Tag Archives: Goldcrest Post

Dolores McGinley heads Goldcrest London’s VFX division

London’s Goldcrest Post, a picture and audio post studio, has launched a visual effects division at its Lexington Street location. It will be led by VFX vet Dolores McGinley, whose first task is to assemble a team of artists that will provide services for both new and existing clients.

During the COVID-19 crisis, all Goldcrest staff is working from home except the colorists, who are coming in as needed and working alone in the grading suites. McGinley and her team will move into the Goldcrest facility when lockdown has ended.

“Having been immersed in such a diverse range of projects over the past five years, we identified the need to expand into VFX some time ago,” explains Goldcrest MD Patrick Malone. “We know how essential an integrated VFX service is to our continued success as a leading supplier of creative post solutions to the film and broadcast community.

“As a successful VFX artist in her own right, Dolores is positioned to interpret the client’s brief and offer constructive creative input throughout the production process. She will also draw upon her considerable experience working with colorists to streamline the inclusion of VFX into the grade and guarantee we are able to meet the specific creative requirements of our clients.”

With over two decades of creative experience, McGinley joins Goldcrest having held various senior roles within the London VFX community. Recent examples of her work include The Crown, Giri/Haji and Good Omens.

Goldcrest adds Wade Rudolph as head of production

New York City’s Goldcrest Post has hired Wade Rudolph as head of production. Rudolph joins after holding a similar position at Deluxe Creative Services, New York, and brings 15 years of production and post experience, spanning episodic and long-form television, independent features and documentaries. At Goldcrest, he will oversee picture finishing and work with clients and the facility’s colorist and editors to ensure projects hit their creative and delivery deadlines.

In addition to his six years at Deluxe as head of production and senior producer, Rudolph’s background also includes senior producer roles with Technicolor PostWorks and Post Factory. He began his career with MTV Networks. His recent credits include the HBO series High Maintenance, the Amazon Prime feature Sea Oak and the HBO feature The Night Of.

“I’ve known Wade for more than a decade and watched as he’s developed into one of the best in-house producers in the industry,” says Goldcrest Post managing director Domenic Rom. “He is smart, understands current workflows and knows how to help clients manage projects efficiently and take advantage of the latest technical resources.”

Rudolph said that he was attracted to Goldcrest by the opportunity to work with Rom, whom he previously served under at Technicolor PostWorks. “Dom gave me my first job in post production,” he says. “I admire the way he treats his staff, his values and his commitment to his clients. I’m thrilled to work with him again.”

Goldcrest Post’s Jay Tilin has passed away

Jay Tilin, head of production at New York’s Goldcrest Post, passed away last month after a long illness. For 40 years, Tilin worked in the industry as an editor, visual effects artist and executive. His many notable credits include the Netflix series Marco Polo and the HBO series Treme and True Detective.

“Jay was in integral part of New York’s post production community and one of the top conform artists in the world,” said Goldcrest Post managing director Domenic Rom. “He was beloved by our staff and clients as an admired colleague and valued friend. We offer our heartfelt condolences to his family and all who knew him.”

Tilin began his career in 1980 as an editor with Devlin Productions. He also spent many years at The Tape House, Technicolor, Riot and Deluxe, all in New York. He was an early adopter of many now standard post technologies, from the advent of HD video in the 1990s through more recent implementations of 4K and HDR finishing.

His credits also include the HBO series Boardwalk Empire, the Sundance Channel series Hap and Leonard, the PBS documentary The National Parks and the Merchant Ivory feature City of Your Final Destination. He also contributed to numerous commercials and broadcast promos. A native New Yorker, Tilin earned a degree in broadcasting from SUNY Oswego.

Tilin is survived by his wife Betsy, his children Kelsey and Sam, his mother Sonya and his sister Felice (Trudy).

Storage Roundtable

By Randi Altman

Every year in our special Storage Edition, we poll those who use storage and those who make storage. This year is no different. The users we’ve assembled for our latest offering weigh in on how they purchase gear, how they employ storage and cloud-based solutions. Storage makers talk about what’s to come from them, how AI and ML are affecting their tools, NVMe growth and more.

Enjoy…

Periscope Post & Audio, GM, Ben Benedetti

Periscope Post & Audio is a full-service post company with facilities in Hollywood and Chicago’s Cinespace. Both facilities provide a range of sound and picture finishing services for TV, film, spots, video games and other media.

Ben Benedetti

What types of storage are you using for your workflows?
For our video department, we have a large, high-speed Quantum media array supporting three color bays, two online edit suites, a dailies operation, two VFX suites and a data I/O department. The 15 systems in the video department are connected via 16GB fiber.

For our sound department, we are using an Avid Nexis System via 6e Ethernet supporting three Atmos mix stages, two sound design suites, an ADR room and numerous sound-edit bays. All the CPUs in the facility are securely located in two isolated machine rooms (one for video on our second floor and one for audio on the first). All CPUs in the facility are tied via an IHSE KVM system, giving us incredible flexibility to move and deliver assets however our creatives and clients need them. We aren’t interested in being the biggest. We just want to provide the best and most reliable services possible.

Cloud versus on-prem – what are the pros and cons?
We are blessed with a robust pipe into our facility in Hollywood and are actively discussing with our engineering staff about using potential cloud-based storage solutions in the future. We are already using some cloud-based solutions for our building’s security system and CCTV systems as well as the management of our firewall. But the concept of placing client intellectual property in the cloud sparks some interesting conversations.We always need immediate access to the raw footage and sound recordings of our client productions, so I sincerely doubt we will ever completely rely on a cloud-based solution for the storage of our clients’ original footage. We have many redundancy systems in place to avoid slowdowns in production workflows. This is so critical. Any potential interruption in connectivity that is beyond our control gives me great pause.

How often are you adding or upgrading your storage?
Obviously, we need to be as proactive as we can so that we are never caught unready to take on projects of any size. It involves continually ensuring that our archive system is optimized correctly and requires our data management team to constantly analyze available space and resources.

How do you feel about the use of ML/AI for managing assets?
Any AI or ML automated process that helps us monitor our facility is vital. Technology advancements over the past decade have allowed us to achieve amazing efficiencies. As a result, we can give the creative executives and storytellers we service the time they need to realize their visions.

What role might the different tiers of cloud storage play in the lifecycle of an asset?
As we have facilities in both Chicago and Hollywood, our ability to take advantage of Google cloud-based services for administration has been a real godsend. It’s not glamorous, but it’s extremely important to keeping our facilities running at peak performance.

