Tag Archives: Editor

Behind the Title: Live Nation Entertainment Editor Hillary Lewis

This Indiana-based editor uses Avid Media Composer at work, Adobe Premiere for personal projects and After Effects for both.

NAME: Indianapolis-based Hillary Lewis

COMPANY: TourDesign Creative/Live Nation Entertainment

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are the post house for all Live Nation artists creating their broadcast, online, print, radio and advertising for concert tours, nationally and internationally.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Using the approved ad materials from our art department and approved radio materials from our audio department, we create TV and online commercials using concert footage and/or music videos, adding motion graphics, transitions, color grading, etc. With the approved commercial, we localize and deliver for each market (city) where the tour will perform.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The editors here are jacks-of-all-trades. We don’t have colorists, assistant editors or other post positions that you’d normally find in TV/film post houses. We truly do it all from start to finish.

One of the things that still surprises me is working with artist management teams that give you unusable footage. Whether it be terrible camera work, aspect ratio differences, low resolution, baked-in logos, etc.

A good majority of artist management teams don’t keep a sufficient archive of raw, uncompressed footage of their artist performances. This inevitably backs us into a corner and we’re tasked with finding and ripping usable footage off of YouTube. The humanity!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I have the most possible time to be creative on a new spot. When I can work on one of my favorite artists or bands. And when I can learn new things and put them in my bag of tricks.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Having to put my name on something I’ve created that I’m not proud of, but that was completely out of my control. For example, a commercial spot that I artistically and creatively didn’t call the shots on.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
For me, there’s a difference between when I’m most productive and when I’m the busiest. We tend to be busiest in the afternoons — from 3pm to 6pm — because we cater to our smaller office on the West Coast. This means the majority of my work is done right before I leave for the day, which often means staying late. But I’m truly more productive in the mornings when the office is less chaotic and when there’s time to be most creative, rather than sacrificing creativity to push a product out in the late afternoon.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Two things. I’m obsessed with Vox’s explainer videos and would be making similar highly designed, motion-graphics-based content on broad topics such as film/TV, music, FAQs, food, travel, etc.

Or, I’d be a phenomenal post production coordinator/supervisor in film/TV.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I entered college as a business major and knew pretty early on it wasn’t going to be a fulfilling career path for me. I happened to take a new media course to fill elective requirements, and it resonated with me so much I switched my major to new media arts and sciences and have been on the post production path ever since. It hasn’t been easy making a name in this industry, but I’ve never once looked back or had any regrets.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The most recent artist tours created by TourDesign: Cardi B, Madonna, Khalid, Live Nation $20 National Concert Week, Lewis Black, MasterChef Junior Live!, Mary J. Blige/NAS, Dave Matthews Band, The Head and the Heart… I could go on.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Not a specific work project, but several accomplishments through my side hustles. I’ve also been a panelist at recent conferences speaking on topics like the gender pay gap, post workflow and new trends in AI and machine learning.

Being an integral part of the media production industry and building a vast network of pros through my travels is something I’m extremely proud of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Our Avid Nexis server at work, my stand-up desk and my AirPods.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
The Blue Collar Post Collective on Facebook. I’m also a member and volunteer. BCPC is a nonprofit supporting emerging talent in post by providing mentorships, networking and funding to attend major industry events for pros who make less than the median income of the state they live in. I was one of the recipients of that funding and it was life-changing for me.

Hillary Lewis on panel at NAB for Gals N Gear.

If anyone reading this has questions about the program, reach out to me on Facebook
or Instagram @hillary.dillary. I follow other Facebook pages like I Am a Female Editor!, Avid Editors of Facebook, Post Chat, I Need an Editor, Austin Digital Jobs (I’ll be moving there soon).

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
If I listen to anything at work it’s either keeping up with current events from talk shows like The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, The Daily Show With Trevor Noah, Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, etc. or Vice News. Or strictly entertaining things like GoT recaps/fan theory videos, SNL, Vox, Funny or Die.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It is extremely high stress! I have to keep my body active during the day, using my stand-up desk in intervals and stretching. I can’t be in the right state of mind if my body feels stiff or sore.

Going to the gym at least two to three nights every week also helps me sleep better, which makes me fresher mentally the next day.

Cooking is a great stress reliever for me as well as a creative outlet. I can try new things and be risky with it. Even if I make a meal that tastes horrible, I know I’ll eventually improve that meal and make something that tastes good. It reminds of something a wise man on Queer Eye once said “Failure is not the opposite of success, it’s a part of it.”

I also love a good beer at the end of the day.

Behind the Title: Exile editor Lorin Askill

Name: Lorin Askill

Company: Exile (@exileedit)

Can you describe your company?
Exile is an editorial and finishing house based in NYC and LA. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Editor

What does that entail?
I take moving images, sound and other raw materials and arrange them in time to create shape and meaning and ultimately tell stories. I always loved the Tarkovsky book title, sculpting in Time. I like to think that is what I do.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Probably how much of an all-encompassing creative process it is. As well as editing picture, I source and edit sounds, I experiment with music, I create rough comps and block compositions for VFX, I play with color and place titles. At its best, editing is not only finding the best pieces of footage and ordering them to tell a story, an editor is crafting the whole visual-aural world that will be carried through to the finished piece.

Hyundai

What’s your favorite part of the job?
I love watching the first cut! When you’re excited about a project, you’ve found the gems and assembled your favorite pieces, solved some challenging problems, fudged together some tricky stunt or effects moments (and it’s already working!). Then you put a piece of music under it that (which you know you can’t actually use), and you feel like it has a good shape and runs from start to finish — usually very over length. It’s so much fun getting to this stage, then sitting back, turning the volume up, pressing play and watching it all together for the first time!

What’s your least favorite part?
My least favorite part is then going through and destroying that first cut with boring realities like running length and client requirements… JOKING. I also love the process of tightening and honing a cut to hit all the right notes and achieve the ultimate vision. But there is nothing like watching the first assembly of a project you love.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Probably first thing when I’ve got fresh eyes and I’m solving problems that seemed impossible the day before. Also the very end of the day when you’re in a little delirious zone and you’re really immersed and engrossed. When I’m cutting a music video, I like to pull up the project late at night and give myself the freedom to play because your brain is definitely functioning in a different way, and sometimes it’s really creative.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I think I’d photograph landscapes and spread environmental awareness while having food pop-ups in my garden.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path?
Ever since I got my first iMac in high school and started speeding up, slowing down and reversing footage in iMovie. I was addicted to it. I was manipulating time and creating stories with images and sound, and it felt like a beautiful combination of visual art and music, both of which I loved and studied. When I realized I could make a living being creative, and hopefully one day make movies. It seemed like a no-brainer.

Sia

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Most recently I’ve been editing a passion project. It’s a short film directed by my brother. It’s a proof-of-concept for a film we’ve been writing together for a long time. Before that I was working on a bunch commercial projects while also cutting musical sequences for a feature film directed by Sia.

What do you use to edit?
I grew up on iMovie and then Final Cut Pro. Now I use Adobe Premiere Pro and find it does exactly what I need it to do.

Name a few pieces of technology you can’t live without.
I hate to say my phone, but it’s undeniable. My laptop for edits on the run. Good headphones. My Hasselblad from the ‘60s.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I get into nature whenever possible, and I cook.

ACE celebrates editing, names Eddie Award winners

By Dayna McCallum

On Friday evening, the 69th Annual ACE Eddie Awards were presented at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance. ACE president Stephen Rivkin, ACE, presided over the evening’s festivities with comedian Tom Kenny serving as the evening’s host (SpongeBob!).

(L-R) Director Peter Farrelly, Bohemian Rhapsody’s John Ottman, ACE

Bohemian Rhapsody, edited by John Ottman, ACE, and The Favourite, edited by Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy) respectively. Ottman and Mavropsaridis, who are also nominated for the Oscar in film editing, were both first time Eddie winners.

Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse, edited by Robert Fisher, Jr., won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and Free Solo, edited by Bob Eisenhardt, ACE, won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included Kyle Reiter for Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Commercial Television), Kate Sanford, ACE for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone” (Best Edited Comedy Series for Non-Commercial Television), Gary Dollner, ACE for Killing Eve – “Nice Face” (Best Edited Drama Series for Commercial Television), Steve Singleton for Bodyguard – Episode 1 (Best Edited Drama Series for Non-Commercial Television), Malcolm Jamieson and Geoffrey Richman, ACE for Escape at Dannemora – Episode Seven (Best Edited Miniseries or Motion Picture for Television), Greg Finton, ACE and Poppy Das, ACE for Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind (Best Edited Documentary, Non-Theatrical), and Hunter Gross, ACE for Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia” (Best Edited Non-Scripted Series), who delivered a very moving acceptance speech in tribute to the late Bourdain.

The Anne V. Coates Student Editing Award went to Boston University’s Marco Gonzalez, who beat out hundreds of competitors from film schools and universities around the country. The Student Editing honor was re-named in honor of the legendary editor who passed away this past year. In another emotional moment, the award was presented by Coates daughter, Emma Hickox, ACE (What Men Want).

Jerrold Ludwig, ACE and Craig McKay, ACE received Career Achievement awards.  Their work was highlighted with clip reels exhibiting their tremendous contributions to film and television throughout their careers.

(L-R) Octavia Spencer, Golden Eddie Honoree Guillermo del Toro

ACE’s prestigious Golden Eddie honor was presented to artist and Oscar-winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. He received the award from his friend and collaborator Octavia Spencer, who starred in del Toro’s The Shape of Water last year.

Other presenters at the show included Oscar nominated director Spike Lee (BlacKkKlansman); Oscar nominated director and ACE Eddie Award nominee for Roma, Alfonso Cuarón; director Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians); director Peter Farrelly (Green Book); D’Arcy Carden (The Good Place); Jennifer Lewis (Black-ish); Angela Sarafyan (Westworld); Harry Shum, Jr. (Crazy Rich Asians); Paul Walter Hauser (BlacKkKlansman); and film editor Carol Littleton, ACE.

Here is the full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):
Bohemian Rhapsody
John Ottman, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):
The Favourite
Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Robert Fisher, Jr.

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):
Free Solo
Bob Eisenhardt, ACE

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):
Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind
Greg Finton, ACE & Poppy Das, ACE

Killing Eve Editor Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Atlanta – “Teddy Perkins”
Kyle Reiter

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – “Simone”
Kate Sanford, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Killing Eve – “Nice Face”
Gary Dollner, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:
Bodyguard – “Episode 1”
Steve Singleton

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:
Escape at Dannemora – “Episode Seven”
Malcolm Jamieson & Geoffrey Richman ACE

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:
Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown – “West Virginia”
Hunter Gross, ACE

STUDENT WINNER
Marco Gonzalez – Boston University

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE, The Favourite’s Yorgos Mavropsaridis, ACE, Paul Walter Hauser.

Nice Shoes welcomes creative editor Marcos Castiel

NYC-based creative studio Nice Shoes has signed creative editor Marcos Castiel for his first US representation. With over two decades of experience as an editor, Castiel has worked with such clients as Coca-Cola, Adidas, Vodafone, ASICS, McDonald’s, Whole Foods, Nivea and Comcast.

Castiel’s work ranges from enigmatic athletic-driven spots — featuring Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi — to narrative spots for international brand campaigns. Castiel will be available via Nice Shoes’ headquarters in New York City as well as any of their satellite or remote locations throughout North America.

Marcos Castiel cut Summer for Portuguese media company NOS.

Castiel entered the filmmaking word with an eye towards directing, but quickly discovered the storytelling power of editing and made the switch. He began his career on the agency side, editing global campaigns at Publicis before moving to the production side where he spent a decade at top production and post houses. Looking to further broaden his creative output, he made the shift to freelance and continued editing top international campaigns.

“Nice Shoes’ vision as a holistic creative studio is very much aligned with my desire for creative diversity in my career,” says Castiel. “Being able to inform my approach with different styles and genres is what helps me continue to partner with clients to elevate their ideas and Nice Shoes truly stands behind that approach.”

Ben Corfield promoted to editor at Stitch in London

Ben Corfield is now a full-fledged editor on the Stitch roster. Having joined the edit house as a Homespun editor a year ago, the London-based Corfield has been working hard on a range of projects. Homespun is the sister company to Stitch. Assistants start editing through Homespun on music videos and short films and then “graduate” to Stitch to work on commercials.

Working on an Avid Media Composer Corfield recently cut a spot for a film for Leica, directed by Barney Cokeliss, involving editing 105 hours of footage for a two-minute spot. At the end of last year, he cut the Sam Smith and Calvin Harris Promises documentary which explores the art of voguing. It was directed by Emil Nava.

Corfield’s initial interest in editing was piqued in the early ’90s while he was watching Terminator 2 on VHS. Inspired after seeing the T 1000 melt through a metal prison gate, he knew then that he somehow wanted to get into film.

“I get to work on the best part of the process as I put it all together to create the finished piece,” says Corfield on the process of editing. “It’s always a privilege to work closely with the director during the edit and see his or her vision in its final form. I’ve already been lucky enough to work with numerous inspirational editors and directors, much of the way I work now is down to what I’ve learnt from them.”

Stitch LA editor cuts first feature doc The Panama Papers

Stitch LA‘s Weston Cadwell has cut his first feature, The Panama Papers for director Alex Winter. This documentary focuses on the coordination of journalists from around the world, working in secret to expose the largest data leak in history. This was a global corruption scandal involving fraudulent power brokers, the uber-rich, elected officials, dictators, cartel bosses, athletes and celebrities who had used the Panamanian law firm of Mossack Fonseca to hide their money. The story cracked open a hidden network of tax evasion, fraud, cronyism, bribing government officials, rigging elections and murder.

Stitch became involved in the film through Dan Swietlik, owner and editor of Stitch LA, who worked with Winter on the feature documentary, Deep Web (2015).

“Alex had a short film project, Relatively Free in 2016. He came to Dan and I worked on the film as a second editor,” explains Weston. “Alex and I worked closely together in the edit bay. I really got to know him, how he works and I think we collaborate really well.

L-R: Editor Weston Cadwell and director Alex Winter.

“I cut a short film with him a year later, Trump Lobby (2017) and then Alex came to us with the feature film and requested me as the sole editor. This would be my first feature film, so I was nervous to take it on but was honored to have the opportunity.”

For this film, there was a huge amount of archive footage to get through, including news bytes, conferences and speeches related to income inequality, shell companies, tax loopholes and similar. There were a lot of topics and themes to cover, and Weston had to be fully educated and immersed in these fields.

Given the amount of footage in the project, the role of the editor and his relationship with the director, was of particular importance. “I had my team. I mean, I have a production company, with researchers, archivists, production coordinators and so on, and we all kind of worked as a hive mind,” says Winter. “Really, a doc is made mostly by me and the editor, so, I was working very closely with Wes. This was an extremely complicated story, with many disparate elements and characters to weave together, and he did an incredible job, not only helping to make the film comprehensible but also emotional and dramatic”

“One of the challenges was just figuring out how we wanted to tell the story, there were a lot of moving parts to the journalists investigation, so we wanted to keep it simple and linear so the viewer could easily follow,” says Weston.

