. Let find out more about McCarthy and what he hopes to accomplish as MPSE president.

Why is this new role with MPSE so important to you?
My family has had a wide range of careers in the movie business. I spent my childhood in my father’s picture editorial room. I had an uncle who was a cinematographer and another uncle, Milo Lory, who was a sound effects editor. Milo won an Academy Award for Ben Hur. The movie industry has been a major part of my life and provided me with great memories and an amazing career. It is simply time to give back to an industry and community that I have been so blessed to be a part of.

What do you hope to tackle first?
The Motion Picture Sound Editors has been in existence for 63 years, promoting the art of sound and supporting its membership. It is my hope to expand its membership offering by increasing awareness and by creating new events and seminars to stimulate collaboration and mentoring of new talent. The board is considering the name “Sound Advice” for these events.

They will be hosted at different studios and facilities. I have already reached out to the management at many facilities for their support, and they have been extremely receptive. In addition, I have started to reach out to technology companies to sponsor an event where their hardware and software solutions can be presented and tested on-site by MPSE members, a kind of one-on-one NAB where companies share their tools and answer questions from the membership.

So educating and sharing information?
We are also considering the possibility of opening up a chat room on the MPSE website where members can ask and answer questions about new tools and hardware solutions, better ways to create sound elements or recordings, the ins and outs of gaming sound, and so forth. It would be a support mechanism for our membership. It would also allow students and up-and -coming talent to gain valuable knowledge early on in their careers, creating a stronger talent base for filmmakers and gaming producers. In that regard, it is my hope that sound editors in areas outside theatrical and television entertainment will increase their involvement in MPSE and provide their knowledge and experience to the organization.

Times are changing. So are the distribution methods and digital devices that share entertainment around the world. The MPSE needs to evolve with these changes and our current board is ready to do so. Most importantly, it is time for our community to share our knowledge and collaborate better to nurture new and upcoming talent. It is important for our professional members to mentor our student members.

You are clearly a believer in education and sharing information. Can you talk about how that has helped you in your career?
It doesn’t happen enough. People want to protect themselves and their careers. I hope we can change that. It is one reason that I ran for president. But this goal will not be realized unless our membership becomes more involved in the organization. Everyone must contribute to make big things happen. Our board wants it. Our membership wants it. I believe they have wanted it for a long time. It just needs a push. I strongly encourage our members — new and old — to get involved, to join the board. New ideas and fresh management is needed for the organization to evolve and diversify.

What is something about the MPSE that people might not know about, but should?

The MPSE organization is more than sound editors who work in features and television. It is a professional organization of sound supervisors, designers and editors, who are also re-recording mixers and Foley artists. Our talent supports and creates sound for all multimedia products, including features and television, and for a gaming industry that is increasing in size by leaps and bounds. Its membership is worldwide and offers anybody interested in entertainment sound the resources to expand their careers.


You started in this biz as a hands-on audio pro, do you ever get the itch to do that again?
I have to admit that it was difficult at first to turn my artistic hat in for an executive position. I still throw in my two cents on a soundtrack when asked and, yes, even sometimes when not asked.

I have been in my management role for roughly 22 years and I have enjoyed every minute. I learn something new every day about the business side of entertainment and try to incorporate that knowledge with my creative background. It helps to round out my decision-making and do what is best for filmmakers and the studios as a whole. Having the creative and business background is extremely helpful in running a post facility. I hope to use my creative knowledge and business experience to expand and strengthen the Motion Picture Sound Editors.

NAB 2015: MPSE panel profiles audio post for ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’

By Mel Lambert

“When a soundtrack is loud you can wing it, but for Fifty Shades of Grey everything had to be carefully balanced to match the different environments,” reported sound effects mixer Anna Behlmer who, with Terry Porter overseeing dialog and music, re-recorded the intricate soundtrack for director Sam Taylor-Johnson’s recent film of the best-selling novel by E. L. James.

“The film’s carefully crafted Foley, for example, created the sense of isolation on the 50th floor of the building that Christian Grey [played by Jamie Dornan] owned,” she continued. “My intention was to create an atmosphere for the scene that you cannot tell is there, but that you Continue reading

MPSE 2015 Golden Reel nominations

The Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE) has announced the nominees for the 62nd MPSE Golden Reel Awards. Nominees represent the work of sound artists and their contributions to the past year’s most outstanding feature film, television, animation and computer entertainment productions.

“2014 was a fantastic year for sound,” said MPSE president Frank Morrone. “The advent of new distribution channels, streaming services and gaming platforms is creating additional opportunities for sound artists to practice their craft beyond the traditional venues of film and television. This year’s nominations reflect that change, spanning an amazing diversity of mediums and genres, all executed at the highest level of creativity. We are truly inspired and impressed by the work of our colleagues.”

The MPSE Golden Reel Awards recognize outstanding achievement in sound editing in 20 categories including feature films, television, animation, computer entertainment and student work. The 62nd MPSE Golden Reel Awards will be held February 15 in Los Angeles.

The 62nd MPSE Golden Reel Awards

2015 MPSE FILMMAKER AWARD
Darren Aronofsky

2015 MPSE CAREER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Skip Lievsay

Here are the 2015 MPSE Golden Reel Award Nominees:
FEATURE ANIMATION

BIG HERO 6
Walt Disney Animation Studios
PRODUCED BY: Roy Conli
DIRECTED BY: Don Hall, Chris Williams
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Shannon Mills
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Robert Shoup
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Kim Foscato
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Danielv Laurie
FOLEY ARTISTS: John Roesch, Alyson Dee Moore
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Addison Teague, Nia Hansen, David C. Hughes, Jeremy Bowker
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Dan Pinder
MUSIC EDITORS: Earl Ghaffari
FOLEY EDITOR: Jim Likowski

BOOK OF LIFE
Reel Fx / Fox Animation
PRODUCED BY: Guillermo del Toro, Aron Warner, Brad Booker, Aaron Berger
DIRECTED BY: Jorge R. Gutlerrez
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Scott Martin Gershin
SOUND DESIGNER: Scott Martin Gershin, Steve Robinson
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Margit Pfeiffer
FOLEY ARTISTS:  Dan O’Connell, John Cucci, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS:  Tim Walston, MPSE, Scott Wolf, MPSE, Masanobu ” Tomi” Tomita, Peter Zinda, Charlie Campagna
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS:  Christopher T. Welch, Julie Feiner
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Charles Martin Inouye