The level of coordination we have achieved in that regard has been tremendous. Those low-tiered storage systems provide simple and direct solutions to our administrative and accounting needs, but when it comes to the high-performance requirements of our facility’s color bays and audio rooms, we still rely on the high-speed on-premises storage solutions.

For simple archiving purposes, a cloud-based solution might work very well, but for active work currently in production … we are just not ready to make that leap … yet. Of course, given Moore’s Law and the exponential advancement of technology, our position could change rapidly. The important thing is to remain open and willing to embrace change as long as it makes practical sense and never puts your client’s property at risk.

Panasas, Storage Systems Engineer, RW Hawkins

RW Hawkins

Panasas offers a scalable high-performance storage solution. Its PanFS parallel file system, delivered on the ActiveStor appliance, accelerates data access for VFX feature production, Linux-based image processing, VR/AR and game development, and multi-petabyte sized active media archives.

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
We just announced that we are now shipping the next generation of the PanFS parallel file system on the ActiveStor Ultra turnkey appliance, which is already in early deployment with five customers.

This new system offers unlimited performance scaling in 4GB/s building blocks. It uses multi-tier intelligent data placement to maximize storage performance by placing metadata on low-latency NVMe SSDs, small files on high IOPS SSDs and large files on high-bandwidth HDDs. The system’s balanced-node architecture optimizes networking, CPU, memory and storage capacity to prevent hot spots and bottlenecks, ensuring high performance regardless of workload. This new architecture will allow us to adapt PanFS to the ever-changing variety of workloads our customers will face over the next several years.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows, etc.?
Absolutely. However, too many tiers can lead to frustration around complexity, loss of productivity and poor reliability. We take a hybrid approach, whereby each server has multiple types of storage media internal to one server. Using intelligent data placement, we put data on the most appropriate tier automatically. Using this approach, we can often replace a performance tier and a tier two active archive with one cost-effective appliance. Our standard file-based client makes it easy to gateway to an archive tier such as tape or an object store like S3.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E? ML? AI?
AI/ML is so widespread, it seems to be all encompassing. Media tools will benefit greatly because many of the mundane production tasks will be optimized, allowing for more creative freedom. From a storage perspective, machine learning is really pushing performance in new directions; low latency and metadata performance are becoming more important. Large amounts of unstructured data with rich metadata are the norm, and today’s file systems need to adapt to meet these requirements.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
Everyone is taking notice of NVMe; it is easier than ever to build a fast array and connect it to a server. However, there is much more to making a performant storage appliance than just throwing hardware at the problem. My customers are telling me they are excited about this new technology but frustrated by the lack of scalability, the immaturity of the software and the general lack of stability. The proven way to scale is to build a file system on top of these fast boxes and connect them into one large namespace. We will continue to augment our architecture with these new technologies, all the while keeping an eye on maintaining our stability and ease of management.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
Today’s modern NAS can take on all the tasks that historically could only be done with SAN. The main thing holding back traditional NAS has been the client access protocol. With network-attached parallel clients, like Panasas’ DirectFlow, customers get advanced client caching, full POSIX semantics and massive parallelism over standard ethernet.

Regarding cloud, my customers tell me they want all the benefits of cloud (data center consolidation, inexpensive power and cooling, ease of scaling) without the vendor lock-in and metered data access of the “big three” cloud providers. A scalable parallel file system forms the core of a private cloud model that yields the benefits without the drawbacks. File-based access to the namespace will continue to be required for most non-web-based applications.

Goldcrest Post, New York, Technical Director, Ahmed Barbary

Goldcrest Post is an independent post facility, providing solutions for features, episodic TV, docs, and other projects. The company provides editorial offices, on-set dailies, picture finishing, sound editorial, ADR and mixing, and related services.

Ahmed Barbary

What types of storage are you using for your workflows?
Storage performance in the post stage is tremendously demanding. We are using multiple SAN systems in office locations that provide centralized storage and easy access to disk arrays, servers, and other dedicated playout applications to meet storage needs throughout all stages of the workflow.

While backup refers to duplicating the content for peace of mind, short-term retention, and recovery, archival signifies transferring the content from the primary storage location to long-term storage to be preserved for weeks, months, and even years to come. Archival storage needs to offer scalability, flexible and sustainable pricing, as well as accessibility for individual users and asset management solutions for future projects.

LTO has been a popular choice for archival storage for decades because of its affordable, high-capacity solutions with low write/high read workloads that are optimal for cold storage workflows. The increased need for instant access to archived content today, coupled with the slow roll-out of LTO-8, has made tape a less favorable option.

Cloud versus on-prem – what are the pros and cons?
The fact is each option has its positives and negatives, and understanding that and determining how both cloud and on-premises software fit into your organization are vital. So, it’s best to be prepared and create a point-by-point comparison of both choices.

When looking at the pros and cons of cloud vs. on-premises solutions, everything starts with an understanding of how these two models differ. With a cloud deployment, the vendor hosts your information and offers access through a web portal. This enables more mobility and flexibility of use for cloud-based software options. When looking at an on-prem solution, you are committing to local ownership of your data, hardware, and software. Everything is run on machines in your facility with no third-party access.

How often are you adding or upgrading your storage?
We keep track of new technologies and continuously upgrade our systems, but when it comes to storage, it’s a huge expense. When deploying a new system, we do our best to future-proof and ensure that it can be expanded.

How do you feel about the use of ML/AI for managing assets?
For most M&E enterprises, the biggest potential of AI lies in automatic content recognition, which can drive several path-breaking business benefits. For instance, most content owners have thousands of video assets.

Cataloging, managing, processing, and re-purposing this content typically requires extensive manual effort. Advancements in AI and ML algorithms have
now made it possible to drastically cut down the time taken to perform many of these tasks. But there is still a lot of work to be done — especially as ML algorithms need to be trained, using the right kind of data and solutions, to achieve accurate results.

What role might the different tiers of cloud storage play in the lifecycle of an asset?
Data sets have unique lifecycles. Early in the lifecycle, people access some data often, but the need for access drops drastically as the data ages. Some data stays idle in the cloud and is rarely accessed once stored. Some data expires days or months after creation, while other data sets are actively read and modified throughout their lifetimes.

