Tag Archives: finishing

Review: FXhome’s HitFilm Pro 12 for editing, compositing, VFX

By Brady Betzel

If you have ever worked in Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple FCP X or Avid Media Composer and wished you could just flip a tab and be inside After Effects, with access to 3D objects directly in your timeline, you are going to want to take a look at FXhome’s HitFilm Pro 12.

Similar to how Blackmagic brought Fusion inside of its most recent versions of DaVinci Resolve, HitFilm Pro offers a nonlinear editor, a composite/VFX suite and a finishing suite combined into one piece of software. Haven’t heard about HitFilm yet? Let me help fill in some blanks.

Editing and 3D model Import

Editing and 3D model Import

What is HitFilm Pro 12?
Technically, HitFilm Pro 12 is a non-subscription-based nonlinear editor, compositor and VFX suite that costs $299. Not only does that price include 12 months of updates and tech support, but one license can be used on up to three computers simultaneously. In my eyes, HitFilm Pro is a great tool set for independent filmmakers, social media content generators and any editor who goes beyond editing and dives into topics like 3D modeling, tracking, keying, etc. without having to necessarily fork over money for a bunch of expensive third-party plugins. That doesn’t mean you won’t want to buy third-party plugins, but you are less likely to need them with HitFilm’s expansive list of native features and tools.

At my day job, I use Premiere, After Effects, Media Composer and Resolve. I often come home and want to work in something that has everything inside, and that is where HitFilm Pro 12 lives. Not only does it have the professional functionality that I am used to, such as trimming, color scopes and more, but it also has BorisFX’s Mocha planar tracking plugin built in for no extra cost. This is something I use constantly and love.

One of the most interesting and recent updates to HitFilm Pro 12 is the ability to use After Effects plugins. Not all plugins will work since there are so many, but in a video released after NAB 2019, HitFilm said plugins like Andrew Kramer’s Video CoPilot Element3D and ones from Red Giant are on the horizon. If you are within your support window, or you continue to purchase HitFilm, FXhome will work with you to get your favorite After Effects plugins working directly inside of HitFilm.

Timeline and 3D model editor

Some additional updates to HitFilm Pro 12 include a completely redesigned user interface that resembles Premiere Pro… kind of. Threaded rendering has also been added, so Windows users who have Intel and Nvidia hardware will see increased GPU speeds, the ability to add title directly in the editor and more.

The Review
So how doees HitFilm Pro 12 compare to today’s modern software packages? That is an interesting question. I have become more and more of a Resolve convert over the past two years, so I am constantly comparing everything to that. In addition, being an Avid user for over 15 years, I am used to a rock-solid NLE with only a few hiccups here and there. In my opinion, HitFilm 12 lands itself right where Premiere and FCP X live.

It feels prosumer-y, in a YouTuber or content-generator capacity. Would it stand up to 10 hours of abuse with content over 45 minutes? It probably would, but much like with Premiere, I would probably split my edits in scenes or acts to avoid slowdowns, especially when importing things like OBJ files or composites.

The nonlinear editor portion feels like Premiere and FCP X had a baby, but left out FCP X’s Magnetic Timeline feature. The trimming in the timeline feels smooth, and after about 20 minutes of getting comfortable with it I felt like it was what I am generally used to. Cutting in footage feels good using three-point edits or simply dragging and dropping. Using effects feels very similar to the Adobe world, where you can stack them on top of clips and they each affect each other from the top down.

Mocha within HitFilm Pro

Where HitFilm Pro 12 shines is in the inclusion of typically third-party plugins directly in the timeline. From the ability to create a scene with 3D cameras and particle generators to being able to track using BorisFX’s Mocha, HitFilm Pro 12 has many features that will help take your project to the next level. With HitFilm 12 Pro’s true 3D cameras, you can take flat text and enhance it with raytraced lighting, shadows and even textures. You can even use the included BorisFX Continuum 3D Objects to make great titles relatively easily. To take it a step further, you can even track them and animate them.

Color Tools
By day, I am an online editor/colorist who deals with the finishing aspect of media creation. Throughout the process, from color correction to exporting files, I need tools that are not only efficient but accurate. When I started to dig into the color correction side of HitFilm Pro 12, things slowed down for me. The color correction tools are very close to what you’ll find in other NLEs, like Premiere and FCP X, but they don’t quite rise to the level of Resolve. HitFilm Pro 12 does operate inside of a 32-bit color pipeline, which really helps avoid banding and other errors when color correcting. However, I didn’t feel that the toolset was making me more efficient; in fact, it was the opposite. I felt like I had to learn FXhome’s way of doing it. It wasn’t that it totally slowed me down, but I felt it could be better.

