Tag Archives: editorial

Post producer Tony Rucker joins Dallas-based 3008 Editorial

Post producer Tony Rucker has joined Dallas-based editorial boutique 3008. He brings over a decade of post experience including work on commercial campaigns, branded content, 3D animation and visual effects projects.

Before joining 3008, Rucker worked as a post producer at Post Asylum, Element X and Fast Cuts. Clients have included Visionworks, The Salvation Army, Atmos Energy, Mott’s and others.

This past year, owner and editor Brent Herrington assumed sole ownership of 3008. While editorial remains the company’s main focus, Herrington has expanded its editorial roster and turnkey production arm under his leadership. “As we see our clients needs evolve, we want to ensure that we too are evolving as a company to offer the talent, comprehensive services and a seamless experience,” he says.

Recent 3008 projects include work for AT&T, Chrysler, Cricket Wireless, McDonald’s, Top Golf, Snapple, Universal Orlando, Bridgestone and Frito-Lay.

Editing vets launch TwoPoint0 ‘collective’ in NYC

Industry vets Wendy Rosen and Anthony Marinelli have launched editorial house TwoPoint0 in New York City, based on what they call an “innovative, new business model” — a creative collective featuring the talents of the two founding partners as well as such seasoned editors as Bruce Ashley, Charlie Cusumano, Jane Keller, Nick Lofting, John Marinis, Keith Olwell and Jon Rosen.

According to partner/executive producer/editor Rosen, TwoPoint0, “is an answer to the constantly shifting advertising/post landscape where more highly experienced, creative individuals prefer to be in the freelance world, yet still desire administrative, production and promotional support.”

“We take the post production model a step beyond the previous four-walling concept,” adds Marinelli. “We provide a seasoned executive producer with Wendy, who is also an editor, so she really understands what the needs of an editor are on any given project. Wendy actively represents editors in the collective, assessing upcoming jobs in the marketplace and determining a complementary editor for a particular project or client.

Rosen and Marinelli’s mission is to create more opportunities for freelance editors while offering greater flexibility to clients by customizing each project to their needs, from conception to completion, with an eye towards comfort and convenience in the process.

Barbara Michelson, head of broadcast production at agency DeVito/Verdi, is currently in the middle of a TwoPoint0 project for Bernie & Phyl’s. It’s being edited by Marinelli, who is also working with agency creatives Rob Slosberg and Matt Songer on the new campaign. “They really understand the demands that we at the agency are under and they deliver every time,” she says.

Michelson likes the new model offered by TwoPoint0. “It provides us a great deal of flexibility about where we can work and when.”

TwoPoint0 editor Bruce Ashley believes in the collective model. “[For the client], you have a small stable of editors to choose from for your projects, whether that talent is working in comedy, beauty, dialog, etc. You also have all the client services that you require. For the editor, we have the full support that we need to complete a project, with a solid assistant and an executive producer like Wendy with so many years of experience. It’s a very appealing model.”

Behind the Title: Wax’s Stephen Jess

NAME: Stephen Jess

COMPANY: New York City edit house Wax

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Wax is a boutique editorial company/creative collective/group of people who are committed to telling great stories — all kinds of stories.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE? Editor/Partner

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m cutting most days, and working with my partner Toni Lipari to create the opportunity for our Continue reading

Boutique edit house Wax adds Christopher Huth

Editor Christopher Huth joins Wax, a New York-based boutique editorial company and creative collective that opened its doors last year.

Huth comes most recently from Lost Planet, where he collaborated with Smuggler director David Frankham on spots for Mercedes and Bank of America, and with Independent Media’s Janusz Kaminski on spots for New York Times Magazine and JBL.

In addition, a fair share of his work has been outside of traditional production workflow, either sourcing material with his own team (Mazda, iStock), creating fresh concepts from existing footage banks (Visa, Belvedere) or generating spots through graphic interface/online content (Google).

Huth’s work includes the Cannes Gold PR Lion-winning Honey Maid “This is Wholesome” campaign for Droga 5 with Academy Award-winning directors Dan Lindsay and TJ Martin; the Cannes Mobile Grand Prix-winning campaign for Google “Demo Slam” via Johannes Leonardo; and AICP Best in Show spot Dear Sophie, for Google Chrome’s “the Web is what you make of it” campaign via BBH New York.

“I try to make a personal connection with the material,” Huth explains, “which means being thoughtful about how I’m connected to it and how the agency is connected to it. I try to give every project patience. It never gets boring, especially because of how quickly the industry moves. The challenges, I find, are to stay on top of technology and the changing software landscape, and to remain thoughtful with clients, directors and myself.”

Huth is currently editing his first campaign at Wax for AT&T, with DGA-nominated directors The Mercadantes via BBDO NY.

Technicolor-PostWorks gets institutionalized for ‘Stonehearst Asylum’

For the film Stonehearst Asylum from Director Brad Anderson and Millennium Entertainment, Technicolor-PostWorks New York‘s facility provided editorial systems and support to the production in addition to handling the editorial conforming, color grading and deliverables.

Based on an Edgar Allan Poe story, Stonehearst Asylum (Kate Beckinsale, Ben Kingsley, Michael Caine) is a thriller about patients who take over a corrupt mental institution. The film was shot in Bulgaria with DP Thomas Yatsko. Brian Gates edited the film at Technicolor-PostWorks’ West Village location. The film was conformed by editor George Bunce on Autodesk Smoke. Technicolor-PostWorks generated DCP, film and video deliverables.

Stonehearst02

Senior colorist Sam Daley applied the final grade in Autodesk Lustre, working under the direct supervision of Anderson and Yatsko. Daley’s role was to enhance the film’s period setting and tense story. “The film takes place at the very end of the 19th century,” notes Yatsko. “It’s set in a remote location in northern England. It’s winter and the facility has no electricity, little oil and few supplies. Most scenes are lit by candlelight.”

Yasko contrasted the warm candlelight with blue lighting from the windows to create separation and convey the sense that we are in a remote country location.  That resulted in a dark, moody look that was further refined in post production. “Sam had his challenges,” Yatsko adds. “In addition to working with minimal light, we shot in Bulgaria in the summer time, where it was hot and sunny, while what we needed was a look that was grey and gloomy.”

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Daley applied a number of atmospheric effects, enhancing the glow of candles and smoothing fog in exterior scenes. He also spent considerable time making skin tone adjustments. “Many of the characters are meant to look unhealthy, as if they are sick or have not been eating well,” Daley explains. “We took some of the life out of their faces. Our Lustre allowed me to isolate skin tones and manipulate them independent of the surrounding frame.”

The final look of the film, says Daley, is different from most period dramas. “Although the hair, wardrobe and set were all period, we treated it like a modern suspense film,” Daley says. “We made a lot of strong color choices.  We didn’t go into a modern palette, but we pushed the colors. We walked a fine line: respecting the time period, while delivering an entertaining movie.”