Tag Archives: Mexico City

Behind the Title: Cinematic Media head of sound Martin Hernández

This audio post pro’s favorite part of the job is the start of a project — having a conversation with the producer and the director. “It’s exciting, like any new relationship,” he says.

Name: Martin Hernández

Job Title: Supervising Sound Editor

Company: Mexico City’s Cinematic Media

Can you describe Cinematic Media and your role there?
I lead a new sound post department at Cinematic Media, Mexico’s largest post facility focused on television and cinema. We take production sound through the full post process: effects, backgrounds, music editing… the whole thing. We finish the sound on our mix stages.

What would surprise people most about what you do?
We want the sound to go unnoticed. The viewer shouldn’t be aware that something has been added or is unnatural. If the viewer is distracted from the story by the sound, it’s a lousy job. It’s like an actor whose performance draws attention to himself. That’s bad acting. The same applies to every aspect of filmmaking, including sound. Sound needs to help the narrative in a subjective and quiet way. The sound should be unnoticed… but still eloquent. When done properly, it’s magical.

Hernandez has been working on Easy for Netflix.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Entering the project for the first time and having a conversation with the team: the producer and the director. It’s exciting, like any new relationship. It’s beautiful. Even if you’re working with people you’ve worked with before, the project is newborn.

My second favorite part is the start of sound production, when I have a picture but the sound is a blank page. We must consider what to add. What will work? What won’t? How much is enough or too much? It’s a lot like cooking. The dish might need more of this spice and a little less of that. You work with your ingredients, apply your personal taste and find the right flavor. I enjoy cooking sound.

What’s your least favorite part of the job?
Me.

What do you mean?
I am very hard on myself. I only see my shortcomings, which are, to tell you the truth, many. I see my limitations very clearly. In my perception of things, it is very hard to get where I want to go. Often you fail, but every once in a while, a few things actually work. That’s why I’m so stubborn. I know I am going to have a lot of misses, so I do more than expected. I will shoot three or four times, hoping to hit the mark once or twice. It’s very difficult for me to work with me.

What is your most productive time of the day?
In the morning. I’m a morning person. I work from my own place, very early, like 5:30am. I wake up thinking about things that I left behind in the session. It’s useless to remain in bed, so I go to my studio and start working on these ideas. It’s amazing how much you can accomplish between 6am and 9am. You have no distractions. No one’s calling. No emails. Nothing. I am very happy working in the mornings.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing?
That’s a tough question! I don’t know anything else. Probably, I would cook. I’d go to a restaurant and offer myself as an intern in the kitchen.

For most people I know, their career is not something they’ve chosen; it was embedded in them when they were born. It’s a matter of realizing what’s there inside you and embracing it. I never, in my wildest dreams, expected to be doing this work.

When I was young, I enjoyed watching films, going to the movies, listening to music. My earliest childhood memories are sound memories, but I never thought that would be my work. It happened by accident. Actually, it was one accident after another. I found myself working with sound as a hobby. I really liked it, so I embraced it. My hobby then became my job.

So you knew early on that audio would be your path?
I started working in radio when I was 20. It happened by chance. A neighbor told me about a radio station that was starting up from scratch. I told my friend from school, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu, the director. Suddenly, we’re working at a radio station. We’re writing radio pieces and doing production sound. It was beautiful. We had our own on-air, live shows. I was on in the mornings. He did the noon show. Then he decided to make films and I followed him.

Easy

What are some of your recent projects?
I just finished a series for Joe Swanberg, the third season of Easy. It’s on Netflix. It’s the fourth project I’ve done with Joe. I’ve also done two shows here in Mexico. The first one is my first full-time job as supervisor/designer for Argos, the company lead by Epigmenio Ibarra. Yankee is our first series together for Netflix, and we’re cutting another one to be aired later in the year. It’s a very exciting for me.

Is there a project that you’re most proud of?
I am very proud of the results that we’ve been getting on the first two series here in Mexico. We built the sound crew from scratch. Some are editors I’ve worked with before, but we’ve also brought in new talent. That’s a very joyful process. Finding talent is not easy, but once you do, it’s very gratifying. I’m also proud of this work because the quality is very good. Our clients are happy, and when they’re happy, I’m happy.