Color

Color

Summing Up
In the end, HitFilm 12 Pro will fill a lot of holes for individual content creators. If you love learning new things (like I do), then HitFilm Pro 12 will be a good investment of your time. In fact, FXhome post tons of video tutorials on all sorts of good and topical stuff, like how to create a Stranger Things intro title.

If you are a little more inclined to work with a layer-based workflow, like in After Effects, then HitFilm Pro Pro 12 is the app you’ll want to learn. Check out HitFilm Pro 12 on FXhome’s website and definitely watch some of the company’s informative tutorials.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Assimilate Scratch 9.1: productivity updates, updated VFX workflow

Assimilate’s Scratch 9.1, a dailies and finishing software, now includes new and extensive performance and productivity features, including integration with Foundry Nuke and Adobe After Effects. It’s available now.

“A primary goal for us is to quickly respond to the needs of DITs and post artists, whether it’s for more advanced features, new format support, or realtime bug-fixes,” said Mazze Aderhold, Scratch product manager at Assimilate. “Every feature introduced in Scratch 9.1 is based on feedback we received from our users before and during the beta cycle.”

The software now features native touch controls for grading by clicking and dragging directly on the image. Thanks to this intuitive way to color and manipulate images, an artist can grade the overall image or even control curves and secondaries — all without a panel and directly where the cursor is dragging.

There is also a redesigned color management system, enabling deep control over how camera-specific gamut and gamma spaces are handled and converted. Additionally, there is a new color-space conversion plugin (any color space to any other) that can be applied at any stage of the color/mastering process.

Also new is integration with After Effects and Nuke. Within Scratch, users can now seamlessly send shots to and from Nuke and After Effects, including transparencies and alphas. This opens up Scratch to high-end tracking, compositing, 3D models, advanced stabilization, motion graphics and more.

Within the VFX pipeline, Scratch can act as a central hub for all finishing needs. It provides realtime tools for any format, data management, playback and all color management in a timeline with audio, including to and from After Effects and Nuke.

Other new features include:

• Integration with Avid, including all metadata in the Avid MXF. Additionally, Scratch includes all the source-shot metadata, such as the genuine Sound TC in Avid MXF, which is important later on in post for something like a Pro Tools roundtrip
• Per-frame metadata on ARRIRAW files, allowing camera departments to pass through camera roll and tilt, lens focus distance metadata items, and more. Editorial and VFX teams can benefit from per-frame info later in the post process.
• Faster playback and rendering
• Realtime, full-res Red 8K DeBayer on GPU
• A deep set of options to load media, including sizing options, LUTs and automatic audio-sync, speeding up the organizational process when dealing with large amounts of disparate media
• A LUT cycler that allows for quick preview and testing of large numbers of looks on footage
• Preset outputs for Pix, Dax, MediaSilo and Copra, simplifying the delivery of industry-standard web dailies


• Vector tool for advanced color remapping using a color grid
• Automatic installation of free Matchbox Shaders, opening Scratch up to a wealth of realtime VFX effects, including glows, lens effects, grain add/remove, as well as more advanced creative FX
• Built-in highlight glow, diffusion, de-noise and time-warp FX
• Added support for AJA’s Io 4K Plus and Kona 5 SDI output devices using the latest SDKs.
• Support for Apple’s new ProRes RAW compressed-acquisition format and Blackmagic RAW support on both OS X and Windows

Scratch 9.1 starts at $89 monthly and $695 annually.

Timber finishes Chipotle ‘Fresh Food’ campaign

In Chipotle’s new Fresh Food campaign, directed by Errol Morris for Moxie Pictures out of agency Venables Bell & Partners, real-life employees of the food chain talk about the pride they take in their work while smashing guacamole and cutting peppers, cilantro and other fresh ingredients.

The food shots are designed to get all five of your senses moving by grabbing the audience with the visually appealing, fresh food served and leading them to taste, smell, and hear the authentic ingredients.

The four spots — Bre – Just BraggingCarson – Good Food Good Person, Krista – Fresh Everyday
Robbie – Microwaves Not Welcome — are for broadcast and the web.