THE BOXTROLLS
Laika Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: David Ichioka, Travis Knight
DIRECTED BY: Anthony Stacchi, Graham Annable
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Tom Myers, Ren Klyce
SOUND DESIGNER: Tom Myers, Ren Klyce
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR:  Thom Brennan
FOLEY ARTISTS:  John Roesch, Jana Thorpe
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS:  Dustin Cawood, David Hughes, Benjamin A Burtt
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR:  Marilyn McCoppin
MUSIC EDITOR: Jonathon Stevens
ADR EDITOR: Marilyn McCoppin
FOLEY EDITOR: Jeremy Molod

How to Train Your Dragon 2

How to Train Your Dragon 2

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2
DreamWorks Animation
PRODUCED BY: Bonnie Arnold
DIRECTED BY:  Dean DeBlois
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Randy Thom, Michael Silvers
SOUND DESIGNER: Randy Thom MPSE, Al Nelson
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Brian Chumney
FOLEY ARTISTS: Sean England, Robin Harlan, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS:  Mac Smith, Jeremy Bowker
FOLEY EDITORS: Pascal Garneau, Sue Fox

THE LEGO MOVIE
Warner Bros.
PRODUCED BY: Roy Lee, Dan Lin
DIRECTED BY:  Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Wayne Pashley MPSE, Fabian Sanjurjo
SOUND DESIGNER: Wayne Pashley, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: John Simpson, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Derryn Pasquill
FOLEY ARTIST:  Ryan Squires
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS:  Damian Candusso MPSE, Rick Lisle, Andrew Miller, Emma Mitchell
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Sonal Joshi
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Tim Ryan
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Nigel Christensen, Jared Dwyer, Cameron Frankley, Geoffrey G. Rubay, Jon Michaels

FEATURE DOCUMENTARY

AMERICA – IMAGINE THE WORLD WITHOUT HER
D’Souza Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Gerald R. Molen, Dinesh D’Souza, Michael Curylo, Gray Frederickson
DIRECTED BY:  John Sullivan, Dinesh D’Souza
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: David Barber, MPSE, David Kitchens, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Ben Zarai, Ken Skoglund
SUPERVISING FOLEY / ADR EDITOR: Gonzalo “Bino” Espinoza
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: David Barber, MPSE
FOLEY ARTISTS: Shaun R. Fabos, David Kitchens, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Sean Gray
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: LA Squared Music
SOUND DESIGN:Randy Torres

CITIZENFOUR
Praxis Films
PRODUCED BY: Dirk Wilutzky, Laura Poitras, Mathilde Bonnefoy
DIRECTED BY: Laura Poitras
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Frank Kruse
SOUND DESIGNER: Frank Kruse
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Alexander Buck
FOLEY ARTIST:  Carsten Richter
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS:  Markus Stemler, Helene Seidl
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Alexander Buck
MUSIC EDITORS: Hans Schuhmann

DEEPSEA CHALLENGE 3D
National Geographic Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Brett Popplewell, James Cameron, Andrew Wight
DIRECTED BY:  John Bruno, Ray Quint
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Chris Goodes
SOUND DESIGNER: Steve Burgess
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: George Alamaras
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Andy Wright
FOLEY ARTIST:  Mario Vaccaro
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: James Ashton, Glenn Newnham
MUSIC EDITORS: Jason Fernandez, Peter Hoyland

GLEN CAMPBELL… I’LL BE ME
PCH Films
PRODUCED BY: Trevor Albert, James Keach
DIRECTED BY: James Keach
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Milos Zivkovic
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Elisa Bonora
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Brooke Wentz
MUSIC EDITOR: Alice Wood

JODOROWSKY’S DUNE
The City Film LLC
PRODUCED BY: Frank Pavich
DIRECTED BY:  Frank Pavich
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jesse Flower-Ambroch

UNDER THE ELECTRIC SKY
Haven Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Simon Lamb, Rachel Miller, Pasquale Rotella, Christopher Boyd
DIRECTED BY:  Jane Lipsitz, Dan Cutforth
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Ben Wilkins, MPSE, Craig Mann
SOUND DESIGNER: Ben Wilkins, MPSE
FOLEY ARTISTS: Dawn Lunsford, Alicia Stevenson
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Lauren Hadaway
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Craig Mann
MUSIC EDITOR: Andrew Brohard

WARSAW UPRISING
MUZEUM POWSTANIA WARSZAWSKIEGO
PRODUCED BY: Piotr C. Śliwowski, Jan Ołdakowski
DIRECTED BY:  Jan Komasa, Władysław Pasikowski
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Kacper Habisiak MPSE, Bartosz Putkiewicz
SOUND DESIGNER: Marcin Kasiński MPSE, Dariusz Stanek
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Henryk Zastróżny
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Filip Krzemień
FOLEY ARTISTS: Jacek Wiśniewski, Jacek Pająk
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Aleksandra Pająk, Anna Kufirska, Filip Krzyżykowski
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Tomasz Maciątek
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Agnieszka Putkiewicz
MUSIC EDITORS: Dariusz Podhajski, Anna Malarowska
ADR EDITORS: Stefan Gawłowski, Maciej Wiejaczka, Jarosław Bajdowski, Mariusz Bielecki, Mariusz Andrysik
SOUND EFFECT EDITOR: Michał Kosterkiewicz

FEATURE ENGLISH LANGUAGE -DIALOGUE/ ADR

BIRDMAN
New Regency Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, James W. Skotchdopole
DIRECTED BY: Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Martin Hernandez, MPSE, Aaron Glascock
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Thierry J. Couturier M.P.S.E.
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Michele Perrone
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Michelle Pazer, Glynnna Grimela
ADR EDITOR: Gloria D’Alessandro

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES
Chernin Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Peter Chernin, Dylan Clark
DIRECTED BY: Matt Reeves
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Douglas Murray, Will Files
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Mildred Iatrou Morgan
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Michael Magill, Kim Foscato
ADR EDITORS: Jim Brookshire, Nancy Nugent Title
DIALOGUE EDITOR: Chris Barnett

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
Indian Paintbrush
PRODUCED BY: Wes Anderson, Scott Rudin, Jeremy Dawson
DIRECTED BY: Wes Anderson
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Wayne Lemmer, Christopher Scarabosio

THE IMITATION GAME
Black Bear Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Nora Grossman, Ido Ostrowsky, Teddy Schwarzman
DIRECTED BY: Morten Tyldum
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Lee Walpole

STILL ALICE
Killer Films
PRODUCED BY: Pamela Koffler, James Brown, Lex Lutzus
DIRECTED BY: Wash Westmoreland, Richard Glatzer
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Javier Bennassar
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Javier Bennassar

