Tag Archives: MovieLabs

Cloud workflow vets launch M&E cloud migration company

A team of cloud workflow experts have launched Fusion Workflows, a new media-workflow design company designed to help M&E companies migrate their infrastructures to scalable cloud platforms.

The company says that moving to cloud-based workflows represents an opportunity to improve the inefficiencies in current systems. However, many companies struggle to understand what is involved in cloud migrations, the costs entailed and how it will affect the demands of their workforce, processes and tools. Fusion Workflows aims to remedy these issues by providing clients a customized “Workflow Migration Guide,” which acts as their design blueprint to rebuild their operations on scalable cloud infrastructure and software-defined processes.

Mark Turner

Fusion provides a holistic approach — working with their clients from inception through to deployment. Fusion provides a comprehensive initial analysis of workflow process and customizes business operations during the migration. The work continues post-migration to include training and onboarding, new software, security and documentation. This one-stop-shop approach is designed so internal teams and systems are working in sync and without interruption.

“The COVID crisis has forced media companies to create temporary hacks and interim cloud workflows but also exposed the need for them to develop a long-term cloud migration vision,” says Mark Turner, Fusion Workflows’ managing partner. “Every company now needs a plan to effectively operate their business without ties to physical locations, on-premises storage or hardware processing. At Fusion we look forward to helping companies design their own cloud migrations.”

Fusion’s team comprises domain experts from the US and Europe, who have designed and implemented cloud-based workflows and created first-in-market re-engineering standards. Fusion’s team has worked across all media industries including major movie and TV production, visual FX, animation, sports, live broadcast, digital cinema, music and OTT streaming.

In addition to Turner, who co-authored the 2020 MovieLabs paper “The Evolution of Media Creation: a 10 year vision for the future of Media Production, Post and Creative Technologies, the team includes ITV vet Emma Clifford, OTT engineer Andrew Ioannou, Lionsgate vet Thomas Hughes, former chief digital strategy officer at Sony Pictures Mitch Singer, recent Techicolor data systems engineer Daryll Strauss, former Sony Pictures CTO Spencer Stephens, Autodesk vet Chris Vienneau and ETC’s Erik Weaver.

HPA Tech Retreat: Cloud workflows in the desert

By Tom Coughlin

At the 2020 HPA Retreat, attendees witnessed an active production of the short The Lost Lederhosen. This film used the Unreal gaming engine to provide impressive graphical details, along with several cameras and an ACES workflow, with much production work done in the cloud. Many of the companies and studios participating in the retreat played a role in the film’s production, and the shooting and post were part of the ongoing presentations and panels on the first official day of the conference. Tuesday’s sessions ended with Joachim Zell from Efilm and Josh Pines from Technicolor showing the completed video.

Shooting The Lost Lederhosen – director Steve Shaw is at the far right.

As you can imagine, several digital storage products were needed for The Lost Lederhosen. In checking out the production rig in the back of the conference room, I saw some G-Tech modular storage units and was told that there was an Isilon storage system on the other side of the wall — a giveaway because of the noise from the fans in the system. In one of the sessions on that first day, it was reported that 5TB of total footage was shot with 500GB left after conforming using Avid Media Composer with AAF. Editing was done in the cloud with Avid Nexis 30TB storage online. During dailies AWS CLI was used to push files to S3 for a common storage location. Pixmover from Pixspan was used to move data to and from LA, along with AWS S3 storage in the San Francisco Bay area.

Colorfront supported the cloud-based live production of the HPA video and did a demonstration of its 2020 Express Dailies that was used to do all the dailies and deliverables, as well as Transkoder which was used to do all the VFX pulls. Frame.io, which was used to move content from cameras to the cloud. A Mac Pro was feeding dual Apple 32-inch Retina Pro XDR displays showing 6K HDR content. Colorfront was displaying Transkoder 2020 running on a Supermicro workstation with four Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti GPUs and an AJA Kona 5 video card outputting to an 85-inch Sony Z9G HDR monitor and an AJA HDR Image Analyzer 12G for video analytic monitoring.

Metadata for video content was an important element in the HPA presentations, which included the ASC MHL (media hash list) that hashes files and folders in a standardized way, with essential file metadata in an XML human-readable format. The ASC MHL is used from data capture and offloading through backup and archiving, and it is an important element in restoring content as shown below. The ASC HML is available on github (https://github.com/ascmitc/mhl) and is still a work in progress.