For Chipotle, Santa Monica’s Timber handled online, finishing and just a splash of cleanup. They used Flame on the project. According to Timber head of production Melody Alexander, “The Chipotle project was based on showcasing the realness of the products the restaurants use in their food. Minimal clean-up was required as the client was keen to keep the naturalness of the footage. We, at Timber, use a combination of finishing tools when working on online projects. The Chipotle project was completely done in Flame.”

Vickie Sornsilp joins 1606 Studio as head of production

San Francisco-based 1606 Studio, formerly Made-SF, has hired veteran post producer Vickie Sornsilp to head of production. Sornsilp, whose background includes senior positions with One Union Recording and Beast Editorial, will oversee editorial and post finishing projects for the studio, which was launched last month by executive producer Jon Ettinger, editor/director Doug Walker and editors Brian Lagerhausen and Connor McDonald.

“Vickie represents what 1606 Studio is all about…family,” says Ettinger. “She trained under me at the beginning of her career and is now ready to take on the mantle of head of production. Our clients trust her to take care of business. I couldn’t be prouder to welcome her to our team.”

A graduate of San Francisco’s Academy of Art University, Sornsilp began her career as a copywriter with agency DDB. She got her start in post production in 2014 with Beast Editorial, where she produced work for such brands as Amazon, Clorox, Doritos, HP, Round Table Pizza, Mini Cooper, Toyota, Visa, Walmart and Yahoo! She joined One Union Recording as executive producer in 2018.

Sornsilp is excited to reunite with 1606 Studio’s founders. “It feels like coming home,” she says. “Jon, Doug, Brian and Connor are legends in the business and I look forward to doing more great work with them.”

Launched under the interim name Made-SF, the company is rebranding as 1606 Studio in anticipation of moving into permanent facilities in April at 1606 Stockton Street in San Francisco’s historic North Beach neighborhood. Currently undergoing a build-out, that site will feature five Adobe Premiere editorial suites, two motion graphics suites, and two Flame post finishing suites with room for further expansion.

“We want to underscore that we are a San Francisco-centric company,” explains Walker. “Service companies from outside the area have been moving into the city to take advantage of the boom in advertising and media production. We want to make it clear that we’re already here and grounded in the community.”

Company 3 to open Hollywood studio, adds Roma colorist Steve Scott

Company 3 has added Steve Scott as EVP/senior finishing artist. His long list of credits includes Alfonso Cuarón’s Oscar-nominated Roma and Gravity; 19 Marvel features, including The Avengers, Iron Man and Guardians of the Galaxy franchises; and many Academy-Award-winning films, including The Jungle Book, Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance and The Revenant (both took Oscars for director Alejandro Iñárritu and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki).

Roma

The addition of Scott comes at a time when Company 3 is completing work on a new location at 950 Lillian Way in Hollywood. This new space represents the first phase of a planned much larger footprint in that area of Los Angeles. This new space will enable the company to significantly expand its capacity while providing the level of artistry and personalized service the industry expects from Company 3. It will also enable them to service more East Side and Valley-based clients.

“Steve is someone I’ve always wanted to work with and I am beyond thrilled that he has agreed to work with us at Company 3,” says CEO Stefan Sonnenfeld. “As we continue the process of re-imagining the entire concept of what ‘post production’ means creatively and technically, it makes perfect sense to welcome a leading innovator and brilliant artist to our team.”

Sonnenfeld and Scott will oversee every facet of this new boutique-style space to ensure it offers the same flexible experience clients have come to expect when working at Company 3. Scott, a devoted student of art and architecture, with extensive professional experience as a painter and architectural illustrator, says, “The opportunity to help design a new cutting-edge facility in my Hollywood hometown was too great to pass up.”

Scott oversees a team of additional artists to offer filmmakers the significantly increased ability to augment and refine imagery as part of the finishing process.

“The industry is experiencing a renaissance of content,” says Sonnenfeld. “The old models of feature film vs. television, long- vs. short-form are changing rapidly. Workflows and delivery methods are undergoing revolutionary changes with more content, and innovative content, coming from a whole array of new sources. It’s a very exciting and challenging time and I think these major additions to our roster and infrastructure will go a long way towards our goal of continuing Company 3’s role as a major force in the industry.”

