Tag Archives: Flame artist

Charlieuniformtango names company vets as new partners

Charlieuniformtango principal/CEO Lola Lott has named three of the full-service studio’s most veteran artists as new partners — editors Deedle LaCour and James Rayburn, and Flame artist Joey Waldrip. This is the first time in the company’s almost 25-year history that the partnership has expanded. All three will continue with their current jobs but have received the expanded titles of senior editor/partner and senior Flame artist/partner, respectively. Lott, who retains majority ownership of Charlieuniformtango, will remain principal/CEO, and Jack Waldrip will remain senior editor/co-owner.

“Deedle, Joey and James came to me and Jack with a solid business plan about buying into the company with their futures in mind,” explains Lott. “All have been with Charlieuniformtango almost from the beginning: Deedle for 20 years, Joey for 19 years and James for 18. Jack and I were very impressed and touched that they were interested and willing to come to us with funding and plans for continuing and growing their futures with us.

So why now after all these years? “Now is the right time because while Jack and I still have a passion for this business and we also have employees/talent — that have been with us for over 18 years — who also have a passion be a partner in this company,” says Lott. “While still young, they have invested and built their careers within the Tango culture and have the client bonds, maturity and understanding of the business to be able to take Tango to a greater level for the next 20 years. That was mine and Jack’s dream, and they came to us at the perfect time.”

Charlieuniformtango is a full-service creative studio that produces, directs, shoots, edits, mixes, animates and provides motion graphics, color grading, visual effects and finishing for commercials, short films, full-length feature films, documentaries, music videos and digital content.

Main Image: (L-R) Joey Waldrip, James Rayburn, Jack Waldrip, Lola Lott and Deedle LaCour

Meet the Artist: The Mill’s Anne Trotman

Anne Trotman is a senior Flame artist and VFX supervisor at The Mill in New York. She specializes in beauty and fashion work but gets to work on a variety of other projects as well.

A graduate of Kings College in London, Trotman took on what she calls “a lot of very random temp jobs” before finally joining London’s Blue Post Production as a runner.

“In those days a runner did a lot of ‘actual’ running around SoHo, dropping off tapes and picking up lunches,” she says, admitting she was also sent out for extra green for color bars and warm sake at midnight. After being promoted to the machine room, she spent her time assisting all the areas of the company, including telecine grading, offline, online, VFX and audio. “This gave me a strong understanding of the post production process as a whole.”

Trotman then joined the 2D VFX teams from Blue, Clear Post Production, The Hive and VTR to create a team at Prime Focus London. She moved into film compositing where she headed up the 2D team as a senior Flame operator. Overseeing projects, including shot allocation and VFX reviews. Then she joined SFG-Technicolor’s commercials facility in Shanghai. After a year in China she joined The Mill in New York, where she is today.

We reached out to Trotman to find out more about The Mill, a technology and visual effects studio, how she works and some recent projects. Enjoy.

Bumble

Can you talk about some recent high-profile projects you’ve completed?
The most recent high-profile project I’ve worked on was for Bumble’s Super Bowl 2019 spot. It was its first commercial ever. Being that Bumble is a female-founded company, it was important for this project to celebrate female artists and empowerment, something I strongly support. Therefore, I was thrilled to lead an all-female team for this project. The agency creatives and producers were all female and so was almost the whole post team, including the editor, colorist and all the VFX artists.

How did you first learn Flame, and how has your use of it evolved over the years?
I had been assisting artists working on a Quantel Editbox at Blue. They then installed a Flame and hired a female artist who had worked on Gladiator. That’s when I knew I had found my calling. Working with technical equipment was very attractive to me, and in those days it was a dark art, and you had to work in a company to get your hands on one. I worked nights doing a lot of conforming and rotoscoping. I also started doing small jobs for clients I knew well. I remember assisting on an Adele pop video, which is where my love of beauty started.