“I found it interesting that we kept our project secret the same way the journalists had to keep their investigation secret for a whole year while they uncovered everything.”

The film premiered internationally at the IDFA film festival last month and is streaming in the US on Epix.

Crazy Rich Asians editor Myron Kerstein

By Amy Leland

When the buzz started in anticipation of the premiere of Crazy Rich Asians, there was a lot of speculation about whether audiences would fill the theaters for the first all-Asian cast in an American film since 1993’s Joy Luck Club. Or whether audiences wanted to see a romantic comedy, a format that seemed to be falling out of favor.

The answer to both questions was a resounding, “Yes!” The film grossed $35 million during its opening weekend, against a $30 million budget. It continued going strong its second weekend, making another $28M, the highest Labor Day weekend box office in more than a decade. It was the biggest opening weekend for a rom-com in three years, and is the most successful studio rom-com in nine. All of this great success can be explained pretty simply — it’s a fun movie with a well-told story.

Not long ago, I had the great fun of sitting down with one of its storytellers, editor Myron Kerstein, to discuss this Jon M. Chu-directed film as well as Kerstein’s career as an editor.

How did you get started as an editor?
I was a fine arts major in college and stumbled upon photography, filmmaking, painting and printmaking. I really just wanted to make art of any kind. Once I started doing more short films in college, I found a knack for editing.

When I first moved to New York, I needed to make a living, so I became a PA, and I worked on a series called TV Nation one of Michael Moore’s first shows. It was political satire. There was a production period, and then slowly the editors needed help in the post department. I gravitated toward these alchemists, these amazing people who were making things out of nothing. I really started to move toward post through that experience.

I also hustled quite a bit with all of those editors, and they started to hire me after that job. Slowly but surely I had a network of people who wanted to hire me again. That’s how I really started, and I really began to love it. I thought, what an amazing process to read these stories and look at how much power and influence an editor has in the filmmaking process.

I was not an assistant for too long, because I got to cut a film called Black & White. Then I quickly began doing edits for other indies, one being a film called Raising Victor Vargas, and another film called Garden State. That was my big hit in the indie world, and slowly that lead to more studio films, and then to Crazy Rich Asians.

Myron Kerstein and Crazy Rich Asians actor Henry Golding.

Your first break was on a television show that was nothing like feature films. How did you ultimately move toward cutting feature films?
I had a real attraction to documentary filmmaking, but my heart wanted to make narrative features. I think once you put that out in the universe, then those jobs start coming to you. I then stumbled upon my mentor, Jim Lyons, who cut all of Todd Haynes’s movies for years. When I worked on Velvet Goldmine as an assistant editor, I knew this was where I really needed to be. This was a film with music that was trying to say something, and was also very subversive. Jim and Todd were these amazing filmmakers that were just shining examples of the things I wanted to make in the future.

Any other filmmakers or editors whose work influenced you as you were starting out?
In addition to Todd Haynes, directors like Gus Van Sant and John Hughes. When I was first watching films, I didn’t really understand what editors did, so at the same time I was influenced by Spielberg, or somebody like George Romero. Then I realized there were editors later who made these things. Ang Lee, and his editor Tim Squyres were like a gods to me. I really wanted to work on one of Ang’s crews very badly, but everyone wanted to work with him. I was working at the same facilities where Ang was cutting, and I was literally sneaking into his edit rooms. I would be working on another film, and I would just kind of peek my head in and see what they were doing and that kind of thing.

How did this Crazy Rich Asians come about for you?
Brad Simpson, who was a post supervisor on Velvet Goldmine back in the ‘90s when I was the assistant editor, is a producer on this film. Flash forward 20 years and I stumbled upon this script through agents. I read it and I was like, “I really want to be a part of this, and Brad’s the producer on this thing? Let me reach out to him.” He said, “I think you might be the right fit for this.” It was pretty nerve-wracking because I’d never worked with Jon before. Jon was a pretty experienced filmmaker, and he’d worked with a lot of editors. I just knew that if I could be part of the process, we could make something special.

My first interview with Jon was a Skype interview. He was in Malaysia already prepping for the film. Those interviews are very difficult to not look or sound weird. I just spoke from the heart, and said this is what I think makes me special. These are the ways I can try to influence a film and be part of the process. Lucky enough between that interview and Brad’s recommendation, I got the job.

Myron Kerstein and director Jon Chu.

When did you begin your work on the film?
I basically started the first week of filming and joined them in Malaysia and Singapore for the whole shoot. It was a pretty amazing experience being out there in two Muslim countries — two Westernized Muslim countries that were filled with some of the friendliest people I’ve ever met. It was an almost entirely local crew, a couple of assistant editors, and me. Sometimes I feel like it might not be the best thing for an editor to be around set too much, but in this case it was good for me to see the setting they were trying to portray… and feel the humidity, the steaminess, the romance and Singapore, which is both alien and beautiful at the same time.

What was your collaboration like with Jon Chu?
It was just an organic process, where my DNA started to become infused with Jon’s. The good thing about my going to Malaysia and Singapore was we got to work together early. One thing that doesn’t happen often anymore is a director who actually screens dailies in a theater. Jon would do that every weekend. We would watch dailies, and he would say what he liked and didn’t like, or more just general impressions of his footage. That allowed me to get into his head a bit.

At the same time I was also cutting scenes. At the end of every day’s screening, we would sit down together. He gave me a lot of freedom, but at the same time was there to give me his first impressions of what I was doing. I think we were able to build some trust really early.

Because of the film’s overwhelming success, this has opened doors for other Asian-led projects.
Isn’t that the most satisfying thing in the world? You hope to define your career by moments like this, but rarely get that chance. I watched this film, right when it was released, which was on my birthday. I ended up sitting next to this young Asian boy and his mom. This kid was just giggling and weeping throughout the movie. To have an interaction with a kid like that, who may have never seen someone like himself represented on the screen was pretty outstanding.

Music was such an important part of this film. The soundtrack is so crucial to moments in the film that it almost felt like a musical. Were you editing scenes with specific songs in mind, or did you edit  and then come back and add music?
Jon gave me a playlist very early on of music he was interested in. A lot of the songs sounded like they were from the 1920s — almost big band tunes. Right then I knew the film could have more of a classy Asian-Gatsby quality to it. Then as we were working on the film together, we started trying out these more modern tunes. I think the producers might have thought we were crazy at one point. You’re asking the audience to go down these different roads with you, and that can sometimes work really well, or sometimes can be a train wreck.

But as much as I love working with music, when I assemble I don’t cut with any music in mind. I try not to use it as a crutch. Oftentimes you cut something with music, either with a song in your head, or often editors will cut with a song as a music bed. But, if you can’t tell a story visually without a song to help drive it, then I think you’re fooling yourself.

I really find that my joy of putting in music happens after I assemble, and then I enjoy experimenting. That Coldplay song at the end of the film, for example… We were really struggling with how to end our movie. We had a bunch of different dialogue scenes that were strung together, but we didn’t feel like it was building up to some kind of climax. I figured out the structure and then cut it like any other scene without any music. Then Jon pitched a couple songs. Ironically enough I had an experience with Coldplay from the opening of Garden State. I liked the idea of this full circle in my own career with Coldplay at the end of a romantic comedy that starred an all-Asian cast. And it really felt like it was the right fit.

The graphic design was fascinating, especially in the early scene with Rachel and Nick on their date that kicks off all of the text messages. Is that something that was storyboarded early, or was that something you all figured out in the edit and in post?
Jon did have a very loose six-page storyboard of how we would get from the beginning of this to the end. The storyboard was nothing compared to what we ended up doing. When I first assembled my footage, I stitched together a two-minute sequence of just split screens of people reacting to other people. Some of that footage is in the movie, but it was just a loose sketch. Jon liked it, but it didn’t represent what he imagined this sequence to be. To some extent he had wondered whether we even needed the sequence.

Jon and I discussed it and said, “Let’s give this a shot. Let’s find the best graphics company out there.” We ended up landing with this company called Aspect, led by John Berkowitz. He and his team of artists worked with us to slowly craft this sequence over months. Beginning with, “How do we get the first text bubble to the second person? What do those text bubbles look like? How do they travel?” Then they gave us 20 different options to see how those two elements would work together. Then we asked, “How do we start expanding outward? What information are we conveying? What is the text bubble saying?” It was like this slowly choreographed dance that we ended up putting together over the course of months.

They would make these little Disney-esque pops. We really loved that. That kind of made it feel like we were back in old Hollywood for a second. At the same time we had these modern devices with text bubbles. So far as the tone was concerned, we tried percussion, just drumming, and other old scores. Then we landed on a score from John Williams from 1941, and that gave us the idea that maybe some old-school big band jazz might go really well in this. Our composer Brian Tyler saw it, and said, “I think I can make this even zanier and crazier.”

How do you work with your assistants?
Assistants are crucial as far as getting through the whole process. I actually had two sets of assistants; John To and David Zimmerman were on the first half in Malaysia and Singapore. I found John through my buddy Tom Cross, who edits for Damien Chazelle. I wanted somebody who could help me with the challenges of getting through places like Malaysia and Singapore, because if you’re looking for help for your Avid, or trying to get dailies from Malaysia to America, you’re kind of on your own. Warner Bros. was great and supportive, and they gave us all the technical help. But it’s not like they can fly somebody out if something goes wrong in an hour.

On the post side I ended up using Melissa Remenarich-Aperlo, and she was outstanding. In the post process I needed somebody to hold down the fort and keep me organized, and also somebody for me to bounce ideas off of. I’m a big proponent of using my assistants creatively. Melissa ended up cutting the big fashion montage. I really struggled with that sequence because I felt strongly like this might be a trope that this film didn’t need. That was the debate with a lot of them. Which romantic comedy tropes should we have in this movie? Jon was like, “It’s wish fulfillment. We really need this. I know we’ve seen it a thousand times, but we need this scene.”

I said let’s try something different. Let’s try inter-cutting the wedding arrival with the montage, and let’s try to make it one big story to get us from us not knowing what she’s going to show up in to her arrival. Both of those sequences were fine on their own, but it didn’t feel like either one of them was doing anything interesting. It just felt like we were eating up time, and we needed to get to the wedding, and we had a lot of story to tell. Once we inter-cut them we knew this was the right choice. As Jon said, you need these moments in the film where you can just sit back and take a breath, smile for a minute and get ready for the drama that starts. Melissa did a great job on that sequence.

Do you have any advice for somebody who’s just starting out and really wants to edit feature films?
I would tell them to start cutting. Cut anything they can. If they don’t have the software, they can cut on iMovie on their iPhone. Then they should  reach out to people like me and create a network. And keep doing that until people say yes. Don’t be afraid to reach out to people.

Also don’t be afraid to be an assistant editor. As much as they want to cut, as they should, they also need to learn the process of editing from others. Be willing to stick with it, even if that means years of doing it. I think you’d be surprised how much you learn over the course of time with good editors. I feel like it’s a long bridge. I’ve been doing this for 20 years, and it took a long time to get here, but perseverance goes a long way in this field. You just have to really know you want to do it and keep doing it.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Veteran editor Antonio Gómez-Pan joins Therapy Studios

Los Angeles-based post house Therapy Studios has added editor Antonio Gómez-Pan to its team. Born in Madrid, and currently splitting his time between his hometown of Barcelona and LA, Gómez-Pan earned a Bachelor of Arts in film editing at cinema school ESCAC.

He says his journey to editing was “sort of a Darwinian process” after he burnt his hands on some fresnel lights and “discovered the beauty of film editing.” While still in school, he edited Mi Amigo Invisible (2010), which premiered at Sundance Film Festival and Elefante (2012), which won the Best Short Film Award at the LA Film Festival and the Sitges Film Festival, along with many others.

Gómez-Pan’s feature work includes Puzzled Love, Hooked Up and Othello, which won Best European Independent Film at ÉCU 2013. On the advertising side, he has worked with global brands like Adidas, Coca-Cola, Chanel, Unicef, Volkswagen, Nike, Ikea, Toyota and many more. Recently, he was appointed an Academic by the Spanish Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Academy, on top of winning the Gold Medal for Best Editing in Berlin.

When asked what his favorite format is, Gómez-Pan couldn’t choose, saying, “I love commercials because of their immediacy and the need to be able to synthesize, but feature films can be more personal and narratively engaging. Music videos are where you are freer to experiment and the editor’s hand is more visible. Documentaries are so rewarding because they’re created in the editing room more than any other genre. I really cannot choose among them.” His enthusiasm for working across the scale is part of why he was drawn to Therapy, where he says, “They do everything, from broadcast campaigns to long-format shows like HBO’s Sonic Highways.”

Gómez-Pan joins Therapy’s existing roster of editors, which includes Doobie White, Kristin McCasey, Lenny Mesina, Meg Ramsay, Steve Prestemon and Jake Shaver. Gómez-Pan says, “Editorial houses don’t exist in Spain, so we are also the ones dealing with the salary, the schedule and all other non-creative parts of the process. That puts you in a tricky position even before you sit down in the editing suite. The role is incredibly rewarding and the editor is held in high esteem, but already I’ve found that we’re much more protected and respected here in the States.”

Marian Oliver upped to editor at Cutters Chicago

Cutters Studios has promoted Marian Oliver to editor at its Chicago location. Oliver began her career in client services at Red Car Chicago in 2009. After earning her degree from Columbia College Chicago, she joined Cutters in 2012 as an assistant editor working on advertising projects. Her most recent projects include campaigns for Meijer, Hallmark, Southwest Airlines, Kiwi, Abbott, Chamberlain and Triscuit.

She uses Avid Media Composer as her main tool, but can edit on Adobe Premiere as well.

Oliver has worked a lot with agency The Distillery Project on jobs including Arrow, Meijer, Tropic Sport, Athletico and RetailMeNot. Per Jacobson, founding partner/CD of The Distillery Project, says, “We fell for Marian long ago when she was assisting Chris Claeys — and snickering along with our antics in the back of his edit suite. From day one, she was quick, smart and had great instincts, which is why we started giving her editing assignments long before she scored the sweet official title of editor.”

The Distillery Project’s founder/chief creative officer John Condon adds, “They say what we do isn’t rocket science, but then one day you find yourself doing a spot that is in fact rocket science. Marian put together a story that not only explained what it took for the European Space Agency to land a probe on a comet going 34,000 mph, but that also touched people emotionally.”

Oliver loves the art of editing. “There is something about the problem solving aspect of the job that I love,” she says. “I know it seems like that isn’t a large part, but it’s like a good 70%. You just keep moving forward, keep trying things, keep thinking and rethinking… sometimes you have to step outside of that frame you have painted yourself into. It’s a challenge and it is frustrating but man when you get it, when you solve that problem and it really works, that’s it, you’re hooked.”