The following day, Tech Retreat main conference producer Mark Schubin said that film hasn’t died yet and that Kodak had received orders from Disney, NBCUniversal, Paramount, Sony and Warner Bros. for motion picture film stock. He talked about what might be the world’s smallest camera, a small endoscopy image chip with 200×200 resolution. And he mentioned Microsoft’s Project Silica proof of concept — a 7.5cm x 7.5cm glass plate storing the 75.6GB Superman movie — as a possible long-term storage media.

MovieLabs

MovieLabs
The MovieLabs white paper released in August 2019, “The Evolution of Media Creation,” was referenced in several talks during the HPA retreat. The paper, created in cooperation with the major film studios, suggests a path to the future of moviemaking, and that path is in the cloud. You can read it here: https://movielabs.com/production-technology

During the SMPTE 2110 IP update, it was said that most new video trucks for the UK’s NEP are built for 2110 IP compliance. There are a total of 12 IP-enabled trucks, six IP control rooms and multiple IP flypacks (backpack IP video gear). In a panel organized by the Digital Production Partnership, the DPP’s Mark Harrison gave a presentation that included information on on-side and cloud storage for M&E applications. He spoke about the 2020 report from the DPP and 10 case studies from the M&E industry of companies that have all adopted cloud-led production for different reasons. We will look at the digital storage needs for three of these case studies.

It was reported that COPA90 is doing high-volume global content management with a cloud production hub and AI using the Veritone Digital Media Hub and IBM Cloud Storage, as shown below.

France TV is doing fast turnaround of high-end drama using cloud-based metadata enrichment with AWS, Azure, a private cloud and local storage before going into Avid Nexis storage, Avid Interplay and Media Composer.

UK’s Jellyfish Pictures is reportedly doing secure distributed high-volume virtualized production using Azure public cloud and a private cloud with PixStor storage.

There are five key principles in the Eluvio content fabric.

Distributed Content Delivery
Eluvio’s Michelle Munson gave an update on the company’s distributed content delivery service, and during a demo at the company’s booth, she told me that Eluvio’s approach keeps the master copy for distribution in cold storage, with the published serviceable content inherently streamable. By reusing distributed parts of content within the network, there is a considerable shrink in requirements for storage. In effect, the fabric replaces a hot storage tier, reducing higher-performance storage and network bandwidth requirements.

In her presentation, Munson said that Eluvio eliminates the need for cloud microservices for content distribution. The blockchain-based network system provides an inherent security model that makes it possible to serve audiences directly over public internet to enable a content fabric. This is not a cloud or a CDN, but rather a data distribution and storage protocol. Rendering is done at the consumer endpoint, allowing consumers to play content just in time with low latency, and monetization happens through secure transactions. MGM is deploying Eluvio’s technology for worldwide content distribution, and some other major media players are also working with the technology.

Renard Jenkins

There are five key principles in the Eluvio content fabric. First, there is no movement of the master copy; a mezzanine copy is used for all servicing. Second, a file-based interface is used for upload and download with underlying objects. Third, streaming and servicing are accomplished from the source in a JIT manner. Fourth, it uses a trustless encryption model over open networks, and fifth, access control and rights management are built in.

Best Practices for Cloud-Based Workflows
MediAnswers’ Chris Lennon and PBS’ Renard Jenkins (who subsequently started work as VP, content transmission, at WarnerMedia) spoke about the right way to do cloud-based workflows, which included local as well as cloud content copies. They gave three principles for survival. First, IT is not IP, and a network should be designed around media use and minimizing packet loss. Second, build or find cloud-native solutions rather than “lift and shift.” Third, linear workflows lead to nonlinear problems.

Universal and the Cloud
Universal’s Annie Chang spoke about tools for the next generation of production, including the use of cloud-based tools such as temporary production storage and an active archive for production assets. She went on to detail future cloud workflows wherein content goes from the camera directly to the cloud (or, if on film, from a digital intermediate post house to the cloud). Editing, dailies distribution and EDL are all done in the cloud, as is final archiving.

Chang said that the move to a mostly cloud-based workflow is already starting at Universal. She reported that DreamWorks Animation (DWA) has built a cloud-native platform that creates workspaces for its artists. Assets are related to each other, and workflows can be kicked off through microservices. She wondered if Universal could repurpose the DWA platform for live-action, VFX assets and workflows.