Rohde & Schwarz, Product Manager, Storage Solutions, Dirk Thometzek

Rohde & Schwarz offers broadcast and media solutions to help companies grow in media production, management and delivery in the IP and wireless age.

Dirk Thometzek

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
The industry is constantly changing, so we monitor market developments and key demands closely. We will be adding new features to the R&S SpycerNode in the next few months that will enable our customers to get their creative work done without focusing on complex technologies. The R&S SpycerNode will be extended with JBODs, which will allow seamless integration with our erasure coding technology, guaranteeing complete resilience and performance.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows, etc.?
Each workflow is different, so, consequently, there is almost no system alike. The real artistry is to tailor storage systems according to real requirements without over-provisioning hardware or over-stressing budgets. Using different tiers can be very helpful to build effective systems, but they might introduce additional difficulties to the workflows if the system isn’t properly designed.

Rohde & Schwarz has developed R&S SpycerNode in a way that its performance is linear and predictable. Different tiers are aggregated under a single namespace, and our tools allow seamless workflows while complexity remains transparent to the users.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E? ML? AI?
Machine learning and artificial intelligence can be helpful to automate certain tasks, but they will not replace human intervention in the short term. It might not be helpful to enrich media with too much data because doing so could result in imprecise queries that return far too much content.

However, clearly defined changes in sequences or reoccurring objects — such as bugs and logos — can be used as a trigger to initiate certain automated workflows. Certainly, we will see many interesting advances in the future.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
NVMe has very interesting aspects. Data rates and reduced latencies are admittedly quite impressive and are garnering a lot of interest. Unfortunately, we do see a trend inside our industry to be blinded by pure performance figures and exaggerated promises without considering hardware quality, life expectancy or proper implementation. Additionally, if well-designed and proven solutions exist that are efficient enough, then it doesn’t make sense to embrace a technology just because it is available.

R&S is dedicated to bringing high-end devices to the M&E market. We think that reliability and performance build the foundation for user-friendly products. Next year, we will update the market on how NVMe can be used in the most efficient way within our products.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
We definitely see a trend away from classic Fibre Channel to Ethernet infrastructures for various reasons. For many years, NAS systems have been replacing central storage systems based on SAN technology for a lot of workflows. Unfortunately, standard NAS technologies will not support all necessary workflows and applications in our industry. Public and private cloud storage systems play an important role in overall concepts, but they can’t fulfil all necessary media production requirements or ease up workflows by default. Plus, when it comes to subscription models, [sometimes there could be unexpected fees]. In fact, we do see quite a few customers returning to their previous services, including on-premises storage systems such as archives.

When it comes to the very high data rates necessary for high-end media productions, NAS will relatively quickly reach its technical limits. Only block-level access can deliver the reliable performance necessary for uncompressed productions at high frame rates.

That does not necessarily mean Fibre Channel is the only solution. The R&S SpycerNode, for example, features a unified 100Gb/s Ethernet backbone, wherein clients and the redundant storage nodes are attached to the same network. This allows the clients to access the storage over industry-leading NAS technology or native block level while enabling true flexibility using state-of-the-art technology.

MTI Film, CEO, Larry Chernoff

Hollywood’s MTI Film is a full-service post facility, providing dailies, editorial, visual effects, color correction, and assembly for film, television, and commercials.

Larry Chernoff

What types of storage are you using for your workflows?
MTI uses a mix of spinning and SSD disks. Our volumes range from 700TB to 1000TB and are assigned to projects depending on the volume of expected camera files. The SSD volumes are substantially smaller and are used to play back ultra-large-resolution files, where several users are using the file.

Cloud versus on-prem — what are the pros and cons?
MTI only uses on-prem storage at the moment due to the real-time, full-resolution nature of our playback requirements. There is certainly a place for cloud-based storage but, as a finishing house, it does not apply to most of our workflows.

How often are you adding or upgrading your storage?
We are constantly adding storage to our facility. Each year, for the last five, we’ve added or replaced storage annually. We now have approximately 8+ PB, with plans for more in the future.

How do you feel about the use of ML/AI for managing assets?
Sounds like fun!

What role might the different tiers of cloud storage play in the lifecycle of an asset?
For a post house like MTI, we consider cloud storage to be used only for “deep storage” since our bandwidth needs are very high. The amount of Internet connectivity we would require to replicate the workflows we currently have using on-prem storage would be prohibitively expensive for a facility such as MTI. Speed and ease of access is critical to being able to fulfill our customers’ demanding schedules.

OWC,Founder/CEO, Larry O’Connor

Larry O’Connor

OWC offers storage, connectivity, software, and expansion solutions designed to enhance, accelerate, and extend the capabilities of Mac- and PC-based technology. Their products range from the home desktop to the enterprise rack to the audio recording studio to the motion picture set and beyond.

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
OWC will be expanding our Jupiter line of NAS storage products in 2020 with an all new external flash base array. We will also be launching the OWC ThunderBay Flex 8, a three-in-one Thunderbolt 3 storage, docking, and PCIe expansion solution for digital imaging, VFX, video production, and video editing.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows etc?
Yes. SSD and NVMe are better for on-set storage and editing. Once you are finished and looking to archive, HDD are a better solution for long term storage.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E? ML? AI?
We see U.2 SSDs as a trend that can help storage in this space. Also, solutions that allow the use of external docking of U.2 across different workflow needs.

How has NvME advanced over the past year?
We have seen NVMe technology become higher in capacity, higher in performance, and substantially lower in power draw. Yet even with all the improving performance, costs are lower today versus 12 months ago. SSD and NVMe are better for on-set storage and editing. Once you are finished and looking to archive, HDD are a better solution for long term storage.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
I see both still having their place — I can’t speak to if one will take over the other. SANs provide other services that typically go hand in hand with M&E needs.

As for cloud, I can see some more cloud coming in, but for M&E on-site needs, it just doesn’t compete anywhere near with what the data rate demand is for editing, etc. Everything independently has its place.

EditShare, VP of Product Management, Sunil Mudholkar

EditShare offers a range of media management solutions, from ingest to archive with a focus on media and entertainment.

Sunil Mudholkar

What kind of storage are you offering and will that be changing in the coming year?
EditShare currently offers RAID and SSD, along with our nearline Sata HDD-based storage. We are on track to deliver NVMe- and cloud-based solutions in the first half of 2020. The latest major upgrade of our file system and management console, EFS2020, enables us to migrate to emerging technologies, including cloud deployment and using NVMe hardware.