Oliver is a member of the Free the Bid database of women in the creative industry. You can check out her profile here. And when not editing? This passionate photographer can be found traveling “in search of the perfect light.”

Editor Paul Zucker on cutting Hotel Artemis

By Zack Wolder

The Drew Pearce-directed Hotel Artemis is a dark action-thriller set in a riot-torn Los Angeles in the not-too-distant future. What is the Hotel Artemis? It’s a secret members-only hospital for criminals run by Jodie Foster with the help of David Bautista. The film boasts an impressive cast that also includes Sterling K. Brown, Jeff Goldblum, Charlie Day, Sofia Boutella and Jennie Slate.

Hotel Artemis editor Paul Zucker, ACE, has varied credits that toggle between TV and film, including Trainwreck, This is 40, Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind, Girls, Silicon Valley and many others.

We recently reached out to Zucker, who worked alongside picture editor Gardner Gould, to talk about his process on the film.

Paul Zucker and adorable baby.

How did you get involved in this film?
This was kind of a blind date set-up. I wasn’t really familiar with Drew, and it was a project that came to me pretty late. I think I joined about a week, maybe two, before production began. I was told that they were in a hurry to find an editor. I read the script, I interviewed with Drew, and that was it.

How long did it take to complete the editing?
About seven months.

How involved were you throughout the whole phase of production? Were you on set at all?
I wasn’t involved in pre-production, so I wasn’t able to participate in development of the script or anything like that, but as soon as the camera started rolling I was cutting. Most of the film was shot on stages in downtown LA, so I would go to set a few times, but most of the time there was enough work to do that I was sequestered in the edit room and trying to keep up with camera.

I’m an editor who doesn’t love to go to set. I prefer to be uninfluenced by whatever tensions, or lack of tensions, are happening on set. If a director has something he needs me for, if it’s some contribution he feels I can make, I’m happy, able and willing to participate in shot listing, blocking and things like that, but on this movie I was more valuable putting together the edit.

Did you have any specific deadlines you had to meet?
On this particular movie there was a higher-than-average number of requests from director Drew Pearce. Since it was mostly shot on stages, he was able to re-shoot things a little easier than you would if we were on location. So it became important for him to see the movie sooner rather than later.

A bunch of movies ago, I adopted a workflow of sending the director whatever I had each Friday. I think it’s healthy for them to see what they’re working on. There’s always the chance that it will influence the work they’re doing, whether it’s performance of the actors or the story or the script or really anything.

As I understand it from the directors I’ve worked for, seeing the editor’s cut can be the worst day of the process for them. Not because of the quality of the editing, but because it’s hard in that first viewing to look past all the things that they didn’t get on set. Its tough to not just see the mistakes. Which is totally understandable. So I started this strategy of easing them into it. I just send scenes; I don’t send them in sequence. By the time they get to the editors cut, they’ve seen most of the scenes, so the shock is lessened and hopefully that screening is more productive

Do you ever get that sense that you may be distracting them or overwhelming them with something?
Yes, sometimes. A couple of pictures ago, I did my normal thing — sending what I had on a Friday — and the director told me he didn’t want to watch them. For him, issues of post were a distraction while he was in production. So to each his own.

Drew Pearce certainly benefitted. Drew was the type of director who, if I sent it at 9pm, he would be watching it at 9:05pm, and he would be giving me notes at 10:05pm.

Are you doing temp color and things like that?
Absolutely. I do as much as the footage I’m given requires. On this particular movie, the cinematographer, the DIT and the lab were so dialed in that these were the most perfect-looking dailies I think I’ve ever gotten. So I had to do next to nothing. I credit DP Chung-Hoon Chung for that. Generally, if I’m getting dailies that are mismatched in color tone, I’m going to do whatever it takes to smooth it out. Nothing goes in front of the director until it’s had a hardcore sound and color pass. I am always trying to leave as little to the imagination as possible. I try to present something that is as close to the experience that the audience will have when they watch the movie. That means great color, great sound, music, all of that.

Do you ever provide VFX work?
Editorial is typically always doing simple VFX work like split-screens, muzzle-flashes for guns, etc. Those are all things that we’re really comfortable doing.

On this movie, theres a large VFX component, so the temp work was more intense. We had close to 500 VFX shots, and there’s some very involved ones. For example, a helicopter crashes into a building after getting blasted out of the sky with a rocket launcher. There are multiple scenes where characters get operated on by robotic arms. There’s a 3D printer that prints organs and guns. So we had to come up with a large number of temp shots in editorial.

Editor Gardner Gould and assistant editors Michael Costello and Lillian Dawson Bain were instrumental in coming up with these shots.

What about editing before the VFX shots are delivered?
From the very beginning, we are game-planning — what are the priorities for the movie vis-a-vis VFX? Which shots do we need early for story reasons? Which shots are the most time consuming for the VFX department? All of these things are considered as the entire post production department collaborates to come up with a priorities list.

If I need temp versions of shots to help me edit the scene, the assistants help me make them. If we can do them, we’ll do them. These aid in determining final VFX shot length, tempo, action, anything. As the process goes on, they get replaced by shots we get from the VFX department.

One thing I’m always keeping in mind is that shots can be created out of thin air oftentimes. If I have a story problem, sometimes a shot can be created that will help solve it. Sometimes the entire meaning of a scene can change.

What do you expect from your assistant editors?
The first assistant had to have experience with visual effects. The management of workflow for 500 shots is a lot, and on this job, we did not have a dedicated VFX editor. That fell upon (my co-editor) editor Gardner Gould.

I generally kick a lot of sound to the assistant, as I’m kind of rapidly moving through cutting picture. But I’m also looking for someone who’s got that storytelling bone that great editors have. Not everybody has it, not every great assistant has it.

There is so much minutiae on the technical side of being an assistant editor that you run the risk of forgetting that you’re working on a movie for an audience. And, indeed, some assistants just do the assistant work. They never cut scenes, they never do creative work, they’re not interested or they just don’t. So I’m always encouraging them to think like an editor at every point.

I ask them for their opinions. I invite them into the process, I don’t want them to be afraid to tell me what they think. You have to express yourself artistically in every decision you make. I encourage them to think critically and analytically about the movie that we’re working on.

I came up as an assistant and I had a few people who really believed in me. They invited me into the room with the director and they gave me that early exposure that really helped me learn my trade. I’m kind of looking to pay back that favor to my assistants.

Why did you choose to edit this film on Avid? Are you proficient in any other NLEs?
Oh, I’d say strictly Avid. To me, a tool, a technology, should be as transparent as possible. I want to have the minimum of time in between thought and expression. Which means that if I think of an edit, I want to automatically, almost without thinking, be able to do a keystroke and have that decision appear on the monitor. I’m so comfortable with Avid that I’m at that point.

How is your creative process different when editing a film versus a TV show?
Well first, a TV show is going to have a pre-determined length. A movie does not have a pre-determined length. So in television you’re always wrangling with the runtime. The second thing that’s different is in television schedules are a little tighter and turnaround times are a little tighter. You’re constantly in pre-production, production and post at the same time.

Also, television is for a small screen. Film, generally speaking, is for the big screen. The venue matters for a lot of reasons, but it matters for pacing. You’re sitting in a movie theater and maybe you can hold shots a little bit longer because the canvas is so wide and there’s so much to look at. Whereas with the small screen, you’re sitting closer to the television, the screen itself is smaller, maybe the shots are typically not as wide or you cut a little quicker.

You’re a very experienced comedic editor. Was it difficult to be considered for a different type of film?
I guess the answer is yes. The more famous work I’ve done in the last couple of years has been for people like Lena Dunham and Judd Apatow. So people say, “Well, he’s a comedy editor.” But if you look at my resume dating back to the very first thing I did in 2001, I edited my first movie — a pretty radical film for Gus Van Sant called Gerry, and it was not a comedy. Eternal Sunshine was not a comedy. Before Girls, I couldn’t get hired on comedies.

Then I got pulled on by Judd to work on some of his movies, and he’s such a brand name that people see that on your resume and they say, “Well, you must be a comedy editor.” So, yes, it does become harder to break out of that box, but that’s the box that other people put you in, I don’t put myself in that. My favorite filmmakers work across all types of genre.

Where do you find inspiration? Music? Other editors? Directors?
Good question. I mean… inspiration is everywhere. I’m a movie fan, I always have been, that’s the only thing I’ve ever wanted to do. I’m always going to the movies. I watch lots of trailers. I like to keep up with what people are doing. I go back and re-watch the things that I love. Listening to other editors or reading other editors speak about their process is inspiring to me. Listening and speaking with people who love what they do is inspiring.

For Hotel Artemis, I went back and watched some movies that were an influence on this one to get in the tone-zone. I would listen to a lot of the soundtracks that were soundtracks to those movies. As far as watching movies, I watched Assault on Precinct 13, for instance. That’s a siege movie, and Hotel Artemis is kind of a siege movie. Some editors say they don’t watch movies while they’re making a movie, they don’t want to be influenced. It doesn’t bother me. It’s all in the soup.


Zack Wolder is a video editor based in NYC. He is currently the senior video editor at Billboard Magazine.  Follow him on Instagram at @thezackwolder.

How being a special needs dad helps me be a better editor at Conan

By Robert James Ashe

I have been working in late night television for Conan O’Brien for nearly 10 years, currently as the lead editor for Conan on the TBS network. Late night television has an extraordinarily demanding pace. An old colleague of mine used to refer to it as the “speed chess” of editing. It demands that your first instincts when editing are the best ones. The pace also puts extraordinary pressure on your writers and producers. I like to think of editors as the pilots hired to bring the plane in for a landing that may have already lost an engine, so it’s important that you maintain balance and focus.

I am the father to three amazing kiddos with special needs. My first daughter was born with the amyoplasia form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. She is also nonverbal. My youngest daughter was born with amniotic banding syndrome. For her, it means she only has a few fully developed fingers and a prosthesis on one of her legs. We’ve addressed her physical challenges through surgery and she has lots of fun sprinting around with her “robot leg,” which is what we call her prosthesis. We are in the middle of adopting our son and hope to bring him home in the fall. He has similar orthopedic challenges to our second daughter.

I take my jobs as editor and as a father very seriously, but it is also important to note that I am happy. Here are some things that I have learned over the years. I have made mistakes in every one of these rules, but I try every day to be better.

1. You will reach a new normal
I like to think of an editor’s job as a client’s spirit guide of sorts. A guardian of the story you are helping to tell. Once you get all of the footage, and you have a good idea of what you are dealing with, your job is to advocate for the story your client is trying to tell while handling various tech issues so you can remain creative. It took me a long time to make this adjustment. Now I try every day to make it my new normal.

Once we got through the first few weeks of my first daughter’s life and received a diagnosis, we decided to not live our lives with a cloud over our heads and to instead look for the sunshine. We refused to consider our lives to be a tragedy. My job is to advocate for my children while making sure they can remain kids throughout the doctor’s appointments and surgeries. I want them to feel happy about their lives.

2. Know Your Role
It’s important to know that the story you are being hired to tell for your client is not yours. I am very trusted at my job to work on pieces with little supervision. I have earned this trust because the writers (my client) know that I will put together segments based on their sensibilities. I am there to help tell their story and to solve any tech problems that may arise in doing so. I am not reinterpreting the story to fit my own sensibilities (plus, I’m not very funny so it works out).

I am a player in my children’s life story. I deal with insurance. My wife takes them to appointments on workdays. But, we are not the ones receiving the therapy or medical services, so our story is different than our children’s. You must know how to separate the two. I am there to guide them. I am there to protect them but it is their story.

Rob (center) with his co-editors Chris Heller and Matt Shaw.

3. Attitude monitors everything
I have to be mindful of my attitude. I am a large, intimidating looking man. The slightest expression of negativity is read to be much larger because of my size. Your attitude can affect an entire workspace. People will recommend a decent editor who is nice over a grumpy “professional” any day of the week. I’ve made this mistake many times. I would start on a new project so passionate and personally invested in the story that I was hired to tell I would be arrogantly offended if I felt that anyone I was working with didn’t give their absolute best. The truth of it is most people try to do their best with the circumstances they have been given, and the more I’d complain the more I’d become the real problem. Give people more credit. You don’t know the kinds of things they have had to deal with.

Dealing with the medical industry can be daunting. It’s easy to feel frustrated on calls with insurance or scheduling appointments. I try to have empathy for the other person I am dealing with as they have to deal with frustrated and frightened people all day. You don’t know the kinds of things they have to deal with. I also have to be very mindful of my attitude around my kids. My wife figured out quickly that if our lives were going to revolve around going to the Children’s Hospital that we were going to make it fun. Our kids actually love going. They have a playground and so many things for the kids to enjoy. If we acted depressed around our children, it would affect them. Before my youngest daughter’s prosthesis, we would talk about all the things she would be able to do and all the fun she’d be able to have once she got her robot leg.

4. The world isn’t fair
Not everyone is going to recognize what you contribute, even when you are at your absolute best. You must try to not take it personally. I try to remind myself that often we are working for people who have their own issues to worry about and don’t always understand the technical challenges of what we do. I have seen hundreds of all sorts of people passed over for promotions they deserve or recognition that they have earned. As someone who has been in charge of other editors, I have also received credit for work that is their own. That is why I insist at the end of every project sending a private post mortem to my clients so people can understand everyone’s contribution.

I get way more credit than I deserve for being a father of my children, and it’s not fair. One time my wife and I brought the kids to a party. My oldest daughter doesn’t have the muscle strength to feed herself, so I spent time feeding her while my wife talked with her friends. After leaving the party, my wife remarked how impressed they were that I fed my child. My wife is an amazing mom. I married Mary Poppins. Our family does deal with a fair amount of challenges, but I have met many single mothers over the years that are worthy of so much more admiration for what they take on than anything we’ve ever accomplished.

5. Take care of yourself
You will never be the best editor you can be unless you take care of yourself. Eating correctly, sleeping enough and moderating drinking or drug use is just the tip of the iceberg. The most high-profile jobs will demand that you be at your best 100% of the time.

My oldest daughter cannot walk without the use of braces, so we need to remain strong enough to lift her upstairs or into the shower. I am getting older, so I’m really starting to make a concentrated effort to eat better, exercise and drink less. The most challenging times we have faced have demanded that we be at our absolute best mentally and physically as long nights during surgeries can be draining.

6. A job is a job; family is everything
I like to park my car on the far side of the studio that I work at. It gives me a 20-minute walk to my trailer that allows me to look at all the other shoots happening that day and reflect on how I used to dream as a kid to one day work in Hollywood. It also gives me a chance to get some exercise.

