Tag Archives: Goldcrest Post

The sounds of HBO’s Divorce: Keeping it real

HBO’s Divorce, which stars Sarah Jessica Parker and Thomas Haden Church, focuses on a long-married couple who just can’t do it anymore. It follows them from divorce through their efforts to move on with their lives, and what that looks like. The show deftly tackles a very difficult subject with a heavy dose of humor mixed in with the pain and angst. The story takes place in various Manhattan locations and a nearby suburb. And as you can imagine the sounds of the neighborhoods vary.

                           
Eric Hirsch                                                              David Briggs

Sound post production for the third season of HBO’s comedy Divorce was completed at Goldcrest Post in New York City. Supervising sound editor David Briggs and re-recording mixer Eric Hirsch worked together to capture the ambiances of upscale Manhattan neighborhoods that serve as the backdrop for the story of the tempestuous breakup between Frances and Robert.

As is often the case with comedy series, the imperative for Divorce’s sound team was to support the narrative by ensuring that the dialogue is crisp and clear, and jokes are properly timed. However, Briggs and Hirsch go far beyond that in developing richly textured soundscapes to achieve a sense of realism often lacking in shows of the genre.

“We use sound to suggest life is happening outside the immediate environment, especially for scenes that are shot on sets,” explains Hirsch. “We work to achieve the right balance, so that the scene doesn’t feel empty but without letting the sound become so prominent that it’s a distraction. It’s meant to work subliminally so that viewers feel that things are happening in suburban New York, while not actually thinking about it.”

Season three of the show introduces several new locations and sound plays a crucial role in capturing their ambience. Parker’s Frances, for example, has moved to Inwood, a hip enclave on the northern tip of Manhattan, and background sound effects help to distinguish it from the woodsy village of Hastings-on-Hudson, where Haden Church’s Robert continues to live. “The challenge was to create separation between those two worlds, so that viewers immediately understand where we are,” explains series producer Mick Aniceto. “Eric and David hit it. They came up with sounds that made sense for each part of the city, from the types of cars you hear on the streets to the conversations and languages that play in the background.”

Meanwhile, Frances’ friend, Diane, (Molly Shannon) has taken up residence in a Manhattan high-rise and it, too, required a specific sonic treatment. “The sounds that filter into a high-rise apartment are much different from those in a street-level structure,” Aniceto notes. “The hum of traffic is more distant, while you hear things like the whirl of helicopters. We had a lot of fun exploring the different sonic environments. To capture the flavor of Hudson-on-Hastings, our executive producer and showrunner came up the idea of adding distant construction sounds to some scenes.”

A few scenes from the new season are set inside a prison. Aniceto says the sound team was able to help breathe life into that environment through the judicious application of very specific sound design. “David Briggs had just come off of Escape at Dannemora, so he was very familiar with the sounds of a prison,” he recalls. “He knew the kind of sounds that you hear in communal areas, not only physical sounds like buzzers and bells, but distant chats among guards and visitors. He helped us come up with amusing bits of background dialogue for the loop group.”

Most of the dialogue came directly from the production tracks, but the sound team hosted several ADR sessions at Goldcrest for crowd scenes. Hirsch points to an episode from the new season that involves a girls basketball team. ADR mixer Krissopher Chevannes recorded groups of voice actors (provided by Dann Fink and Bruce Winant of Loopers Unlimited) to create background dialogue for a scene on a team bus and another that happens during a game.

“During the scene on the bus, the girls are talking normally, but then the action shifts to slo-mo. At that point the sound design goes away and the music drives it,” Hirsch recalls. “When it snaps back to reality, we bring the loop-group crowd back in.”

The emotional depth of Divorce marks it as different from most television comedies, it also creates more interesting opportunities for sound. “The sound portion of the show helps take it over the line and make it real for the audience,” says Aniceto. “Sound is a big priority for Divorce. I get excited by the process and the opportunities it affords to bring scenes to life. So, I surround myself by smart and talented people like Eric and David, who understand how to do that and give the show the perfect feel.”

All three seasons of Divorce are available on HBO Go and HBO Now.