When I first started using Flame, the whole job was usually completed by one artist. These days, jobs are much bigger, and with so many versions for social media, some days a lot of my day is coordinating the team of artists. Workshare and remote artists are becoming a big part of our industry, so communicating with artists all over the world has become a big part of my job in order to bring everything together to create the final film.

In addition to Flame, what other tools are used in your workflow?
Post production has changed so much in the past five years. My job is not just to press buttons on a Flame to get a commercial on television anymore; that’s only a small part. My job is to help the director and/or the agency position a brand and connect it with the consumer.

My workflow usually starts with bidding an agency or a director’s brief. Sometimes they need tests to sell an idea to a client. I might supervise a previz artist on Maxon Cinema 4D to help them achieve the director’s vision. I attend most of the shoots, which gives me an insight into the project while assessing the client’s goals and vision. I can take Flame on a laptop to my shoots to do tests for the director to help explain how certain shots will look after post. This process is so helpful all around in order for me to see if what we are shooting is correct and for the client to understand the director’s vision.

At The Mill, I work closely with the colorists who work on FilmLight Baselight before completing the work on Flame. All the artists at The Mill use Flame and Foundry Nuke, although my Flame skills are 100% better than my Nuke skills.

What are the most fulfilling aspects of the work you do?
I’m lucky to work with many directors and agency creatives that I now call friends. It still gives me a thrill when I’m able to interpret the vision of the creative or director to create the best work possible and convey the message of the brand.

I also love working with the next generation of artists. I especially love being able to work alongside the young female talent at The Mill. This is the first company I’ve worked at where I’ve not been “the one and only female Flame artist.”

At the Mill NY, we currently have 11 full-time female 2D artists working in our team, which has a 30/70 male to female ratio. Still a way to go to get to 50/50, so if I can inspire another female intern or runner who is thinking of becoming a VFX artist or colorist, then it’s a good day. Helping the cycle continue for female artists is so important to me.

What is the greatest challenge you’ve faced in your career?
Moving to Shanghai. Not only did I have the challenge of the language barrier to overcome but also the culture — from having lunch at noon to working with clients from a completely different background than mine. I had to learn all I could about the Chinese culture to help me connect with my clients.

Covergirl with Issa Rae

Out of all of the projects you’ve worked on, which one are you the most proud of?
There are many, but one that stands out is the Covergirl brand relaunch (2018) for director Matt Lambert at Prettybird. As an artist working on high-profile beauty brands, what they stand for is very important to me. I know every young girl will want to use makeup to make themselves feel great, but it’s so important to make sure young women are using it for the right reason. The new tagline “I am what I make-up” — together with a very diverse group of female ambassadors — was such a positive message to put out into the world.

There was also 28 Weeks Later, a feature film from director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo. My first time working on a feature was an amazing experience. I got to make lifelong friends working on this project. My technical abilities as an artist grew so much that year, from learning the patience needed to work on the same shot for two months to discovering the technical difficulties in compositing fire to be able to blow up parts of London. Such fun!

Finally, there was also a spot for the Target Summer 2019 campaign. It was directed by Whitelabel’s Lacey, who I collaborate with together on a lot of projects. Tristan Sheridan was the DP and the agency was Mother NY.

Target Summer Campaign

What advice do you have for a young professional trying to break into the industry?
Try everything. Don’t get pigeonholed into one area of the industry too early on. Learn about every part of the post process; it will be so helpful to you as you progress through your career.

I was lucky my first boss in the industry (Dave Cadle) was patient and gave me time to find out what I wanted to focus on. I try to be a positive mentor to the young runners and interns at The Mill, especially the young women. I was so lucky to have had female role models throughout my career, from the person that employed me to the first person that started training me on Flame. I know how important it is to see someone like you in a role you are thinking of pursuing.