EFS can manage and use multiple storage pools, enabling clients to use the most cost-effective tiered storage for their production, all while keeping that single namespace.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows etc?
Absolutely. It’s clearly financially advantageous to have varying performance tiers of storage that are in line with the workflows the business requires. This also extends to the cloud, where we are seeing public cloud-based solutions augment or replace both high-performance and long-term storage needs. Tiered storage enables clients to be at their most cost effective by including parking storage and cloud storage for DR, while keeping SSD and NVME storage ready and primed for their high-end production.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E? ML? AI?
AI and ML have somewhat of an advantage for storage when it comes to things like algorithms that are designed to automatically move content between storage tiers to optimize costs. This has been commonplace in the distribution side of the ecosystem for a long time with CDNs. ML and AI have a great ability to impact the Opex side of asset management and metadata by helping to automate very manual, repetitive data entry tasks through audio and image recognition, as an example.

AI can also assist by removing mundane human-centric repetitive tasks, such as logging incoming content. AI can assist with the growing issue of unstructured and unmanaged storage pools, enabling the automatic scanning and indexing of every piece of content located on a storage pool.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
Like any other storage medium, when it’s first introduced there are limited use cases that make sense financially, and only a certain few can afford to deploy it. As the technology scales and changes in form factor, and pricing becomes more competitive and inline with other storage options, it then can become more mainstream. This is what we are starting to see with NVMe.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
Yes, NAS has overtaken SAN. It’s easier technology to deal with — this is fairly well acknowledged. It’s also easier to find people/talent with experience in NAS. Cloud will start to replace more NAS workflows in 2020, as we are already seeing today. For example, our ACL media spaces project options within our management console were designed for SAN clients migrating to NAS. They liked the granular detail that SAN offered, but wanted to migrate to NAS. EditShare’s ACL enables them to work like a SAN but in a NAS environment.

Zoic Studios CTO Saker Klippsten

Zoic Studios is an Emmy-winning VFX company based in Culver City, California, with sister offices in Vancouver and NYC. It creates computer-generated special effects for commercials, films, television and video games.

Saker Klippsten

What types of projects are you working on?
We work on a range of projects for series, film, commercial and interactive games (VR/AR). Most of the live-action projects are mixed with CG/VFX and some full-CG animated shots. In addition, there is typically some form of particle or fluid effects simulation going on, such as clouds, water, fire, destruction or other surreal effects.

What types of storage are you using for those workflows?
Cryogen – Off-the-shelf tape/disk/chip. Access time > 1 day. Mostly tape-based and completely offline, which requires human intervention to load tapes or restore from drives.
Freezing – Tape robot library. Access time < .5 day. Tape-based and in the robot. This does not require intervention.Cold – Spinning disk. Access time — slow (online). Disaster recovery and long-term archiving.
Warm – Spinning disk. Access time — medium (online). Data that needs to still be accessed promptly and transferred quickly (asset depot).
Hot – Chip-based. Access time — fast (online). SSD generic active production storage.
Blazing – Chip-based. Access time — uber fast (online). NVMe dedicated storage for 4K and 8K playback, databases and specific simulation workflows.

Cloud versus on-prem – what are the pros and cons?
The great debate! I tend to not look at it as pro vs. con, but where you are as a company. Many factors are involved and there is no one size that fits all, as many are led to believe, and neither cloud or on-prem alone can solve all your workflow and business challenges.

Cinemax’s Warrior (Credit: HBO/David Bloomer)

There are workflows that are greatly suited for the cloud and others that are potentially cost prohibitive for a number of reasons, such as the size of the data set being generated. Dynamics Cache Simulations are a good example, which can quickly generate tens of TBs or sometimes hundreds of TBs. If the workflow requires you to transfer this data on premises for review, it could take a very long time. Other workflows such as 3D CG-generated data can take better advantage of the cloud. They typically have small source file payloads that need to be uploaded and then only require final frames to be downloaded, which is much more manageable. Depending on the size of your company and level of technical people on hand, the cloud can be a problem

What triggers buying more storage in your shop?
Storage tends to be one of the largest and most significant purchases at many companies. End users do not have a clear concept of what happens at the other end of the wire from their workstation.

All they know is that there is never enough storage and it’s never fast enough. Not investing in the right storage can not only be detrimental to the delivery and production of a show, but also to the mental focus and health of the end users. If artists are constantly having to stop and clean up/delete, it takes them out of their creative rhythm and slows down task completion.

If the storage is not performing properly and is slow, this will not only have an impact on delivery, but the end user might be afraid they are being perceived as being slow. So what goes into buying more storage? What type of impact will buying more storage have on the various workflows and pipelines? Remember, if you are a mature company you are buying 2TB of storage for every 1TB required for DR purposes, so you have a complete up-to-the-hour backup.

Do you see ML/AI as important to your content strategy?
We have been using various layers of ML and heuristics sprinkled throughout our content workflows and pipelines. As an example, we look at the storage platforms we use to understand what’s on our storage, how and when it’s being used, what it’s being used for and how it’s being accessed. We look at the content to see what it contains and its characteristics. What are the overall costs to create that content? What insights can we learn from it for similarly created content? How can we reuse assets to be more efficient?

Dell Technologies, CTO, Media & Entertainment, Thomas Burns

Thomas Burns

Dell offers technologies across workstations, displays, servers, storage, networking and VMware, and partnerships with key media software vendors to provide media professionals the tools to deliver powerful stories, faster.

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
Dell Technologies offers a complete range of storage solutions from Isilon all-flash and disk-based scale-out NAS to our object storage, ECS, which is available as an appliance or a software-defined solution on commodity hardware. We have also developed and open-sourced Pravega, a new storage type for streaming data (e.g. IoT and other edge workloads), and continue to innovate in file, object and streaming solutions with software-defined and flexible consumption models.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows etc?
Intelligent tiering is crucial to building a post and VFX pipeline. Today’s global pipelines must include software that distinguishes between hot data on the fastest tier and cold or versioned data on less performant tiers, especially in globally distributed workflows. Bringing applications to the media rather than unnecessarily moving media into a processing silo is the key to an efficient production.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E? ML? AI?
New developments in storage class memory (SCM) — including the use of carbon nanotubes to create a nonvolatile, standalone memory product with speeds rivaling DRAM without needing battery backup — have the potential to speed up media workflows and eliminate AI/ML bottlenecks. New protocols such as NVMe allow much deeper I/O queues, overcoming today’s bus bandwidth limits.