Main Image Credit: 2018 HPA Awards Ceremony/Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

Creative editorial and post boutique Hiatus opens in Detroit

Hiatus, a full-service, post production studio with in-house creative editorial, original music composition and motion graphics departments, has opened in Detroit. Their creative content offerings cover categories such as documentary, narrative, conceptual, music videos and advertising media for all video platforms.

Led by founder/senior editor Shane Patrick Ford, the new company includes executive producer/partner Catherine Pink, and executive producer Joshua Magee, who joins Hiatus from the animation studio Lunar North. Additional talents feature editor Josh Beebe, composer/editor David Chapdelaine and animator James Naugle.

The roots of Hiatus began with The Factory, a music venue founded by Ford while he was still in college. It provided a venue for local Detroit musicians to play, as well as touring bands. Ford, along with a small group of creatives, then formed The Work – a production company focused on commercial and advertising projects. For Ford, the launch of Hiatus is an opportunity to focus solely on his editorial projects and to expand his creative reach and that of his team nationally.

Leading up to the launch of Hiatus, the team has worked on projects for brands such as Sony, Ford Motor Company, Acura and Bush’s, as well as recent music videos for Lord Huron, Parquet Courts and the Wombats.

The Hiatus team is also putting the finishing touches on the company’s first original feature film Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win. The film uncovers a Detroit Police decoy unit named STRESS and the efforts made to restore civil order in 1970s post-rebellion Detroit. Dare to Struggle, Dare to Win makes its debut at the Indy Film Festival on Sunday April 29th and Tuesday May 1st in Indianapolis, before it hits the film festival circuit.

“Launching Hiatus was a natural evolution for me,” says Ford. “It was time to give my creative team even more opportunities, to expand our network and to collaborate with people across the country that I’ve made great connections with. As the post team evolved within The Work, we outgrew the original role it played within a production company. We began to develop our own team, culture, offerings and our own processes. With the launch of Hiatus, we are poised to better serve the visual arts community, to continue to grow and to be recognized for the talented creative team we are.”

“Instead of having a post house stacked with people, we’d prefer to stay small and choose the right personal fit for each project when it comes to color, VFX and heavy finishing,” explains Hiatus EP Catherine Pink. “We have a network of like-minded artists that we can call on, so each project gets the right creative attention and touch it deserves. Also, the lower overhead allows us to remain nimble and work with a variety of budget needs and all kinds of clients.”

MPC LA moves to Culver City location, expands MPC Film

After eight years in Santa Monica, MPC LA has moved to a 25,000-square-foot digital studio in Culver City at 8921 Lindblade Street.

MPC Advertising now has more space dedicated to VFX, color and finishing. The new space also plays host to a purpose-built VR/AR infrastructure and its content production arm, MPC Creative.

MPC Film LA has a greatly expanded footprint in the new facility, offering filmmakers the opportunity to collaborate with MPC’s artists to support the pre-production phase of development. Creative services include concept and production design, previs and visual development, and preliminary bidding and budgeting.

Julian Levi, the newly promoted GM at MPC Film LA, says, “We are excited to be able to continue collaborating with filmmakers in the very early stages of production. Having all of our front-end resources consolidated in the new studio means our clients can take advantage of MPC LA’s creative services all in one space.”

The space features an MPAA approved previs artist workspace and a screening room with 3D stereo, HD and 2K/4K projection, offering 2K synced reviews, TV-IPS video feed and video conferencing.

VFX industry veteran Joanna Capitano (right) has also joined the team at MPC Film LA, overseeing and representing the studio’s VFX supervisor talent, including Richard Stammers, Erik Nash and Guillaume Rocheron. Capitano was most recently VP of features at Digital Domain.

In discussing the move, MPC’s global CEO, Mark Benson, explains, “Culver City presented a unique opportunity to build out our custom-designed, integrated studio in a 25,000-square-foot space. It is a great fit because Culver City is fast becoming Los Angeles’ hotbed of emerging technology, and it’s located off the 10 freeway and Metro Expo line, making it convenient for our clients.”

MPC Film previs/postvis teams are currently working on Ghost in the Shell, Fantastic Beasts, Alien Covenant and The Dark Tower.

 

Quick Chat: Light Iron New York supervising colorist Steven Bodner

By Randi Altman

Turn your TV to any network or streaming channel any evening and you will immediately be reminded just how much television production is currently going on in New York City. This boon is directly related to New York’s inviting production tax incentives. And thanks to the state’s post production tax incentives, many of these shows are now staying in New York for finishing.