Outside of work, how do you enjoy spending your free time?
I travel as much as I can. I love learning about new cultures; it keeps me grounded. I live in New York City, which is a bubble, and if you stay here too long, you start to forget what the real world looks like. I also try to give back when I can. I’ve been helping a director friend of mine with some films focusing on the issue of female homelessness around the world. We collaborated on some lovely films about women in LA and are currently working on some London-based ones.

You can find out more here.

Anne Trotman Image: Photo by Olivia Burke

Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.

Behind the Title: Jogger Studios’ CD Andy Brown

This veteran creative director can also often be found at the controls of his Flame working on a new spot.

NAME: Andy Brown

COMPANY: Jogger Studios (@joggerstudios)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a boutique post house with offices in the US and UK providing visual effects, motion graphics, color grading and finishing. We are partnered with Cut + Run for editorial and get to work with their editors from around the world. I am based in our Jogger Los Angeles office, after having helped found the company in London.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing compositing, visual effects and finishing. Looking after staff and clients. Juggling all of these things and anticipating the unexpected.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m still working “on the box” every day. Even though my title is creative director, it is the hands-on work that is my first love as far as project collaborations go. Also I get to re-program the phones and crawl under the desks to get the wires looking neater when viewed from the client couch.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The variety, the people and the challenges. Just getting to work on a huge range of creative projects is such a privilege. How many people get to go to work each day looking forward to it?

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
The hours, occasionally. It’s more common to have to work without clients nowadays. That definitely makes for more work sometimes, as you might need to create two or three versions of a spot to get approval. If everyone was in the room together you reach a consensus more quickly.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the start of the day best, when everyone is coming into the office and we are getting set up for whatever project we are working on. Could be the first coffee of the day that does it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I want to say classic car dealer, but given my actual career path the most likely alternative would be editor.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
There were lots of reasons, when I look at it. It was either the Blue Peter Book of Television (the longest running TV program for kids, courtesy of the BBC) or my visit to the HTV Wales TV station with my dad when I was about 12. We walked around the studios and they were playing out a film to air, grading it live through a telecine. I was really struck by the influence that the colorist was having on what was seen.

I went on to do critical work on photography, film and television at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies at Birmingham University. Part of that course involved being shown around the Pebble Mill BBC Studios. They were editing a sequence covering a public enquiry into the Handsworth riots in 1985. It just struck me how powerful the editing process was. The story could be told so many different ways, and the editor was playing a really big part in the process.

Those experiences (and an interest in writing) led me to think that television might be a good place to work. I got my first job as a runner at MPC after a friend had advised me how to get a start in the business.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We worked on a couple of spots for Bai recently with Justin Timberlake creating the “brasberry.” We had to make up some graphic animations for the newsroom studio backdrop for the shoot and then animate opening title graphics to look just enough like it was a real news report, but not too much like a real news report.

We do quite a bit of food work, so there’s always some burgers, chicken or sliced veggies that need a bit of love to make them pop.

There’s a nice set extension job starting next week, and we recently finished a job with around 400 final versions, which made for a big old deliverables spreadsheet. There’s so much that we do that no one sees, which is the point if we do it right.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes the job that you are most proud of isn’t necessarily the most amazing thing to look at. I used to work on newspaper commercials back in the UK, and it was all so “last minute.” A story broke, and all of a sudden you had to have a spot ready to go on air with no edit, no footage and only the bare bones of a script. It could be really challenging, but we had to get it done somehow.

But the best thing is seeing something on TV that you’ve worked on. At Jogger Studios, it is primarily commercials, so you get that excitement over and over again. It’s on air for a few weeks and then it’s gone. I like that. I saw two of our spots in a row recently on TV, which I got a kick out of. Still looking for that elusive hat-trick.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The Flame, the Land Rover Series III and, sadly, my glasses.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Just friends and family on Instagram, mainly. Although like most Flame operators, I look at the Flame Learning Channel on YouTube pretty regularly. YouTube also thinks I’m really interested in the Best Fails of 2018 for some reason.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
More often than not it is podcasts. West Wing Weekly, The Adam Buxton Podcast, Short Cuts and Song Exploder. Plus some of the shows on BBC 6 Music, which I really miss.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go to work every day feeling incredibly lucky to be doing the job that I do, and it’s good to remember that. The 15-minute walk to and from work in Santa Monica usually does it.