GPUDirect enables direct paths between GPUs and network storage, bypassing the CPU for lower latency access to GPU compute — desirable for both M&E and AI/ML applications. Ethernet mesh, a.k.a. Leaf/Spine topologies, allow storage networks to scale more flexibly than ever before.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
Advances in I/O virtualization make NVMe useful in hyper-converged infrastructure, by allowing different virtual machines (VMs) to share a single PCIe hardware interface. Taking advantage of multi-stream writes, along with vGPUs and vNICs, allows talent to operate more flexibly as creative workstations start to become virtualized.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
IP networks scale much better than any other protocol, so NAS allows on-premises workloads to be managed more efficiently than SAN. Object stores (the basic storage type for cloud services) support elastic workloads extremely well and will continue to be an integral part of public, hybrid and private cloud media workflows.

ATTO, Manager, Products Group, Peter Donnelly

ATTO network and storage connectivity products are purpose-made to support all phases of media production, from ingest to final archiving. ATTO offers an ecosystem of high-performance connectivity adapters, network interface cards and proprietary software.

Peter Donnelly

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
ATTO designs and manufactures storage connectivity products, and although we don’t manufacture storage, we are a critical part of the storage ecosystem. We regularly work with our customers to find the best solutions to their storage workflow and performance challenges.

ATTO designs products that use a wide variety of storage protocols. SAS, SATA, Fibre Channel, Ethernet and Thunderbolt are all part of our core technology portfolio. We’re starting to see more interest in NVMe solutions. While NVMe has already seen some solid growth as an “inside-the-box” storage solution, scalability, cost and limited management capabilities continue to limit its adoption as an external storage solution.

Data protection is still an important criteria in every data center. We are seeing a shift from traditional hardware RAID and parity RAID to software RAID and parity code implementations. Disk capacity has grown so quickly that it can take days to rebuild a RAID group with hardware controllers. Instead, we see our customers taking advantage of rapidly dropping storage prices and using faster, reliable software RAID implementations with basic HBA hardware.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
For inside-the-box storage needs, we have absolutely seen adoption skyrocket. It’s hard to beat the price-to-performance ratio of NVMe drives for system boot, application caching and similar use cases.

ATTO is working independently and with our ecosystem partners to bring those same benefits to shared, networked storage systems. Protocols such as NVMe-oF and FC-NVMe are enabling technologies that are starting to mature, and we see these getting further attention in the coming year.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger work groups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
We see customers looking for ways to more effectively share storage resources. Acquisition and ongoing support costs, as well as the ability to leverage existing technical skills, seem to be important factors pulling people toward Ethernet-based solutions.
However, there is no free lunch, and these same customers aren’t able to compromise on performance and latency concerns, which are important reasons why they used SANs in the first place. So there’s a lot of uncertainty in the market today. Since we design and market products in both the NAS and SAN spaces, we spend a lot of time talking with our customers about their priorities so that we can help them pick the solutions that best fit their needs.

Masstech, CTO, Mike Palmer

Masstech creates intelligent storage and asset lifecycle management solutions for the media and entertainment industry, focusing on broadcast and video content storage management with IT technologies.

Mike Palmer

What kind of storage are you offering, and will that be changing in the coming year?
Masstech products are used to manage a combination of any or all of these kinds of storage. Masstech allows content to move without friction across and through all of these technologies, most often using automated workflows and unified interfaces that hide the complexity otherwise required to directly manage content across so many different types of storage.

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows, etc.?
One of the benefits of having such a wide range of storage technologies to choose from is that we have the flexibility to match application requirements with the optimum performance characteristics of different storage technologies in each step of the lifecycle. Users now expect that content will automatically move to storage with the optimal combination of speed and price as it progresses through workflow.

In the past, HSM was designed to handle this task for on-prem storage. The challenge is much wider now with the addition of a plethora of storage technologies and services. Rather than moving between just two or three tiers of on-prem storage, content now often needs to flow through a hybrid environment of on-prem and cloud storage, often involving multiple cloud services, each with three or four sub-tiers. Making that happen in a seamless way, both to users and to integrated MAMs and PAMs, is what we do.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E?
Cloud storage pricing that continues to drop along with the advance of storage density in both spinning disk and solid state. All of these are interrelated and have the general effect of lowering costs for the end user. For those who have specific business requirements that drive on-prem storage, the availability of higher density tape and optical disks is enabling petabytes of very efficient cold storage within less space than contained in a single rack.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
In addition to the obvious application of making media available more quickly, the greatest value of NVMe within M&E may be found in enabling faster search of both structured and unstructured metadata associated with media. Yes, we need faster access to media, but in many cases we must first find the media before it can be accessed. NVMe can make that search experience, particularly for large libraries, federated data sets and media lakes, lightning quick.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger workgroups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
Just as AWS, Azure and Wasabi, among other large players, have replaced many instances of on-prem NAS, so have Box, Dropbox, Google Drive and iCloud replaced many (but not all) of the USB drives gathering dust in the bottom of desk drawers. As NAS is built on top of faster and faster performing technologies, it is also beginning to put additional pressure on SAN – particularly for users who are sensitive to price and the amount of administration required.

Backblaze, Director of Product Marketing, M&E, Skip Levens

Backblaze offers easy-to-use cloud backup, archive and storage services. With over 12 years of experience and more than 800 Petabytes of customer data under management, Backblaze has offers cloud storage to anyone looking to create, distribute and preserve their content forever.

What kind of storage are you offering and will that be changing in the coming year?
At Backblaze, we offer a single class, or tier, of storage where everything’s active and immediately available wherever you need it, and it’s protected better than it would be on spinning disk or RAID systems.

Skip Levens

Are certain storage tiers more suitable for different asset types, workflows, etc?
Absolutely. For example, animators need different storage than a team of editors all editing a 4K project at the same time. And keeping your entire content library on your shared storage could get expensive indeed.

We’ve found that users can give up all that unneeded complexity and cost that gets in the way of creating content in two steps:
– Step one is getting off of the “shared storage expansion treadmill” and buying just enough on-site shared storage that fits your team. If you’re delivering a TV show every week and need a SAN, make it just large enough for your work in process and no larger.

– Step two is to get all of your content into active cloud storage. This not only frees up space on your shared storage, but makes all of your content highly protected and highly available at the same time. Since most of your team probably use MAM to find and discover content, the storage that assets actually live on is completely transparent.