Goldcrest Post hires industry vet Dom Rom as managing director

Domenic Rom, a veteran of the New York post world, has joined Goldcrest Post as managing director. In this new role, he will oversee operations, drive sales and pursue growth strategies for Goldcrest, a provider of post services for film and television. Rom was most recently president/GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services in LA.

“Domenic is a visionary leader who brings a client-centric approach toward facility management, and understands the industry’s changing dynamics,” says Goldcrest Films owner/executive director Nick Quested. “He inspires his team to perform at a peak level and deliver the quality services our clients expect.”

In his previous position, Rom led Deluxe’s global services for television, including its subsidiaries Encore and Level 3. Prior to that, he was managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which included East Coast operations for Encore, Company 3 and Method. He was SVP at Technicolor Creative Services for three years and an executive at Postworks for 11. Rom began his career as a colorist at DuArt Film Labs, eventually becoming executive VP in charge of its digital and film labs.

Rom says that he looks forward to working with Goldcrest Post’s management team, including head of production Gretchen McGowan and head of picture Jay Tilin. “We intend to be a very client-oriented facility,” he notes. “When clients walk in the door, they should feel at home, feel that this is their place. Jay and Gretchen both get that. We will work together very closely to ensure Goldcrest is a solid, responsive facility.”

He is also very happy about being back in New York City. “New York is my home,” says Rom. “When I decided to come back to the city just walking around town made me feel alive again. The New York market is so tight, the energy so high it just felt right. The people are real, the clients are amazing and the work is equal to anywhere in the world. I don’t regret a second of the past few years… I expanded my knowledge of other markets and made life-long friendships all over the world. At the end of the day though, my family and my work family are in New York.”

Recent projects for Goldcrest include the Netflix series Russian Doll and the independent features Sorry to Bother You, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Native Son and High Flying Bird.

IBC: Surrounded by sound

By Simon Ray

I came to the 2016 IBC Show in Amsterdam at the start of a period of consolidation at Goldcrest in London. We had just gone through three years of expansion, upgrading, building and installing. Our flagship Dolby Atmos sound mixing theatre finished its first feature, Jason Bourne, and the DI department recently upgraded to offer 4K and HDR.

I didn’t have a particular area to research at the show, but there were two things that struck me almost immediately on arrival: the lack of drones and the abundance of VR headsets.

Goldcrest’s Atmos mixing stage.

360 audio is an area I knew a little about, and we did provide a binaural DTS Headphone X mix at the end of Jason Bourne, but there was so much more to learn.

Happily, my first IBC meeting was with Fraunhofer, where I was updated on some of the developments they have made in production, delivery and playback of immersive and 360 sound. Of particular interest was their Cingo technology. This is a playback solution that lives in devices such as phones and tablets and can already be found in products from Google, Samsung and LG. This technology renders 3D audio content onto headphones and can incorporate head movements. That means a binaural render that gives spatial information to make the sound appear to be originating outside the head rather than inside, as can be the case when listening to traditionally mixed stereo material.

For feature films, for example, this might mean taking the 5.1 home theatrical mix and rendering it into a binaural signal to be played back on headphones, giving the listener the experience of always sitting in the sweet spot of a surround sound speaker set-up. Cingo can also support content with a height component, such as 9.1 and 11.1 formats, and add that into the headphone stream as well to make it truly 3D. I had a great demo of this and it worked very well.

I was impressed that Fraunhofer had also created a tool for creating immersive content, a plug-in called Cingo Composer that could run as both VST and AAX plug-ins. This could run in Pro Tools, Nuendo and other DAWs and aid the creation of 3D content. For example, content could be mixed and automated in an immersive soundscape and then rendered into an FOA (First Order Ambisonics or B-Format) 4-channel file that could be played with a 360 video to be played on VR headsets with headtracking.

After Fraunhofer, I went straight to DTS to catch up with what they were doing. We had recently completed some immersive DTS:X theatrical, home theatrical and, as mentioned above, headphone mixes using the DTS tools, so I wanted to see what was new. There were some nice updates to the content creation tools, players and renderers and a great demo of the DTS decoder doing some live binaural decoding and headtracking.

