Tag Archives: Glenn Derry

Virtual Production Field Guide: Fox VFX Lab’s Glenn Derry

Just ahead of SIGGRAPH, Epic Games has published a resource guide called “The Virtual Production Field Guide”  — a comprehensive look at how virtual production impacts filmmakers, from directors to the art department to stunt coordinators to VFX teams and more. The guide is workflow-agnostic.

The use of realtime game engine technology has the potential to impact every aspect of traditional filmmaking, and the trend is increasingly being used in productions ranging from films like Avengers: Endgame and the upcoming Artemis Fowl to TV series like Game of Thrones.

The Virtual Production Field Guide offers an in-depth look at different types of techniques from creating and integrating high-quality CG elements live on set to virtual location scouting to using photoreal LED walls for in-camera VFX. It provides firsthand insights from award-winning professionals who have used these techniques – including directors Kenneth Branagh and Wes Ball, producers Connie Kennedy and Ryan Stafford, cinematographers Bill Pope and Haris Zambarloukos, VFX supervisors Ben Grossmann and Sam Nicholson, virtual production supervisors Kaya Jabar and Glenn Derry, editor Dan Lebental, previs supervisor Felix Jorge, stunt coordinators Guy and Harrison Norris, production designer Alex McDowell, and grip Kim Heath.

As mentioned, the guide is dense with information, so we decided to run an excerpt to give you an idea of what it covers.

Glenn DerryHere is an interview with Glenn Derry, founder and VP of visual effects at Fox VFX Lab, which offers a variety of virtual production services with a focus on performance capture. Derry is known for his work as a virtual production supervisor on projects like Avatar, Real Steel and The Jungle Book.

Let’s find out more.

How has performance capture evolved since projects such as The Polar Express?
In those earlier eras, there was no realtime visualization during capture. You captured everything as a standalone piece, and then you did what they called the director layout. After-the-fact, you would assemble the animation sequences from the motion data captured. Today, we’ve got a combo platter where we’re able to visualize in realtime.
When we bring a cinematographer in, he can start lining up shots with another device called the hybrid camera. It’s a tracked reference camera that he can hand hold. I can immediately toggle between an Unreal overview or a camera view of that scene.The earlier process was minimal in terms of aesthetics. We did everything we could in MotionBuilder, and we made it look as good as it could. Now we can make a lot more mission-critical decisions earlier in the process because the aesthetics of the renders look a lot better.

What are some additional uses for performance capture?
Sometimes we’re working with a pitch piece, where the studio is deciding whether they want to make a movie at all. We use the capture stage to generate what the director has in mind tonally and how the project could feel. We could do either a short little pitch piece or, for something like Call of the Wild, we created 20 minutes and three key scenes from the film to show the studio we could make it work.

The second the movie gets greenlit, we flip over into preproduction. Now we’re breaking down the full script and working with the art department to create concept art. Then we build the movie’s world out around those concepts.

We have our team doing environmental builds based on sketches. Or in some cases, the concept artists themselves are in Unreal Engine doing the environments. Then our virtual art department (VAD) cleans those up and optimizes them for realtime.

Are the artists modeling directly in Unreal Engine?
The artists model in Maya, Modo, 3ds Max, etc. — we’re not particular about the application as long as the output is FBX. The look development, which is where the texturing happens, is all done within Unreal. We’ll also have artists working in Substance Painter and it will auto-update in Unreal. We have to keep track of assets through the entire process, all the way through to the last visual effects vendor.

How do you handle the level of detail decimation so realtime assets can be reused for visual effects?
The same way we would work on AAA games. We begin with high-resolution detail and then use combinations of texture maps, normal maps and bump maps. That allows us to get high-texture detail without a huge polygon count. There are also some amazing LOD [level of detail] tools built into Unreal, which enable us to take a high-resolution asset and derive something that looks pretty much identical unless you’re right next to it, but runs at a much higher frame rate.

Do you find there’s a learning curve for crew members more accustomed to traditional production?
We’re the team productions come to do realtime on live-action sets. That’s pretty much all we do. That said, it requires prep, and if you want it to look great, you have to make decisions. If you were going to shoot rear projection back in the 1940s or Terminator 2 with large rear projection systems, you still had to have all that material pre-shot to make it work.
It’s the same concept in realtime virtual production. If you want to see it look great in Unreal live on the day, you can’t just show up and decide. You have to pre-build that world and figure out how it’s going to integrate.

