Tag Archives: Matt Osborne

Behind the Title: Spot Welders’ editor Matt Osborne

After the time-consuming and sometimes stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material.

NAME: Matt Osborne

COMPANY: Spot Welders

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Spot Welders is a creative editorial company.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Offline Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I take all the footage that production shoots, make selects on the best shots and performances, and craft it into a cohesive narrative or visually engaging film. I then work with the director, agency and client to get the best out of the material and try to make sure everyone is happy with the final result.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of footage that editors get these days. The average person might think we just cut out the bad bits or choose the best takes and string them together, but we might get up to 30 hours of footage or more for a single 60-second commercial with no storyboard. It’s our job to somehow make sense of it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with directors. After the time-consuming and sometimes quite stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I really enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material. I like making sure we have the best moments and are telling the story in the most interesting way possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sitting for long hours. I really want to try out one of those standing desks! Also, trying to wrangle 100 different opinions into the edit without butchering it.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Probably the morning after sleeping on an edit. There’s something about coming in with fresh eyes and marveling at your wondrous edit from the previous night. Or, conversely, crying about the disaster you have in front of you that needs immediate fixing. Either way, I find this is the best time to get in the flow with new ideas and work very quickly at improving the edit.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
After high school, I spent about five years working at various ski resorts in Australia and Canada and snowboarding every day, so I guess I’d still be doing that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
It sounds cheesy but in hindsight I was probably destined to be an editor. I was always drawn to puzzles and figuring out how things go together, and editing is a lot like a giant puzzle with no correct answers.

I made skate videos with two VHS decks as a teenager, and then I realized a few years later that you could do it on a computer and could get paid to basically do the same thing. That’s when I knew it was the job for me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Audi, Nike, BMW and a couple of very cool passion projects, which will hopefully be released soon.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
Not really. It almost always comes down to storytelling. Whether that’s narrative or purely visual, you want to make the viewer feel something, so that’s always the goal. The methods to get there are usually pretty much the same.

Cayenne

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Commercially, probably the Porsche film, Cayenne, with Rob Chiu at Iconoclast. It was a big project for the global release of a new car. They shot in amazing locations, and the footage was incredible, so I felt a lot of pressure on that one I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Personally, the Medicine music video I did with Salomon Ligthelm and Khalid Mohtaseb was a humbling experience and something I’m very proud of. It’s actually more of a narrative short film than a music video and tells the fictionalized story of a real-life couple, in which the wife is blind.

It was a very sensitive story, shot beautifully and using non-actors. It might be the only time I’ve cried watching the rushes. I think we successfully managed to instill that raw emotion into the final edit.

Medicine

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I grew up on Final Cut Pro. I taught myself to edit back on Version 2 by reading the manual while working in a factory packing carrots. I was pretty upset when they ditched it but moved over to Avid Media Composer and haven’t looked back. I love it now. Well, maybe except for the effects tool.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Yes, it’s sometimes expected these days that the offline will look and sound like the final product, so color grading, sound design, music editing, comping, etc.

Personally, if I have time, I’ll try and do some of these things on a basic level to get the edit approved, but it’s all going to be taken over by very talented professionals in their own craft who will do a much better job than I ever could. So I prefer to focus on the actual nuts and bolts — am I using the best shots? Am I telling this story in the most compelling, engaging and entertaining way possible? But sometimes you’ve got to throw a whoosh in to make people happy.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, Garmin, MacBook. Although I spent a couple weeks on beaches last year and learned we don’t really need any of it, well, at least while you’re on the beach, and not working!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’ve gotten completely addicted to running the past couple of years. I find there’s nothing better than a run at 5am to clear the mind.