Tag Archives: finishing

Timber finishes Chipotle ‘Fresh Food’ campaign

In Chipotle’s new Fresh Food campaign, directed by Errol Morris for Moxie Pictures out of agency Venables Bell + Partners, real-life employees of the food chain talk about the pride they take in their work while smashing guacamole and cutting peppers, parsley and other fresh ingredients.

The food shots are designed to get all five of your senses moving by grabbing the audience with the visually appealing, fresh food served and leading them to taste, smell, and hear the authentic ingredients.

The four spots — Bre – Just BraggingCarson – Good Food Good Person, Krista – Fresh Everyday
Robbie – Microwaves Not Welcome — are for broadcast and the web.

For Chipotle, Santa Monica’s Timber handled online, finishing and just a splash of clean-up. They used Flame on the project. According to Timber head of production Melody Alexander, “The Chipotle project was based on showcasing the realness of the products the restaurants uses in their food. Minimal clean-up was required as the client was keen to keep the naturalness of the footage. We at Timber use a combination of finishing tools when working on online projects. The Chipotle project was completely done in the Flame.”

Vickie Sornsilp joins 1606 Studio as head of production

San Francisco-based 1606 Studio, formerly Made-SF, has hired veteran post producer Vickie Sornsilp to head of production. Sornsilp, whose background includes senior positions with One Union Recording and Beast Editorial, will oversee editorial and post finishing projects for the studio, which was launched last month by executive producer Jon Ettinger, editor/director Doug Walker and editors Brian Lagerhausen and Connor McDonald.

“Vickie represents what 1606 Studio is all about…family,” says Ettinger. “She trained under me at the beginning of her career and is now ready to take on the mantle of head of production. Our clients trust her to take care of business. I couldn’t be prouder to welcome her to our team.”

A graduate of San Francisco’s Academy of Art University, Sornsilp began her career as a copywriter with agency DDB. She got her start in post production in 2014 with Beast Editorial, where she produced work for such brands as Amazon, Clorox, Doritos, HP, Round Table Pizza, Mini Cooper, Toyota, Visa, Walmart and Yahoo! She joined One Union Recording as executive producer in 2018.

Sornsilp is excited to reunite with 1606 Studio’s founders. “It feels like coming home,” she says. “Jon, Doug, Brian and Connor are legends in the business and I look forward to doing more great work with them.”

Launched under the interim name Made-SF, the company is rebranding as 1606 Studio in anticipation of moving into permanent facilities in April at 1606 Stockton Street in San Francisco’s historic North Beach neighborhood. Currently undergoing a build-out, that site will feature five Adobe Premiere editorial suites, two motion graphics suites, and two Flame post finishing suites with room for further expansion.

“We want to underscore that we are a San Francisco-centric company,” explains Walker. “Service companies from outside the area have been moving into the city to take advantage of the boom in advertising and media production. We want to make it clear that we’re already here and grounded in the community.”

Company 3 to open Hollywood studio, adds Roma colorist Steve Scott

Company 3 has added Steve Scott as EVP/senior finishing artist. His long list of credits includes Alfonso Cuarón’s Oscar-nominated Roma and Gravity; 19 Marvel features, including The Avengers, Iron Man and Guardians of the Galaxy franchises; and many Academy-Award-winning films, including The Jungle Book, Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance and The Revenant (both took Oscars for director Alejandro Iñárritu and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki).

Roma

The addition of Scott comes at a time when Company 3 is completing work on a new location at 950 Lillian Way in Hollywood. This new space represents the first phase of a planned much larger footprint in that area of Los Angeles. This new space will enable the company to significantly expand its capacity while providing the level of artistry and personalized service the industry expects from Company 3. It will also enable them to service more East Side and Valley-based clients.

“Steve is someone I’ve always wanted to work with and I am beyond thrilled that he has agreed to work with us at Company 3,” says CEO Stefan Sonnenfeld. “As we continue the process of re-imagining the entire concept of what ‘post production’ means creatively and technically, it makes perfect sense to welcome a leading innovator and brilliant artist to our team.”

Sonnenfeld and Scott will oversee every facet of this new boutique-style space to ensure it offers the same flexible experience clients have come to expect when working at Company 3. Scott, a devoted student of art and architecture, with extensive professional experience as a painter and architectural illustrator, says, “The opportunity to help design a new cutting-edge facility in my Hollywood hometown was too great to pass up.”