In response to this increase in work, Panavision’s Light Iron in New York has been growing its episodic division, most recently with the addition of supervising colorist Steven Bodner, who joins after eight years at Deluxe in New York.

Bodner’s extensive television resume includes Girls, Blue Bloods, Treme, True Detective and the new HBO series Vinyl. Bodner also works on features, including the recent Beasts of No Nation, starring Idris Elba.

Considering his history and his new position, we figured there was no better time to reach out and learn more about Bodner and how he works.

Why was now the right time to make a move, and why was Light Iron the right choice?  
I was with Deluxe for the past eight years and felt I needed a change. I was approached by Light Iron and was impressed right off the bat with their technological know-how and advancements. The Panavision connection also influenced my decision. I love the fact that I can be involved from the early stages of choosing the camera and lenses to the final delivery.

What do you hope to accomplish in your new position at Light Iron? Your title says supervising colorist, but you will you be hands-on for shows as well?
I am 100 percent hands-on with all the projects I work on. I feel like I can connect more with the filmmakers and creatives by touching every frame of the show or film. My title is more for building a strong team and department. I want to help our new colorists polish their skills so that we can all grow together and collaborate. I have a lot of knowledge I can spread through our new department, and the title allows me to do that.

What is your color grading tool of choice?
I feel like we as artists use many tools to mold a picture. A great colorist can shape pretty pictures with whatever platform we are given — it’s more about the creative vision. That being said, I am currently using the latest version of Resolve from Blackmagic. (Light Iron’s New York facility just installed a Quantum StorNext 5 SAN (700 TB) and a Sony X300 for HDR monitoring.)

What is your ideal way of working on a TV show, and does that differ from how you work on a feature?
What I like to do, whether it be TV or a film, is get involved as early as possible. I like to get into the head of the DP and/or director and see what his or her visions are for the show. Then, during testing, I like to find time to sit and play around a bit and get some “look-book” stills done for reference going forward. When a delivery actually comes in, I like to do a quick pass unsupervised and get everything in a ballpark with my look-book stills and then go from there with the clients.

Do you prefer getting visual examples of looks or talking about the look and feel?
It’s always nice to get visual examples of what the DP or creative wants. However, there are situations when time doesn’t allow for that and a quick conversation is all you get. That’s why, for me, it’s important to be involved from the start and to communicate as often as possible or needed.

As a New York post veteran, it must be fun watching all this episodic work come to New York, and stay in NY for post. 
It’s been great watching the amount of NY work grow. I remember years ago only doing the dailies and hoping for a day when we could keep the finishing here as well. It’s a dream come true.

What changes/trends have you noticed over the past few years relating to color grading?
The biggest changes or trends I’ve noticed are related to speed and capabilities. With most projects being digital now, there is an expectation for speed. We have to be fast and precise while retaining the look and the feel of the show. I also feel like we are doing a fair amount of beauty work in color due to the stronger color tools and better trackers.

Finally, where do you find inspiration for looks? Photography? Museums? The streets of New York?
I get my inspiration from everyday life, photography and other shows or films. I also like to sit in my color suite and just try things that I normally wouldn’t do, when a client is present, to see what comes out of it.

XML, AAF, EDL, WTF?

Taking your project from the edit suite to the final product.

By The Unknown Artist

I’ve been asked a few times recently to explain the what, how and why of XML, AAF and EDLs. They’re an essential part of any turnover, and each post house will request a different set of one or more of these (often along with your project or bin). I, the Unknown Artist, am here to try and demystify this aspect of turnovers, and hopefully make turnover specs seem less weirdly demanding.

What are they?
When a project is conformed, we’re not relinking your timeline, but rebuilding it in different software. Depending on that software, we need the details of your timeline in one of these formats to interpret it correctly. An EDL is the most simple of the three, which is why we often Continue reading

ProMAX targets 4K edit, VFX workflows with One workstations

ProMAX Systems, makers of high-performance video storage servers, editing workstations and archival appliances, has launched the ProMax One and One+ workstations, which are designed specifically for video editors, colorists, and VFX artists working with 4K workflows.

The new One and One+ models are easy-to-configure, turnkey systems. In the same modular construct as ProMAX’s Platform shared storage servers, the One and One+ lines both offer two base configurations and options for adding modules for graphics, storage, archive and more. The workstations’ “All-in-One” infrastructure enables true end-to-end workflows with data ingest, editing, and archiving functions all possible within a single workstation.