Hollywood has been very kind to me, but my job doesn’t define my happiness. It’s not who I am. One of the best things that has ever happened to me in Hollywood was to figure out that once you take all the glitz and glamor away, it is a job like any other. A job I enjoy that allows me to provide for my family.

When I’m gone from this world, my most meaningful accomplishments will have nothing to do with my job and everything to do with my family and friends. The greatest thing I have done with my life is adopting my (soon to be) two children. My job demands long hours, so I have to miss some things, but I take comfort in knowing that it is to provide for their future.

7. You are capable of much more than you know
When I became an editor, I really didn’t know what my career would have in store. I just found it fun and decided that I could make money doing it. When I started in late night television almost 10 years ago, delivering a 42-minute show in 90 minutes used to make my hands shake. Now, it is one of the easiest points of my day. I went from freelancing on side projects for little money to helping plan international media transfers and deliveries for network primetime specials supported by an amazing and capable team. I’m proud of what I’ve been able to accomplish.

When my first child was born. I didn’t know what life was going to have in store. We just decided to go all in and be the best we could be at it, and now we are parents to (soon to be) three wonderful kiddos with an amazing orthopedic medical team. Our children are part of case studies that will advance medical science. They’ve been filmed and photographed for others to learn how to properly treat joint contractures and prosthesis adaptations. Their presence is going to help future kids get the treatment they need. When something like this happens in your life, you find out what you are really made of.

8. Finally, please remember to have fun. It’s fun.
I wish you nothing but the best.


Robert James Ashe is the four-time Emmy-nominated lead editor of Conan on TBS. You can follow him on Twitter at @robertjamesashe and read more pieces from him on The Mighty.

Editor and Exile co-owner Eric Zumbrunnen has passed away at 52

Award-winning editor Eric Zumbrunnen has lost his battle with cancer. Known for his intelligence, kindness and dry wit as much as his editorial talent, Zumbrunnen left a memorable imprint that spanned the worlds of feature films, commercials, music videos, short films and documentaries.

In 2014, Zumbrunnen co-founded Santa Monica and New York-based post company Exile with partners Kirk Baxter, Matt Murphy and Carol Lynn Weaver. Zumbrunnen valued the opportunity to learn from the gifted writers, directors and editors he worked with. While he held himself and his co-workers to a high standard, he was also committed to encouraging and mentoring other editors and would-be editors.

Known to many as “EZ,”Zumbrunnen graduated from USC with a degree in journalism, and began his professional life in video post. A proficient guitarist, he brought his affinity for music to his early work editing music videos, including classics such as Weezer’s Buddy Holly, Smashing Pumpkins’ Tonight, Tonight, Beck’s Where It’s At and Bjork’s It’s Oh So Quiet.

He developed close collaborative relationships with a few directors, and subsequently expanded into commercials for clients such as Nike, Xbox and Apple, and ultimately into feature films. He had worked many times with director Spike Jonze. The pair’s collaboration spanned two decades and resulted in the Oscar-nominated Her, Adaptation, Where the Wild Things Are and Being John Malkovich, which earned Zumbrunnen an ACE Award for Best Edited Feature Film. More recently he was awarded a Bronze Lion for Editing at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity for his work on Jonze’s Kenzo World fragrance ad My Mutant Brain. He was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences this year.

Zumbrunnen is survived by his wife Suzanne and children Henry and Greta.

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

Editor William Hoy — working on VFX-intensive War for the Planet of the Apes

By Mel Lambert

For William Hoy, ACE, story and character come first. He also likes to use visual effects “to help achieve that idea.” This veteran film editor points to director Zack Snyder’s VFX-heavy I, Robot, director Matt Reeves’ 2014 version of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and his new installment, War for the Planet of the Apes, as “excellent examples of this tenet.”

War for the Planet of the Apes, the final part of the current reboot trilogy, follows a band of apes and their leader as they are forced into a deadly conflict with a rogue paramilitary faction known as Alpha-Omega. After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, their leader begins a quest to avenge his kind, and an epic battle that determines the fate of both their species and the future of our planet.

Marking the picture editor’s second collaboration with Reeves, Hoy recalls that he initially secured an interview with the director through industry associates. “Matt and I hit it off immediately. We liked each other,” Hoy recalls. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes had a very short schedule for such a complicated film, and Matt had his own ideas about the script — particularly how the narrative ended. He was adamant that he ‘start over’ when he joined the film project.

“The previous Dawn script, for example, had [the lead ape character] Caesar and his followers gaining intelligence and driving motorized vehicles,” Hoy says. “Matt wanted the action to be incremental which, it turned out, was okay with the studio. But a re-written script meant that we had a very tight shoot and post schedule. Swapping its release date with X-Men: Days of Future Past gave us an additional four or five weeks, which was a huge advantage.”

William Hoy, ACE (left), Matt Reeves (right).

Such a close working relationship on Dawn of the Planet of the Apes meant that Hoy came to the third installment in the current trilogy with a good understanding of the way that Reeves likes to work. “He has his own way of editing from the dailies, so I can see what we will need on rough cut as the filmed drama is unfolding. We keep different versions in Avid Media Composer, with trusted performances and characters, and can see where they are going” with the narrative. Having worked with Reeves over the past two decades, Stan Salfas, ACE, served as co-editor on the project, joining prior to the Director’s Cut.

[Editor’s Note: Salfas, was not available for this interview. In answer to a request for an account of his experience on the last two Planet of the Apes movies he wrote: “Working on a large scale VFX movie teaches powerful lessons in collaboration. For the last 20 years through 11 different projects, I was Matt Reeves’ sole editor. When we began work on the Apes films, their vast complexity, the sheer volume of work in every area and an accelerated schedule all made it clear we needed two editors. Matt put himself on a virtual 16-hour a day schedule, as well. It was time for all hands on deck. First, we strove to advance the cut scene by scene in the picture department, often working around the clock. In addition, there were multiple layers of coordination including temp music tracking, sound design and of course visual effects (sessions often went four or five hours each day). Throughout, we continuously interfaced with other creative team members. Under this kind of work load, collaboration between two editors and a director takes many forms, and as we worked over so many months, it became clear: virtually every cinematic moment in the finished film would flow out of a synergy of contributions from many places. Lesson learned: the goal for all of us in post production, as in any film, is to serve the single vision of the director — to forge many voices into one.]

A member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences, Hoy also worked with director Randall Wallace on We Were Soldiers and The Man in the Iron Mask, with director Phillip Noyce on The Bone Collector and director Zack Snyder on Watchmen, a film “filled with emotional complexity and heavy with visual effects,” he says.

An Evolutionary Editing Process
“Working scene-by-scene with motion capture images and background artwork laid onto the Avid timeline, I can show Matt my point of view,” explains Hoy. “We fill in as we go — it’s an evolutionary process. I will add music and some sound effects for that first cut so we can view it objectively. We ask, ‘Is it working?’ We swap around ideas and refine the look. This is a film that we could definitely not have cut on film; there are simply too many layers as the characters move through these varied backgrounds. And with the various actors in motion capture suits giving us dramatic performances, with full face movements [CGI-developed facial animation], I can see how they are interacting.”

To oversee the dailies on location, Hoy set up a Media Composer editing system in Vancouver, close to the film locations used for principal photography. “War for the Planet of the Apes was shot on Arri Alexa 65 digital cameras that deliver 6K images,” the editor recalls. “These files were down-sampled to 4K and delivered to Weta Digital [in New Zealand] as source material, where they were further down-sampled to 2K for CGI work and then up-sampled back to 4K for the final release. I also converted our camera masters to 2K DNxHD 32/36 for editing color-timed dailies within my Avid workstation.”

In terms of overall philosophy, “we did not want to give away Caesar’s eventual demise. From the script, I determined that the key arc was the unfolding mystery of ‘What is going on?’ And ‘Where will it take us?’ We hid that Caesar [played by Andy Serkis] is shot with an arrow, and initially just showed the blood on the hand of the orangutan, Maurice [Karin Konoval]; we had to decide how to hide that until the key moment.”

Because of the large number of effect-heavy films that Hoy has worked on, he is considered an action/visual effects editor. “But I am drawn to performances of actors and their characters,” he stresses. “If I’m not invested in their fate, I cannot be involved in the action. I like to bring an emotional value to the characters, and visualize battle scenes. In that respect Matt and I are very much in tune. He doesn’t hide his emotion as we work out a lot of the moves in the editing room.”

For example, in Dawn of The Planet of The Apes, Koba, a human-hating Bonobo chimpanzee who led a failed coup against Caesar, is leading apes against the human population. “It was unsatisfying that the apes would be killing humans while the humans were killing apes. Instead, I concentrated on the POV of Caesar’s oldest son, Blue Eyes. We see the events through his eyes, which changed the overall idea of the battle. We shot some additional material but most of the scene — probably 75% — existed; we also spoke with the FX house about the new CGI material,” which involved re-imaged action of horses and backgrounds within the Virtual Sets that were fashioned by Weta Digital.

Hoy utilized VFX tools on various layers within his Media Composer sessions that carried the motion capture images, plus the 3D channels, in addition to different backgrounds. “Sometimes we could use one background version and other times we might need to look around for a new perspective,” Hoy says. “It was a trial-and-error process, but Matt was very receptive to that way of working; it was very collaborative.”

Twentieth Century Fox’s War for the Planet of the Apes.

Developing CGI Requests for Key Scenes
By working closely with Weta Digital, the editor could develop new CGI requests for key scenes and then have them rendered as necessary. “We worked with the post-viz team to define exactly what we needed from a scene — maybe to put a horse into a blizzard, for example. Ryan Stafford, the film’s co-producer and visual effects producer, was our liaison with the CGI team. On some scenes I might have as many as a dozen or more separate layers in the Avid, including Caesar, rendered backgrounds, apes in the background, plus other actors in middle and front layers” that could be moved within the frame. “We had many degrees of freedom so that Matt and I could develop alternate ideas while still preserving the actors’ performances. That way of working could be problematic if you have a director who couldn’t make up his mind; happily, Matt is not that way!”

Hoy cites one complex scene that needed to be revised dramatically. “There is a segment in which Bad Ape [an intelligent chimpanzee who lived in the Sierra Zoo before the Simian Flu pandemic] is seen in front of a hearth. That scene was shot twice because Matt did not consider it frenetic enough. The team returned to the motion capture stage and re-shot the scene [with actor Steve Zahn]. That allowed us to start over again with new, more frantic physical performances against resized backgrounds. We drove the downstream activities – asking Weta to add more snow in another scene, for example, or maybe bring Bad Ape forward in the frame so that we can see him more clearly. Weta was amazing during that collaborative process, with great input.”

The editor also received a number of sound files for use within his Avid workstation. “In the beginning, I used some library effects and some guide music — mostly some cues of composer Michael Giacchino’s Dawn score music from music editor Paul Apelgren. Later, when the picture was in one piece, I received some early sketches from the sound design team. For the Director’s Cut we had a rough cut with no CGI from Weta Digital. But when we received more sound design, I would create temp mixes on the Avid, with a 5.1-channel mix for the sound-editorial team using maybe 24 tracks of effects, dialog and music elements. It was a huge session, but Media Composer is versatile. After turning over that mix to Will Files, the film’s sound designer, supervising sound editor and co-mixer, I was present with Matt on the re-recording stage for maybe six weeks of the final mix as the last VFX elements came in. We were down to the wire!”

Hoy readily concedes that while he loves to work with new directors — “and share their point of view” — returning to a director with whom he has collaborated previously is a rewarding experience. “You develop a friendly liaison because it becomes easier once you understand the ways in which a director works. But I do like to be challenged with new ideas and new experiences.” He may get to work again with Reeves on the director’s next outing, The Batman, “but since Matt is still writing the screenplay, time will tell!”


Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLAHe is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

 

Behind the Title: Edit 1 creative director/editor Ken Kresge

NAME: Ken Kresge

COMPANY: New York City’s Edit 1

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a production company with a unique talent for previs and content work.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
VP creative director/editor

Edit 1

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
At heart, I’m an editor. I have been so for the past 20 years. Editing led to a natural progression into being a CD. I manage the creative expectation of our clients and make sure our team of pros executes it in the manner that I feel represents the client’s needs.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In today’s business environment, being an editor means more than editing video, offline color correct and light After Effects work. Now the job includes all that plus a myriad other things, ranging from collaborating concept and script to audio, online color correct, graphic design, 3D animation and even helping with PR and social media. Fortunately, I love doing all those things, so for me now is a great time to be a creative editor.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with my new colleagues. It’s been 17 years since I was the new guy, and for me its very exciting getting to know them and seeing their talent for the first time. Oh yeah, the pizza on Friday is pretty awesome.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Give me some time and I am sure I will find something.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I like the mornings, when its just one or two of us. I put on some music and get ready for whatever is coming up.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a scientist or a host for a comedic documentary TV show. Yes, that is pretty specific for me.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I used editing as a way of expressing myself. I started my first editing gig at McCann Erickson.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Is it ok if that hasn’t happened yet?

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I just joined Edit 1 so much of it is still going on, but I can say I was able to re-connect with some of my previous clients and friends on a few projects from McCann, Evoke, DDB, One World Trade and Grey. They have kept me quite busy over the past four weeks.

Edit 1’s rooftop.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
One World is project I am proud of for a few reasons. I helped on the agency pitch and then helped create this interactive AR project for iPad, which involved editing almost 50 different videos about places in New York City. Moreover, I am a New Yorker, and having lived here through 9/11, this project gave me an overwhelming sense of pride. For me it’s like patriotism, in a New York-er way. I’m also proud of a personal project called “Road Trip Earth.”

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A powerful laptop, Adobe’s Creative Cloud and a decent camera/phone.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Honestly, I don’t follow anything.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I listen to KEXP almost every day. I love John in the Morning. Other than that, lately, it’s a lot of ALT-J, Modest Mouse and the new Slowdive.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just don’t sweat it anymore. Life can be pretty hard but I have a good one, with an amazing wife and kids to share it with. I try not to mess with those things and everything else seems to fall into place.

Nomad Editing adds Nate Cali

Santa Monica’s Nomad has added editor Nate Cali to its roster. Cali, who will be based out of the Santa Monica office, has edited campaigns for Nike, Reebok, Red Bull, Taco Bell, Capital One and Funny or Die. Cali edits on Adobe Premiere.

Most recently, he was freelancing out of Saatchi LA working on Toyota. Prior to that, while he frequently worked out of the Optimus Chicago office and spent a lot of time there, he was based out of Optimus LA, where he moved up the ranks from assistant editor to a partner in the company. He also spent time at Union Editorial.

While at the Los Angeles Film School, he studied under Danford B. Greene, who cut Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles. “My mother was a stand-up comedian,” he says. “I always knew I wanted to cut comedy. Danford taught me how to make people laugh by highlighting reactions instead of actions.”