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING
Working Title
PRODUCED BY: Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Glenn Freemantle
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Gillian Dodders, Paul Wrightson

Unbroken

Unbroken

UNBROKEN
Universal Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Matthew Baer, Angelina Jolie, Clayton Townsend
DIRECTED BY: Angelina Jolie
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Becky Sullivan, MPSE, Andrew DeCristofaro, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Laura Atkinson, Glynna Grimala
ADR EDITOR: Lauren Hadaway

WHIPLASH
Blumhouse Productions
PRODUCED BY: Jason Blum, Jason Reitman, Couper Samuelson, David Lancaster
DIRECTED BY: Damien Chazelle
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Ben Wilkins, Craig Mann
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Joe Schiff, Lauren Hadaway

FEATURE ENGLISH LANGUAGE-EFFECTS/ FOLEY

AMERICAN SNIPER
Warner Brothers
PRODUCED BY: Bruce Berman, Jason Hall, Sheroum Kim, Tim Moore
DIRECTED BY: Clint Eastwood
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Bub Asman, Alan Robert Murray

BIRDMAN
New Regency Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, James W. Skotchdopole
DIRECTED BY: Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Martin Hernandez, MPSE, Aaron Glascock
SOUND DESIGNERS: Aaron Glascock, Peter Brown
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Goeun Lee
FOLEY ARTISTS: Catherine Harper, Jeffrey Wilholt, Gary Marullo
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Roland N. Thai, Jeremy Peirson, Alejandro Quevedo, Albert Gasser
SUPERVISING FOLEY ARTIST:Gary Hecker
FOLEY EDITOR: Joe Dzuban

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER
Marvel Studios
PRODUCED BY: Kevin Feige, Victoria Alonso
DIRECTED BY: Joe Russo, Anthony Russo
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Shannon Mills, Daniel Laurie
SOUND DESIGNER: David Hughes, Al Nelson
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Nia Hansen
FOLEY ARTISTS: Ronni Brown, Sean England
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Josh Gold, Ken Fischer, Jeremy Bowker, JR Grubbs, Richard Hymns, David Acord
FOLEY EDITOR: Dee Selby

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES
Chernin Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Peter Chernin, Dylan Clark
DIRECTED BY: Matt Reeves
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Will Files, Douglas Murray
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: John Murray
FOLEY ARTISTS: Dan O’Connell, Andy Malcolm
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: John Morris, Jack Whittaker, Scott Guitteau, Doug Jackson, Mac Smith,  David Grimaldi,
FOLEY EDITORS: John Murray, Scott Curtis, Thomas Small

FURY
Columbia Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Bill Block, David Ayer, Ethan Smith, John Lesher
DIRECTED BY: David Ayer
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Paul N.J. Ottosson, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Mark Pappas
FOLEY ARTISTS: Gary Hecker, Rick Owens
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Jamie Hardt, MPSE, Lee Gilmore, MPSE, Hamilton Sterling,
Bruce Tanis, MPSE
FOLEY EDITORS: Jonathan Klein, Scott Curtis, MPSE

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
Marvel Studios
PRODUCED BY: Victoria Alonso, Kevin Feige, Louis D’Esposito, Alan Fine
DIRECTED BY: James Gunn
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Matthew Wood, Christopher Boyes
SOUND DESIGNER: Christopher Boyes, David Acord
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Kevin Sellers
FOLEY ARTISTS: Denise Thorpe, Jana Vance
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: David Acord, Kyrsten Mate, David Chrastka
DIALOGUE/ADR EDITORS: Cheryl Nardi, Brad Semenoff
FOLEY EDITORS: Dee Selby, Luke Dunn Gielmuda

INTERSTELLAR
Paramount Pictures; Warner Brothers; Legendary Pictures, Syncopy
PRODUCED BY: Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas, Lynda Obst
DIRECTED BY: Christopher Nolan
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Richard King
SOUND DESIGNER: Richard King
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Christopher Flick
FOLEY ARTISTS: John Roesch, Alyson Dee Moore
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Michael W. Mitchell, Jeff Sawyer, Ken Johnson, Aaron Glascock
FOLEY EDITORS: Michael Dressel, Scott Curtis, MPSE

UNBROKEN
Universal Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Matthew Baer, Angelina Jolie, Clayton Townsend
DIRECTED BY: Angelina Jolie
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Becky Sullivan, MPSE, Andrew DeCristofaro, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Jay Wilkinson, Eric A. Norris, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: David Raines, MPSE
FOLEY ARTISTS: Dan O’Connell, John T. Cucci, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Karen Triest, Dan Hegeman, Nancy MacLeod,
Darren “Sunny” Warkentin, MPSE

FEATURE FOREIGN LANGUAGE -EFFECTS/ FOLEY/ DIALOGUE/ ADR

HUMAN CAPITAL
Indiana Production Company
PRODUCED BY: Marco Cohen, Fabrizio Donvito, Benedetto Habib
DIRECTED BY: Paolo Virzí
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Daniela Bassani
SOUND DESIGNER: Gianni Pallotto
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Paolo Amici, Riccardo Cameracanna, Daniele Quadrioli,
David Quadrioli
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Enzo Mandara
MUSIC EDITOR: Taketo Gohara
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Fabrizio Quadrioli, Italo Cameracanna

THE LIBERATOR
Producciones Insurgentes, C.A.
PRODUCED BY: Ana Loehnert, Winfried Hammacher, Alberto Arvelo
DIRECTED BY: Alberto Arvelo
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Jay Nierenberg, MPSE, Jonathan Wales
SOUND DESIGNER: Trevor Gates
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Andrés Velasquez
FOLEY ARTIST: Vicki O’Reilly Vandegrift
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Chris Diebold, Steven Iba, Charles Maynes, MPSE, Brent Findley
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Angela Hemingway, Todd Niesen, MPSE
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR:  Ramiro Belgardt
ADR EDITORS: Juan Diego Borda, Aleksandar Sasha Panich
FOLEY EDITOR: Zach Schmitt, MPSE

THE RAID 2
Pt. Merantau Films
PRODUCED BY: Aram Tertzakian, Nick Spicer, Rangga Maya Barack-Evans
DIRECTED BY: Gareth Evans
SUPERVISING SOUND / FOLEY EDITOR: Jonathan Greber
SOUND DESIGNERS: Brandon Proctor, Al Nelson
FOLEY ARTIST: Sean England
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Dug Winningham, Kim Foscato