Universal

Chang discussed an experiment wherein Universal took one shot from Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (including reference photos, LIDAR scans, camera raw) and demonstrated a VFX pull on premises at DWA while also testing in a public cloud. When Universal ran the content from the cloud and showed it to Universal VFX execs and the VFX producer from Hobbs & Shaw, Chang was told that this was something they have wanted for a decade. Developing the platform this year, Universal plans to test it on a full production in 2021. The company has 10 concurrent projects and is coordinating with multiple industry efforts with ACES, USC ETC and MovieLabs.

ACES
There was much discussion on the next developments for ACES (Academy Color Encoding System), particularly the implementation of ACES 1.2 and the development of ACES 2.0. A panel at the retreat suggested that practical problems with image matching with the current version of ACES could be solved by using AMF (ACES Metadata File). But there are some image matching problems that are not ACES-related but rather related to the source of the image and what sort of format is used for comparison. ACES 2.0 development is underway that plans to address these and other issues with the current version of ACES.

Storage
The digital storage exhibitors at the HPA Retreat included Cloudian (local object storage), which demonstrated with AWS, Azure, Google and other cloud storage services. Quantum had an exhibit that focused on its media and storage solutions, such as StorNext Workflow Storage Platform, F-Series NVMe storage, Xcellis high-performance workflow storage appliances and the its object storage and tape archive solutions. (Note that Quantum recently acquired Western Digital’s ActiveScale object storage.)

Racktop was advertising its Brickstor all-flash or hybrid HDD/SSD CyberConverged data storage offering, which supports FIPS 140-2 and AES-256 for encryption and compliance. Rohde & Schwarz was demoing IMF-based workflows with its Spycer Node media storage.

Rohde & Schwarz

Scale Logic featured its Atavium data management and orchestration solution. According to the product literature, data entering Atavium is identified, tagged and classified and can be searched via metadata or tags whether the data is on premises or in the cloud. Also, tasks can be automated using a combination of metadata and tags and a set of APIs and scheduler and application integration determine the placement of data to reflect the needs of the workflow. Local storage includes nearline HDDs as well as NVMe flash, and DRAM is used for read-ahead cache. The system will work with Spectra Logic’s Black Pearl and integrates with asset management systems.

Seagate Technology was showing storage products, including its Lyve Drive Shuttle for physical data delivery using e-ink and protective cases for shipping storage devices. The company had flyers out on its Seagate Exos modular storage for capacity and the Seagate Nytro modular storage for performance. Pixit Media was partnering with Seagate on its software-defined storage solution.

StorageDNA was showing its analytics-driven data management platform (DNAfabric) that provides data visibility services, including storage capacity and cost as well as data mobility services. Tiger Technology was showing its Tiger Bridge and shared an exhibit space with Nexsan NAS products. Western Digital was showing various G-Tech products, including its G-Speed Shuttle storage systems as well as desktop and mobile HDD and SSD storage devices.


Tom Coughlin is a digital storage analyst and business and technology consultant. His Coughlin Associates consults, publishes books and market and technology reports (such as the annual Digital Storage in Media and Entertainment Report ). He is currently working on his 2020 Digital Storage in Media and Entertainment Survey, feel free to participate:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MWXL22N

 

 

Quick Chat: Frame.io’s new global SVP of innovation, Michael Cioni

By Randi Altman

Production and post specialist Michael Cioni, whom many of you might know from his years at Light Iron and Panavision, has joined Frame.io as global SVP of innovation. He will lead a new LA-based division of Frame.io that is focused on continued investment into cloud-enabled workflows for films and episodics — specifically, automated camera-to-cutting room technology.

Frame.io has been 100 percent cloud-based since the company was formed, according to founder Emery Wells. “We started seeding new workflows around dailies, collaborative review and realtime integration with NLEs for parallel work and approvals. Now, with Michael, we’re building Frame.io for the new frontier of cloud-enabled professional workflows. Frame.io will leverage machine learning and a combination of software and hardware in a way that will truly revolutionize collaboration.”

Quoted in a Frame.io release that went out today, Cioni says, “A robust camera-to-cloud approach means filmmakers will have greater access to their work, greater control of their content, and greater speed with which to make key decisions,” says Cioni. “Our new roadmap will dramatically reduce the time it takes to get original camera negative into the hands of editors. Directors, cinematographers, post houses, DITs and editors will all be able to work with recorded images in real time, regardless of location.”