“I feel so lucky to have a career that requires me to collaborate with other people who have the same passion and drive as I do. I connect very well with people who care deeply about their work. I love working on cars and extreme sports projects and while I think the flashy stuff is cool, I’m most interested in bringing the best emotions out of a piece. I want people to feel a personal connection to that spot.”

A chat with Emmy-winning comedy editor Sue Federman

This sitcom vet talks about cutting Man With A Plan and How I Met Your Mother.

By Dayna McCallum

The art of sitcom editing is overly enjoyed and underappreciated. While millions of people literally laugh out loud every day enjoying their favorite situation comedies, very few give credit to the maestro behind the scenes, the sitcom editor.

Sue Federman is one of the best in the business. Her work on the comedy How I Met Your Mother earned three Emmy wins and six nominations. Now the editor of CBS’ new series, Man With A Plan, Federman is working with comedy legends Matt LeBlanc and James Burrows to create another classic sitcom.

However, Federman’s career in entertainment didn’t start in the cutting room; it started in the orchestra pit! After working as a professional violinist with orchestras in Honolulu and San Francisco, she traded in her bow for an Avid.

We sat down to talk with Federman about the ins and outs of sitcom editing, that pesky studio audience, and her journey from musician to editor.

When did you get involved with your show, and what is your workflow like?
I came onto Man With A Plan (MWAP) after the original pilot had been picked up. They recast one of the leads, so there was a reshoot of about 75 percent of the pilot with our new Andi, Liza Snyder. My job was to integrate the new scenes with the old. It was interesting to preserve the pace and feel of the original and to be free to bring my own spin to the show.

The workflow of the show is pretty fast since there’s only one editor on a traditional audience sitcom. I usually put a show together in two to three days, then work with the producers for one to two days, and then send a pretty finished cut to the studio/network.

What are the biggest challenges you face as an editor on a traditional half-hour comedy?
One big challenge is managing two to three episodes at a time — assembling one show while doing producer or studio/network notes on another, as well as having to cut preshot playbacks for show night, which can be anywhere from three to eight minutes of material that has to be cut pretty quickly.

Another challenge is the live audience laughter. It’s definitely a unique part of this kind of show. I worked on How I Met Your Mother (HIMYM) for nine years without an audience, so I could completely control the pacing. I added fake laughs that fit the performances and things like that. When I came back to a live audience show, I realized the audience is a big part of the way the performances are shaped. I’ve learned all kinds of ways to manipulate the laughs and, hopefully, still preserve the spontaneous live energy of the show.

How would you compare cutting comedy to drama?
I haven’t done much drama, but I feel like the pace of comedy is faster in every regard, and I really enjoy working at a fast pace. Also, as opposed to a drama or anything shot single-camera, the coverage on a multi-cam show is pretty straightforward, so it’s really all about performance and pacing. There’s not a lot of music in a multi-cam, but you spend a lot of time working with the audience tracks.

What role would you say an editor has in helping to make a “bit” land in a half-hour comedy?
It’s performance, timing and camera choices — and when it works, it feels great. I’m always amazed at how changing an edit by a frame or two can make something pop. Same goes for playing something wider or closer depending on the situation.

MWAP is shot before a live studio audience. How does that affect your rhythm?
The audience definitely affects the rhythm of the show. I try to preserve the feeling of the laughs and still keep the show moving. A really long laugh is great on show night, but usually we cut it down a bit and play off more reactions. The actors on MWAP are great because they really know how to “ride” the laughs and not break character. I love watching great comedic actors, like the cast of I Love Lucy, for example, who were incredible at holding for laughs. It’s a real asset and very helpful to the editor.

Can you describe your process? And what system do you edit the show on?
I’ve always used the Avid Media Composer. Dabbled with Final Cut, but prefer Avid. I assemble the whole show in one sequence and go scene by scene. I watch all of the takes of a scene and make choices for each section or sometimes for each line. Then I chunk the scene together, sometimes putting in two choices for a line or area. I then cut into the big pieces to select the cameras for each shot. After that, I go back and find the rhythm of the scene — tightening the pace, cutting into the laughs and smoothing them.

After the show is put together, I go back and watch the whole thing again, pretending that I’ve never seen it, which is a challenge. That makes me adjust it even more. I try to send out a pretty polished first cut, without cutting any dialogue to show the producers everything, which seems to make the whole process go faster. I’m lucky that the directors on MWAP are very seasoned and don’t really give me many notes. Jimmy Burrows and Pam Fryman have directed almost all of the episodes, and I don’t send out a separate cut to either of them. Particularly with Pam, as I’ve worked with her for about 11 years, so we have a nice shorthand.

How do assistant editors work into the mix?
My assistant, Dan “Steely” Esparza, is incredible! He allows me to show up to work every day and not think about anything other than cutting the show. He’s told me, even though I always ask, that he prefers not to be an editor, so I don’t push him in that direction. He is excellent at visual effects and enjoys them, so I always have him do those. On HIMYM, we had quite a lot of visual effects, so he was pretty busy there. But on MWAP, it’s mostly rough composites for blue/greenscreen scenes and painting out errant boom shadows, boom mics and parts of people.

Your work on HIMYM was highly lauded. What are some of your favorite “editing” moments from that show and what were some of the biggest challenges they threw at you?
I really loved working on that show — every episode was unique, and it really gave me opportunities to grow as an editor. Carter Bays and Craig Thomas were amazing problem solvers. They were able to look at the footage and make something completely different out of it if need be. I remember times when a scene wasn’t working or was too long, and they would write some narration, record the temp themselves, and then we’d throw some music over it and make it into a montage.

Some of the biggest editing challenges were the music videos/sequences that were incorporated into episodes. There were three complete Robin Sparkles videos and many, many other musical pieces, almost always written by Carter and Craig. In “P.S. I Love You,” they incorporated her last video into kind of a Canadian Behind the Music about the demise of Robin Sparkles, and that was pretty epic for a sitcom. The gigantic “Subway Wars” was another big challenge, in that it had 85 “scenelets.” It was a five-way race around Manhattan to see who could get to a restaurant where Woody Allen was supposedly eating first, with each person using a different mode of transportation. Crazy fun and also extremely challenging to fit into a sitcom schedule.

You started in the business as a classical musician. How does your experience as a professional violinist influence your work as an editor?
I think the biggest thing is having a good feeling for the rhythm of whatever I’m working on. I love to be able to change the tempo and to make something really pop. And when asked to change the pacing or cut sections out, when doing various people’s notes, being able to embrace that too. Collaborating is a big part of being a musician, and I think that’s helped me a lot in working with the different personalities. It’s not unlike responding to a conductor or playing chamber music. Also having an understanding of phrasing and the overall structure of a piece is valuable, even though it was musical phrasing and structure, it’s not all that different.

Obviously, whenever there’s actual music involved, I feel pretty comfortable handling it or choosing the right piece for a scene. If classical music’s involved, I have a great deal of knowledge that can be helpful. For example, in HIMYM, we needed something to be a theme for Barney’s Playbook antics. I tried a few things, and we landed on the Mozart Rondo Alla Turca, which I’ve been hearing lately in the Progresso Soup commercials.

How did you make the transition from the concert hall to the editing room?
It’s a long story! I was playing in the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra and was feeling stuck. I was lucky enough to find an amazing career counseling organization that helped me open my mind to all kinds of possibilities, and they helped me to discover the perfect job for me. It was quite a journey, but the main thing was to be open to anything and identify the things about myself that I wanted to use. I learned that I loved music (but not playing the violin), puzzles, stories and organizing — so editing!

I sold a bow, took the summer off from playing and enrolled in a summer production workshop at USC. I wasn’t quite ready to move to LA, so I went back to San Francisco and began interning at a small commercial editing house. I was answering phones, emptying the dishwasher, getting coffees and watching the editing, all while continuing to play in the Ballet Orchestra. The people were great and gave me opportunities to learn whenever possible. Luckily for me, they were using the Avid before it came to TV and features. Eventually, there was a very rough documentary that one of the editors wanted to cut, but it wasn’t organized. They gave me the key to the office and said, “You want to be an editor? Organize this!” So I did, and they started offering me assistant work on commercials. But I wanted to cut features, so I started to make little trips to LA to meet anybody I could.

Bill Steinberg, an editor working in the Universal Syndication department who I met at USC, got me hooked up with an editor who was to be one of Roger Corman’s first Avid editors. The Avids didn’t arrive right away, but he helped me put my name in the hat to be an assistant the next time. It happened, and I was on my way! I took a sabbatical from the orchestra, went down to LA, and worked my tail off for $400 a week on three low-budget features. I was in heaven. I had enough hours to join the union as an assistant, but I needed money to pay the admission fee. So I went back to San Francisco and played one month of Nutcrackers to cover the fee, and then I took another year sabbatical. Bill offered me a month position in the syndication department to fill in for him, and show the film editors what I knew about the Avid.

Eventually Andy Chulack, the editor of Coach, was looking for an Avid assistant, and I was recommended because I knew it. Andy hired me and took me under his wing, and I absolutely loved it. I guess the upshot is, I was fearlessly naive and knew the Avid!

What do you love most about being an editor?
I love the variation of material and people that I get to work with, and I like being able to take time to refine things. I don’t have to play it live anymore!

Chatting with Scorsese’s go-to editor Thelma Schoonmaker

By Iain Blair

Thelma Schoonmaker and Martin Scorsese go together like Lennon and McCartney, or Ben and Jerry. It’s hard to imagine one without the other.

Simply put, Schoonmaker has been Martin Scorsese’s go-to editor and key collaborator over the course of 23 films and half a century, winning Oscars for Raging Bull, The Aviator and The Departed. Now 77, she also recently received a career achievement award at the American Cinema Editors’ 67th Eddie Awards.

She cut Scorsese’s first feature, Who’s that Knocking at My Door, and since Raging Bull has worked on all of his feature films, including such classics as The King of Comedy, After Hours, The Color of Money, The Last Temptation of Christ, New York Stories, GoodFellas (which earned her another Oscar nomination), Cape Fear, The Age of Innocence, Casino, Kundun, Gangs of New York (another Oscar nomination), Shutter Island, Hugo (another Oscar nomination) and The Wolf of Wall Street.

Their most recent collaboration was Silence, Scorsese’s underrated and powerful epic, which is now available via Blu-ray, DVD and On Demand from Paramount Home Media Distribution.

A 28-year passion project that reinforces Scorsese’s place in the pantheon of great directors, Silence tells the story of two Christian missionaries (Adam Driver and Andrew Garfield) who travel to Japan in search of their missing mentor (Liam Neeson) at a time when Christianity was outlawed. When they are captured and imprisoned, both men are plunged into an odyssey that will test their faith, challenge their sanity and, perhaps, risk their very lives

I recently talked with Schoonmaker about cutting Silence, working with Scorsese, and their long and storied collaboration.

Silence must have been very challenging to cut as it’s very long and could easily have ended up being a bit slow and boring.
(Laughs) You’re right! It was one of the things we were most concerned about from the start, as it’s a very meditative film. It’s nothing like his last films, Hugo and Wolf of Wall Street, and it couldn’t be more different.

Wolf had all the crazy stuff and the wild humor and improvisation, but with Silence Marty wanted to make an entirely different movie from the way most movies are made today. So that was a very brave commitment, I think, and it was difficult to find the right balance and the right pace. We experimented a great deal with just how slow it could be, without losing the audience.

Even the film’s opening scene was a major challenge. It’s very slow and sets the tone before the film even starts, with just the cicadas on the soundtrack. It tells you, slow down from our crazy lives, just feel what’s going on and engage with it. The minimal score is all part of that. It’s not telling the audience what to think, as scores usually do. He wanted the audience to decide what they feel and think, and he was adamant about starting the film off like that, which was also brave.

It feels far closer to The Age of Innocence in terms of its pacing than his more recent films.
Yes, and that was definitely a big part of its appeal for him, as it’s set in another country and also another century, so Marty wanted the film to be very meditative, and the pace of it had to reflect all that. Along with that, he was able to examine his religious concerns and interests, which he couldn’t do so much in other films. They were always there, but here they’re up front.

Did you stay in New York cutting while he shot in Taiwan, or did you visit the set?
I was in Taipei while they shot, working on the dailies, but I didn’t go on set as the locations they used were very arduous — up these steep mountains — and it took two hours just to get up there. There was bad weather and mud, wind, mosquitoes and snakes. Really, I just didn’t have the time to go on set, so I never got to see the great beauty of Taiwan, since I was back in Taipei in my editing room.

I do go on sets sometimes, and I love to visit and watch Marty work with the actors, and it’s always fun to be on the set, but as an editor, I also want to be unbiased when I sit down and watch footage. I don’t want to have my eye prejudiced by what I see on set and how difficult it might be to get a particular shot. That has nothing at all to do with my job.

How long did it take to edit?
Almost a year, but we had a couple of interruptions. Marty had to finish up his show for HBO, Vinyl, and then there was a family illness. But I love having that much time. Most editors simply don’t get to live with a film that long, and you really have to in order to understand it and understand what it’s saying to you. You’re editing the work of 250 people, and you have to respect that. You shouldn’t have to rush it.

Last time we talked, you were using Lightworks to edit. Do you use Avid now?
No, I still use Lightworks, and I still prefer it. It’s what I was trained on during the early days of digital editing, and it’s used a lot in Europe. Our first digital film was Casino, and back then Lightworks sent a computer expert to train me, and I’ve loved it ever since because it has a controller that is like the old flatbed editing machines and I love that — you can customize it very easily. It also has this button that allows me to throw stuff out of sync and experiment more, and that’s not available on Avid. So I’ve been editing on Lightworks ever since Casino.

When I last interviewed Marty, he told me that editing and post are his favorite parts of filmmaking. When you both sit down to edit it must be like having two editors in the room rather than a director and his editor?
It’s exactly like that. I do the first cut, but then once he comes in after the shoot we make every decision together. He’s a brilliant editor, and he taught me everything I know about editing— I knew nothing when we started together. He also thinks like an editor, unlike many directors. When he’s writing and then shooting, he’s always thinking about how it’ll cut together. Some directors shoot a lot of stuff, but does it cut together? Marty knows all that and what coverage he needs. He’s a genius, and such a knowledgeable person to be around every day.

You’ve been Marty’s editor since his very first film, back in 1967 — a 50-year collaboration. What’s the secret?
I think it’s that we’re true collaborators. He’s such an editing director, and we know each other so well by now, but it’s always fresh and interesting. There are no ego battles. Every film’s different, with different challenges, and he’s always curious, always learning, always open to new experiences. I feel very fortunate.

What’s next?
Right now I’m working on the diaries of my husband, (famed British director) Michael Powell (The Red Shoes, Black Narcissus), and then Marty and I will start The Irishman later in the summer. It’s all about elderly gangsters, with Robert De Niro and Al Pacino. It’s exciting.


Industry insider Iain Blair has been interviewing the biggest directors in Hollywood and around the world for years. He is a regular contributor to Variety and has written for such outlets as Reuters, The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe.