Living so close to the beach is fantastic. We can get down to the sand, get the super-brella set up and get in the sea with the bodyboards in about 15 minutes. Then there’s the Malibu Cars & Coffee, which is a great place to start your Sunday.

VFX house Jamm adds Flame artist Mark Holden

Santa Monica-based visual effects boutique Jamm has added veteran Flame artist Mark Holden to its roster. Holden comes to Jamm with over 20 years of experience in post production, including stints in London and Los Angeles.

It didn’t take long for Holden to dive right in at Jamm; he worked on Space 150’s Buffalo Wild Wings Super Bowl campaign directed by the Snorri Bros. and starring Brett Favre. The Super Bowl teaser kicked off the pre-game.

Holden is known not only for his visual effects talent, but also for turning projects around under tight deadlines and offering his clients as many possible solutions within the post process. This has earned him work with leading agencies such as Fallon, Mother, Saatchi & Saatchi, Leo Burnett, 180, TBWA/Chiat/Day, Goodby Silverstein & Partners, Deutsch, David & Goliath, and Team One. He has worked with brands including Lexus, Activision, Adidas, Chevy, Geico, Grammys, Kia, Lyft, Pepsi, Southwest Airlines, StubHub, McDonald’s, Kellogg’s, Stella Artois, Silk, Heineken and Olay.

 

ArsenalCreative beefs up with head of 2D Chris Noellert

LA-based ArsenalCreative has brought on Chris Noellert as head of 2D. He brings with him over 20 years of experience in VFX, Flame and post. During Noellert’s two-decade career, he’s been a Flame artist and served as VFX supervisor at shops including Chimney, Syndicate, Mirada Studios. Most recently, he spent nearly four years at Carbon VFX, where he held the title of creative director/lead Flame.

At ArsenalCreative, Noellert had already worked on the “Not Just New, Better” campaign for Hyundai, continuing his longtime collaboration with agency partner Innocean. “I had done a fair amount of work for Innocean at my previous shop, including leading two of their three Hyundai Super Bowl ads, First Date and Ryan Town, and over the years we really hit a nice stride,” he says. “It’s fantastic when you have the opportunity to consistently work with creative directors and teams where you have developed a creative shorthand. You can anticipate and fulfill their needs successfully thru the project — from concepting and participating on-set, to sitting in the bay and pulling it all together. So when Innocean called with ‘Not Just New, Better,’ I was super excited to get them introduced to my new cohorts at Arsenal.”

In addition to the Hyundai and Principal Financial campaigns — Noellert led the revamped logo rollout and brand campaign — ArsenalCreative is also releasing 17 web films for Toyota in partnership with Saatchi & Saatchi LA and Superlounge’s Jordan Brady.

“From the outset, I was looking for an established boutique-style shop positioned to expand into the latest media trends and technologies” he explains. “I also knew I was looking for a shop that fosters open relations with clientele – allowing me to take a collaborative leading role in the creative process, not being the guy in the Flame suite in the corner at a two-man shop, or a cog in a wheel of hundreds.”

Veteran Flame artist Toby Brockhurst joins Zoic

Visual effects house Zoic Studios, based in Culver City, has added Flame artist Toby Brockhurst. With over two decades of experience, he has worked on effects-driven spots for major brands such as Kia, Guinness, Volvo, EA Sports and BMW, and worked for top shops including MPC, Framestore, The Mill and Method Studios.

He has also worked on music videos — for Tori Amos, Air, Annie Lenox, George Michael, Jamiroquai and Missy Elliott — and feature films, such as Transformers 3D, Pearl Harbor, Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, Harry Potter and The Big Lebowski. Recent work out of Zoic includes spots for Jeep, Samsung and Sony PlayStation.