The visual effects team and the virtual production team have to be involved from day one. They can’t just be brought in at the last minute. And that’s a significant change for producers and productions in general. It’s not that it’s a tough nut to swallow, it’s just a very different methodology.

How does the cinematographer collaborate with performance capture?
There are two schools of thought: one is to work live with camera operators, shooting the tangible part of the action that’s going on, as the camera is an actor in the scene as much as any of the people are. You can choreograph it all out live if you’ve got the performers and the suits. The other version of it is treated more like a stage play. Then you come back and do all the camera coverage later. I’ve seen DPs like Bill Pope and Caleb Deschanel pick this right up.

How is the experience for actors working in suits and a capture volume?
One of the harder problems we deal with is eye lines. How do we assist the actors so that they’re immersed in this, and they don’t just look around at a bunch of gray box material on a set. On any modern visual effects movie, you’re going to be standing in front of a 50-foot-tall bluescreen at some point.

Performance capture is in some ways more actor-centric versus a traditional set because there aren’t all the other distractions in a volume such as complex lighting and camera setup time. The director gets to focus in on the actors. The challenge is getting the actors to interact with something unseen. We’ll project pieces of the set on the walls and use lasers for eye lines. The quality of the HMDs today are also excellent for showing the actors what they would be seeing.

How do you see performance capture tools evolving?
I think a lot of the stuff we’re prototyping today will soon be available to consumers, home content creators, YouTubers, etc. A lot of what Epic develops also gets released in the engine. Money won’t be the driver in terms of being able to use the tools, your creative vision will be.

My teenage son uses Unreal Engine to storyboard. He knows how to do fly-throughs and use the little camera tools we built — he’s all over it. As it becomes easier to create photorealistic visual effects in realtime with a smaller team and at very high fidelity, the movie business will change dramatically.

Something that used to cost $10 million to produce might be a million or less. It’s not going to take away from artists; you still need them. But you won’t necessarily need these behemoth post companies because you’ll be able to do a lot more yourself. It’s just like desktop video — what used to take hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of Flame artists, you can now do yourself in After Effects.

Do you see new opportunities arising as a result of this democratization?
Yes, there are a lot of opportunities. High-quality, good-looking CG assets are still expensive to produce and expensive to make look great. There are already stock sites like TurboSquid and CGTrader where you can purchase beautiful assets economically.

But with the final assembly and coalescing of environments and characters there’s still a lot of need for talented people to do it effectively. I can see companies emerging out of that necessity. We spend a lot of time talking about assets because it’s the core of everything we do. You need to have a set to shoot on and you need compelling characters, which is why actors won’t go away.

What’s happening today isn’t even the tip of the iceberg. There are going to be 50 more big technological breakthroughs along the way. There’s tons of new content being created for Apple, Netflix, Amazon, Disney+, etc. And they’re all going to leverage virtual production.
What’s changing is previs’ role and methodology in the overall scheme of production.
While you might have previously conceived of previs as focused on the pre-production phase of a project and less integral to production, that conception shifts with a realtime engine. Previs is also typically a hands-off collaboration. In a traditional pipeline, a previs artist receives creative notes and art direction then goes off to create animation and present it back to creatives later for feedback.

In the realtime model, because the assets are directly malleable and rendering time is not a limiting factor, creatives can be much more directly and interactively involved in the process. This leads to higher levels of agency and creative satisfaction for all involved. This also means that instead of working with just a supervisor you might be interacting with the director, editor and cinematographer to design sequences and shots earlier in the project. They’re often right in the room with you as you edit the previs sequence and watch the results together in realtime.

Previs image quality has continued to increase in visual fidelity. This means a greater relationship between previs and final pixel image quality. When the assets you develop as a previs artist are of a sufficient quality, they may form the basis of final models for visual effects. The line between pre and final will continue to blur.

The efficiency of modeling assets only once is evident to all involved. By spending the time early in the project to create models of a very high quality, post begins at the outset of a project. Instead of waiting until the final phase of post to deliver the higher-quality models, the production has those assets from the beginning. And the models can also be fed into ancillary areas such as marketing, games, toys and more.