ROAR
Abis Rizvi Films
PRODUCED BY: Abiz Rizvi
DIRECTED BY: Kamal Sadanah
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Resul Pookutty, MPSE, Amrit Pritam Dutta
SOUND DESIGNER: Resul Pookutty, Amrit Pritam Dutta
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Vijay Kumar
FOLEY ARTISTS: Karnail Singh Virdi, Sajjan Chowdhry
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Amrit Pritam Dutta, Vijay Kumar, Arunav Dutta, Abhishruti Bezboruah

UZUMASA LIMELIGHT
Eleven Arts
PRODUCED BY: Ko Mori
DIRECTED BY: Ken Ochiai
SUPERVISING SOUND / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Carlos Sanches
SOUND DESIGNER: Matt Hall, Josh Johnson
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: John Sanacore
FOLEY ARTIST: Jeff Wilhoit, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Gerry Gonzalez, Hiroki Matsuura
MUSIC EDITORS: Nobuko Toda, Kazuma Jinnouchi

FEATURE MUSIC

BIRDMAN
New Regency Pictures
PRODUCED BY: Arnon Milchan, James W. Skotchdopole, Alejandro González Iñárritu,
John Lesher
DIRECTED BY: Alejandro González Iñárritu
MUSIC EDITORS: Terry Wilson, Will Kaplan

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES
Fox
PRODUCED BY: Dylan Clark, Peter Chernin, Mark Bomback, Thomas Hammel
DIRECTED BY: Matt Reeves
MUSIC EDITOR: Paul Apelgren

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS
Temple Hill Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Wyck Godfrey, Marty Bowen
DIRECTED BY:  Josh Boone
MUSIC EDITOR: Katrina Schiller

GONE GIRL
Twentieth Century Fox
PRODUCED BY: Cean Chaffin, Resse Witherspoon, Joshua Donen, Arnon Milchan
DIRECTED BY: David Fincher
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Jonathon Stevens
MUSIC EDITORS: Ren Klyce

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY
Marvel Studios
PRODUCED BY: Kevin Feige, Victoria Alonso, Louis D’Esposito
DIRECTED BY:  James Gunn
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR:  Steve Durkee
MUSIC EDITORS: Will Kaplan, Darrell Hall

INTERSTELLAR
Paramount Pictures; Warner Brothers; Legendary Pictures, Syncopy
PRODUCED BY: Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas, Lynda Obst
DIRECTED BY:  Christopher Nolan
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR:  Alex Gibson
MUSIC EDITOR: Ryan Rubin

SELMA
Pathe’
PRODUCED BY: Oprah Winfrey, Dede Gardner, Christian Colson, Jeremy Kleiner
DIRECTED BY:  Ava DuVernay
MUSIC EDITORS: Julie Pearce, Clint Bennett

FEATURE MUSICAL

Annie

Annie

ANNIE
Olive Bridge Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Will Gluck, Alicia Emmrich, James Lassiter, Will Smith
DIRECTED BY:  Will Gluck
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jon Wakeham
MUSIC EDITORS: Lisa Jaime, Sherry Whitfield

GET ON UP
JB Films LLC
PRODUCED BY: Mick Jagger, Victoria Pearman, Brian Grazer, Erica Huggins
DIRECTED BY:  Tate Taylor
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Curt Sobel, MPSE
MUSIC EDITORS: Jordan Corngold, Bill Bernstein, Stephanie Lowry, Richard Henderson

INTO THE WOODS
Lucamar Productions
PRODUCED BY: John DeLuca, Rob Marshall, Callum McDougall, Marc Platt
DIRECTED BY: Rob Marshall
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Mike Higham
MUSIC EDITOR: Jennifer Dunnington

THE JERSEY BOYS
Malpaso Productions
PRODUCED BY: Clint Eastwood, Robert Lorenz, Graham King
DIRECTED BY:  Clint Eastwood
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR:  Chris McGeary
MUSIC EDITORS: Tommy Lockett, Angela Claverie

WHIPLASH
Blumhouse Productions
PRODUCED BY: Jason Blum, Jason Reitman, Couper Samuelson, David Lancaster
DIRECTED BY:  Damien Chazelle
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Ben Wilkins, MPSE, Craig Mann
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR:  Richard Henderson
MUSIC EDITOR: Craig Mann

COMPUTER EPISODIC (WEBISODE)

HALO NIGHTFALL
Scott Free
PRODUCED BY: Aidan Elliott, Mark Huffam
DIRECTED BY: Sergio Mimica-Gezzan
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Lee Walpole
SOUND DESIGNER: Andy Kennedy
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Sarah Elias
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jeff Richardson,
FOLEY ARTIST: Meltem Baytok Topalkci
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Matthew Mewett, Danton Tanimura

JABBAWOCKEEZ PRESENTS REGENERATE
Jabbawookeez
PRODUCED BY: Kevin Tancheron, Beatriz Acevedo, Doug Grieff, Lydia Antonini
DIRECTED BY: Kevin Tancheron
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Michael Babcock
SOUND DESIGNERS: Michael Babcock, Tim Gedemer
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Bryan Jerden

POET ANDERSON: THE DREAM WALKER
To The Stars
PRODUCED BY: Tom DeLonge, Ben Kull
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / DESIGNER: Robert Kellough, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: George Pereyra

VIDEO GAME HIGH SCHOOL (SEASON 3)
EPISODE 1 “OMGWTFPSI”
The Collective Digital Studio LLC
PRODUCED BY: Raul Celaya, Abanoub Andraous
DIRECTED BY: Freddie Wong, Matt Arnold
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Steven Cahill
SOUND DESIGNERS: Steven Cahill, Aaron Bartscht
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Gerry Montejo
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Jon Lyga
FOLEY ARTIST: Gerry Montejo
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Aaron Bartscht, Richard Garcia
MUSIC EDITORS: Greg Nicolett, Preston Shepard

WORLD OF WARCRAFT – LORDS OF WAR
Rollover Productions, Inc
PRODUCED BY: Caroline Hernandez, MPSE, Philip Hillenbrand, Eric Davis
DIRECTED BY: Doug Gregory, Marc Messenger
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Paul Menichini, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Tim Nielsen, Stuart Provine
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Darrin Mann
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Alexander Ephraim
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Andrea Toyias
FOLEY ARTIST: Gregg Barbanell, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Charles Deenen, MPSE, Caroline Hernandez, MPSE
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Derek Duke
MUSIC EDITORS: Neal Acree, Alexander Ephraim, MPSE