Now life gets very simple for creative support teams managing that workflow: your shared storage stays fast and lean, and you can stop paying for storage that doesn’t fit that model. This could include getting rid of LTO, big JBODs or anything with a limited warranty and a maintenance contract.

What do you see are the big technology trends that can help storage for M&E?
For shooters and on-set data wranglers, the new class of ultra-fast flash drives dramatically speeds up collecting massive files with extremely high resolution. Of course, raw content isn’t safe until it’s ingested, so even after moving shots to two sets of external drives or a RAID cart, we’re seeing cloud archive on ingest. Uploading files from a remote location, before you get all the way back to the editing suite, unlocks a lot of speed and collaboration advantages — the content is protected faster, and your ingest tools can start making proxy versions that everyone can start working on, such as grading, commenting, even rough cuts.

We’re also seeing cloud-delivered workflow applications. The days of buying and maintaining a server and storage in your shop to run an application may seem old-fashioned. Especially when that entire experience can now be delivered from the cloud and on-demand.

Iconik, for example, is a complete, personalized deployment of a project collaboration, asset review and management tool – but it lives entirely in the cloud. When you log in, your app springs to life instantly in the cloud, so you only pay for the application when you actually use it. Users just want to get their creative work done and can’t tell it isn’t a traditional asset manager.

How has NVMe advanced over the past year?
NVMe means flash storage can completely ditch legacy storage controllers like the ones on traditional SATA hard drives. When you can fit 2TB of storage on a stick thats only 22 millimeters by 80 millimeters — not much larger than a stick of gum — and it’s 20 times faster than an external spinning hard drive and draws only 3.5V, that’s a game changer for data wrangling and camera cart offload right now.

And that’s on PCIe 3. The PCI Express standard is evolving faster and faster too. PCIe 4 motherboards are starting to come online now, PCIe 5 was finalized in May, and PCIe 6 is already in development. When every generation doubles the available bandwidth that can feed that NVMEe storage, the future is very, very bright for NVMe.

Do you see NAS overtaking SAN for larger workgroups? How about cloud taking on some of what NAS used to do?
For users who work in widely distributed teams, the cloud is absolutely eating NAS. When the solution driving your team’s projects and collaboration is the dashboard and focus of the team — and active cloud storage seamlessly supports all of the content underneath — it no longer needs to be on a NAS.

But for large teams that do fast-paced editing and creation, the answer to “what is the best shared storage for our team” is still usually a SAN, or tightly-coupled, high-performance NAS.

Either way, by moving content and project archives to the cloud, you can keep SAN and NAS costs in check and have a more productive workflow, and more opportunities to use all that content for new projects.

The sounds of HBO’s Divorce: Keeping it real

HBO’s Divorce, which stars Sarah Jessica Parker and Thomas Haden Church, focuses on a long-married couple who just can’t do it anymore. It follows them from divorce through their efforts to move on with their lives, and what that looks like. The show deftly tackles a very difficult subject with a heavy dose of humor mixed in with the pain and angst. The story takes place in various Manhattan locations and a nearby suburb. And as you can imagine the sounds of the neighborhoods vary.

                           
Eric Hirsch                                                              David Briggs

Sound post production for the third season of HBO’s comedy Divorce was completed at Goldcrest Post in New York City. Supervising sound editor David Briggs and re-recording mixer Eric Hirsch worked together to capture the ambiances of upscale Manhattan neighborhoods that serve as the backdrop for the story of the tempestuous breakup between Frances and Robert.

As is often the case with comedy series, the imperative for Divorce’s sound team was to support the narrative by ensuring that the dialogue is crisp and clear, and jokes are properly timed. However, Briggs and Hirsch go far beyond that in developing richly textured soundscapes to achieve a sense of realism often lacking in shows of the genre.

“We use sound to suggest life is happening outside the immediate environment, especially for scenes that are shot on sets,” explains Hirsch. “We work to achieve the right balance, so that the scene doesn’t feel empty but without letting the sound become so prominent that it’s a distraction. It’s meant to work subliminally so that viewers feel that things are happening in suburban New York, while not actually thinking about it.”

Season three of the show introduces several new locations and sound plays a crucial role in capturing their ambience. Parker’s Frances, for example, has moved to Inwood, a hip enclave on the northern tip of Manhattan, and background sound effects help to distinguish it from the woodsy village of Hastings-on-Hudson, where Haden Church’s Robert continues to live. “The challenge was to create separation between those two worlds, so that viewers immediately understand where we are,” explains series producer Mick Aniceto. “Eric and David hit it. They came up with sounds that made sense for each part of the city, from the types of cars you hear on the streets to the conversations and languages that play in the background.”

Meanwhile, Frances’ friend, Diane, (Molly Shannon) has taken up residence in a Manhattan high-rise and it, too, required a specific sonic treatment. “The sounds that filter into a high-rise apartment are much different from those in a street-level structure,” Aniceto notes. “The hum of traffic is more distant, while you hear things like the whirl of helicopters. We had a lot of fun exploring the different sonic environments. To capture the flavor of Hudson-on-Hastings, our executive producer and showrunner came up the idea of adding distant construction sounds to some scenes.”

A few scenes from the new season are set inside a prison. Aniceto says the sound team was able to help breathe life into that environment through the judicious application of very specific sound design. “David Briggs had just come off of Escape at Dannemora, so he was very familiar with the sounds of a prison,” he recalls. “He knew the kind of sounds that you hear in communal areas, not only physical sounds like buzzers and bells, but distant chats among guards and visitors. He helped us come up with amusing bits of background dialogue for the loop group.”

Most of the dialogue came directly from the production tracks, but the sound team hosted several ADR sessions at Goldcrest for crowd scenes. Hirsch points to an episode from the new season that involves a girls basketball team. ADR mixer Krissopher Chevannes recorded groups of voice actors (provided by Dann Fink and Bruce Winant of Loopers Unlimited) to create background dialogue for a scene on a team bus and another that happens during a game.

“During the scene on the bus, the girls are talking normally, but then the action shifts to slo-mo. At that point the sound design goes away and the music drives it,” Hirsch recalls. “When it snaps back to reality, we bring the loop-group crowd back in.”