Scott oversees a team of additional artists to offer filmmakers the significantly increased ability to augment and refine imagery as part of the finishing process.

“The industry is experiencing a renaissance of content,” says Sonnenfeld. “The old models of feature film vs. television, long- vs. short-form are changing rapidly. Workflows and delivery methods are undergoing revolutionary changes with more content, and innovative content, coming from a whole array of new sources. It’s a very exciting and challenging time and I think these major additions to our roster and infrastructure will go a long way towards our goal of continuing Company 3’s role as a major force in the industry.”

Main Image Credit: 2018 HPA Awards Ceremony/Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

Creative editorial and post boutique Hiatus opens in Detroit

Hiatus, a full-service, post production studio with in-house creative editorial, original music composition and motion graphics departments, has opened in Detroit. Their creative content offerings cover categories such as documentary, narrative, conceptual, music videos and advertising media for all video platforms.

Led by founder/senior editor Shane Patrick Ford, the new company includes executive producer/partner Catherine Pink, and executive producer Joshua Magee, who joins Hiatus from the animation studio Lunar North. Additional talents feature editor Josh Beebe, composer/editor David Chapdelaine and animator James Naugle.

The roots of Hiatus began with The Factory, a music venue founded by Ford while he was still in college. It provided a venue for local Detroit musicians to play, as well as touring bands. Ford, along with a small group of creatives, then formed The Work – a production company focused on commercial and advertising projects. For Ford, the launch of Hiatus is an opportunity to focus solely on his editorial projects and to expand his creative reach and that of his team nationally.

Leading up to the launch of Hiatus, the team has worked on projects for brands such as Sony, Ford Motor Company, Acura and Bush’s, as well as recent music videos for Lord Huron, Parquet Courts and the Wombats.

The Hiatus team is also putting the finishing touches on the company’s first original feature film Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win. The film uncovers a Detroit Police decoy unit named STRESS and the efforts made to restore civil order in 1970s post-rebellion Detroit. Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win makes its debut at the Indy Film Festival on Sunday April 29th and Tuesday May 1st in Indianapolis, before it hits the film festival circuit.

“Launching Hiatus was a natural evolution for me,” says Ford. “It was time to give my creative team even more opportunities, to expand our network and to collaborate with people across the country that I’ve made great connections with. As the post team evolved within The Work, we outgrew the original role it played within a production company. We began to develop our own team, culture, offerings and our own processes. With the launch of Hiatus, we are poised to better serve the visual arts community, to continue to grow and to be recognized for the talented creative team we are.”

“Instead of having a post house stacked with people, we’d prefer to stay small and choose the right personal fit for each project when it comes to color, VFX and heavy finishing,” explains Hiatus EP Catherine Pink. “We have a network of like-minded artists that we can call on, so each project gets the right creative attention and touch it deserves. Also, the lower overhead allows us to remain nimble and work with a variety of budget needs and all kinds of clients.”

MPC LA moves to Culver City location, expands MPC Film

After eight years in Santa Monica, MPC LA has moved to a 25,000-square-foot digital studio in Culver City at 8921 Lindblade Street.

MPC Advertising now has more space dedicated to VFX, color and finishing. The new space also plays host to a purpose-built VR/AR infrastructure and its content production arm, MPC Creative.

MPC Film LA has a greatly expanded footprint in the new facility, offering filmmakers the opportunity to collaborate with MPC’s artists to support the pre-production phase of development. Creative services include concept and production design, previs and visual development, and preliminary bidding and budgeting.

Julian Levi, the newly promoted GM at MPC Film LA, says, “We are excited to be able to continue collaborating with filmmakers in the very early stages of production. Having all of our front-end resources consolidated in the new studio means our clients can take advantage of MPC LA’s creative services all in one space.”

The space features an MPAA approved previs artist workspace and a screening room with 3D stereo, HD and 2K/4K projection, offering 2K synced reviews, TV-IPS video feed and video conferencing.

VFX industry veteran Joanna Capitano (right) has also joined the team at MPC Film LA, overseeing and representing the studio’s VFX supervisor talent, including Richard Stammers, Erik Nash and Guillaume Rocheron. Capitano was most recently VP of features at Digital Domain.

