Tag Archives: James Cameron

Rob Legato to receive HPA’s Lifetime Achievement Award 

The Hollywood Professional Association (HPA) will honor renowned visual effects supervisor and creative Robert Legato with its Lifetime Achievement Award at the HPA Awards at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles on November 21. Now in its 14th year, the HPA Awards recognize creative artistry, innovation and engineering excellence in the media content industry. The Lifetime Achievement Award honors the recipients’ dedication to the betterment of the industry.

Legato is an iconic figure in the visual effects industry with multiple Oscar, BAFTA and Visual Effects Society nominations and awards to his credit. He is a multi-hyphenate on many of his projects, serving as visual effects supervisor, VFX director of photography and second unit director. From his work with studios and directors and in his roles at Sony Pictures Imageworks and Digital Domain, he has developed a variety of digital workflows.

He has enjoyed collaborations with leading directors including James Cameron, Jon Favreau, Martin Scorsese and Robert Zemeckis. Legato’s career in VFX began in television at Paramount Pictures, where he supervised visual effects on two Star Trek series, which earned him two Emmy awards. He left Paramount to join the newly formed Digital Domain where he worked with founders James Cameron, Stan Winston and Scott Ross. He remained at Digital Domain until he segued to Sony Imageworks.

Legato began his feature VFX career on Neil Jordan’s Interview with the Vampire. He then served as VFX supervisor and DP for the VFX unit on Ron Howard’s Apollo 13, which earned him his first Academy Award nomination, and a win at the BAFTAs. He worked with James Cameron on Titanic, earning him his first Academy Award. Legato continued to work with Cameron, conceiving and creating the virtual cinematography pipeline for Cameron’s visionary Avatar.

Legato has also enjoyed a long collaboration with Martin Scorsese that began with his consultation on Kundun and continued with the multi-award winning film The Aviator, on which he served as co-second unit director/cameraman and VFX supervisor. Legato’s work on The Aviator won him three VES awards. He returned to work with the director on the Oscar Best Picture winner The Departed as the 2nd unit director/cameraman and VFX supervisor.  Legato and Scorsese collaborated once again on Shutter Island, on which he was both VFX supervisor and 2nd unit director/cameraman. He continued on to Scorsese’s 3D film Hugo, which was nominated for 11 Oscars and 11 BAFTAs, including Best Picture and Best Visual Effects. Legato won his second Oscar for Hugo as well as three VES Society Awards. His collaboration with Scorsese continued with The Wolf of Wall Street as well as with non-theatrical and advertising projects such as the Clio award-winning Freixenet: The Key to Reserva, a 10-minute commercial project, and the Rolling Stones feature documentary, Shine a Light.

Legato worked with director Jon Favreau on Disney’s The Jungle Book (second unit director/cinematographer and VFX supervisor) for which he received his third Academy Award, a British Academy Award, five VES Awards, an HPA Award and the Critics’ Choice Award for Best Visual Effects for 2016. His latest film with Favreau is Disney’s The Lion King, which surpassed $1 billion in box office after fewer than three weeks in theaters.

Legato’s extensive credits include serving as VFX supervisor on Chris Columbus’ Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, as well as on two Robert Zemeckis films, What Lies Beneath and Cast Away. He was senior VFX supervisor on Michael Bay’s Bad Boys II, which was nominated for a VES Award for Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects, and for Digital Domain he worked on Bay’s Armageddon.

Legato is a member of ASC, BAFTA, DGA, AMPAS, VES, and the Local 600 and Local 700 unions.

Sony updates Venice to V2 firmware, will add HFR support

At CineGear, Sony introduced new updates and developments for its Venice CineAlta camera system including Version 2 firmware, which will now be available in early July.

Sony also showed the new Venice Extension System, which features expanded flexibility and enhanced ergonomics. Also announced was Sony’s plan for high frame rate support for the Venice system.

Version 2 adds new features and capabilities specifically requested by production pros to deliver more recording capability, customizable looks, exposure tools and greater lens freedom. Highlights include:

With 15+ stops of exposure latitude, Venice will support high base ISO of 2500 in addition to an existing ISO of 500, taking full advantage of Sony’s sensor for superb low-light performance with dynamic range from +6 stops to -9 stops as measured at 18% middle gray. This increases exposure indexes at higher ISOs for night exteriors, dark interiors, working with slower lenses or where content needs to be graded in high dynamic range while maintaining the maximum shadow details; Select FPS (off speed) in individual frame increments, from 1 to 60; V2.0 adds several Imager Modes, including 25p in 6K full-frame, 25p in 4K 4:3 anamorphic, 6K 17:9, 1.85:1 and 4K 6:5 anamorphic imager modes; user-uploadable 3D LUTs allows users to customize their own looks and save them directly into the camera; wired LAN remote control allows users to remotely control and change key functions, including camera settings, fps, shutter, EI, iris (Sony E-mount lens), record start/stop and built-in optical ND filters; and E-mount allows users to remove the PL mount and use a wide assortment of native E-mount lenses.

The Venice Extension System is a full-frame tethered extension system that allows the camera body to detach from the actual image sensor block with no degradation in image quality up to 20 feet apart. These are the result of Sony’s long-standing collaboration with James Cameron’s Lightstorm Entertainment.

“This new tethering system is a perfect example of listening to our customers, gathering strong and consistent feedback, and then building that input into our product development,” said Peter Crithary, marketing manager for motion picture cameras, Sony. “The Avatar sequels will be among the first feature films to use the new Venice Extension System, but it also has tremendous potential for wider use with handheld stabilizers, drones, gimbals and remote mounting in confined places.”

Also at CineGear, Sony shared the details of a planned optional upgrade to support high frame rate — targeting speeds up to 60fps in 6K, up to 90fps in 4K and up to 120fps in 2K. It will be released in North America in the spring of 2019.