Tag Archives: Maxon Cinema 4D R20

Review: Maxon Cinema 4D Release 20

By Brady Betzel

Last August, Maxon made available its Cinema 4D Release 20. From the new node-based Material Editor to the all new console used to debug and develop scripts, Maxon has really upped the ante.

At the recent NAB show, Maxon announced that they acquired Redshift Rendering Technologies, the makers of the Redshift rendering engine. This acquisition will hopefully tie in an industry standard GPU-based rendering engine inside of Cinema 4D R20’s workflow and speed up rendering. As of now there is still the same licensing fees attached to Redshift as there were before the acquisition: Node-Locked is $500 and Floating is $600.

Digging In
The first update to Cinema 4D R20 that I wanted to touch on is the new node-based Material Editor. If you are familiar with Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve or Nuke’s applications, then you have seen how nodes work. I love how nodes work, allowing the user to not only layer up effects — or in Cinema 4D R20’s case — diffusion to camera distance. There are over 150 nodes inside of the material editor to build textures with.

One small change that I noticed inside of the updated Material Editor was the new gradient settings. When you are working with gradient knots you can now select multiple knots at once and then right click and double the selected knots, invert the knots, select different knot interpolations (including stepped, smooth, cubic, linear, and blend) and even distribute the knots to clean up your pattern. A real nice and convenient update to gradient workflows.

In Cinema 4D R20, not only can you add new nodes from the search menu, but you can also click the node dots in the Basic properties window and route nodes through there. When you are happy with your materials made in the node editor, you can save them as assets in the scene file or even compress them in a .zip file to share with others.

In a related update category, Cinema 4D Release 20 has introduced the Uber Material. In simple terms (and I mean real simple), the Uber Material is a node-based material that is different from standard or physical materials because it can be edited inside of the Attribute Manager or Material Editor but retain the properties available in the Node Editor.

The Camera Tracking and 2D Camera View has been updated. While the Camera Tracking mode has been improved, the new 2D Camera View mode has combined the Film Move mode with the Film Zoom mode. Adding the ability to use standard shortcuts to move around a scene instead of messing with the Film Offset or Focal Length in the Camera Object Properties dialogue. For someone like me who isn’t a certified pro in Cinema 4D, these little shortcuts really make me feel at home. Much more like apps I’m used to such as Mocha Pro or After Effects. Maxon has also improved the 2D tracking algorithm for much tighter tracks as well as added virtual keyframes. The virtual keyframes are an extreme help when you don’t have time for minute adjustments.

Volume Modeling
What seems to be one of the largest updates in Cinema 4D R20 is the addition of Volume Modeling with the OpenVDB-based Volume Builder. According to www.openvdb.org, “OpenVDB is an Academy Award-winning C++ library comprising a hierarchical data structure and a suite of tools for the efficient manipulation of sparse, time-varying, volumetric data discretized on three-dimensional grids,” developed by Ken Museth at DreamWorks Animation. It uses 3D pixels called voxels instead of polygons. When using the Volume Builder you can combine multiple polygon and primitive objects using Boolean operations: Union, Subtract or Intersect. Furthermore you can smooth your volume using multiple techniques, including one that made me do some extra Google work: Laplacian Flow.

Fields
When going down the voxel rabbit hole in Cinema 4D R20, you will run into another new update: Fields. Prior to Cinema 4D R20, we would use Effectors to affect strength values of an object. You would stack and animate multiple effectors to achieve different results. In Cinema 4D R20, under the Falloff tab you will now see a Fields list along with the types of Field Objects to choose from.

Imagine you make a MoGraph object that you want its opacity to be controlled by a box object moving through your MoGraph but also physically modified by a capsule poking through. You can combine these different field object effectors by using compositing functions in the Fields list. In addition you can animate or alter these new fields straight away in the Objects window.

Summing Up
Cinema 4D Release 20 has some amazing updates that will greatly improve efficiency and quality of your work. From tracking updates to field updates, there are plenty of exciting tools to dive into. And if you are reading this as an After Effects user who isn’t sure about Cinema 4D, now is the time to dive in. Once you learn the basics, whether it’s from Youtube tutorials or you sign up for www.cineversity.com classes, you will immediately see an increase in the quality of your work.

Combining Adobe After Effects, Element 3D and Cinema 4D R20 is the ultimate in 3D motion graphics and 2D compositing — accessible to almost everyone. And I didn’t even touch on the dozens of other updates to Cinema 4D R20 like the multitude of ProRender updates, FBX import/export options, new node materials and CAD import support for Cataia, Iges, JT, Solidworks and Step formats. Check out Cinema 4D Release 20’s newest features on YouTube and on their website.