DIRECT TO VIDEO ANIMATION

THE BOXCAR CHILDREN
Hammerhead Productions
PRODUCED BY: Dan Chuba, Mark Dippe
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Eric Lalicata, Tom Boykin
SOUND DESIGNER: Ryan Gegenheimer
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Kyle Lane
FOLEY ARTIST: Tara Blume
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Dhyana Carlton-Tims

THE PIRATE FAIRY
Disneytoon Studios
PRODUCED BY: Jenni Magee-Cook, John Lasseter
DIRECTED BY: Peggy Holmes
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Todd Toon, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Todd Toon, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Thomas Whiting
FOLEY ARTISTS: John Roesch, Alyson Dee Moore
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Odin Benitez, MPSE, Adam Kopald, MPSE, Charles W. Ritter,
Pernell L. Salinas
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Charles Martin Inouye
MUSIC EDITOR: Jim Harrison

RAINBOW BRITE
Feeln
PRODUCED BY: Jack Liburn, Laurence Braun
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Eric Marks, MPSE

SCOOBY DOO AND THE WRESTLE-MANIA MYSTERY
Warner Bros. Animation
PRODUCED BY: John Donkin, Jerry Davis
DIRECTED BY: Brandon Vietti
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Devon Bowman, Rob McIntyre
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Aran Tanchum
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Kelly Foley-Downes
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Mark Keatts
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Michael Garcia, MPSE
FOLEY ARTIST: Vincent Guisetti
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Jessey Drake, Jim Lucero, Marc Schmidt, Michael Kreple
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Ryan Shore

STAR WARS : THE CLONE WARS
“SACRIFICE”
Lucasfilm Animation
PRODUCED BY: George Lucas, Cary Silver, Dave Filoni, Steward Lee
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Matthew Wood
SOUND DESIGNER: David Acord
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Kevin Sellers
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Steve Slanec
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Jeremy Bowker
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Dean Menta
MUSIC EDITOR: Sean Kiner

DIRECT TO VIDEO LIVE ACTION

THE CHRISTMAS DRAGON
Arrowstorm Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Jason Faller, Kynan Griffin
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Carlos Sanches
SOUND DESIGNERS: Josh Johnson, Carlos Sanches

LEPRECHAUN: ORIGINS
WWE Studios
PRODUCED BY:
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Darren “Sunny” Warkentin, MPSE, Lon Bender, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Kris Fenske, MPSE, Rusty Dumm

THE PRINCE
PRODUCED BY: Emmett/Furla Films
PRODUCED BY: Randall Emmett, George Furla
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: David Barber, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Ben Zarai, SeanGray

RED SKY
Aldamisa Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Russell Gray, Dmitry Guzeev
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: David Barber, MPSE, Ben Zarai
SOUND DESIGNER: Ken Skoglund

STONEHEARST ASYLUM
Icon Productions
PRODUCED BY: Mark Amin, Bruce Davey
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Lon Bender, MPSE, Bill Dean
SOUND DESIGNERS: Lon Bender, MPSE, Kris Fenske, MPSE

WER
FilmDistrict
PRODUCED BY: Morris Paulson, Mathew Peterman
SUPERVSING SOUND EDITOR: Trip Brock

GAME CINEMATICS

FAR CRY 4
Ubisoft Montreal
PRODUCED BY: Dan Hay
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Chris Ove
SOUND DESIGNERS: Kevin Vail, Eduardo Vaisman
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Martin Laplante
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Philip Hunter
FOLEY ARTISTS: Alexis Farand, Tchae Measroch
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Marc Gagnon, Jean-Francois St-Pierre, Chris Groegler, Matte Wagner
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Carl Bramucci, Emmanuelle Novero
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Jerome Angelot
MUSIC EDITOR: Simon Laundry

HALO: MASTER CHIEF COLLECTION 2014
Blur / Microsoft / 343 Industries
PRODUCED BY: Tyler Jeffers, Frank Balson, Bonnie Ross, Dan Ayoub
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Charles Deenen, MPSE, Tim Gedemer, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Csaba Wagner, Stuart Provine
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Braden Parkes
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Trygg Littlefield
FOLEY ARTISTS: Gregg Barbanell, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Tim Walston, MPSE, Justin Davey, George Pereyra, Travis Prater

LEAGUE OF LEGENDS – ‘A NEW DAWN’
Riot Games
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Riot Games Audio Team
SOUND DESIGNERS: Riot Games Audio Team
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Riot Games Audio Team
FOLEY ARTISTS: Gary Hecker, Gary Marullo
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Riot Games Audio Team

OVERWATCH – “THE EXHIBIT”
Rollover Productions, Inc
PRODUCED BY: Caroline Hernandez, Taka Yasuda
DIRECTED BY: Jeff Chamberlain
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Paul Menichini, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Tim Nielsen, Caroline Hernandez, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Darrin Mann
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Alexander Ephraim, MPSE
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Andrea Toyias
FOLEY ARTISTS: Gregg Barbanell, MPSE
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Derek Duke
MUSIC EDITOR: Neal Acree

STAR CITIZEN
Cloud Imperium Games, LLC
PRODUCED BY: Chris Roberts, Travis Day, John Schimmel
DIRECTED BY: Chris Roberts, Martin Galway
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Charles Deenen, MPSE, Tim Gedemer, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Jay Jennings
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Bryan Jerden, Travis Prater
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Robb Gilligan

WORLD OF WARCRAFT – WARLORDS OF DRAENOR INTRO CINEMATIC
Rollover Productions, Inc.
PRODUCED BY: Caroline Hernandez, MPSE, Taka Yasuda
DIRECTED BY: Marc Messenger
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Paul Menichini, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: David Farmer, MPSE, Caroline Hernandez, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Darrin Mann
FOLEY ARTIST: Gregg Barbanell, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Alexander Ephraim, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Andrea Toyias, Thomas Brewer, MPSE
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: John Kurlander
MUSIC EDITOR: Neal Acree

TV ANIMATION – EFFECTS/ FOLEY/ DIALOGUE/ ADR

THE 7D
“Buckets / Frankengloom”
Disney Television Animation
PRODUCED BY: Louis Cuck (Line Producer), Tom Warburton (Co-EP), Tom Ruegger (EP)
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Kate Finan, Otis Van Osten
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: John Sanacore
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jason Oliver
FOLEY ARTIST: Jeff Wilhoit, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Roger Pallan, Gerardo Gonzalez

GRAVITY FALLS
“Into the Bunker”
Disney Television Animation
PRODUCED BY: Alex Hirsch, Rob Renzetti, Brian Doell
DIRECTED BY: Joe Pitt
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Heather Olsen, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Aran Tanchum
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Robbi Smith, MPSE
FOLEY ARTIST: John Lampinen