Rick Pearson on cutting Kong: Skull Island

By Randi Altman

Who doesn’t love a good King Kong movie? And who says a good King Kong movie has to have the hairy giant climbing the Empire State Building, lady in hand?

The Jordan Vogt-Roberts-directed Kong: Skull Island, which had an incredible opening weekend at the box office — and is still going strong — tells the story of a 1973 military expedition to map out an island where in 1944 two downed pilots happened upon a huge monster. What could possibly go wrong?

Editor Rick Pearson, who was originally set to come on board for 10 weeks during the Director’s Cut process to help with digital effects turnovers, ended up seeing the project through to the end. Pearson came on during the last third of production, as the crew was heading off to Vietnam.

The process was already in place where rough cuts were shared on the PIX system for the director’s review. That seemed to be work well, he says.

To find out more about the process, I recently touched base with Pearson, who at the time of our interview was in Budapest editing a film about the origin of Robin Hood. He kindly took time out of his busy schedule to talk about his work and workflow on Kong: Skull Island, which in addition to Vietnam shot in Hawaii and Australia.

Would director Vogt-Roberts get you notes? Did he give you any direction in terms of the cut?
Yes, he would give very specific notes via PIX. He would drop the equivalent of locators or markers on sequences that I would send him and say, “Could you maybe try a close-up here?” Or “Could you try this or that?” They were very concise, so that was helpful. Eventually, though, you get to a point where you really need to be in a room together to explore options.

There are a lot of visual effects in the film. Can you talk about how that affected your edit and workflow?
Some of the sequences were quite evolved in terms of previsualization that had been done a year or more prior. Then there was a combination of previs, storyboards and some sequences, one in particular had kind of a loose set of storyboards and some previs, but then the set piece was evolving as we were working.

The production was headed to Vietnam and there was a lot of communication between myself, Jordan and the producers about trying to nail down the structure of this set piece so they would know what to shoot in terms of plates, because it was a battle that largely took place between Kong and one of the creatures of the island — it was a lot of plate work.

Would you say that that was the most difficult sequence to work on, or is there another more challenging sequence that you could point to?
I think they were all challenging. For me, that last sequence, which we called the “Final Battle” was challenging in there was not a lot that was nailed down. There were some beats we knew we wanted to try to play, but it sort of kept evolving. I enjoy working on these kinds of films with those types of sequences because they’re so malleable. It’s a fun sandbox to play in because, to an extent, you’re limited only by your imagination.

Still, you’re committing a lot of money, time and resources, so you need to look down field as far as you can to say, “This is the right direction and we’re all on the same page.” It’s a big, slow-moving, giant cargo ship that takes a long time to course-correct. You want to make sure that you’re heading in the right direction, or at least as close as you can be, when you start going down those roads.

Any other shots that stand out?
There was one thing that was kind of a novelty on this picture — and I know that it’s not the first time it’s been done, but it was the first time for me. We had some pretty extensive re-shoots, but our cast was kind of spread all over the globe. In one of the re-shoots, we needed a conversation to happen in a bar between three of the characters, Tom Hiddelston, John Goodman and Cory Hawkins. None of them were available at the same time or in the same city.

The scene was going to the three of them sitting down at a table having a conversation where John Goodman’s character offers Tom Hiddelston’s character a job as their guide to take them to Skull Island. I think it was Goodman’s character that was shot first. We show Goodman’s side of the table in New York with that side of the bar behind him and an empty chair beside him. Then we shot Hawkin’s character by himself in front of a greenscreen sitting in a chair reacting to Goodman and delivering his dialogue. Lastly, we shot Hiddelston in LA with that side of the bar and overs with doubles. It all came together, and I thought, “I don’t think anybody would have a clue that none of these people were in the same room at the same time.” It was kind of a Rubik’s Cube… an editorial bit of sleight of hand that worked in the end.


You worked with other editors on the film, correct?
Yes, editor Bob Murawski helped me tremendously; he ended up taking over my original role, which was during the Director’s Cut. Bob came on to help split up these really demanding visual effects sequence turnovers every two weeks. We had to keep on it to make the release date.

Murawski was a huge help, but so was the addition of Josh Schaeffer, who had worked with Jordan in the past. He was one of the additional editors on Jordan’s Kings of Summer (2013). Jordan had shot a lot of material — it wasn’t necessarily montage-based, but we weren’t entirely sure how it was going to work in the picture. We knew that he had a long-standing relationship with Josh and was comfortable with him. Bob said, “While we’re in the middle of a Director’s Cut and you and I are trying to feed this giant visual effects beast, there’s also this whole other aspect that Jordan and Josh could really focus on.” Josh was a really big help in getting us through the process. Both Bob and Josh were very big assets to me.

How do you work with your assistant editor?
I’ve had the same first assistant, Sean Thompson, for about 12 years. Unfortunately, he’s not with me here in Budapest. I took this film after the original editor dropped out for health reasons. Sean has a young family, and 15 weeks in Budapest and then another 12 weeks in London just wasn’t possible for him.

How did you work with Sean on Skull Island?
He’s a terrific manager of the cutting room in terms of discerning the needs of other departments, be it digital effects, music or sound. I lean on him to let me know what I absolutely need to know, and he takes care of the rest. That’s one of the roles he serves, and he’s bulletproof.

I also rely on him creatively. He’s tremendous with his sound work and very good at looking at cuts with me and giving his feedback. I throw him scenes to cut as much as I can, but sometimes on films like this there are so many other demands as a manager.

You use Avid Media Composer. Any special keyboard mappings, or other types of work you provide?
As a feature film editor my main objective is to make sure that the story and the characters are firing on all cylinders. I’m not particularly interested in how far I can push the box technically.

I’ve mapped the keyboard to what I’m comfortable with, but I don’t think it’s anything that’s particularly sophisticated. I try to do as much as I can on the keyboard so that I keep the
pointing and clicking to a minimum.

You edit a lot of action films. Is that just because people say, “He does action,” or is that your favorite kind of film to cut?
It’s interesting you should say that… the first Hollywood feature I cut was Bowfinger, which is comedy. I hadn’t cut any comedy before that and suddenly I was the comedy editor. I found it ironic because everything I had done prior was action-based television, music videos and commercials. I’ve always loved cutting action and juxtaposing images in a way that tells a story that’s not necessarily being told verbally. It’s not just like, “Wow, look at how much stuff is blowing up and that’s amazing how many cars are involved.” It’s actually character-based and story-driven.

I also really enjoy comedy. There is quite a lot of comedy in Kong, so it’s nice to flex that muscle too. I’ve tried very hard to not get pigeonholed.

So you are knee-deep in this Robin Hood film?
I sure am! I wasn’t planning on getting back on to another film quite so quickly, but I was very intrigued by both the director and script. As I mentioned earlier, they had an editor slated for the picture but unfortunately she fell ill just weeks prior to the start of production. So suddenly, here I am.

The added bonus is you get to play in Europe for a bit.
Yes, actually, I’m sitting here in my apartment. I have a laptop and an additional monitor and I’ve been cutting scenes. I have a lovely view of the parliament building, which is on the Danube. It’s a beautiful domed building that’s lit up every night until midnight. It’s really kind of cool.

Bringing the documentary Long Live Benjamin to life

By Dayna McCallum

The New York Times Op-Docs recently debuted Long Live Benjamin, a six-part episodic documentary directed by Jimm Lasser (Wieden & Kennedy) and Biff Butler (Rock Paper Scissors), and produced by Rock Paper Scissors Entertainment.

The film focuses on acclaimed portrait artist Allen Hirsch, who, while visiting his wife’s homeland of Venezuela, unexpectedly falls in love. The object of his affection — a deathly ill, orphaned newborn Capuchin monkey named Benjamin. After nursing Benjamin back to health and sneaking him into New York City, Hirsch finds his life, and his sense of self, forever changed by his adopted simian son.

We reached out to Lasser and Butler to learn more about this compelling project, the challenges they faced, and the unique story of how Long Live Benjamin came to life.

Long Live Benjamin

Benjamin sculpture, Long Live Benjamin

How did this project get started?
Lasser: I was living in Portland at the time. While in New York I went to visit Allen, who is my first cousin. I knew Benjamin when he was alive, and came by to pay my respects. When I entered Allen’s studio space, I saw his sculpture of Benjamin and the frozen corpse that was serving as his muse. Seeing this scene, I felt incredibly compelled to document what my cousin was going through. I had never made a film or thought of doing so, but I found myself renting a camera and staying the weekend to begin filming and asking Allen to share his story.

Butler: Jimm had shown up for a commercial edit bearing a bag of Mini DV tapes. We offered to transfer his material to a hard drive, and I guess the initial copy was never deleted from my own drive. Upon initial preview of the material, I have to say it all felt quirky and odd enough to be humorous; but when I took the liberty of watching the material at length, I witnessed an artist wrestling with his grief. I found this profound switch in takeaway so compelling that I wanted to see where a project like this might lead.

Can you describe your collaboration on the film?
Lasser: It began as a director/editor relationship, but it evolved. Because of my access to the Hirsch family, I shot the footage and lead the questioning with Allen. Biff began organizing and editing the footage. But as we began to develop the tone and feel of the storytelling, it became clear that he was as much a “director” of the story as I was.

Butler: In terms of advertising, Jimm is one of the smartest and discerning creatives I’ve had the pleasure of working with. I found myself having rather differing opinions to him, but I always learned something new and felt we came to stronger creative decisions because of such conflict. When the story of Allen and his monkey began unfolding in front of me, I was just as keen to foster this creative relationship as I was to build a movie.

Did the film change your working relationship?
Butler: As a commercial editor, it’s my job to carry a creative team’s hard work to the end of their laborious process — they conceive the idea, sell it through, get it made and trust me to glue the pieces together. I am of service to this, and it’s a privilege. When the footage I’d found on my hard drive started to take shape, and Jimm’s cousin began unloading his archive of paintings, photographs and home video on to us, it became a more involved endeavor. Years passed, as we’d get busy and leave things to gather dust for months here and there, and after a while it felt like this film was something that reflected both of our creative fingerprints.

Long Live Benjamin

Jimm Lasser, Long Live Benjamin

How did your professional experiences help or influence the project?
Lasser: Collaboration is central to the process of creating advertising. Being open to others is central to making great advertising. This process was a lot like film school. We both hadn’t ever done it, but we figured it out and found a way to work together.

Butler: Jimm and I enjoyed individual professional success during the years we spent on the project, and in hindsight I think this helped to reinforce the trust that was necessary in such a partnership.

What was the biggest technical challenge you faced?
Butler: The biggest challenge was just trying to get our schedules to line up. For a number of years we lived on opposite sides of the country, although there were three years where we both happened to live in New York at the same time. We found that the luxury of sitting was when the biggest creative strides happened. Most of the time, though, I would work on an edit, send to Jimm, and wait for him to give feedback. Then I’d be busy on something else when he’d send long detailed notes (and often new interviews to supplement the notes), and I would need to wait a while until I had the time to dig back in.

Technically speaking, the biggest issue might just be my use of Final Cut Pro 7. The film is made as a scrapbook from multiple sources, and quite simply Final Cut Pro doesn’t care much for this! Because we never really “set out” to “make a movie,” I had let the project grow somewhat unwieldy before realizing it needed to be organized as such.

Long Live Benjamin

Biff Butler, Long Live Benjamin

Can you detail your editorial workflow? What challenges did the varying media sources pose?
Butler: As I noted before, we didn’t set out to make a movie. I had about 10 tapes from Jimm and cut a short video just because I figured it’s not every day you get to edit someone’s monkey funeral. Cat videos this ain’t. Once Allen saw this, he would sporadically mail us photographs, newspaper clippings, VHS home videos, iPhone clips, anything and everything. Jimm and I were really just patching on to our initial short piece, until one day we realized we should start from scratch and make a movie.

As my preferred editing software is Final Cut Pro 7 (I’m old school, I guess), we stuck with it and just had to make sure the media was managed in a way that had all sources compressed to a common setting. It wasn’t really an issue, but needed some unraveling once we went to online conform. Due to our schedules, the process occurred in spurts. We’d make strides for a couple weeks, then leave it be for a month or so at a time. There was never a time where the project wasn’t in my backpack, however, and it proved to be my companion for over five years. If there was a day off, I would keep my blades sharp by cracking open the monkey movie and chipping away.

You shot the project as a continuous feature, and it is being shown now in episodic form. How does it feel to watch it as an episodic series?
Lasser: It works both ways, which I am very proud of. The longer form piece really lets you sink into Allen’s world. By the end of it, you feel Allen’s POV more deeply. I think not interrupting Alison Ables’ music allows the narrative to have a greater emotional connective tissue. I would bet there are more tears at the end of the longer format.

The episode form sharpened the narrative and made Allen’s story more digestible. I think that form makes it more open to a greater audience. Coming from advertising, I am used to respecting people’s attention spans, and telling stories in accessible forms.

How would you compare the documentary process to your commercial work? What surprised you?
Lasser: The executions of both are “storytelling,” but advertising has another layer of “marketing problem solving” that effects creative decisions. I was surprised how much Allen became a “client” in the process, since he was opening himself up so much. I had to keep his trust and assure him I was giving his story the dignity it deserved. It would have been easy to make his story into a joke.

Artist Allen Hirsch

Butler: It was my intention to never meet Allen until the movie was done, because I cherished that distance I had from him. In comparison to making a commercial, the key word here would be “truth.” The film is not selling anything. It’s not an advertisement for Allen, or monkeys, or art or New York. We certainly allowed our style to be influenced by Allen’s way of speaking, to sink deep into his mindset and point of view. Admittedly, I am very often bored by documentary features; there tends to be a good 20 minutes that is only there so it can be called “feature length” but totally disregards the attention span of the audience. On the flip side, there is an enjoyable challenge in commercial making where you are tasked to take the audience on a journey in only 60 seconds, and sometimes 30 or 15. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed being in control of what our audience felt and how they felt it.

What do you hope people will take away from the film?
Lasser: To me this is a portrait of an artist. His relationship with Benjamin is really an ingredient to his own artistic process. Too often we focus on the end product of an artist, but I was fascinated in the headspace that leads a creative person to create.

Butler: What I found most relatable in Allen’s journey was how much life seemed to happen “to” him. He did not set out to be the eccentric man with a monkey on his shoulders; it was through a deep connection with an animal that he found comfort and purpose. I hope people sympathize with Allen in this way.


To watch Long Live Benjamin, click here.

Dallas-based Post Asylum adds editor Bradley Thurman

Dallas-based Post Asylum has added editor Bradley Thurman to its roster. With more than 10 years of industry experience, Thurman spent two years as an editor at Reel FX and had a nine-year run with Fast Cuts. His body of work includes national spots for Salvation Army, American Home Shield, Chuck E. Cheese and the Texas Lottery.

albertsonsThurman — who edits on Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere — hit the ground running with Post Asylum, cutting a 12-spot campaign for Dallas County Colleges, plus a couple of spots for Albertsons grocery store (pictured).