And, finally, I think it’s safe to assume that Maxon’s acquisition of RedShift renderer poses a bright future for Cinema 4D users.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

postPerspective Impact Award winners from SIGGRAPH 2018

postPerspective has announced the winners of our Impact Awards from SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver. Seeking to recognize debut products with real-world applications, the postPerspective Impact Awards are voted on by an anonymous judging body made up of respected industry artists and professionals. It’s working pros who are going to be using new tools — so we let them make the call.

The awards honor innovative products and technologies for the visual effects, post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. They celebrate companies that push the boundaries of technology to produce tools that accelerate artistry and actually make users’ working lives easier.

While SIGGRAPH’s focus is on VFX, animation, VR/AR, AI and the like, the types of gear they have on display vary. Some are suited for graphics and animation, while others have uses that slide into post production, which makes these SIGGRAPH Impact Awards doubly interesting.

The winners are as follows:

postPerspective Impact Award — SIGGRAPH 2018 MVP Winner:

They generated a lot of buzz at the show, as well as a lot of votes from our team of judges, so our MVP Impact Award goes to Nvidia for its Quadro RTX raytracing GPU.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Winners:

  • Maxon for its Cinema 4D R20 3D design and animation software.
  • StarVR for its StarVR One headset with integrated eye tracking.

postPerspective Impact Awards — SIGGRAPH 2018 Horizon Winners:

This year we have started a new Imapct Award category. Our Horizon Award celebrates the next wave of impactful products being previewed at a particular show. At SIGGRAPH, the winners were:

  • Allegorithmic for its Substance Alchemist tool powered by AI.
  • OTOY and Epic Games for their OctaneRender 2019 integration with UnrealEngine 4.

And while these products and companies didn’t win enough votes for an award, our voters believe they do deserve a mention and your attention: Wrnch, Google Lightfields, Microsoft Mixed Reality Capture and Microsoft Cognitive Services integration with PixStor.

 

Maxon intros Cinema 4D Release 20

Maxon will be at Siggraph this year showing the next iteration of its Cinema 4D Release 20 (R20), an update of its 3D design and animation software. Release 20 introduces high-end features for VFX and motion graphics artists including node-based materials, volume modeling, CAD import and an evolution of the MoGraph toolset.

Maxon expects Cinema 4D Release 20 to be available this September for both Mac and Windows operating systems.

Key highlights in Release 20 include:
Node-Based Materials – This feature provides new possibilities for creating materials — from simple references to complex shaders — in a node-based editor. With more than 150 nodes to choose from that perform different functions, artists can combine nodes to easily build complex shading effects. Users new to a node-based material workflow still can rely on Cinema 4D’s standard Material Editor interface to create the corresponding node material in the background automatically. Node-based materials can be packaged into assets with user-defined parameters exposed in a similar interface to Cinema 4D’s Material Editor.

MoGraph Fields – New capabilities in this procedural animation toolset offer an entirely new way to define the strength of effects by combining falloffs — from simple shapes, to shaders or sounds to objects and formulas. Artists can layer Fields atop each other with standard mixing modes and remap their effects. They can also group multiple Fields together and use them to control effectors, deformers, weights and more.

CAD Data Import – Popular CAD formats can be imported into Cinema 4D R20 with a drag and drop. A new scale-based tessellation interface allows users to adjust detail to build amazing visualizations. Step, Solidworks, JT, Catia V5 and IGES formats are supported.

Volume Modeling – Users can create complex models by adding or subtracting basic shapes in Boolean-type operations using Cinema 4D R20’s OpenVDB–based Volume Builder and Mesher. They can also procedurally build organic or hard-surface volumes using any Cinema 4D object, including new Field objects. Volumes can be exported in sequenced .vdb format for use in any application or render engine that supports OpenVDB.

ProRender Enhancements — ProRender in Cinema 4D R20 extends the GPU-rendering toolset with key features including subsurface scattering, motion blur and multipasses. Also included are Metal 2 support, an updated ProRender core, out-of-core textures and other architectural enhancements.

Core Technology Modernization —As part of the transition to a more modern core in Cinema 4D, R20 comes with substantial API enhancements, the new node framework, further development on the new modeling framework and a new UI framework.

During Siggraph, Maxon will have guest artists presenting at their booth each day of the show. Presentations will be live streamed on C4DLive.com.