One and One+ features optimize strengths in high-performance editorial functionality and graphics processing. For editorial acceleration, high clock speed CPUs with up to 3.7GHz support a smooth and responsive editing experience.

For VFX work, dual 12-core CPUs apply 24 cores of processing power for fast renders. All One systems provide huge on-board RAID storage, offering fast, secure access to data with storage modules up to 30TB on the ProMAX One, and 40TB on the ProMAX One+. In addition, all new One workstations have the ability to add multiple GPU cards, via seven PCIe slots.

One and One+ workstations are currently available through the ProMAX global network of authorized reseller partners.

Brewster Parsons hires VFX vet Jason Cohon

Venice, California-based VFX house Brewster Parsons continues its path to growth through staff additions, facility and technology updates, and global partnerships. Most recently they added VFX vet Jason Cohon as senior producer.

Cohon has experience creating and finishing all types of visual content. Working working at Asylum, Brand New School, Digital Domain, Mirada and Sway Studio, he has produced live-action and VFX-intensive feature, television, commercial and experiential projects working with directors such as Dante Ariola, Nicolai Fuglsig, Joseph Kosinski and Rupert Sanders.

At Brewster Parsons, he now joins CG/VFX supervisor TJ Burke, who has 24 feature film credits and has worked with Hydraulx and ILM; VFX supervisor and lead Flame artist Louis Mackall, another former Hydraulx talent; and VFX supervisor and lead Flame artist Andrew Eksner, who has spent time at Digital Domain and Method.

“Brewster Parsons is equal parts VFX/design/finishing facility and lifestyle brand,” says Cohon. “It’s rare in our industry to find a company that believes as strongly in the quality of their product as they do in their employees’ quality of life. I think that shows through in the artistry and in the overall great attitude of everyone who works here.”

Over the past year, Brewster Parsons has opened a new finishing suite on its Abbot Kinney premises in Venice, and also forged strategic relationships with other leading facilities. Among those is Ollin VFX in Mexico City, which mainly works on features and has handled many projects for David Fincher, and leading Barcelona VFX shop Furia Digital. Over the past 18 months, both companies have contributed to Brewster Parsons projects for Royal Caribbean.

 

Lucky Post hires finishing artist Tim Nagle

Dallas-based Lucky Post has added Tim Nagle as finishing artist. Nagle’s first collaboration with Lucky Post began as the engineering designer of the studio back in 2012, designing the studio’s all-important technology backbone.

In 2002 Nagle founded Creative Integrations, a full-service engineering and integration firm specializing in post, recording, animation and broadcast facilities. For over a decade, Nagle helped companies design, improve and streamline workflows of all types, including facility design for companies throughout the country. Among them, Red Car in Dallas and NY, Union Editorial, 1st Avenue Machine, Smoke & Mirrors and Passion Pictures in NY, DigitalFX in Baton Rouge and Cook Children’s Hospital in Fort Worth.

He began his career as an engineer for Solid State Logic (1997-2000) working with the company’s many clients, including Fox, Warner Bros., Skywalker Ranch, EA Games, Wonderland and ABC, among others. Since 2002, he has also lent his talent to the sound department of studio feature films and television before making this transition to online editing.

“I’ve always loved the independence of consultancy but when I wasn’t at Lucky Post I found I really missed the environment and the people. When I reflected on my future, I kept returning to Lucky Post.”

Since joining Lucky, Nagle has collaborated with agencies McGarrah Jessee, Moroch and The Richards Group. View his spot reel here.

In addition to assuming the artist’s chair, Nagle leads the company’s assistant training program, providing those working alongside Lucky Post’s editors, designers and sound designers with the necessary technology knowledge and experience.

 

Nashville’s Forward adds more finishing tools

Nashville — Post production facility Forward has purchased two Quantel Pablo Rio color and finishing systems, adding to its services.

Started by director Shaun Silva, Forward opened its doors in 2012, equipped with Quantel iQ and Pablo finishing suites. Forward has since worked on music videos for leading country music artists, including Luke Bryan, Kenny Chesney and Kacey Musgrove, as well as the Emmy nominated ESPN 30 for 30 documentary film The Irrelevant Giant.

photo 3small

Pablo Rio is Quantel’s color and finishing system that provides a streamlined workflow for 2D and stereo 3D projects. It runs on high-performance PC hardware and exploits Nvidia Maximus multi-GPU technology.