With immersive and 3D audio being the exciting new things, there were other interesting products on display that related to this area. In the Future Zone Sennheiser was showing their Ambeo VR mic (see picture, right). This is an ambisonic microphone that has four capsules arranged in a tetrahedron, which make up the A-format. They also provide a proprietary A-B format encoder that can run as a VST or AAX plug-in on Mac and Windows to process the outputs of the four microphones to the W,X,Y,Z signals (the B-format).

From the B-Format it is possible to recreate the 3D soundfield, but you can also derive any number of first-order microphones pointing in any direction in post! The demo (with headtracking and 360 video) of a man speaking by the fireplace was recorded just using this mic and was the most convincing of all the binaural demos I saw (heard!).

Still in the Future Zone, for creating brand new content I visited the makers of the Spatial Audio Toolbox, which is similar to the Cingo Creator tool from Fraunhofer. B-Com’s Spatial Audio Toolbox contains VST plug-ins (soon to be AAX) to enable you to create an HOA (higher order ambisonics) encoded 3D sound scene using standard mono, stereo or surround source (using HOA Pan) and then listen to this sound scene on headphones (using Render Spk2Bin).

The demo we saw at the stand was impressive and included headtracking. The plug-ins themselves were running on a Pyramix on the Merging Technologies stand in Hall 8. It was great to get my hands on some “live” material and play with the 3D panning and hear the effect. It was generally quite effective, particularly in the horizontal plane.

I found all this binaural and VR stuff exciting. I am not sure exactly how and if it might fit into a film workflow, but it was a lot of fun playing! The idea of rendering a 3D soundfield into a binaural signal has been around for a long time (I even dedicated months of my final year at university to writing a project on that very subject quite a long time ago) but with mixed success. It is exciting to see now that today’s mobile devices contain the processing power to render the binaural signal on the fly. Combine that with VR video and headtracking, and the ability to add that information into the rendering process, and you have an offering that is very impressive when demonstrated.

I will be interested to see how content creators, specifically in the film area, use this (or don’t). The recreation of the 3D surround sound mix over 2-channel headphones works well, but whether headtracking gets added to this or not remains to be seen. If the sound is matched to video that’s designed for an immersive experience, then it makes sense to track the head movements with the sound. If not, then I think it would be off-putting. Exciting times ahead anyway.

Simon Ray is head of operations and engineering Goldcrest Post Production in London.

IBC 2015 Blog: HDR displays

By Simon Ray

It was an interesting couple of days in Amsterdam. I was hoping to get some more clarity on where things were going with the High Dynamic Range concept in both professional and consumer panels, as well as delivery mechanisms to get it to the consumers. I am leaving IBC knowing more, but no nearer a coherent idea as to exactly where this is heading.

I initially visited Dolby to get an update on Dolby Vision (our main image), see where they were with their Dolby Vision technology and most importantly get my reserved tickets for the screening of Fantastic Four in the Auditorium (Laser Projection and Dolby Atmos). It all sounded very positive with news of a number of consumer panel manufacturers being close to releasing Dolby Vision-capable TVs. For example, Vizio with their Reference Series panel and streaming services like VUDU streaming Dolby Vision HDR content, although this is just in the USA to begin with. I also had my first look at a Dolby “Quantum Dot” HDR display panel, which did look good and surely has the best name of any tech out here.

There are other HDR offerings out there with Amazon Prime having announced in August that they will be streaming HDR content in the UK, but not initially in the Dolby Vision format (HDR video is available with the Amazon Instant Video app for Samsung SUHD TVs like the JS9000, JS9100 and JS9500 series) and selected LG TVs (G9600 and G9700 series) and the “big” TV manufacturers have or are about to launch HDR panels. So far so good.

Pro HDR Monitors
Things got bit more vague again when I started looking into HDR-equipped professional panels for color correction. There are only two I could find in the show: Sony had an impressive HDR-ready panel connected to a Filmlight BaseLight tucked away on their large stand in Hall 12; and Canon, who had their equally impressive prototype display tucked away in Hall 11 connected to a SGO Mistika. Both displays had different brightness specs and gamma options.

canon

When I asked some other manufacturers about their HDR panels the response was the same: “We are going to wait until the specifications are finalized before committing to an HDR monitor.” This leaves me to think this is a bad time to be buying a monitor. You are either going to buy an HDR monitor now, which may not be correct to the final specifications, or you are going to be buying a non-HDR monitor that is likely to be superseded in the near future.

