Tag Archives: editing

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Ned Borgman

This editor’s path began early. “I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials,” he says.

Name: Ned Borgman

Company: PS260

Can you describe your company?
PS260 is a post house built for ideas, creative solutions and going beyond the boards. We have studios in New York, Venice, California and Boston. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Film editor, problem solver, cleaner of messes.

What does that entail?
My job is to make everything look great. Every project takes an entire team of super-talented people who bring their expertise to bear to tell a story. They create all of the puzzle pieces that end up in the dailies, and I put them together in such a way that they can all shine their best.

Facebook small business campaign

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think it would be the sheer amount of stuff that can become an editor’s responsibility. So many details go into crafting a successful edit, and an editor needs to be well-versed in all of it. Color grading, visual effects, design, animation, music, sound design, the list goes on. The point isn’t to be a master of all of those things, (that’s why we work with other amazing people when it comes to finishing), but to know the needs of each of those parts and how to make sure every detail can get properly addressed.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
It’s the middle part. When we’re all in the middle of the edit, up to our necks in footage and options and ideas. Out of all of that exploration the best bits start to stand out. The sound design element from that cut and the music track from that other version and a take we tried last night. It all starts to make sense, and from there it’s about making sure the best bits can work well together.

What’s your least favorite?
Knowing there are always some great cuts that will only ever exist inside a Premiere Pro bin. Not every performance or music track or joke can make it into the final cut and out into the world and that’s ok. Maybe those cuts are airing in some other parallel universe.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Whenever the office is empty. So either early in the morning or late at night.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably something with photography. I’m too attached to visual storytelling, and I’m a horrible illustrator.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path? 
I’ve always been enamored with commercials. I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials. I remember making my first in-camera edit in third grade when I was messing around with the classroom camcorder set up on a tripod. I had recorded myself in front of the camera and then recorded a bit of the empty classroom. Playing it back, it looked like I had vanished into thin air. It blew my eight-year-old mind.

Burger King

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Let’s see, Burger King’s flame-broiled campaign with MullenLowe was great. It has a giant explosion, which is always nice. Facebook’s small business campaign with 72andSunny was a lot of fun with an amazing team of people. And some work for the Google Home Hub launch with Google Creative Labs was fun because launching stuff is exciting.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? 
Not exactly. Every genre has its specific needs, but I think the fundamentals remain the same. I need to pay attention to rhythm, to performances, to music, to sound design, to VO — all of that stuff. It’s about staying in tune with how all of these ingredients interact with each other to create a reaction from the audience, no matter the reaction you’re striving for.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
I grew up obsessed with practical effects in movies, so I’d have to say Burger King “Gasoline Shuffle”. It has a massive explosion that was shot in camera and it looks incredible. I wish I was on set that day.

What do you use to edit?
Adobe Premiere Pro all the way. I like to think that one day I’ll be back on Avid Media Composer though.

What is your favorite plugin?
I don’t have one. Just give me that basic install.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Sure. I’ll often record the scratch VO when there’s one needed. My voice is…serviceable. What that means is that as soon as the real VO talent gets placed in the cut, everyone’s thrilled with how much better everything sounds. That’s cool by me.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my Shure in-ear headphones, and an extra long charging cable.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Change some diapers. My wife and I just had our first kid last August, and she’s incredible. A game of peek-a-boo can really change your perspective.

Blackmagic’s Resolve 16: speedy cut page, Resolve Editor Keyboard, more

Blackmagic was at NAB with Resolve 16, which in addition to dozens of new features includes a new editing tab focused on speed. While Resolve still has its usual robust editing offerings, this particular cut page is designed for those working on short-form projects and on tight deadlines. Think of having a client behind you watching you cut something together, or maybe showing your director a rough cut. You get in, you edit and you go — it’s speedy, like editing triage.

For those who don’t want to edit this way, no worries, you don’t have to use this new tab. Just ignore it and move on. It’s an option, and only an option. That’s another theme with Resolve 16 — if you don’t want to see the Fairlight tab, turn it off. You want to see something in a different way, turn it on.

Blackmagic also introduced the DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, a new premium keyboard for Resolve that helps improve the speed of editing. It allows the use of two hands while editing, so transport control and selecting clips can be done while performing edits. The Resolve Editor Keyboard will be available in August for $995.