The emotional depth of Divorce marks it as different from most television comedies, it also creates more interesting opportunities for sound. “The sound portion of the show helps take it over the line and make it real for the audience,” says Aniceto. “Sound is a big priority for Divorce. I get excited by the process and the opportunities it affords to bring scenes to life. So, I surround myself by smart and talented people like Eric and David, who understand how to do that and give the show the perfect feel.”

All three seasons of Divorce are available on HBO Go and HBO Now.

Goldcrest Post hires industry vet Dom Rom as managing director

Domenic Rom, a veteran of the New York post world, has joined Goldcrest Post as managing director. In this new role, he will oversee operations, drive sales and pursue growth strategies for Goldcrest, a provider of post services for film and television. Rom was most recently president/GM of Deluxe TV Post Production Services in LA.

“Domenic is a visionary leader who brings a client-centric approach toward facility management, and understands the industry’s changing dynamics,” says Goldcrest Films owner/executive director Nick Quested. “He inspires his team to perform at a peak level and deliver the quality services our clients expect.”

In his previous position, Rom led Deluxe’s global services for television, including its subsidiaries Encore and Level 3. Prior to that, he was managing director of Deluxe’s New York studio, which included East Coast operations for Encore, Company 3 and Method. He was SVP at Technicolor Creative Services for three years and an executive at Postworks for 11. Rom began his career as a colorist at DuArt Film Labs, eventually becoming executive VP in charge of its digital and film labs.

Rom says that he looks forward to working with Goldcrest Post’s management team, including head of production Gretchen McGowan and head of picture Jay Tilin. “We intend to be a very client-oriented facility,” he notes. “When clients walk in the door, they should feel at home, feel that this is their place. Jay and Gretchen both get that. We will work together very closely to ensure Goldcrest is a solid, responsive facility.”

He is also very happy about being back in New York City. “New York is my home,” says Rom. “When I decided to come back to the city just walking around town made me feel alive again. The New York market is so tight, the energy so high it just felt right. The people are real, the clients are amazing and the work is equal to anywhere in the world. I don’t regret a second of the past few years… I expanded my knowledge of other markets and made life-long friendships all over the world. At the end of the day though, my family and my work family are in New York.”

Recent projects for Goldcrest include the Netflix series Russian Doll and the independent features Sorry to Bother You, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, Native Son and High Flying Bird.

IBC: Surrounded by sound

By Simon Ray

I came to the 2016 IBC Show in Amsterdam at the start of a period of consolidation at Goldcrest in London. We had just gone through three years of expansion, upgrading, building and installing. Our flagship Dolby Atmos sound mixing theatre finished its first feature, Jason Bourne, and the DI department recently upgraded to offer 4K and HDR.

I didn’t have a particular area to research at the show, but there were two things that struck me almost immediately on arrival: the lack of drones and the abundance of VR headsets.

Goldcrest’s Atmos mixing stage.

360 audio is an area I knew a little about, and we did provide a binaural DTS Headphone X mix at the end of Jason Bourne, but there was so much more to learn.

Happily, my first IBC meeting was with Fraunhofer, where I was updated on some of the developments they have made in production, delivery and playback of immersive and 360 sound. Of particular interest was their Cingo technology. This is a playback solution that lives in devices such as phones and tablets and can already be found in products from Google, Samsung and LG. This technology renders 3D audio content onto headphones and can incorporate head movements. That means a binaural render that gives spatial information to make the sound appear to be originating outside the head rather than inside, as can be the case when listening to traditionally mixed stereo material.

For feature films, for example, this might mean taking the 5.1 home theatrical mix and rendering it into a binaural signal to be played back on headphones, giving the listener the experience of always sitting in the sweet spot of a surround sound speaker set-up. Cingo can also support content with a height component, such as 9.1 and 11.1 formats, and add that into the headphone stream as well to make it truly 3D. I had a great demo of this and it worked very well.

I was impressed that Fraunhofer had also created a tool for creating immersive content, a plug-in called Cingo Composer that could run as both VST and AAX plug-ins. This could run in Pro Tools, Nuendo and other DAWs and aid the creation of 3D content. For example, content could be mixed and automated in an immersive soundscape and then rendered into an FOA (First Order Ambisonics or B-Format) 4-channel file that could be played with a 360 video to be played on VR headsets with headtracking.

After Fraunhofer, I went straight to DTS to catch up with what they were doing. We had recently completed some immersive DTS:X theatrical, home theatrical and, as mentioned above, headphone mixes using the DTS tools, so I wanted to see what was new. There were some nice updates to the content creation tools, players and renderers and a great demo of the DTS decoder doing some live binaural decoding and headtracking.

With immersive and 3D audio being the exciting new things, there were other interesting products on display that related to this area. In the Future Zone Sennheiser was showing their Ambeo VR mic (see picture, right). This is an ambisonic microphone that has four capsules arranged in a tetrahedron, which make up the A-format. They also provide a proprietary A-B format encoder that can run as a VST or AAX plug-in on Mac and Windows to process the outputs of the four microphones to the W,X,Y,Z signals (the B-format).

From the B-Format it is possible to recreate the 3D soundfield, but you can also derive any number of first-order microphones pointing in any direction in post! The demo (with headtracking and 360 video) of a man speaking by the fireplace was recorded just using this mic and was the most convincing of all the binaural demos I saw (heard!).

Still in the Future Zone, for creating brand new content I visited the makers of the Spatial Audio Toolbox, which is similar to the Cingo Creator tool from Fraunhofer. B-Com’s Spatial Audio Toolbox contains VST plug-ins (soon to be AAX) to enable you to create an HOA (higher order ambisonics) encoded 3D sound scene using standard mono, stereo or surround source (using HOA Pan) and then listen to this sound scene on headphones (using Render Spk2Bin).

The demo we saw at the stand was impressive and included headtracking. The plug-ins themselves were running on a Pyramix on the Merging Technologies stand in Hall 8. It was great to get my hands on some “live” material and play with the 3D panning and hear the effect. It was generally quite effective, particularly in the horizontal plane.

I found all this binaural and VR stuff exciting. I am not sure exactly how and if it might fit into a film workflow, but it was a lot of fun playing! The idea of rendering a 3D soundfield into a binaural signal has been around for a long time (I even dedicated months of my final year at university to writing a project on that very subject quite a long time ago) but with mixed success. It is exciting to see now that today’s mobile devices contain the processing power to render the binaural signal on the fly. Combine that with VR video and headtracking, and the ability to add that information into the rendering process, and you have an offering that is very impressive when demonstrated.

