Tag Archives: Mission Digital

Behind the Title: Mission’s head of digital imaging, Pablo Garcia Soriano

NAME: Pablo Garcia Soriano (@pablo.garcia.soriano)

COMPANY: UK-based Mission (@missiondigital)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Mission is a provider of DIT and digital lab services based in London, with additional offices in Cardiff, Rome, Prague and Madrid. We process and manage media and metadata, producing rich deliverables with as much captured metadata as possible — delivering consistency and creating efficiencies in VFX and post production.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Head of Digital Imaging

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with cinematographers to preserve their vision from the point of capture until the final deliverable. This means supporting productions through camera tests, pre-production and look design. I also work with manufacturers, which often means I get an early look at new products.

Mission

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It sounds like a very technical job, but it’s so much more than engineering — it’s creative engineering. It’s problem solving and making technical complexities seem easy to a creative person.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with cinematographers to help them achieve their vision and make sure it is preserved through post. I also enjoy being able to experiment with the latest technology and have an influence on products. Recently, I’ve been involved with growing Mission’s international presence with our Madrid office, which is particularly close to my heart.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sometimes I get to spend hours in a dark room with a probe calibrating monitors. It’s dull but necessary!

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
In the early to mid-morning after two coffees. Also at the end of the day when the office is quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Gardening… or motor racing.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I feel like it chose me. I’m an architect by training, but was a working musician until around the age of 28 when I stepped down from the stage and started as a freelancer doing music promos. I was doing a bit of everything on those, director, editor, finishing, etc. Then I was asked to be the assistant editor on two films by a colleague whom I was sharing and office with.

After this experience (and due to the changes the music industry was going through), I decided to focus fully on editing several documentaries, short films. I then ended up on a weekly TV show where I was in charge of the final assembly. This is where I started paying attention to continuity and the overall look. I was using Apple Final Cut and Apple Color, which I loved. All of this happened in a very organic way and I was always self-taught.

I didn’t take studying seriously until I met the DP Rafa Roche, AEC, on our first film together around the age of 31. Rafa mentored me, teaching me all about cameras, lenses, filters and filled my brain with curiosity about all the technical stuff (signal, codecs, workflows). From there to now it all has been a bit of a rollercoaster with some moments of real vertigo caused by how fast it all has developed.

Downton Abby

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We work on a lot of features and television in the UK and Europe — recent projects include Cats, Downton Abbey, Cursed and Criminal.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
In 2018, I was the HDR image supervisor for the World Cup in Moscow. Knowing the popularity of football and working on a project that would be seen by so many people around the world was truly an honor, despite the pressure!

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A good reference monitor, a good set of speakers and Spotify.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, music is a huge part of my life. I have very varied taste. For example, I enjoy Wilco, REM and Black Sabbath.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to walk by the River Thames in Hammersmith, London, near where I live.

Whiskey Cavalier DPs weigh in on the show’s look, DITs

While ABC recently cancelled freshman series Whiskey Cavalier, their on-set workflow is an interesting story to tell. The will-they-won’t-they drama featured FBI agent Will Chase (Scott Foley) and CIA operative Frankie Trowbridge (Lauren Cohan) — his codename is Whiskey Cavalier and hers is Fiery Tribune. The two lead an inter-agency team of spies who travel all over the world, periodically saving the world and each other, all while navigating friendship, romance and office politics.

David “Moxy” Moxness

Like many episodic television shows, Whiskey Cavalier used two cinematographers who alternated episodes so that the directors could work side-by-side with a cinematographer while prepping. David “Moxy” Moxness, CSC, ASC, shot the pilot. Moxness had previously worked on shows like Lethal Weapon, Fringe and Smallville and was just finishing another show when Warner Bros. sent him the pilot script.

“I liked it and took a meeting with director Peter Atencio,” explains Moxness. “We had a great meeting and seemed to be on the same page creatively. For me, it’s so much about collaborating on good shows with great people. Whiskey gave me that feeling.” Sid Sidell, ASC, a friend and colleague of Moxness’, was brought on as the second DP.

While Whiskey Cavalier’s plot has its two main characters traveling all over the world, principal photography took place in Prague. Neither cinematographer had worked there previously, although Moxness had passed through on vacation years before. While prepping and shooting the pilot, Moxness developed the look of the show with director Atencio. “Peter and I had the idea of using the color red when our lead character Will Chase was conflicted emotionally to trigger an emotional response for him,” he explains. “This was a combo platter of set dressing, costumes and lighting. We were very precise about not having the color red in frame other than these times. Also, when the team was on a mission, we kept to a cooler palette while their home base, New York, used warmer tones.”