The keyboard combined with the new cut page is designed to further speed up editing. This alternate edit page lets users import, edit, trim, add transitions, titles, automatically match color, mix audio and more. Whether you’re delivering for broadcast or for YouTube, the cut page allows editors to do all things in one place. Plus, the regular edit page is still available, so customers can switch between edit and cut pages to change editing styles right in the middle of a job.

“The new cut page in DaVinci Resolve 16 helps television commercial and other high-end editors meet super tight deadlines on fast turn-around projects,” says Grant Petty, Blackmagic CEO. “We’ve designed a whole new high-performance, nonlinear workflow. The cut page is all about power and speed. Plus, editors that need to work on more complex projects can still use the regular edit page. DaVinci Resolve 16 gives different editors the choice to work the way they want.”

The cut page is reminiscent of how editors used to work in the days of tape, where finding a clip was easy because customers could just spool up and down the tape to see their media and select shots. Today, finding the right clip in a bin with hundreds of files can be slow. With source tape, users no longer have to hunt through bins to find the clip they need. They can click on the source tape button and all of the clips in their bin appear in the viewer as a single long “tape.” This makes it easy to scrub through all of the shots, find the parts they want and quickly edit them to the timeline. Blackmagic calls it an “old-fashioned” concept that’s been modernized to help editors find the shots they need fast.

The new cut page features a dual timeline so editors don’t have to zoom in or out. The upper timeline shows users the entire program, while the lower timeline shows the current work area. Both timelines are fully functional, allowing editors to move and trim clips in whichever timeline is most convenient.

Also new is the DaVinci Neural Engine, which uses deep neural networks and learning, along with AI, to power new features such as speed warp motion estimation for retiming, super scale for up-scaling footage, auto color and color matching, facial recognition and more. The DaVinci Neural Engine is entirely cross-platform and uses the latest GPU innovations for AI and deep learning. The Neural Engine provides simple tools to solve complex, repetitive and time-consuming problems. For example, it enables facial recognition to automatically sort and organize clips into bins based on people in the shot.

DaVinci Resolve 16 also features new adjustment clips that let users apply effects and grades to clips on the timeline below; quick export that can be used to upload projects to YouTube, Vimeo and Frame.io from anywhere in the application; and new GPU-accelerated scopes providing more technical monitoring options than before. So now sharing your work on social channels, or for collaboration via Frame.io., is simple because it’s integrated into Resolve 16 Studio

DaVinci Resolve 16 Studio features improvements to existing ResolveFX, along with several new plugins that editors and colorists will like. There are new ResolveFX plugins for adding vignettes, drop shadows, removing objects, adding analog noise and damage, chromatic aberration, stylizing video and more. There are also improvements to the scanline, beauty, face refinement, blanking fill, warper, dead pixel fixer and colorspace transformation plugins. Plus, users can now view and edit ResolveFX keyframes from the timeline curve editor on the edit page or from the keyframe panel on the color page.

Here are all the updates within Resolve 16:

• DaVinci Neural Engine for AI and deep learning features
• Dual timeline to edit and trim without zooming and scrolling
• Source tape to review all clips as if they were a single tape
• Trim interface to view both sides of an edit and trim
• Intelligent edit modes to auto-sync clips and edit
• Timeline review playback speed based on clip length
• Built-in tools for retime, stabilization and transform
• Render and upload directly to YouTube and Vimeo
• Direct media import via buttons
• Scalable interface for working on laptop screens
• Create projects with different frame rates and resolutions
• Apply effects to multiple clips at the same time
• DaVinci Neural Engine detects faces and auto-creates bins
• Frame rate conversions and motion estimation
• Cut and edit page image stabilization
• Curve editor ease in and out controls
• Tape-style audio scrubbing with pitch correction
• Re-encode only changed files for faster rendering
• Collaborate remotely with Frame.io integration
• Improved GPU performance for Fusion 3D operations
• Cross platform GPU accelerated tools
• Accelerated mask operations including B-Spline and bitmap
• Improved planar and tracker performance
• Faster user and smart cache
• GPU-accelerated scopes with advanced technical monitoring
• Custom and HSL curves now feature histogram overlay
• DaVinci Neural Engine auto color and shot match
• Synchronize SDI output to viewer zoom
• Mix and master immersive 3D audio
• Elastic wave audio alignment and retiming
• Bus tracks with automation on timeline
• Foley sampler, frequency analyzer, dialog processor, FairlightFX
• 500 royalty-free Foley sounds effects
• Share markers and notes in collaboration workflows
• Individual user cache for collaborative projects
• Resolve FX plugins with timeline and keyframes