I will be interested to see how content creators, specifically in the film area, use this (or don’t). The recreation of the 3D surround sound mix over 2-channel headphones works well, but whether headtracking gets added to this or not remains to be seen. If the sound is matched to video that’s designed for an immersive experience, then it makes sense to track the head movements with the sound. If not, then I think it would be off-putting. Exciting times ahead anyway.

Simon Ray is head of operations and engineering Goldcrest Post Production in London.

IBC 2015 Blog: HDR displays

By Simon Ray

It was an interesting couple of days in Amsterdam. I was hoping to get some more clarity on where things were going with the High Dynamic Range concept in both professional and consumer panels, as well as delivery mechanisms to get it to the consumers. I am leaving IBC knowing more, but no nearer a coherent idea as to exactly where this is heading.

I initially visited Dolby to get an update on Dolby Vision (our main image), see where they were with their Dolby Vision technology and most importantly get my reserved tickets for the screening of Fantastic Four in the Auditorium (Laser Projection and Dolby Atmos). It all sounded very positive with news of a number of consumer panel manufacturers being close to releasing Dolby Vision-capable TVs. For example, Vizio with their Reference Series panel and streaming services like VUDU streaming Dolby Vision HDR content, although this is just in the USA to begin with. I also had my first look at a Dolby “Quantum Dot” HDR display panel, which did look good and surely has the best name of any tech out here.

There are other HDR offerings out there with Amazon Prime having announced in August that they will be streaming HDR content in the UK, but not initially in the Dolby Vision format (HDR video is available with the Amazon Instant Video app for Samsung SUHD TVs like the JS9000, JS9100 and JS9500 series) and selected LG TVs (G9600 and G9700 series) and the “big” TV manufacturers have or are about to launch HDR panels. So far so good.

Pro HDR Monitors
Things got bit more vague again when I started looking into HDR-equipped professional panels for color correction. There are only two I could find in the show: Sony had an impressive HDR-ready panel connected to a Filmlight BaseLight tucked away on their large stand in Hall 12; and Canon, who had their equally impressive prototype display tucked away in Hall 11 connected to a SGO Mistika. Both displays had different brightness specs and gamma options.

canon

When I asked some other manufacturers about their HDR panels the response was the same: “We are going to wait until the specifications are finalized before committing to an HDR monitor.” This leaves me to think this is a bad time to be buying a monitor. You are either going to buy an HDR monitor now, which may not be correct to the final specifications, or you are going to be buying a non-HDR monitor that is likely to be superseded in the near future.

Another thing I noticed was that the professional HDR panels were all being shown off in a carefully (or as carefully as a trade show allows) light environment to give them the best opportunity to make an impact. Any ambient light getting into the viewing environment is going to detract from the benefits of having the increased dynamic range and brightness of the HDR display, which I imagine might be a problem in the average living room. I hope this does not reduce the chance of this technology making an impact because it is great to see images seemingly having more depth and quality to them. As a representative on the Sony stand said, “It feels more immersive — I am so much more engaged in the picture.”

sony

Dolby
The problem of the ambient light was also picked up on in an interesting talk in the Auditorium as part of the “HDR: From zero to infinity” series. There were speakers from iMax, Dolby, Barco and Sony talking about the challenges of bringing HDR to the cinema. I had come across the idea of HDR in cinema from Dolby through their “Dolby Cinema” project, which brings together HDR picture and immersive sound with Dolby Atmos.

I am in the process of building a theatre to mix theatrical soundtracks in Dolby Atmos, but despite the exciting opportunities for sound that Atmos offers the sound teams, in the UK at least the take up by Cinemas is slow. One of the best things about Dolby Atmos for me is that if you go to see a film in Atmos, you know that the speaker system is going to be of a certain standard, otherwise Dolby would not have given it Atmos status. For too long, cinemas have been allowed to let the speaker systems wear down to the point where it becomes unlistenable. If these new initiatives can give cinemas an opportunity to reinvest in the equipment (and the various financial implications and challenges and who would meet these costs were discussed) and get a return on that investment it could be a chance to stop the rot and improve the cinema going experience. And, importantly, for us in post it gives us an exciting high bench mark to be aiming for when working on films.

Simon Ray is head of operations and engineering Goldcrest Post Production in London.

Goldcrest UK adds Patrick Malone as MD, ups Chris Quested to CEO

London – Goldcrest Post, with the intent of entering the UK film post arena has named Patrick Malone (pictured) as managing director. Former managing director Chris Quested has been named CEO.

Based in London, Malone will oversee the accelerated growth of the company’s digital intermediate department in addition to strengthening the executive management of the existing sound facility, home to the Academy Award-winning team from Les Misérables.

Malone most recently served as Head of DI at Company 3, a subsidiary of Deluxe Entertainment Services and a pioneering provider of post services to all the major studios, where he was responsible for feature films collaborating with filmmakers such as Ron Howard on Rush, Sam Mendes on Skyfall, Tom Hooper on Les Misérables and with Paul Greengrass on Captain Phillips.

“All the awards confirm Goldcrest Post has a long and enviable track record for their sound work. This is an incredible opportunity to add London’s premier picture facility to their client offering. I’m thrilled to be joining Chris and the team and I can’t wait to get started,” said Malone.

Chris Quested noted “It is very exciting to have Patrick join us at Goldcrest Post. He has a unique record of achievement in his field… this unrivaled depth of knowledge and expertise will play a key role in our aggressive on-going expansion.”

Currently, Goldcrest Films (www.goldcrestfilms.com) is fully financing and distributing The Autopsy of Jane Doe, director Andre Ovredal’s English language follow-up to his international hit Troll Hunter. In addition, they recently announced they will be financing and distributing Brooklyn Bridge to which Daniel Radcliffe is attached to star.

Two hot items at the electronics circus

By Tim Spitzer
Managing Director
Goldcrest Post, NYC
www.goldcrestfilms.com/postny

VFX

SGO, manufacturers of Mistika, introduced Mamba FX.  Mamba FX is a stunningly cost-effective node-based, shot-based, Windows-based effects software package.  Mamba FX is effectively the full subset of effects tools that live in Mistika.

Mamba FX allows capture of all the same camera codecs/file formats as Mystika.

Mamba FX has the same stabilizing, speed change, compositing, tracking, text, color, and 3D tools as Mystika. In my understanding the only tools that have been removed are the Stereoscopic toolset. Continue reading