PENN ZERO: PART-TIME HERO
“North Pole Down “
Disney TV Animation
PRODUCED BY: Sam Levine, Jared Bush, Michele Mazzano
DIRECTED BY: Tom De Rosier, Adam Henry
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Eric Freeman
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Roy Braverman
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Mark Kondracki
FOLEY ARTIST: John Lampinen

SOFIA THE FIRST
“The Curse of Princess Ivy”
Walt Disney Productions
PRODUCED BY: Jamie Mitchell, Craig Gerber, Clay Renfroe
DIRECTED BY: Jamie Mitchell, Mircea Mantta
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Timothy J. Borquez, MPSE, Thomas Syslo
FOLEY ARTIST: Diane Greco
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Alex Borquez, Tony Orozco, Daisuke Sawa
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Nick Gotten

STAR WARS : REBELS
“Gathering Forces “
Lucasfilm Animation
PRODUCED BY: Simon Kinberg, Dave Filoni, Greg Weisman, Kiri Hart
DIRECTED BY: Dave Filoni, Steward Lee
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Matthew Wood, David Acord
SOUND DESIGNER: David Acord
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Frank Rinella
FOLEY ARTISTS: Kim Patrick, Frank Rinella
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Ryan Frias
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Tony Diaz, MPSE
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Sean Kiner

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES
“”In Dreams”
Nickelodeon Animation Studios Inc.
PRODUCED BY: Ciro Nieli, Brandon Auman, Peter Hastings, Macgregor Middleton
DIRECTED BY: Sebastian Montes
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jeff Shiffman
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Roger Pallan
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Anna Adams
FOLEY ARTISTS: Roger Pallan, Alex Ullrich, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Gerardo Gonzalez, Matt Hall
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Sebastian Evans II

ULTIMATE SPIDERMAN
“The Spider-Verse: Part 1 “
Film Roman/Marvel Animation
PRODUCED BY: Eric Radomski, Kenneth Ito, Harrison Wilcox, Jeph Loeb
DIRECTED BY: Alex Soto
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Mike Draghi , MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Greg Rubin, Marcos Abrom
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Maciek Malish, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: John Brengman
FOLEY ARTISTS: Maciek Krakówka, Tomek Dukszta
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Jesse Arruda, MPSE

TV DOCUMENTARY LONG FORM – EFFECTS/ FOLEY/ DIALOGUE/ ADR

DEADLIEST CATCH
“You’ll Know My Name is the Lord”
Original Productions, LLC, a FremantleMedia Company for the Discovery Channel
PRODUCED BY: Decker Watson, John Gray, Jeff Conroy, Johnny Beechler
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Bob Bronow, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Doug Kern
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Eddie Rodriguez
MUSIC EDITOR: Selina Zakaria

FOO FIGHTERS SONIC HIGHWAYS
“Seattle”
Roswell Films
PRODUCED BY: John Ramsay, James A. Rota
DIRECTED BY: Dave Grohl
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER /
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Eddie Kim
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jeff Fuller
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Eddie Kim, Justin Lebens
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Justin Lebens
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Jeff Fuller

THE WORLD WARS
“Trial By Fire “
Stephen David Entertainment For History
PRODUCED BY: Stephen David, Shirley Escott
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Tim W. Kelly
SOUND DESIGNERS: Jonathan Soule, Brian McCallister
MUSIC EDITORS: John Kilgour, Mike Alfin

TV DOCUMENTARY SHORT FORM – EFFECTS/ FOLEY/ DIALOGUE/ ADR

AX MEN
“Ax Marks the Spot”
Original Productions / Max Post
PRODUCED BY: Dave Freed, Sarah Whalen, Adam Bradley, Jeff Meredith
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Bob Bronow, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Chris Chappel
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Jake Allston

UNDRAFTED
“105 “
Mandalay Sports Media
PRODUCED BY: Marc Levy, Michael Gleaton
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Eric Lalicata, Shaun Cunningham

UNSUNG HEROES: THE STORY OF AMERICA’S FEMALE PATRIOTS
“UNSUNG HEROES: The Story of America’s Female Patriots Part 1 “
Eleventh Day Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Frank Martin, Luke Ellis, Matthew Hickey
DIRECTED BY: Frank Martin
SUPERVISING SOUND / DIALOGUE EDITOR /
SOUND EFFECTS / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jack Sherman
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Larry Brown
MUSIC EDITOR: Larry Brown

TV LONG FORM – DIALOGUE/ ADR

DELIVERANCE CREEK
“Pilot “
Lifetime
PRODUCED BY: Jon Amiel, Melissa Carter
DIRECTED BY:  Jon Amiel
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Christopher Aud, Gregory Gerlich
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Stephanie Brown
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: David Cowan

KLONDIKE
“Episode 1 “
Scott Free C/o Chris Walters
PRODUCED BY: Michael Frislev, Clara George, Chad Oakes
DIRECTED BY: Simon Cellan Jones
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Lee Walpole
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Jason Lawrence
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Iain Eyre

LIZZIE BORDEN TOOK AN AX
Sony Pictures Television
PRODUCED BY: Judith Verno, Michael Mahoney
DIRECTED BY: Nick Gome
SUPERVISING SOUND / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Bernard Weiser, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Rob Getty, MPSE

HBO's The Normal Heart

HBO’s The Normal Heart

THE NORMAL HEART
Home Box Office
PRODUCED BY: Dante Di Loreto, Dede Gardner, Alexis Woodall, Gina Lamar
DIRECTED BY: Ryan Murphy
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Gary Megregian, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jason Krane, MPSE

PETALS ON THE WIND
“Petals on the Wind “
Cue the Dog Productions
PRODUCED BY: Meredith Finn
DIRECTED BY: Karen Moncrieff
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Erich Gann, Joe Melody
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Erich Gann

TV LONG FORM – FX/ FOLEY

Houdini

Houdini

HOUDINI
“Night 1”
Lionsgate Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Gerald W. Abrams, David Eick, Ildiko Kemeny, Karen Mayeda-Vranek
DIRECTED BY: Uli Edel
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Michael J. Benavente, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Robert Ulrich
FOLEY ARTIST: Joan Rowe, MPSE
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Michael Sana, Paul Diller, Tim Cleveland, Gary Megregian, MPSE