Avid offers rebuilt engine and embraces cloud, ACES, AI, more

By Daniel Restuccio

During its Avid Connect conference just prior to NAB, Avid announced a Media Composer upgrade, support for ACES color standard and additional upgrades to a number of its toolsets, apps and services, including Avid Nexis.

The chief news from Avid is that Media Composer, its flagship video editing system, has been significantly retooled: sporting a new user interface, rebuilt engine, and additional built-in audio, visual effects, color grading and delivery features.

In a pre-interview with postPerspective, Avid president/CEO Jeff Rosica said, “We’re really trying to leap frog and jump ahead to where the creative tools need to go.”

Avid asked themselves, what did they need to do “to help production and post production really innovate?” He pointed to TV shows and films, and how complex they’re getting. “That means they’re dealing with more media, more elements, and with so many more decisions just in the program itself. Let alone the fact that the (TV or film) project may have to have 20 different variants just to go out the door.”

Jeff Rosica

The new paneled user interface simplifies the workspace, has redesigned bins to find media faster, as well as task-based workspaces showing only what the user wants and needs to see.

Dave Colantuoni, VP of product management at Avid, said they spent the most amount of time studying the way that editors manage and organize bins and content within Media Composer. “Some of our editors use 20, 30, 40 bins at a time. We’ve really spent a lot of time so that we can provide an advantage to you in how you approach organizing your media. “

Avid is also offering more efficient workflow solutions. Users, without leaving Media Composer, can work in 8K, 16K or HDR thanks to the newly built-in 32-bit full float color pipeline. Additionally, Avid continues to work with OTT content providers to help establish future industry standards.

“We’re trying to give as much creative power to the creative people as we can, and bring them new ways to deal with things,” said Rosica. “We’re also trying to help the workflow side. We’re trying to help make sure production doesn’t have to do more with less, or sometimes more with the same budget. Cloud (computing) allows us to bring a lot of new capabilities to the products, and we’re going to be cloud powering a lot of our products… more than you’ve seen before.”

The new Media Composer engine is now native OP1A, can handle more video and audio streams, offers Live Timeline and background rendering, and a distributed processing add-on option to shorten turnaround times and speed up post production.

“This is something our competitors do pretty well,” explained Colantuoni. “And we have different instances of OP1A working among the different Avid workflows. Until now, we’ve never had it working natively inside of Media Composer. That’s super-important because a lot of capabilities started in OP1A, and we can now keep it pristine through the pipeline.”

Said Rosica, “We are also bringing the ability to do distributive rendering. An editor no longer has to render or transcode on their machine. They can perform those tasks in a distributed or centralized render farm environment. That allows this work to get done behind the scenes. This is actually an Avid Supply solution, so it will be very powerful and reliable. Users will be able to do background rendering, as well as distributive rendering and move things off the machine to other centralized machines. That’s going to be very helpful for a lot of post workflows.”

Avid had previously offered three main flavors of Media Composer: Media Composer First, the free version; Media Composer; and Media Composer Ultimate. Now they are also offering a new Enterprise version.

For the first time, large production teams can customize the interface for any role in the organization, whether the user is a craft editor, assistant, logger or journalist. It also offers unparalleled security to lock down content, reducing the chances of unauthorized leaks of sensitive media. Enterprise also integrates with Editorial Management 2019.

“The new fourth tier at the top is what we are calling the Enterprise Edition or Enterprise. That word doesn’t necessarily mean broadcast,” says Rosica. “It means for business deployment. This is for post houses and production companies, broadcast, and even studios. This lets the business, or the enterprise, or production, or post house to literally customize interfaces and customize work spaces to the job role or to the user.”