“Bradley’s already written and successfully pitched a comedy script for one of our consumer electronics brand clients,” notes Post Asylum EP Graham Hagood. “This addition further solidifies Post Asylum as a concept-through-completion, one-stop-shop for motion content across all media.”

Post Asylum offers concept development, creative direction, design, production, editorial, animation, visual effects, VR/experiential, original music and color/finish. And they recently combined forces with animation studio Element X. The two fully integrated shops are aligned with Pure Evil Music.

Cut+Run NY promotes Adam Bazadona and Ellese Jobin

At New York’s Cut+Run, Ellese Jobin has been promoted to head of production and Adam Bazadona to editor.

Bazadona started as an assistant at Cut+Run in 2009. Moving from assisting to editing has been a fluid transition for him, with credits that include co-editor on Green Day’s Oh Love (directed by Sam Bayer) and the CFDA Fashion Fund films (directed by Jun Diaz), a collaboration with Andrés Cortés on Rehearsal Space (featuring Sonic Youth’s Lee Renaldo) and the recent Panda Desiigner video.

In 2015, Bazadona cut Scott McFarnon’s Crazy Heart directed by Floyd Russ. In the world of spots, he has worked on projects for Mercedes, Kobe Bryant, Verizon Wireless and Blue Apron.

Jobin joined Cut+Run shortly after Bazadona, working in client service and reception. She quickly became involved in projects, assuming the role of producer and eventually senior producer. As head of production, Ellese will oversee Cut+Run’s NY producer team and all facets of the post process in a management capacity.

Bilingual editor Alejandro Delgado joins Hooligan

Hooligan, a NYC-based creative post production boutique that specializes in artistic offline editing and visual effects, has hired editor Alejandro Delgado. From Spain, Delgado brings nearly two decades of experience editing film, television and commercial content for markets across Europe and the Americas. His signing marks Hooligan’s commitment to serving the needs of its agency and brand clients in both the general and US Hispanic market.

“It’s an asset to have an editor like Alejandro who can translate different cultural and lingual nuances through visual storytelling and dialogue,” remarks Hooligan president/editor Kane Platt. “He brings a rare combination of artistry, technical skill and work ethic to his craft. But most of all, everyone knows Alejandro for his big heart and unselfish attitude — traits that perfectly align with the collaborative culture we stand for at Hooligan.”

Delgado previously worked with Hooligan as a freelancer on campaigns for Apple, the NYC Langone Institute and Invokana.

Born and raised in Madrid, Delgado’s filmmaking career took off in his native city as a senior editor and visual effects director at Delirium Post, cutting campaigns for Audi, McDonald’s, Fiat and Sony, among many other prominent brands in Spain. In 2003, he started a lengthy freelance career working with top production and post facilities in Europe, as well as Blue Rock in New York City. Notable on his reel from this period is the Bronze Cannes-honored campaign for Renault and award-winning spots for McDonald’s and Mercedes.

Then came tenures at New Art Miami and 2150 Editorial, working in the Hispanic and Latin American markets on award-winning campaigns for AT&T, Wendy’s and DirecTV Latin America.

“It’s an interesting time right now as US Hispanics continue to redefine the consumer silos —and how marketing and advertising strategies react,” explains Delgado. “This has led to a greater demand for the production of bilingual content in the States, as we’re already seeing more and more campaigns shot in Spanish and English, rather than two different campaigns.”

Behind the Title: Northern Lights CD/editor Pat Carpenter

NAME: Pat Carpenter

COMPANY: New York-based Northern Lights.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE NORTHERN LIGHTS?
We are a creative agency that handles all aspects of content creation from ideation through completion, and everything in between.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director/Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The majority of my career has been editorial for commercials, networks and digital content in both long and short form. I have been extremely fortunate to have a diverse background. In the past couple of years the post industry has gone through a bit of a change, which affects how I work with my clients.

I’m often asked to creatively oversee entire projects from start to finish, which might require concepting, writing, producing, supervising several editors, overseeing music composition or designing a graphic approach to a campaign or spot. All of this is, in addition to my traditional editing responsibilities, is where the title of creative director comes in. It’s a continuation of the editorial process on projects where clients are looking for creative solutions beyond strictly editorial.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
How involved I am in all aspects of a project from designing the overall look and feel of a spot to tweaking copy, auditioning VO talent and suggesting music tracks.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Making something that elicits some sort of emotion from the viewer. In the world of mass consumption and disposable media, where people are inundated with content, if at the end of the day somebody watches something that I had a part in making them feel something that was intended, that’s still the biggest thrill.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Accelerated deadlines. You want to give it your all, and that becomes difficult when it’s due yesterday.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Morning… there’s still hope in the morning!!!

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Playing drums.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
After college I knew liked both production and post, and then it all clicked while playing in bands on NYC’s Lower East Side. Editing always came easiest for me, and I was fortunate enough to have some incredible mentors, so the progression from assistant to editor was natural. If you asked 20-year-old Pat, he’d say I’d be playing drums professionally for a career. The Pat of today is pretty happy to be an editor.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
A WWE campaign called For the Hero in All of Us, which aired on NBC’s two broadcast networks, 17 cable channels and more than 50 digital properties; ID designs for Nickelodeon; and NCAA Confidential, a 60-minute show for CBS Sports that aired before the NCAA Basketball championship.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Most recently, Adult Rappers. It’s an independent documentary that pulls back the curtain on the world of “working class” rappers. The film spotlights independent artists struggling to find a balance between making a living and pursuing their art alongside the never-ending saga of age and relevance. It was a total passion project that seemed to strike a chord with a lot of folks. I’m proud to have edited it.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Phone. PowerBook. Drumsticks.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Twitter and Instagram

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I really try to bounce around as much as possible. As for artists, I’ve been listening to Todd Snider as of late, but I still find myself hitting sites: http://www.syffal.com, http://www.birp.fm or http://www.musictrajectory.com to see what they have going on.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Play drums and Crossfit for sure, but mostly a little time with my two girls will put it all back in perspective.

NYC’s Industrial Color grows with editor Bruce Ashley, EP Gary Giambalvo

New York’s Industrial Color, a 25-year-old creative studio known for working in fashion and beauty post work, has added two veterans to its staff — editor Bruce Ashley and executive producer Gary Giambalvo. The moves fit in with the company’s growth strategy targeting advertising and branded content production.

“For years the creative capabilities of Industrial Color in areas such as post production, VFX and animation has largely been a secret, known primarily to the fashion/beauty world,” says COO of Industrial Color Mathieu Champigny. “But with the content creation growth globally, we see an incredible opportunity to partner with major agencies and add creative value to their most challenging projects.”

Australia-native Ashley has done substantial fashion and beauty work for brands such as Tiffany, Avon, DKNY, Raw Spirit and Clinique. Other brands like Coca-Cola, Guinness, NBA, Facebook and Red Bull already know Ashley’s expertise in emotional storytelling. In addition to spots, Ashley also cuts many music videos, including for such artists as Madonna, Bruce Springsteen, INXS, Santana and, most famously, Pearl Jam’s Jeremy. His long-form work includes the 2015 feature documentary Hitting the Apex, directed by Mark Neale and produced/narrated by Brad Pitt, as well as concert films for U2 and David Bowie.

Ashley’s early editing career was spent at New York post houses Mad River Post and 89 Greene Street, as well as at television networks in Australia and London. In 2007, Ashley joined the post house Company X.

EP/director of integrated production, Giambalvo — whose resume includes stints at The Studio and Curious Pictures — is a longtime committee member of the AICP Digital Board of Directors. “I was looking for a place that had all the tools and talents in place, but that needed someone that could take those pieces, better integrate them and bring them to the next level,” Giambalvo says.

Giambalvo adds that the company is looking to grow further with the addition of several new producers and graphic designers that the company will announce in the near future.

Tips: From editing to directing

By Dave Henegar

Recently, I was asked by a client of mine to direct a national commercial. At first I thought, “What a fantastic opportunity!” Then reality set in. I realized that for the last 23 years I’ve been editing for some of the greatest commercial directors in the industry, but I had no idea how they did what they did.

So, naturally, I felt a mix of excitement and anxiety. After picking myself up off the floor, I thought about the many years I was lucky enough to work with such beautiful pieces, and my confidence grew as I recounted the varied and ingenious ways those directors told their stories. From the way they composed their images to the art direction of every meticulous detail. The great effort they put into connecting one shot to the next.

As their editor, I realized my life was much easier when all of those details were worked out well in advance. In fact, the worst projects I’ve worked on were the ones where directors set up many cameras and simply “captured” the action and said to themselves “we’ll figure it out in the edit.”

With that in mind, I set out on day one to craft a 30 second story that had a structure similar to the great directors I had worked with in the past. Thankfully, the commercial turned out to be a success, and I was proud of the final product.  In fact, there was very little I would change if I had to do it over.

So in light of the fact that I’ve only directed one commercial, I was asked to give my thoughts on making the leap into directing from editorial. Perhaps the best way to do that is to offer up the top five lessons I learned that may help other editors who dream of becoming directors.

1.  Pre-pro is more than half the battle
The day after I got the call from the agency I began drawing my own storyboards. I needed to understand quickly if I could pull off the grand concept the agency had presented. I must have drawn a hundred images. Like editing, I was rearranging shots in my head, but now I had to draw each one of those images and decide if they would work or not. Then came the process of the director’s treatment. Because I was a first-timer, I had to design and write the treatment myself. I took the treatment very seriously because I knew that it would be my one chance to prove that I understood what the client’s needs were and how to execute what the agency had carefully constructed. My words had to be clear and compelling — the images and layout had to be crafted and polished. Everything you present in your treatment is a reflection of your taste level. And lastly, location scouting is incredibly important. Design the perfect environment in your head before you begin your search, it will help you narrow down the vast number of images that will start pouring in from the location scouts.

2. Choose the Best Help You Can Afford
I would not have been able to achieve the look I wanted without the best cinematographer. Once I had secured best DP, I knew that he would bring with him his best keys. It’s a trickle down effect: choose the best and they’ll choose the best. The shoot day goes infinitely smoother and faster when the right people are in place.

3. Pay Close Attention to the Client
The client knows their audience far better than you will. You will be tempted to take their money and make the film of your dreams, but in my opinion that’s not what makes a good director. A good director is someone who can take the limitations and opportunities they’ve been handed and make an outstanding product.

4. Try Not to Edit Your Own Work
I believe that teamwork is better than a one-man-band. Talented teams can elevate a project. A talented editor will show you different ways in which your story could be told. As a director, it’s easy to get your storyboards firmly embedded in your head and simply edit what you had storyboarded. Let someone else you trust take your film in ways you didn’t expect.

5. Learn How to Present
Often times as editors we are required to say a few words before we press “play” for the first time. We may caveat the edit before showing it, saying something like “the sound is still rough” or “VFX aren’t in place yet.” Apart from that, we’re not required to go into great detail about deeper concepts. As a director, I learned that I was accountable for several hundreds of thousands of dollars earmarked for the vision I was trying to sell.  I have never spent so much time on the phone in my life!

Being a director is mostly about being a great communicator. You need to be able to effectively explain your concept and execution to the agency and the client — several times over! People who are prepared to plop down a six-figure check want to have everything explained to them in great detail. As well they should! If they’re paying the bill, they deserve to know what they’re getting for their money. Also being able to communicate with your crew is tremendously important. The more you communicate, the more respect you’ll get from those who are trying to help you bring your vision to life.  Respect everyone in your crew — period.

So that’s the top five, of what could easily be 25, things to think about when moving from editorial to directing.

To all my friends in editorial, I highly recommend trying it if you’ve not yet had the opportunity. It’s a challenging task but exciting. Take advantage of your many years of storytelling experience and put them behind the camera. It’s a humbling and exhilarating experience!

Dave Henegar is co-founder and editor at Butcher Post in Santa Monica.

Editor Trish Fuller joins Work Editorial in NYC

Work Editorial, which has expanded from London to New York and Los Angeles, has added editor Trish Fuller to its NYC-based studio. Fuller, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, got her start at Whitehouse Post London before moving to New York for the launch of Whitehouse’s New York office in 2002.

Fuller’s previous editing credits include Macy’s campaigns with Barry Levinson; Liberty Mutual with Tony Goldwyn and Stylewar; Verizon with Phil Morrison; a Drug Free America campaign for Hill Holiday, directed by Eric Stoltz; a Martini Campaign starring George Clooney and directed by Francois Girard; Glamour’s series of short films directed by Jennifer Aniston and Kate Hudson; and a Sprint campaign for F&P directed by Stacy Wall.

Fuller joins editors Cass Vanini and Ben Jordan, as well as partners editor Rich Orrick and executive producer Jane Dilworth, who also both relocated to Work’s New York office just over a year ago joining New York executive producer Erica Thompson.

Fuller will be available for projects at all Work offices, both domestic and abroad. “Work has relationships with directors and agencies in both the US and the UK,” she says, “and that fluidity is incredibly appealing to me. I get the best of both worlds — signing on with Work is like a new beginning, and also a coming home.”

Behind the Title: Editor Christian Jhonson

NAME: Christian Jhonson (@avidusersecuado)

COMPANY: Ecuador’s Teleamazonas

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Teleamazonas is a TV station — the first television station in my country. We produce shows like The Voice Ecuador and broadcast international series like The Simpsons. We have also built a huge reputation for shows featuring local stories.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor. I’m am also an Avid-certified trainer — I run The Cut Center, a future learning center. In addition, I volunteer for Avid as an ambassador, providing solutions for Latin America and beyond.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR JOB AT TELEAMAZONAS?
As an editor at the TV station, I create promos highlighting what the TV station has planned for the month.

YOU CUT ON MEDIA COMPOSER, BUT DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE PLUG-IN?
For video, I use Boris FX’s Continuum Complete.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
No one project is the same; every promo is its own production and allows for creativity.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Digitizing and selecting shots.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Midday, because it is the time to take a rest, do some re-edits, watch what I’ve done and recreate the editing and creative “process.”

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I couldn’t see myself doing any other job.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
When I was 20, I had an experience with some film tests, which were homework from my university. Since then I took this profession seriously. That passion and dedication are part of me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Trailers for Latin America, which promote romance stories like like La Prepago and La Promesa.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The La Prepago trailer. It is the story of a women who has trouble making money. She is a student, but her parents are poor. She is desperate and decides to use her good looks to make money and agrees to be a “prepago,” which means a girl who sells her body. That is a very “illegal” way to gain money in Colombia. The film is produced by Sony Pictures Television for the Latin American market.