We reached out to Cioni with some questions about Frame.io and the cloud.

Why was now the right time for you to move on from Light Iron — which you helped to establish — and Panavision to join Frame.io?
After 10 years at Light Iron and over four at Panavision, I have been very fortunate to spend large portions of my career focused on both post and production. Being at both these groups gave me more access to the unique challenges our industry collaborators face, especially with more productions operating on global schedules. Light Iron and Panavision equipped me with the ideal training to explore something entirely new that couples production and post together in an entirely new way. Frame.io is the right foundation for this change.

What will your day-to-day look like at the company?
I will be based in LA and helping build out Frame.io’s newest division in Los Angeles. I will also be traveling regularly to New York to work directly with the engineers and security teams on our roadmap development. This is great for me because I loved living in New York when we opened up Light Iron NY, but I also love working in LA, where so many post and production infrastructures call home.

Frame.io was founded by post pros. Why is it so important for the company to continue that tradition with your hire?
I find that the key to success in any industry is largely dependent on how deep your knowledge well goes. Even though we in media and entertainment serve the world through creative means, the filmmaking process is inherently complex and inherently technical. It always has been.

The best technologies are the ones that are invisible and let the creative process flow without thought about the technology behind what is happening in your mind. Frame.io CEO Emery Wells and I have a profound respect for post production because we were both entrepreneurs and experts in the post space. Anyone who has built or operated a post facility (big or small) knows that post is a hub linking together nearly all workflow components for both creative and technical team members.

Because post lives at the core of Emery and myself, Frame.io will always be grounded in the professional workflow space, which enables us to better evolve our technology into markets of every type and scale.

Your roadmap seems in line with the MovieLabs white paper on the future of production, which is cloud-based. Can you address that?
MovieLabs is arguably the best representation of a technological roadmap for the media and entertainment industry. I was thrilled to see an early copy because it parallels a similar vision I have been exploring since 2013. I believe MovieLabs paints an accurate picture of the great things we are going to be able to do using cloud and machine learning technology, but it also demonstrates how many challenges there are before we can enjoy all the benefits. Frame.io not only supports the conclusions of the MovieLabs white paper, we have already begun deploying solutions to bring a new virtual creative world to reality.

Main Image: (L-R) Michael Cioni and Emery Wells

IBC 2019 in Amsterdam: Big heads in the cloud

By David Cox

IBC 2019 kicked off with an intriguing announcement from Avid. The company entered into a strategic alliance with Microsoft and Disney’s Studio Lab to enable remote editorial workflows in the cloud.

The interesting part for me is how this affects the perception of post producing in the cloud, rather than the actual technology of it. It has been technically possible to edit remotely in the cloud for some time —either by navigating the Wild West interfaces of the principal cloud providers and “spinning up” a remote computer, connecting some storage and content, and then running an edit app or alternatively, by using a product that takes care of all that such as Blackbird. No doubt, the collaboration with Disney will produce products and services within an ecosystem that makes the technical use of the cloud invisible.

Avid press conference

However, what interests me is that arguably, the perception of post producing in the cloud is instantly changed. The greatest fear of post providers relates to the security of their clients’ intellectual property. Should a leak ever occur, to retain the client (or indeed avoid a catastrophic lawsuit), the post facility would have to make a convincing argument that security protocols were appropriate. Prior to the Disney/Avid/Microsoft Azure announcement, the part of that argument where the post houses say “…then we sent your valuable intellectual property to the cloud” caused a sticky moment. However, following this announcement, there has been an inherent endorsement by the owner of one of the most valuable IP catalogs (Disney) that post producing in the cloud is safe — or at least will be.

Cloudy Horizons
At the press conference where Avid made its Disney announcement, I asked whether the proposed cloud service would be a closed, Avid-only environment or an open platform to include other vendors. I pointed out that many post producers also use non-Avid products for various aspects, from color grading to visual. Despite my impertinence in mentioning competitors (even though Avid had kindly provided lunch), CEO Jeff Rosica provided a well-reasoned and practical response. To paraphrase, while he did not explicitly say the proposed ecosystem would be closed, he suggested that from a commercial viewpoint, other vendors would more likely want to make their own cloud offerings.