Nexis Cloudspaces
Avid also announced Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces. So Instead of resorting to NAS or external drives for media storage, Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces allows editorial to offload projects and assets not currently in production. Cloudspaces extends Avid Nexis storage directly to Microsoft Azure.

“Avid Nexis|Cloudspaces brings the power of the cloud to Avid Nexis, giving organizations a cost-effective and more efficient way to extend Avid Nexis storage to the cloud for reliable backup and media parking,” said Dana Ruzicka, chief product officer/senior VP at Avid. “Working with Microsoft, we are offering all Avid Nexis users a limited-time free offer of 2TB of Microsoft Azure storage that is auto-provisioned for easy setup and as much capacity as you need, when you need it.”

ACES
The Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) team also announced that Avid is now part of the ACES Logo Program, as the first Product Partner in the new Editorial Finishing product category. ACES is a free, open, device-independent color management and image interchange system and is the global standard for color management, digital image interchange and archiving. Avid will be working to implement ACES in conformance with logo program specifications for consistency and quality with a high quality ACES-color managed video creation workflow.

“We’re pleased to welcome Avid to the ACES logo program,” said Andy Maltz, managing director of the ACES Council. “Avid’s participation not only benefits editors that need their editing systems to accurately manage color, but also the broader ACES end-user community through expanded adoption of ACES standards and best practices.”

What’s Next?
“We’ve already talked about how you can deploy Media Composer or other tools in a virtualized environment, or how you can use these kind of cloud environments to extend or advance production,” said Rosica. “We also see that these things are going to allow us to impact workloads. You’ll see us continue to power our MediaCentral platform, editorial management of MediaCentral, and even things like Media Composer with AI to help them get to the job faster. We can help automate functions, automate environments and use cloud technologies to allow people to collaborate better, to share better, to just power their workloads. You’re going to see a lot from us over time.”

Arvato to launch VPMS MediaEditor NLE at NAB

First seen as a technology preview at IBC 2018, Arvato’s MediaEditor is a browser-based desktop editor aimed at journalistic editing and content preparation workflows. MediaEditor projects can be easily exported and published in various formats, including square and vertical video, or can be opened in Adobe Premiere with VPMS EditMate for craft editing.

MediaEditor, which features a familiar editing interface, offers simple drag-and-drop transitions and effects, as well as basic color correction. Users can also record voiceovers directly into a sequence, and the system enables automatic mixing of audio tracks for quicker turnaround. Arvato will add motion graphics for captioning and pre-generated graphics in an upcoming version of MediaEditor.

MediaEditor is a part of Arvato Systems’ Video Production Management Suite (VPMS) enterprise MAM solution. Like other products in the suite, it can be independently deployed and scaled, or combined with other products for workflows across the media enterprise. MediaEditor can also be used with Vidispine-based systems, and VPMS and Vidispine clients can access their material through MediaEditor whether on-premise or via the cloud. MediaEditor takes advantage of the advanced VPMS streaming technology allowing users to work anywhere with high-quality, responsive video playback, even on lower-speed connections.

Remembering industry icon Norm Hollyn

Norman Hollyn passed away this week. A film editor, music editor and teacher, probably the best way to describe him is beloved. Since the news broke of his sudden death while lecturing in Japan, there has been an unending outpouring of love and respect for the man who edited Sophie’s Choice and Heathers.

We, at postPerspective, want to pay tribute to Norm by sharing just a few memories from those who knew and loved him.

“Ten years ago, I was working on one of my first large, public technology presentations. I was passed Norman Hollyn’s name as a good resource. We had never heard of one another let alone met one another. Nevertheless, he gave over an hour of his time on a Sunday afternoon to talk with me. The time he spent with me — a stranger seeking knowledge — is the embodiment of who Norman was as a human and educator. This one talk evolved into one of the most rewarding and important friendships I’ve ever had.

“As profoundly sad as I am, I take solace in the fact that if his friendship meant this much to me, how important was his impact to the tens of thousands of people around the world that he inspired, educated and — yes — friended? Then I smile, because I know he’d have some self-deprecating quip ready as a retort.