From a spot promoting PlayStation's first-ever series "Powers."

From a spot promoting PlayStation’s first-ever series “Powers.”

Zoic executive creative director/partner Chris Jones, says, “Toby is a great addition to the Zoic commercial division. He’s the perfect mix of artist, technician and the guy you want by your side on set and in the bay. We’re incredibly lucky to have him on board.”

After spending his youth as a shepherd on his family’s dairy farm in Wiltshire, England — yes, you read that correctly — Brockhurst earned a degree in architecture and traded in his crook for a computer when he interned at VTR London. He spent nights and weekends learning the Quantel Paintbox, then Harry, and quickly moved up as an artist, eventually jumping on the Flame in 1995.

Brockhurst spent a number of years bouncing between London and the US, directing, VFX supervising and, of course, providing Flame work. He eventually succumbed to the need for vitamin D and has resided permanently in Los Angeles since 2011.

‘Banshee’ associate producer Gwyn Shovelski talks VFX

By Randi Altman

For those of you lucky enough to have discovered Banshee on Cinemax, you know just how fun a ride it can be… and just how violent. The amount of blood spilled would make Quentin Tarantino proud.

The show recently finished its third season run of action-packed goodness, and while the episodes featured many in-your-face visual effects — I urge you to search for “Chayton’s Death Scene” on YouTube — courtesy of Zoic Studios, there were also many effects that were just, well, face effects.

If you are a viewer, you know that most of the characters aren’t who they appear to be, and the audience is let in on their back stories via flashbacks. That is where Technicolor Flame artist Continue reading

To rent or buy? That is the question

What best fits your studio’s needs is a personal choice.

By Fred Ruckel

When it comes to production, there is always a debate about whether to buy equipment or rent it. RuckSackNY has faced this dilemma many times over the years and recently we decided it was time to take the plunge — we are now investing in the gear we would often rent.

This decision was not taken lightly and didn’t happen overnight because our choice wasn’t a cheap one. For me, it all comes down to quality control and consistent shooting. Over the course of the year we shoot as many as 20 times, which might not seem like a lot to some, but for a little company like ours it means constantly hiring crews and equipment.

Continue reading

Paul Marangos brings his Flame expertise to Hooligan in NYC

Paul Marangos has joined New York editing and VFX boutique Hooligan as senior visual effects Flame artist. He has over 20 years of post experience, with an eight year tenure at The Mill and stops at London’s Cell, LA’s The Finish Line, Johannesburg’s Blade and Scarlet in NYC.

He has already wrapped up several projects with Hooligan, including commercials for Citi and Match.com, and Indrani’s short film Crescendo, curated by Pepsi in conjunction with the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

Match

“I’ve always enjoyed working with editors, and Hooligan provides me the opportunity to step out of traditional facilities and work directly with them in order to continue doing what I do best,” says the South African born Marangos.

“Paul always seems to be way ahead of me,” adds Kane Platt, president/senior editor at Hooligan. “He always knows what I’m working on and what the creative challenges are, and will call me into to his room to look at wonderful visual ideas before I’ve even started cutting. It’s an enthusiasm that one rarely finds — and it usually leads to great things.”

Over the years Marangos has contributed to commercials for brands such as Nike, BMW, Taco Bell, Lexus, Honda, Guinness, Cadburys, Samsung and Pepsi. His advertising reel is highlighted by Nando’s Cannes Lion-honored “Dictator” campaign and FNB’s 2010 World Cup ad in which he seamlessly composited a full stadium using only 150 people.

Marangos has also worked on graphics packages for major networks and TV shows, including the Sucker TV, and the 2001 feature film “Hannibal. His special effects work can be found in music videos for Oasis (Right Here, Right Now) and Mariah Carey (My All), as well as Björk, Madonna, Goldfrapp, Kyle Minogue, Radiohead and Elton John.