Rosica’s comments suggest that post houses can expect many clouds on their horizons from various application developers. The issue will then be how these connect to make coherent and streamlined workflows. This is not a new puzzle for post people to solve — we have been trying to make local systems from different manufacturers to talk to each other for years, with varying degrees of success. Making manufacturers’ various clouds work together would be an extension of that endeavor. Hopefully, manufacturers will use their own migrations to the cloud to further open their systems, rather than see it as an opportunity to play defensive, locking bespoke file systems and making cross-platform collaboration unnecessarily awkward. Too optimistic, perhaps!

Or One Big Cloud?
Separately to the above, just prior to IBC, MovieLabs introduced its white paper, which discussed a direction of travel for movie production toward the year 2030. The IBC produced a MovieLabs panel on the Sunday of the show, moderated by postPerspective’s own Randi Altman and featuring tech chiefs from the major studios. It would be foolish not to pay it proper consideration, given that it’s backed by Disney, Sony, Paramount, Warner Bros. and Universal.

MovieLabs panel

To summarize, the proposition is that the digital assets that will be manipulated to make content stay in one centralized cloud. Apps that manipulate those assets, such as editorial and visual effects apps, delivery processes and so on, will operate in the same cloud space. The talent that drives those apps will do so via the cloud. Or to put it slightly differently, the content assets don’t move — rather, the production apps and talent move to the assets. Currently, we do the opposite: the assets are transferred to where the post services are provided.

There are many advantages to this idea. Multiple transfers of digital assets to many post facilities would end. Files would be secured on a policy basis, enabling only the relevant operators to have access for the appropriate duration. Centralized content libraries would be produced, helping to enable on-the-fly localization, instant distribution and multi-use derivatives, such as marketing materials and games.

Of course, there are many questions. How do the various post application manufacturers maintain their product values if they all work as in-cloud applications on someone else’s hardware? What happens to traditional post production facilities if they don’t need any equipment and their artists log in from wherever? How would a facility protect itself from payment disputes if it does not have control over the assets it produces?

Personally, I have moved on from the idea of brick-and-mortar facilities. Cloud post permits nearly unlimited resources and access to a global pool of talent, not just those who reside within a commutable distance from the office. I say, bring it on… within reason. Of course, this initiative relates only to the production of content for those key studios. There’s a whole world of content production beyond that scope.

Blackmagic

Knowing Your Customer
Another area of interest for me at IBC 2019 was how offerings to colorists have become quite polarized. On one hand there is the seemingly all-conquering Resolve from Blackmagic Design. Inexpensive, easy to access and ubiquitous. On the other hand there is Baselight from FilmLight — a premium brand with a price tag and associated entry barrier to match. The fact that these two products are both successful in the same market but with very different strategies is testament to a fundamental business rule: “Know your customer.” If you know who your customer is going to be, you can design and communicate the ideal product for them and sell it at the right price.

A chat with FilmLight’s joint founder, Wolfgang Lempp, and development director Martin Tlaskal was very informative. Lempp explained that the demand placed on FilmLight’s customers is similarly polarized. On one hand, clients — including major studios and Netflix — mandate fastidious adherence to advanced and ever-improving technical standards, as well as image pipelines that are certified at every step. On the other hand, different clients place deadline or budget as a prevalent concern. Tlaskal set out for FilmLight to support those color specialists that aim for top-of-the industry excellence. Having the template for the target customer defines and drives what features FilmLight will develop for its Baselight product.

FilmLight

At IBC 2019, FilmLight hosted guest speaker-led demonstrations (“Colour on Stage”) to inspire creative grading and to present its latest features and improvements including better hue-angle keying, tracking and dealing with lens distortions.

Blackmagic is no less focused on knowing its customer, which explains its success in recent years. DaVinci Resolve once shared the “premium” space occupied by FilmLight but went through a transition to aim itself squarely at a democratized post production landscape. This shift meant a recognition that there would be millions of content producers and thousands of small post houses rather than a handful of large post facilities. That transition required a great deal more than merely slashing the price. The software product would have to work on myriad hardware combinations, not just the turnkey approved setup, and would need to have features and documentation aimed at those who hadn’t spent the past three years training in a post facility. By knowing exactly who the customer would be, Blackmagic built Resolve into an extremely successful, cross-discipline, post production powerhouse. Blackmagic was demonstrating the latest Resolve at IBC 2019, although all new features had been previously announced because, as director of software engineering Rohit Gupta explained, Blackmagic does not time its feature releases to IBC.