Another thing I noticed was that the professional HDR panels were all being shown off in a carefully (or as carefully as a trade show allows) light environment to give them the best opportunity to make an impact. Any ambient light getting into the viewing environment is going to detract from the benefits of having the increased dynamic range and brightness of the HDR display, which I imagine might be a problem in the average living room. I hope this does not reduce the chance of this technology making an impact because it is great to see images seemingly having more depth and quality to them. As a representative on the Sony stand said, “It feels more immersive — I am so much more engaged in the picture.”

sony

Dolby
The problem of the ambient light was also picked up on in an interesting talk in the Auditorium as part of the “HDR: From zero to infinity” series. There were speakers from iMax, Dolby, Barco and Sony talking about the challenges of bringing HDR to the cinema. I had come across the idea of HDR in cinema from Dolby through their “Dolby Cinema” project, which brings together HDR picture and immersive sound with Dolby Atmos.

I am in the process of building a theatre to mix theatrical soundtracks in Dolby Atmos, but despite the exciting opportunities for sound that Atmos offers the sound teams, in the UK at least the take up by Cinemas is slow. One of the best things about Dolby Atmos for me is that if you go to see a film in Atmos, you know that the speaker system is going to be of a certain standard, otherwise Dolby would not have given it Atmos status. For too long, cinemas have been allowed to let the speaker systems wear down to the point where it becomes unlistenable. If these new initiatives can give cinemas an opportunity to reinvest in the equipment (and the various financial implications and challenges and who would meet these costs were discussed) and get a return on that investment it could be a chance to stop the rot and improve the cinema going experience. And, importantly, for us in post it gives us an exciting high bench mark to be aiming for when working on films.

Simon Ray is head of operations and engineering Goldcrest Post Production in London.

Goldcrest UK adds Patrick Malone as MD, ups Chris Quested to CEO

London – Goldcrest Post, with the intent of entering the UK film post arena has named Patrick Malone (pictured) as managing director. Former managing director Chris Quested has been named CEO.

Based in London, Malone will oversee the accelerated growth of the company’s digital intermediate department in addition to strengthening the executive management of the existing sound facility, home to the Academy Award-winning team from Les Misérables.

Malone most recently served as Head of DI at Company 3, a subsidiary of Deluxe Entertainment Services and a pioneering provider of post services to all the major studios, where he was responsible for feature films collaborating with filmmakers such as Ron Howard on Rush, Sam Mendes on Skyfall, Tom Hooper on Les Misérables and with Paul Greengrass on Captain Phillips.

“All the awards confirm Goldcrest Post has a long and enviable track record for their sound work. This is an incredible opportunity to add London’s premier picture facility to their client offering. I’m thrilled to be joining Chris and the team and I can’t wait to get started,” said Malone.

Chris Quested noted “It is very exciting to have Patrick join us at Goldcrest Post. He has a unique record of achievement in his field… this unrivaled depth of knowledge and expertise will play a key role in our aggressive on-going expansion.”

Currently, Goldcrest Films (www.goldcrestfilms.com) is fully financing and distributing The Autopsy of Jane Doe, director Andre Ovredal’s English language follow-up to his international hit Troll Hunter. In addition, they recently announced they will be financing and distributing Brooklyn Bridge to which Daniel Radcliffe is attached to star.

Two hot items at the electronics circus

By Tim Spitzer
Managing Director
Goldcrest Post, NYC
www.goldcrestfilms.com/postny

VFX

SGO, manufacturers of Mistika, introduced Mamba FX.  Mamba FX is a stunningly cost-effective node-based, shot-based, Windows-based effects software package.  Mamba FX is effectively the full subset of effects tools that live in Mistika.

Mamba FX allows capture of all the same camera codecs/file formats as Mystika.

Mamba FX has the same stabilizing, speed change, compositing, tracking, text, color, and 3D tools as Mystika. In my understanding the only tools that have been removed are the Stereoscopic toolset. Continue reading