ISA
Fluency
PRODUCED BY: Valerie Stadler, Jose Marquez
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Eric Lalicata, Tom Boykin
SOUND DESIGNER: Zach Goheen
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Kyle Lane
FOLEY ARTIST: Tara Blume
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Ryan Gegenheimer

KLONDIKE
“Episode 1”
Scott Free co Chris Walters
PRODUCED BY: Michael Frislev, Clara George, Chad Oakes
DIRECTED BY: Simon Cellan Jones
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Lee Walpole
SOUND DESIGNER: Frank Laratta
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Catherine Thomas
FOLEY ARTISTS: Sue Harding, Peter Burgis
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Andy Kennedy, Joe Beal, John Sawa, Juraj Mravec

LIZZIE BORDEN TOOK AN AXE
Sony Pictures Television
PRODUCED BY: Judith Verno, Michael Mahoney
DIRECTED BY: Nick Gomez
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Bernard Weiser, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Mike Pipgras, MPSE
FOLEY ARTIST: Anita Cannella
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Mark Lanza, MPSE, Mark Petersen

THE NORMAL HEART
Home Box Office
PRODUCED BY: Dante Di Loreto, Dede Gardner, Alexis Woodall, Gina Lamar
DIRECTED BY: Ryan Murphy
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Gary Megregian, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNERS: Timothy A. Cleveland, John Petaja
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Scott Curtis, MPSE
FOLEY ARTISTS: Alicia Stevenson, Dawn Lunsford
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Paul Diller

TV SHORT FORM – DIALOGUE / ADR

GAME OF THRONES
“The Children”
HBO Programming in association with Bighead, Littlehead; Television 360; Startling Television and Generator Productions
PRODUCED BY: David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Greg Spence
DIRECTED BY: Alex Graves
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Tim Kimmel
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Jed Dodge
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Tim Hands

HOMELAND
“Redux”
Showtime/ Fox 21
PRODUCED BY: Howard Gordon, Alex Ganza
DIRECTED BY: Carl Franklin
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Craig Dellinger, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Jon Wakeham, Nello Torri

HOUDINI
“Night 2”
Lionsgate Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Gerald W. Abrams, David Eick, Ildiko Kemeny, Karen Mayeda-Vranek
DIRECTED BY: Uli Edel
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR /
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Michael Benavente, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: David Beadle, Lance Wiseman

THE NEWSROOM
“Oh Shenandoah “
HBO / Farnsworth Entertainment Productions
PRODUCED BY: Aaron Sorkin, Alan Poul, Dauri Chase
DIRECTED BY: Paul Lieberstein
SUPERVISING SOUND / ADR EDITOR: Mark Relyea
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITORS: Edmund Lachmann, Julie Altus

The Newsroom

The Newsroom

PENNY DREADFUL – SEASON 1
“Seance”
Desert Wolf Productions
PRODUCED BY: John Logan, Sheila Hockin, Bill Goddard, John Weber
DIRECTED BY: Juan Antonio Bayona
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jane Tattersall, MPSE
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: David McCallum
SUPERVISING ADR EDITOR: Dale Sheldrake

THE STRAIN
“The Box”
The Strain Productions Inc
PRODUCED BY: Guillermo Del Toro, Carlton Cuss, Chuck Hogan, Ra’uf Glascow
SUPERVISING SOUND / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Nelson Ferreira
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE EDITOR: Jill Purdy, MPSE

True Blood

True Blood

TRUE BLOOD
“Jesus Gonna Be Here”
Fangbanger Productions, Inc.
PRODUCED BY: Brian Buckner, Gregg Fienberg
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: John Benson, MPSE
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Jason Krane, MPSE

TRUE DETECTIVE
“Who Goes There”
HBO
PRODUCED BY: Carol Cuddy, Steve Golin, Jessica Levin, Scott Stephens
DIRECTED BY: Cary Fukunaga
SUPERVISING SOUND / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Eliza Paley

TV SHORT FORM – FX/ FOLEY

THE 100
“We Are Grounders – Part Two”
Bonanza Productions, Inc.
PRODUCED BY: Jason Rothenberg, Jae Marchant, Tim Scanlan, Kira Snyder
DIRECTED BY: Dean White
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Norval Crutcher III, MPSE, Peter Austin
SOUND DESIGNER: Peter Daniel Lago, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Mitch Gettleman
FOLEY ARTISTS: Catherine Harper, MPSE, Ellen Heuer
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Marc Meyer

FARGO TV SERIES
“Ep 106 “Buridan’s Ass”
MGM Television & FXP
PRODUCED BY: Noah Hawley, Warren Littlefield, John Cameron, Michael Frislev
DIRECTED BY: Colin Bucksey
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Frank Laratta, Kevin Buchholz
SOUND DESIGNER: John Peccatiello
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Andrew Morgado
FOLEY ARTIST: Adam Decoster

GAME OF THRONES
“The Children”
HBO Programming in association with Bighead, Littlehead; Television 360; Startling Television and Generator Productions
PRODUCED BY: David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Greg Spence
DIRECTED BY: Alex Graves
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Tim Kimmel
SOUND DESIGNER: Paula Fairfield, MPSE
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Brett Voss
FOLEY ARTISTS: Jeffrey Wilhoit, MPSE, Dylan Wilhoit
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Bradley Katona, MPSE

PEAKY BLINDERS
“Episode 1”
Tiger Aspect
PRODUCED BY: Katie Swinden
DIRECTED BY: Otto Bathurst
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Lee Walpole
SOUND DESIGNER: Jim Goddard
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Catherine Thomas
FOLEY ARTIST: Andie Derrick

PENNY DREADFUL 
“Night Work”
Neal Street Productions/Showtime Networks Inc.
PRODUCED BY: John Logan, Sam Mendes, Pippa Harris, Sheila Hockin
DIRECTED BY: J.A. Bayona
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jane Tattersall, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Oriol Tarragó
FOLEY ARTISTS: Andy Malcolm, Goro Koyama
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: David Rose, MPSE, Marc Bech

TRUE DETECTIVE
“The Secret Fate of All Life”
HBO
PRODUCED BY: Scott Stephens, Steve Golin, Jessica Levin
DIRECTED BY: Cary Joji Fukunaga
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Eliza Paley
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Lidia Tamplenizza
FOLEY ARTISTS: Matt Haasch, Jay Peck
SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR: Mariusz Glabinski, MPSE

VIKINGS
“Answers in blood”
World 2000 Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Sheila Hockin, Steve Wakefield, Bill Goddard, Michael Hirst
DIRECTED BY: Jeff Woolnough
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Jane Tattersall, MPSE
SOUND DESIGNER: Steve Medeiros
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Andy Malcolm
FOLEY ARTISTS: Goro Koyama, Sandra Fox