When I had to edit for the trailer, I found myself with a big problem — everything was in different places. I had to search for the music, ask for the shots, sound effects… everything had to be rebuilt. It was a surgeon-like job.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Computer, cell phone and my car.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Well, I’m an admin of Avid editors on Facebook, I manage Avid Pro Tools’ Facebook/Latin America, and I manage Avid Isis’ Facebook. I also enjoy reading and commenting on Avid blogs, Videoguys.com and postperspective.com.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I don’t feel stress at all. I love what I do.

Editor Ben Whitten joins Northern Lights

NYC-based post studio Northern Lights has added veteran editor Ben Whitten to its staff. Whitten has nearly two decades of experience as an editor, with work spanning commercials, broadcast promos, long form and PSAs. He has worked many ad agencies over the years, including Grey, JWT, Y&R, DraftFCB, as well as networks like USA Network, Food Network and WE. Prior to joining Northern Lights, Whitten cut campaigns for the shows White Collar, Burn Notice, Complications and Suits.

Whitten uses Avid Media Composer as his main tool. “About six years ago, the company I was at switched over to Final Cut, so I worked exclusive on Final Cut 7 for two years,” he explains. “But I switched back over to Avid; besides my familiarity with the system, I missed how ‘real’ the realtime editing and effects are in Avid.”

Whitten studied Jazz Performance at Philadelphia’s The University of the Arts before heading to NYC hoping to work in the recording industry. At night he interned at a record label, but during the day he held a job at a boutique ad agency — it was there he got the chance to cut a number of small projects. In addition to editing, he climbed the ranks to director of broadcast production, overseeing both in-house and outside production including editing, sound design, recording, mixing and licensing.

With more editing under his belt, Whitten moved on to Mad House, an edit shop where he spent nearly 15 years working with ad agencies on campaigns including an Addy Award-winning USPS 9/11 spot featuring Carly Simon’s “Let the River Run” and a series of music-driven spots for Burger King. He also used his musical background on a range of projects for Atlantic Records artists for almost a decade.

So why Northern Lights, and why now? Why NL and why now?  “I have always been a fan of the creativity and quality of the work that comes from Northern Lights,” says Whitten. ” I am also impressed with how well they’ve done building a truly one-stop creative shop. When the opportunity opened up to talk with [the partners] about joining the team, I was really interested and intrigued. After talking with them I knew this was the right place for me.”

Check out Whitten’s reel.

Behind the Title: Editor Bob Mori

NAME: Bob Mori

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I’m a film editor working in commercials, feature films and experiential media projects. My experience is with brands such as Nike, BMW, Time Warner, Ford, Jeep, Coca-Cola, Scion, Altoids, LG, Sega, Dyson, Warner Bros., USPS, Chrysler, L’Oréal, Neutrogena, Budweiser, LucasArts, Dodge, Adidas,Toyota and AT&T.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY:
I am currently working freelance in the Los Angeles and New York markets. I have worked with Jump, Optimus, Cosmo Street and Red Car.

WHAT DO YOU EDIT ON?
I use Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro — visual effects, sound design and music are all-inclusive.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT YOUR ROLE AS AN EDITOR?
I nurture projects from award to final mix and delivery. Once on board A project, I’m there every step of the way.

Bob Mori

Bob Mori in his edit suite.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I have a few: working with a creative team that understands everyone’s participation is important to success; elevation of the concept even at the smallest level; dedication, conceptual thought and grace through years of my own personal experience; and watching an audience’s reaction to all that hard work!

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being nimble and wearing many hats throughout the process. Having aesthetic and technical knowledge that includes different approaches. Starting again never scares me.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?

Running out of time and knowing that we could have made it better. Everyone has experienced this, and it’s a reality we’ve all come to accept.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Watching dailies. Although, now we call them “media assets”… right? Usually it’s at double speed due to time constraints.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I never had a “Plan B” mapped out. This is bliss for me. I love what I do and can’t dream of doing anything else.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
That dye was set early on for me. I shot and edited films on 8mm film in high school. I was a film major at Columbia College in Chicago.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU’VE WORKED ON?
In late 2015, my commercial projects included Equifax, Home Advisor and South of Wilshire.

I also did work for On the Record With Mick Rock. Rock is a British photographer, best known for his iconic shots of rock and roll legends such as Queen, David Bowie, Syd Barrett, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop and The Sex Pistols.

WHAT RECENT PROJECT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
Who’s Driving Doug just had its world premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. It opened in theaters and VOD on February 26. The film stars RJ Mitte of Breaking Bad, Paloma Kwiatkowski of Bates Motel, Ray William Johnson of Equals Three, and Daphne Zuniga.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Premiere Pro CC, Avid Media Composer, Photoshop and, of course, my iPhone.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Every. Single. One. Facebook, Instagram, you name it. I’m easy to find and communicate with everywhere in the world.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Music is essential to picture cutting. Not just popular music, but every genre. Some of my best friends are music composers. And usually (with rare exception) music is half of what you are emotionally feeling while watching.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Yoga. Hiking. The beach. Walking my dog Bruno (who is in our main photo). And escaping into film. As Frank Capra famously said, “As with heroin, the antidote to film is more film.”

The Colorist Society. Why Not?

Colorists deserve their own collective!

By Jim Wicks

Will there come a day when colorists become a band of brothers and sisters? Or are we destined to remain solo participants on the world cinema stage?

In the motion pictures and television industries, many artists are collectively known by the company they keep. DPs — American Society of Cinematographers (ASC); Editors — American Cinema Editors (ACE) and Motion Pictures Editors Guild (MPEG); Digital Artists – Visual Effects Society (VES); Directors — The Directors Guild (DGA); Composers and Arrangers — American Society of Music Arranges and Composers (ASMAC).

For some time, a certain thought has been germinating from deep down: colorists should have their own collective noun. One could imagine acronyms like the CCS (Cinema Colorist Society), the SMPC (Society of Motion Picture Colorists) or the ACAS (The Academy of Color Arts and Science) and so on.

Some time ago I took the initiative to register a couple of those domain names. I even managed to cobble a few colorist friends together, but it quickly devolved.

Some colorists are using Pablo Rio.

Some colorists are using Pablo Rio.

The notion of a colorist society is not far-fetched. An association of colorists, by colorists, for colorists. In much the same way as ASC, ACE and others are organizations for its members, the Colorist Society could — and should — be the same for the colorists.

The Colorist Society would be a non-profit, honorary and professional association dedicated to advancing the arts, sciences and applications of color correction and to improving the welfare of its members by providing professional enrichment and education, fostering community and promoting industry standards and recognition.

If you stop to think about it, the colorist is closely aligned with specific groups of artists. In motion pictures, we work with the cinematographer, but also the director, and sometimes the producer. In television, it’s the producer and show runner. In music videos, the director, cinematographer and editor. These are more the rule than the exception, although — at the end of the day, the colorist will work with just about anyone and under just about any conditions.

As I see it there are three types of colorists:
– The one-man band, who runs their own business. This is most likely a jack-of-all trades (finder, minder, grinder), who is busy trying to do it all and stay afloat.
– The editor/colorist. Mainly an editor who knows enough about color to provide it as a value-added service.
– The colorist associated with, or working for, a brick and mortar post facility. Perhaps even the owner/operator.

Some opt for DaVinci Resolve

Some opt for DaVinci Resolve

This is, in my opinion, is a template that could be applied across all the artistic motion picture and television disciplines mentioned above. Substitute the word “colorist” for any other artistic discipline in our industry, and the result would be the same or pretty darn close.

So what’s the point? The point is that colorists could and hopefully will, one day, have their own collective noun. The next time you finish watching a motion picture, stay to watch the credits roll by. Look for the colorist credit. (Hint: it’s down towards the end, with the crafts people who serve food on set. Yet, we are more closely aligned with the cinematographer, whose credit rolled by five minutes earlier.)

Our industry can turn on a dime. It happened in 1999/2000 when, legend has it, Roger Deakins‘ (ASC) pursuit for a unique look to O Brother, Where Art Thou? ushered in the age of color.

Whether shot on film or digital, we colorists have a hand in helping the narrative storytelling of a motion picture, television show, commercial, music video and so on.

I believe that it’s possible that a group like this will happen one day… because we are a band of brothers and sisters.

Jim Wicks is senior colorist at Olympusat, Inc. in South Florida. He is  also a freelance colorist whose work can be seen at the movies, on Blu-ray, television, the web, and mobile devices worldwide.

William Goldenberg on editing ‘The Imitation Game’

By Randi Altman

William Goldenberg’s path to editing The Imitation Game was an interesting one. He had never worked with director Morten Tyldum before, but a chance meeting at a party after the BAFTA Awards led to the pairing.

“I didn’t know who he was, and he was loud,” Goldenberg laughs. “This long-haired, Norwegian man came up to me and said he’d love for me to edit this film he was going to direct. His English wasn’t great, and I wasn’t quite sure what he was talking about, but I said, ‘Sure.’”

Goldenberg went on to forget about the meeting until a couple of months later when he received The Imitation Game script, and pieced it all together. Thus began the start of a beautiful Continue reading

Editor Eddie Ringer leaves agency life for Wildchild

Editor Eddie Ringer, who also lists directing on his resume, has joined Wildchild + bonch, the New York- and LA-based editorial, design and production collective founded by editor Yvette Piñeyro.

After six months freelancing for various Bay Area ad agencies, including Goodby Silverstein & Partners, BarrettSF and Godfrey Q, Ringer decided to plant roots at Wildchild. Prior to this recent round of freelancing he spent over eight years at the Sausalito agency Butler Shine Stern + Partners (BSSP), where he edited and directed many ad projects that included TV spots as well as longer-format web videos and digital projects.

He’s collaborated with such talent as Noam Murro, who directed a recent high-style Benefit Cosmetics spot Ringer cut, and Erich Joiner of Tool, who shot a comic campaign for Greyhound that highlights Ringer’s timing, pacing and ear for sound design and audio.  Ringer cut MJZ director Craig Gillespie’s recent Priceline campaign starring William Shatner and @radical.media director Steve Miller’s comic Roku campaign, as well as editing the agency’s Raise the River PSA online videos starring Robert Redford and Will Ferrell.

With his directing hat on he’s shot projects not only for BSSP clients such as Mountain Hardware and Radio Shack but also produced, directed and edited a short documentary for Vice Media as well as a music video for the hip-hop artist DaVinci.

“Eddie’s a filmmaker at heart,” says BSSP executive creative director John Butler. “He’s a talented director/editor who knows how to put something together extremely well. So he was more than an editor here — he was the guy who could help us create content, bring it to life, and then put it together in editorial. We miss him.”

Ringer is looking forward to this new phase of his advertising career as he settles in at Wildchild.  “I felt it was time to take the next step and join a company where I could rekindle many of the relationships I’ve had with creatives and start building new ones,” he says. “I’m excited about the prospect of working on a wider range of brands and collaborating with new directors.”

A Pittsburgh native, Ringer attended the  Art Institute of Pittsburgh, studying film and video. It was there that he found fellow students were always turning to him to edit their projects. He relocated to the Bay Area and applied for a job at BSSP, back when the agency was considerably smaller. Starting in the tape vault, his talent and skill set grew along with the agency as its client base expanded.

Cutters ups Aaron Kiser to editor

Aaron Kiser has been promoted to editor at Chicago-based Cutters, where he has been since 2007. After studying telecommunications at Indiana University, Kiser moved to Chicago and landed an internship with Cutters.

Over the next two and a half years, he rose to become a tape room operator and was named an assistant editor in 2010. Mentored for more than three years by Cutters editor/partner Grant Gustafson, Kiser has also worked closely with and learned from many of the veteran editors at Cutters.

According to executive producer/partner Craig Duncan, Kiser has developed a consistent client base and is now regularly requested to edit projects by agencies, brands and directors. Over the past year, he has been the lead editor on projects for Bayer, Capital One, Cricket, La Quinta and State Farm, and most recently for the first new work for McDonald’s via Cossette Chicago, which was directed by Tool of North America’s Erich Joiner.

Kiser has also been playing the drums for 18 years, and he’s one of the founders of the nationally known band Fort Frances, which has toured widely and performed at the likes of CMJ, SXSW and Summerfest. The band’s newest album is due out in 2015.

Editor Kevin Zimmerman joins LA’s Spot Welders

Kevin Zimmerman, a comedy and dialogue specialist, has joined the editorial roster at Spot Welders in Los Angeles. Over the years he has cut pieces for such brands as Bud Light, Taco Bell, Jell-O, Xbox, Hotels.com and Capital One. Among his agency clients are shops like Crispin Porter + Bogusky, DDB, Deutsch and 72andSunny.

Zimmerman joins the company from NO6 in Santa Monica. Prior to that he was with The Whitehouse, also in LA. He got his start at Mad River Post, where he worked his way up from assistant before to full-time editor. He was also on the roster at FilmCore and spent several years as a freelance editor working at a range of editorial houses in LA, New York and Toronto.

Zimmerman studied film at SUNY in Binghamton, New York, before enrolling at Boston University for graduate-level studies in cinematography.  He relocated to the West Coast and found himself at Mad River, starting as the vault manager.  It was, he recalls, “a right place, right time” kind of move, as he quickly moved into editing, drawn to its ability to have more influence on the storytelling process.

Valet

Kia’s Valet

Since arriving at Spot Welders he edited Kia’s Valet spot for David & Goliath that introduced NBA great LeBron James as the brand’s newest ambassador. He’s also worked for longtime client Best Buy. Check out his reel here.

“I’m very much a comedy/dialogue editor, and I’m quite comfortable in that genre,” he explains.  “And with editors like Haines Hall and Dick Gordon on board, it allows us to team up to handle big projects and packages.”

PostChat: Editor Jeffrey Wolf

By Randi Altman

This week’s guest on #PostChat is veteran editor Jeffrey Wolf, whose film credits include Billy Madison, Beautiful Girls, Bachelorette, A.C.O.D. and the upcoming You’re Not You, starring Hilary Swank.

While Wolf has edited feature films of all kinds, a majority of them have been comedies. His favorite type of project to edit? “Movies made from brilliant scripts with a great story, wonderful actors and a genius director.” Who wouldn’t love that?

Wolf’s go-to editing system is the Avid Media Composer; he particularly likes the ScriptSync feature.

The trend of asking editors to take on more than just the cutting hasn’t escaped Wolf, who Continue reading

Meet The Artist: Meetal Gokul

Behind the Title….

image

Dark rooms, polorized glasses and making 3D visions a reality

NAME: Meetal Gokul

COMPANY: Park Road Post Production (www.parkroadpost.co.nz) in Wellington, New Zealand

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY:

Park Road Post Production is a post production facility located five minutes from Stone Street Studios. Park Road was established as a one-stop shop and offers all post services for a feature from digital rushes, stereoscopic alignment, digital intermediate, Foley, ADR and sound mixing through to the final completion of all film and digital deliverables for distribution. Continue reading