In discussing the move, MPC’s global CEO, Mark Benson, explains, “Culver City presented a unique opportunity to build out our custom-designed, integrated studio in a 25,000-square-foot space. It is a great fit because Culver City is fast becoming Los Angeles’ hotbed of emerging technology, and it’s located off the 10 freeway and Metro Expo line, making it convenient for our clients.”

MPC Film previs/postvis teams are currently working on Ghost in the Shell, Fantastic Beasts, Alien Covenant and The Dark Tower.

 

Quick Chat: Light Iron New York supervising colorist Steven Bodner

By Randi Altman

Turn your TV to any network or streaming channel any evening and you will immediately be reminded just how much television production is currently going on in New York City. This boon is directly related to New York’s inviting production tax incentives. And thanks to the state’s post production tax incentives, many of these shows are now staying in New York for finishing.

In response to this increase in work, Panavision’s Light Iron in New York has been growing its episodic division, most recently with the addition of supervising colorist Steven Bodner, who joins after eight years at Deluxe in New York.

Bodner’s extensive television resume includes Girls, Blue Bloods, Treme, True Detective and the new HBO series Vinyl. Bodner also works on features, including the recent Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba.

Considering his history and his new position, we figured there was no better time to reach out and learn more about Bodner and how he works.

Why was now the right time to make a move, and why was Light Iron the right choice?  
I was with Deluxe for the past eight years and felt I needed a change. I was approached by Light Iron and was impressed right off the bat with their technological know-how and advancements. The Panavision connection also influenced my decision. I love the fact that I can be involved from the early stages of choosing the camera and lenses to the final delivery.

What do you hope to accomplish in your new position at Light Iron? Your title says supervising colorist, but you will you be hands-on for shows as well?
I am 100 percent hands-on with all the projects I work on. I feel like I can connect more with the filmmakers and creatives by touching every frame of the show or film. My title is more for building a strong team and department. I want to help our new colorists polish their skills so that we can all grow together and collaborate. I have a lot of knowledge I can spread through our new department, and the title allows me to do that.

What is your color grading tool of choice?
I feel like we as artists use many tools to mold a picture. A great colorist can shape pretty pictures with whatever platform we are given — it’s more about the creative vision. That being said, I am currently using the latest version of Resolve from Blackmagic. (Light Iron’s New York facility just installed a Quantum StorNext 5 SAN (700 TB) and a Sony X300 for HDR monitoring.)

What is your ideal way of working on a TV show, and does that differ from how you work on a feature?
What I like to do, whether it be TV or a film, is get involved as early as possible. I like to get into the head of the DP and/or director and see what his or her visions are for the show. Then, during testing, I like to find time to sit and play around a bit and get some “look-book” stills done for reference going forward. When a delivery actually comes in, I like to do a quick pass unsupervised and get everything in a ballpark with my look-book stills and then go from there with the clients.

Do you prefer getting visual examples of looks or talking about the look and feel?
It’s always nice to get visual examples of what the DP or creative wants. However, there are situations when time doesn’t allow for that and a quick conversation is all you get. That’s why, for me, it’s important to be involved from the start and to communicate as often as possible or needed.

As a New York post veteran, it must be fun watching all this episodic work come to New York, and stay in NY for post. 
It’s been great watching the amount of NY work grow. I remember years ago only doing the dailies and hoping for a day when we could keep the finishing here as well. It’s a dream come true.

What changes/trends have you noticed over the past few years relating to color grading?
The biggest changes or trends I’ve noticed are related to speed and capabilities. With most projects being digital now, there is an expectation for speed. We have to be fast and precise while retaining the look and the feel of the show. I also feel like we are doing a fair amount of beauty work in color due to the stronger color tools and better trackers.

Finally, where do you find inspiration for looks? Photography? Museums? The streets of New York?
I get my inspiration from everyday life, photography and other shows or films. I also like to sit in my color suite and just try things that I normally wouldn’t do, when a client is present, to see what comes out of it.

XML, AAF, EDL, WTF?

Taking your project from the edit suite to the final product.

By The Unknown Artist

I’ve been asked a few times recently to explain the what, how and why of XML, AAF and EDLs. They’re an essential part of any turnover, and each post house will request a different set of one or more of these (often along with your project or bin). I, the Unknown Artist, am here to try and demystify this aspect of turnovers, and hopefully make turnover specs seem less weirdly demanding.