TV SHORT FORM MUSIC SCORE

ALMOST HUMAN
“Simon Says”
Bonanza Productions
PRODUCED BY: Joel H Wyman, Brian Burke, Tanya Swerling
MUSIC EDITOR: Warren Brown, MPSE

AMERICAN HORROR STORY
“Monsters Among Us”
Ryan Murphy Productions
PRODUCED BY: Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Alexis Woodall, Dante Di Loreto
DIRECTED BY: Ryan Murphy
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: David Klotz

BANSHEE
“The Thunder Man”
Screaming Spirit Prod, LLC
PRODUCED BY: Greg Yaitanes, Allen M Palmer, Alan Ball, Jonathan Tropper
DIRECTED BY: Greg Yaitanes
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Skye Lewin, MPSE

BORGIA
“1507”
Atlantique Productions – Lagardère Entertainment
PRODUCED BY: Tom Fontana, Barry Levinson
MUSIC EDITOR: Robert Cotnoir, MPSE

FARGO
“The Crocodile’s Dilemma”
Fargo Alberta Productions
PRODUCED BY: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen, Noah Hawley, Warren Littlefield
DIRECTED BY: Adam Bernstein
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Skye Lewin, MPSE

GAME OF THRONES
“The Watchers On The Wall”
Home Box Office (HBO)
PRODUCED BY: David Benioff, D.B. Weiss, Carolyn Strauss, Greg Spence
DIRECTED BY: Neil Marshall
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: David Klotz

GOTHAM
“Lovecraft”
Warner Bros.
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Ashley Revell

HOUSE OF CARDS SEASON 2
“Chapter 14”
Media Rights Capital
PRODUCED BY: Dana Brunetti, David Fincher, Eric Roth, Kevin Spacey
DIRECTED BY: Carl Franklin
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Jonathon Stevens
MUSIC EDITOR: Marie Ebbing

VERNA FIELDS AWARD FOR STUDENT FILM MAKERS

SIN FRONTERA
Chapman University Dodge College of Film and Media Arts
PRODUCED BY: Israel Gutierrez
DIRECTED BY: Israel Gutierrez
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / SOUND EFFECTS / FOLEY /
DIALOGUE & ADR EDITOR / SOUND DESIGNER: Shasha Dong
FOLEY ARTISTS: Israel Gutierrez, Katherine Katherine Shafer
SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Shasha Dong

THE NIGHT GUARDIAN
University of Southern California, School of Cinematic Arts
PRODUCED BY: Kyle Dare, Jamari Perry
DIRECTED BY: Brian Ott
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITORS: Zheng Jia, Reese Robinson
SOUND DESIGNER: Zheng Jia
SUPERVISING SOUND EFFECTS / FOLEY /
MUSIC EDITOR: Zheng Jia
SUPERVISING DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Reese Robinson
FOLEY ARTISTS: Kyle Dare, Brian Ott
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Reese Robinson

HOMINID
Savannah College of Art and Design
PRODUCED BY: Justin Suttles, Oran Domingue, John Dan
DIRECTED BY: Justin Suttles
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / DIALOGUE & ADR EDITOR
SOUND DESIGNER: Thomas Schmidt
FOLEY ARTISTS: Nick Caramela, Becca High
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Kyle Lammerding, Nick Lawrence, Jake Flack, Leo Marcil
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Max Christman

SEA ODYSSEY
Savannah College of Art and Design
PRODUCED BY: Timothy Cella, Adam Nelson, Carolyn Shannon, Lauren Skillen
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR: Beau Anthony Jimenez
SUPERVISING FOLEY EDITOR: Eolyne Arnold
FOLEY ARTIST: Melissa Terry
SOUND EFFECTS EDITORS: Jacob Flack, Nick Caramela, Matt Yocum
DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR: Kia Paquin

POSTHUMOUS
University Of Miami
PRODUCED BY: Noah DeBonis, Lissette Villarchao
SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR / DIALOGUE / ADR EDITOR
SOUND DESIGNER / SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR / SUPERVISING MUSIC EDITOR: Jorge Fernandez
FOLEY ARTISTS: Giampiero Paglione

Motion Picture Sound Editors Golden Reel nominees for feature films

Los Angeles — The Motion Picture Sound Editors (http://mpse.org) has announces nominees for the 61st MPSE Golden Reel Awards in feature film categories. Nominations for television, animation and computer entertainment categories will be announced on Friday, January 17.

The MPSE Golden Reel Awards recognize outstanding achievement in sound editing in 22 categories encompassing feature films, television, animation, computer entertainment and student work. The 61st MPSE Golden Reel Awards held on February 16 at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel and Suites, Los Angeles.

The 61st MPSE Golden Reel Awards Nominees
BEST SOUND EDITING: SOUND EFFECTS AND FOLEY IN AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE FEATURE
12 Years a Slave
All Is Lost
Captain Phillips
Fast & Furious 6
Gravity
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Iron Man 3
Lone Survivor

BEST SOUND EDITING: DIALOGUE AND ADR IN AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE FEATURE
12 Years a Slave
American Hustle
August: Osage County
Captain Phillips
Gravity
Her
Inside Llewyn Davis
Lone Survivor
 
BEST SOUND EDITING IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE (ENGLISH OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE) (INCLUDES ADR, DIALOGUE, SOUND EFFECTS AND FOLEY)
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2
The Croods
Despicable Me 2
Epic
Ernest & Celestine
Frozen
Monsters University
Planes

BEST SOUND EDITING IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE FEATURE (INCLUDES ADR, DIALOGUE, SOUND EFFECTS, AND FOLEY
Blue Is the Warmest Color
The Grandmaster
The Past
Wadjda
 
BEST SOUND EDITING – MUSIC IN A MUSICAL FEATURE (ENGLISH OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE)
Frozen
Inside Llewyn Davis
Justin Bieber’s Believe
Metallica Through the Never

BEST SOUND EDITING – MUSIC IN A FEATURE (ENGLISH OR FOREIGN LANGUAGE)
12 Years a Slave
47 Ronin
American Hustle
Gravity
The Great Gatsby
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
World War Z

BEST SOUND EDITING IN A FEATURE DOCUMENTARY FEATURE – FOREIGN LANGUAGE
“1”
20 Feet from Stardom
CinemAbility
Dirty Wars
Good Ol’ Freda
Muscle Shoals
Rising from Ashes
Sound City