SGO

Aiming between the extremities established by FilmLight and Blackmagic Design, SGO promoted a new positioning of its flagship product, Mistika, via the Boutique subproduct. This is essentially a software-only Mistika that runs on PC or Mac. Subscription prices range from 99 euros per month to 299 euros per month, depending on features, although there have been several discounted promotions. The more expensive options include SGO’s highly regarded stereo 3D tools and camera stitching features for producing wrap-around movies.

Another IBC — done!


David Cox is a VFX compositor and colorist with more than 20 years of experience. He started his career with MPC and The Mill before forming his own London-based post facility. Cox specializes in unusual projects, such as those using very high resolutions and interactive immersive experiences featuring realtime render engines and augmented reality.

MovieLabs, film studios release ‘future of media creation’ white paper

MovieLabs (Motion Pictures Laboratories), a nonprofit technology research lab that works jointly with member studios Sony, Warner Bros., Disney, Universal and Paramount, has published a new white paper presenting an industry vision for the future of media creation technology by 2030.

The paper, co-authored by MovieLabs and technologists from Hollywood studios, paints a bold picture of future technology and discusses the need for the industry to work together now on innovative new software, hardware and production workflows to support and enable new ways to create content over the next 10 years. The white paper is available today for free download on the MovieLabs website.

The 2030 Vision paper lays out key principles that will form the foundation of this technological future, with examples and a discussion of the broader implications of each. The key principles envision a future in which:

1. All assets are created or ingested straight to the cloud and do not need to move.
2. Applications come to the media.
3. Propagation and distribution of assets is a “publish” function.
4. Archives are deep libraries with access policies matching speed, availability and security to the economics of the cloud.
5. Preservation of digital assets includes the future means to access and edit them.
6. Every individual on a project is identified and verified and their access permissions are efficiently and consistently managed.
7. All media creation happens in a highly secure environment that adapts rapidly to changing threats.
8. Individual media elements are referenced, tracked, interrelated and accessed using a universal linking system.
9. Media workflows are non-destructive and dynamically created using common interfaces, underlying data formats and metadata.
10. Workflows are designed around realtime iteration and feedback.

Rich Berger

“The next 10 years will bring significant opportunities, but there are still major challenges and inherent inefficiencies in our production and distribution workflows that threaten to limit our future ability to innovate,” says Richard Berger, CEO of MovieLabs. “We have been working closely with studio technology leaders and strategizing how to integrate new technologies that empower filmmakers to create ever more compelling content with more speed and efficiency. By laying out these principles publicly, we hope to catalyze an industry dialog and fuel innovation, encouraging companies and organizations to help us deliver on these ideas.”

The publication of the paper will be supported with a panel discussion at the IBC Conference in Amsterdam. The panel, “Hollywood’s Vision for the Future of Production in 2030,” will include senior technology leaders from the five major Hollywood motion picture studios. It will take place on Sunday, September 15 at 2:15pm in the IBC Conference in the Forum room of the RAI. postPerspective’s Randi Altman will moderate the panel made up of Sony’s Bill Baggelaar, Disney’s Shadi Almassizadeh, Universal’s Michael Wise and Paramount’s Anthony Guarino. More details can be found here.

“Sony Pictures Entertainment has a deep appreciation for the role that current and future technologies play in content creation,” says CTO of Sony Pictures Don Eklund. “As a subsidiary of a technology-focused company, we benefit from the power of Sony R&D and Sony’s product groups. The MovieLabs 2030 document represents the contribution of multiple studios to forecast and embrace the impact that cloud, machine learning and a range of hardware and software will have on our industry. We consider this a living document that will evolve over time and provide appreciated insight.”

According to Wise, SVP/CTO at Universal Pictures, “With film production experiencing unprecedented growth, and new innovative forms of storytelling capturing our audiences’ attention, we’re proud to be collaborating across the industry to envision new technological paradigms for our filmmakers so we can efficiently deliver worldwide audiences compelling entertainment.”

For those not familiar with MovieLabs, their stated goal is “to enable member studios to work together to evaluate new technologies and improve quality and security, helping the industry deliver next-generation experiences for consumers, reduce costs and improve efficiency through industry automation, and derive and share the appropriate data necessary to protect and market the creative assets that are the core capital of our industry.”