This didn’t always prove to be straightforward. “You still have to adjust to location surroundings — when scouting for the pilot, I realized Prague still had mostly sodium vapor streetlights, which are not often seen in America anymore,” explains Moxness. “This color was completely opposite to what Peter and I had discussed regarding our nighttime palette, and we had a big car chase over a few nights and in different areas. I knew time and resources would in no way allow us to change or adjust this, and that I would have to work backwards from the existing tones. Peter agreed and we reworked that into our game. For our flashbacks, I shot 35mm 4-perf film with an ARRI IIC hand-cranked camera and Kowa lenses. That was fun! We continued all of these techniques and looks during the series.”

DITs
Mission, a UK-based DIT/digital services provider serving Europe, was brought on to work beside the cinematographers. Mission has an ever-expanding roster of DITs and digital dailies lab operators and works with cinematographers from preproduction onward, safeguarding their color decisions as a project moves from production into post.

Moxness and Sidell hadn’t worked with Mission before, but a colleague of Moxness’ had spoken to him about the experience of working with Mission on a project the year before. This intrigued Moxness, so he was waiting for a chance to work with them.

“When Whiskey chose to shoot in Prague I immediately reached out to Mission’s managing director, Mark Purvis,” explains Moxness. “Mark was enthusiastic about setting us up on Whiskey. After a few conversations to get to know each other, Mark suggested DIT Nick Everett. Nick couldn’t have been a better match for me and our show.”

Interestingly, Sidell had often worked without a DIT before his time on Whiskey Cavalier. He says, “My thoughts on the DP/DIT relationship changed drastically on Whiskey Cavalier. By choice, before Whiskey, I did the majority of my work without a DIT. The opportunity to work alongside Nick Everett and his Mission system changed my view of the creative possibilities of working with a DIT.”

Gear
Whiskey Cavalier was shot with the ARRI Alexa Mini and primarily ARRI Master Prime lenses with a few Angenieux zooms. Both Moxness and Sidell had worked with the Mini numerous times before, finding it ideal for episodic television. The post workflow was simple. On set, Everett used Pomfort’s LiveGrade to set the look desired by the cinematographers. Final color was done at Picture Shop in Los Angeles by senior colorist George Manno.

Moxy (behind camera) and director/EP Peter Atencio (to his right) on the Prague set.

“There are a few inherent factors shooting episodic television that can, and often do, handcuff the DP with regards to maintaining their intended look,” says Moxness. “The shooting pace is very fast, and it is not uncommon for editorial, final color and sometimes even dailies to happen far away from the shooting location. Working with a properly trained and knowledgeable DIT allows the DP to create a desired look and get it into and down the post pipeline to maintain that look. Without a proper solid roadmap, others start to input their subjective vision, which likely doesn’t match that of the DP. When shooting, I feel a strong responsibility to put my thumbprint on the work as I was hired to do. If not, then why was I chosen over others?”

Since successfully working on Whiskey Cavalier in Prague, Mission has set up a local office in Prague, led by Mirek Sochor and dedicated to Mission’s expansion into Central Europe.

And Moxness will be heading back to Prague to shoot Amazon’s The Wheel of Time.

 

Digital services company Mission hires Mirek Sochor

UK-based Mission, which provides DIT and digital lab/dailies services, has hired Mirek Sochor as manager for Central Europe. Sochor joins Mission from Universal Production Partners (UPP) in Prague where he was the associate producer and supervisor of the film and TV services department. UPP is one of the biggest post facilities in mainland Europe.

Sochor’s recent credits include Crazy Rich Asians, Carnival Row and Genius. Additionally, in 2013 he was named by the Czech Republic’s Minister of Culture as an advising expert in economical and technological aspects in the field of technical development and innovation in cinematography, and in the field of preserving the national film heritage and making it accessible to the public.

At Mission, he will head business and production in Central Europe, spearheading the company’s expansion into Prague and beyond. For the last few months Mission’s DIT Nick Everett has been supporting cinematographers David Moxness, ASC, and Sid Sidell, ASC, on the ABC TV series Whiskey Cavalier. ABC’s Whiskey Cavalier stars Scott Foley and Lauren Cohan.

Mark Purvis, Mission’s managing director, saw the opportunities in Prague and other locations in Central Europe, explaining, “We are strongly committed to providing the same high level of support to productions as we have in the United Kingdom, with a focus on streamlining workflows, adding the best staff in key locations and continually training our technicians to better service our clients.”

Mission continues to grow, with offices in London and Wales and an ever-expanding roster of world-class DITs and digital dailies lab operators. They have recently worked on feature films Yesterday, Mary Queen of Scots and Downton Abbey, TV shows A Discovery of Witches, His Dark Materials and Whiskey Cavalier plus many more. They are a key partner to many cinematographers, working with them from pre-production onwards, safeguarding their color decisions as a project moves from production into post.