What pieces of technology can you not live without?
Avid Pro Tools. It’s the universal language for sound. It allows me to share sound elements and sessions from all over the world, just like we do locally, between editing and mixing stages. The second is my converter. We are using the Red system from Focusrite. It’s a beautiful machine.

This is a high-stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Keep working.

Post house Cinematic Media opens in Mexico City, targets film, TV

Mexico City is now home to Cinematic Media, a full-service post production finishing facility focused on television and cinema content   Located on the lot at Estudios GGM, the facility offers dailies, look development, editorial finishing, color grading and other services, and aims to capitalize on entertainment media production in Mexico and throughout Central and South America.

Scot Evans

In its first project, Cinematic Media provided finishing services for the second season of the Netflix series Ingobernable.

CEO Scot Evans brings more than 25 years of post experience and has managed large-scale post production operations in the United States, Mexico and Canada. His recent posts include executive VP at Technicolor PostWorks in New York, managing director of Technicolor in Vancouver and managing director of Moving Picture Company (MPC) in Mexico City.

“We’re excited about the future for entertainment production in Mexico,” says Evans. “Netflix opened the door and now Amazon is in Mexico. We expect film production to also grow. Through its geographic location, strong infrastructure and cinematic history, Mexico is well-positioned to become a strong producer of content for the world market.”

Cinematic Media has been built from the ground up with a workflow modeled after top-tier facilities in Hollywood and geared toward television and cinema finishing. Engineering design was supervised by John Stevens, whose four decades of post experience includes stints at Cinesite, Efilm, The Post Group, Encore Hollywood, MTI Film and, currently, the Foundation.

Resources include a DI theater with DaVinci Resolve, 4K projection and 7.1 surround sound, four color suites supporting 2K, 4K and HDR, multiple editorial finishing suites, and a Colorfront On-Set Dailies system. The facility also offers look development services to assist productions in creating end-to-end color pipelines, as well as quality control and deliverable services for streaming, broadcast and cinema. Plans to add visual effects services are in the works.

“We can handle six or seven series simultaneously,” says Evans. “There is a lot of redundancy built into our pipeline, making it incredibly efficient and virtually eliminating downtime. A lot of facilities in Hollywood would be envious of what we have here.”

Cinematic Media features high-speed connectivity via the private network Sohonet. It will be employed to share media with studios, producers and distributors around the globe securely and efficiently. It will also be used to facilitate remote collaboration with directors, cinematographers, editors, colorists and other production partners.

Evans cites as a further plus Cinematic Media’s location within Estudios GGM, which has six sound stages, production and editorial office space, grip and lighting resources and more. Producers can take projects from concept to the screen from within the confines of the site. “We can literally walk down a flight of stairs to support a project shooting on one of the stages,” he says. “Proximity is important. We expect many productions to locate their offices and editorial teams here.”

Managing director Arturo Sedano will oversee day-to-day operations. He has supervised post for thousands of hours of television and cinema content on behalf of studios and producers from around the globe, including Netflix, Telemundo, Sony Pictures, Viacom, Lionsgate, HBO, TV Azteca, Grupo Imagen and Fox.

Other key staff includes senior colorist Ana Montaño whose experience as a digital colorist spans facilities in Mexico City, Barcelona, London, Dublin and Rome; producer and post supervisor Cyntia Navarro, previously with Lejana Films and Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (IMCINE). Her credits span episodic television, feature film and documentaries, and include projects for IFC Films, Canal Once, UPI, Discovery Channel, Netflix and Amazon.

Additional staff includes chief technology officer Oliver De Gante, previously with Ollin VFX, where his credits included the hit films Chappie, Her, Tron: Legacy and The Social Network, as well as the Netflix series House of Cards; technical director Gabriel Kerlegand, a workflow specialist and digital imaging technologist with 18 years of experience in cinema and television; and coordinator and senior conform editor Humberto Flores, formerly senior editor at Zenith Adventure Media.