Chief engineer of Forward (@Forwardllc)  Jim Harvath CSTE, says, “The flexibility of configuring the Pablo Rio hardware allows us to ‘right size’ our hardware to what our current workflow demands are. Plus, knowing that we can expand instantly with off the shelf parts allows us to stay competitive and grow as necessary, when we’re ready.”

NAB: The Foundry announces Nuke Studio for VFX, editorial and finishing

Las Vegas – Here at the NAB show, The Foundry introduced Nuke Studio, allowing users to do VFX, editorial and finishing in a single application. It will be available later this year.

This new tool extends the existing Nukeproduct line and draws on The Foundry’s existing compositing, conforming and shot management technology, as well as adding a host of new features and functionality. Nuke Studio is a node-based VFX, editorial and finishing studio that’s targeted at artists working independently as well as in collaborative teams.

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At almost 20 years old, Wildchild is in growth mode

By Randi Altman

New York-based editing and post house Wildchild recently celebrated its 19th anniversary, which is fairly remarkable for an independently owned studio in today’s economic climate and with the changes that have occurred in our industry over recent years.

So we checked in with editor/owner Yvette Piñeyro to get a feel for where Wildchild is headed and how she has remained so successful in a very competitive space, and in a very competitive city.

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Meet The Director of Engineering: John Stevens

NAME: John Stevens

COMPANY: Hollywood-based MTI Film, LLC (http://www.mtifilm.com, @MTIFilm)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The official line is: MTI Film is a full-service post facility providing dailies, editorial, visual effects, color correction and assembly for film, television and commercial projects. MTI also boasts a new DI theater that is fully calibrated and capable of 4K play back.

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Meet The VP of Creative Services/Colorist: Chris Jacobson

NAME: Chris Jacobson

COMPANY: SIM Digital (@SIMDigital1)/Bling Digital (http://www.blingdigital.com)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
SIM Digital/Bling Digital supplies production and post technology and services within North America. We have offices in Los Angeles, Atlanta, Toronto, Vancouver, and Halifax. SIM Digital supplies camera systems, lighting and related gear to film and television productions. Bling Digital is a specialist in post workflows. Bling designs and builds workflows encompassing such things as on-set review, dailies processing (on-set, near-set and off-site), editorial, final color grading and finishing. For many television productions, we supply complete, fully integrated production and post packages that extend from the camera through final delivery.

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Meet The Artist: Alex MacLean

maclean

This colorist and DI supervisor craves creative work.

NAME: Alexander MacLean (@alexm13)

COMPANY: Berkeley, CA’s Colorflow (www.colorflow.com), @colorflowpost

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Colorflow is a full-service post company specializing in color grading for independent films, documentaries, long-form television, commercials and other projects. We’re located in a newly built facility in the historic Saul Zaentz Media Center in Berkeley, California. We have three color grading and finishing suites, and a DCI-compliant DI grading theater.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Colorist and DI supervisor.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I wear a few different hats. In my job as colorist, I primarily work on commercials and other short-form projects. As DI Supervisor, I supervise all of the color sessions that we do and help our artists with anything that they need. I develop workflows for their projects and act as technical liaison between them and other vendors, such as visual effects supplies and editors.

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AMD, Dell hold user event in New York City

NICK ? ROY

Technicolor Postworks Nick Marucci and Steve Grillo from Brightshot.

AMD and Dell held an event last week in New York City designed to better position themselves in the post production market. While they had technology to show — including AMD FirePro graphics cards and the Dell Precision rack workstation R7610, the tower workstation  T7610 and the mobile workstation M6800 — for the post pros in attendance, the key part of the intimate event was to share information. This included asking questions about what pros need day to day from their technology and workflow, what their pain points are, how Dell (www.dell.com) and AMD (www.amd.com) can help, and what they could do better.

David from Prime Focus

Prime Focus senior editor David Gauff, who won a FirePro graphics card at the event.

It was an open and honest discussion intended to help the product makers as well as the users, who also took the opportunity to mingle with peers from the New York area.  Guests included artist from studios of all sizes, working in a variety of aspects of the industry, including visual effects, editing and finishing.

“It was great to meet with the team behind the machines,” said Fred Ruckel, creative director at Rucksack NY. “With so many options today, being able to discuss my company’s needs at length was refreshing. When the conversation switched to innovation and future workflows, they took copious notes for implementation in future releases. It felt nice to actually be heard.”

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