What are they?
When a project is conformed, we’re not relinking your timeline, but rebuilding it in different software. Depending on that software, we need the details of your timeline in one of these formats to interpret it correctly. An EDL is the most simple of the three, which is why we often Continue reading

ProMAX targets 4K edit, VFX workflows with One workstations

ProMAX Systems, makers of high-performance video storage servers, editing workstations and archival appliances, has launched the ProMax One and One+ workstations, which are designed specifically for video editors, colorists, and VFX artists working with 4K workflows.

The new One and One+ models are easy-to-configure, turnkey systems. In the same modular construct as ProMAX’s Platform shared storage servers, the One and One+ lines both offer two base configurations and options for adding modules for graphics, storage, archive and more. The workstations’ “All-in-One” infrastructure enables true end-to-end workflows with data ingest, editing, and archiving functions all possible within a single workstation.

One and One+ features optimize strengths in high-performance editorial functionality and graphics processing. For editorial acceleration, high clock speed CPUs with up to 3.7GHz support a smooth and responsive editing experience.

For VFX work, dual 12-core CPUs apply 24 cores of processing power for fast renders. All One systems provide huge on-board RAID storage, offering fast, secure access to data with storage modules up to 30TB on the ProMAX One, and 40TB on the ProMAX One+. In addition, all new One workstations have the ability to add multiple GPU cards, via seven PCIe slots.

One and One+ workstations are currently available through the ProMAX global network of authorized reseller partners.

Brewster Parsons hires VFX vet Jason Cohon

Venice, California-based VFX house Brewster Parsons continues its path to growth through staff additions, facility and technology updates, and global partnerships. Most recently they added VFX vet Jason Cohon as senior producer.

Cohon has experience creating and finishing all types of visual content. Working working at Asylum, Brand New School, Digital Domain, Mirada and Sway Studio, he has produced live-action and VFX-intensive feature, television, commercial and experiential projects working with directors such as Dante Ariola, Nicolai Fuglsig, Joseph Kosinski and Rupert Sanders.

At Brewster Parsons, he now joins CG/VFX supervisor TJ Burke, who has 24 feature film credits and has worked with Hydraulx and ILM; VFX supervisor and lead Flame artist Louis Mackall, another former Hydraulx talent; and VFX supervisor and lead Flame artist Andrew Eksner, who has spent time at Digital Domain and Method.

“Brewster Parsons is equal parts VFX/design/finishing facility and lifestyle brand,” says Cohon. “It’s rare in our industry to find a company that believes as strongly in the quality of their product as they do in their employees’ quality of life. I think that shows through in the artistry and in the overall great attitude of everyone who works here.”

Over the past year, Brewster Parsons has opened a new finishing suite on its Abbot Kinney premises in Venice, and also forged strategic relationships with other leading facilities. Among those is Ollin VFX in Mexico City, which mainly works on features and has handled many projects for David Fincher, and leading Barcelona VFX shop Furia Digital. Over the past 18 months, both companies have contributed to Brewster Parsons projects for Royal Caribbean.

 

Lucky Post hires finishing artist Tim Nagle

Dallas-based Lucky Post has added Tim Nagle as finishing artist. Nagle’s first collaboration with Lucky Post began as the engineering designer of the studio back in 2012, designing the studio’s all-important technology backbone.

In 2002 Nagle founded Creative Integrations, a full-service engineering and integration firm specializing in post, recording, animation and broadcast facilities. For over a decade, Nagle helped companies design, improve and streamline workflows of all types, including facility design for companies throughout the country. Among them, Red Car in Dallas and NY, Union Editorial, 1st Avenue Machine, Smoke & Mirrors and Passion Pictures in NY, DigitalFX in Baton Rouge and Cook Children’s Hospital in Fort Worth.

He began his career as an engineer for Solid State Logic (1997-2000) working with the company’s many clients, including Fox, Warner Bros., Skywalker Ranch, EA Games, Wonderland and ABC, among others. Since 2002, he has also lent his talent to the sound department of studio feature films and television before making this transition to online editing.

“I’ve always loved the independence of consultancy but when I wasn’t at Lucky Post I found I really missed the environment and the people. When I reflected on my future, I kept returning to Lucky Post.”

Since joining Lucky, Nagle has collaborated with agencies McGarrah Jessee, Moroch and The Richards Group. View his spot reel here.

In addition to assuming the artist’s chair, Nagle leads the company’s assistant training program, providing those working alongside Lucky Post’s editors, designers and sound designers with the necessary technology knowledge and experience.