“I know when someone passes, it’s common to remind folks to tell the ones they care about that they are loved. In this case, I humbly ask that you reach out to your educators — the ones that inspire(d) you, made you a better person, and a student of the world.” — Michael Kammes, BeBop Technologies

“Norm was not just a really good guy who gave so much back to the community. He was also a friend. What I will miss the most is his sharp New York wit. When he would sit on Editors’ Lounge panels, and also moderate some of them, he could be counted on to keep things snappy and humorous. We enjoyed the challenge of busting each other’s chops and then going out for a drink afterwards. He has left a very large hole in our community, and a hollow place in my heart.” — Terry Curren, AlphaDogs/Editor’s Lounge

“I had the good fortune to first meet Norman about 20 years ago. He was always eager to share his knowledge and did so in a most caring way.  When we first met, he handed me his book; then years later, as the digital age solidified, he handed me a revised copy! A lot of people in our industry claim to have written the handbook for post production, but Norman actually did. His passion and excitement for all things post was infectious, and I, like all who got the chance to know him, are better because of our experiences with him. He will be missed.” — Mark Kaplan, Technicolor Production Services

“I’m feeling so comforted by reading the hundreds of stories and tributes about the wonderful Norman Hollyn. His life and interactions with those around him were uplifting, and the lessons he taught went beyond film, and encompassed friendship, mentoring, humor and inclusion. We will all continue to be inspired by him for the rest of our lives and I’m forever grateful. Thank you, Norm!” — Jenni McCormick, American Cinema Editors

The joke was: “You would say, ‘He couldn’t carry my scissors’ when you were talking about someone you didn’t think had the talent. Norm could carry all our scissors!” — Herb Dow, ACE

In honor of Norm, LinkedIn and Lynda.com have made his LinkedIn Learning course, Foundations of Video: the Art of Editing, available free for an entire month.

And if you want some Norm wisdom, here he is talking to our Barry Goch at last year’s HPA Tech Retreat.

Main Image Courtesy of Editor’s Lounge.

Duo teams up to shoot, post Upside Down music video

The Gracie and Rachel music video Upside Down, a collaboration between the grand prize-winners of Silver Sound Showdown, was written, directed and edited by Ace Salisbury and Adam Khan. Showdown is one-part music video film festival, one-part battle of the bands. In a rare occurrence, Salisbury and Khan, both directors in competition, tied for grand prize with their music videos (RhodoraStairwell My Love). Showdown is held annually at Brooklyn Bowl, a bowling alley and venue in Brooklyn, New York.

Ace Salisbury

We reached out to the directors and the band to find out more about this Silver Sound-produced four-minute offering about a girl slowly unraveling emotionally, which was shot with a Red camera.

What did you actually win? What resources were available to you?
Salisbury: Winning the grand prize got me teamed up with the winning band Gracie and Rachel, and with Adam, to make a music video, with Silver Sound stepping in to offer their team to help shoot and edit, and giving time at their partner’s studio space at Parlay Studios in New Jersey.

Khan: Silver Sound offered a DP, editor and colorist, but Ace and I decided to do of all that ourselves. Parlay Studios graced us with three days in one of their spaces, as well as access to any equipment available. I was a kid in a candy store.

What was it like collaborating with a co-director and a band you had never met before?
Salisbury: Working with a co-director can be great — you can balance the workload, benefit from your differing skillsets and shake up your usual comfort zone for how you go about making work.

It’s important to stop being precious about your vision for the project, and be game to compromise on every idea you bring, but you learn a lot. Having never met Adam before made the whole experience more exciting. I had no ability to predict what he would bring to the project in terms of personality and work style from looking at his reel.

Adam Khan

Making a video with a production company is like having a well-connected producer on your project; once you get them onboard with your idea, all of the resources at their disposal come out of the woodwork, and things like studio space and high-power DPs come into the mix if you want them.

Pitching a music video to a band you’ve never met is interesting. You look at their music, aesthetics and previous music videos and try to predict what direction they’ll want to move in. You want to make them something they’ll embrace and want to promote the hell out of, not sweep under the rug. With Gracie and Rachel, they have such an established aesthetic, the key was figuring out how to take what they had and make it look polished.

Khan: At first I was wary of co-directing, I was concerned our ideas/egos would clash. But after meeting with Ace all worry vanished. Sure both of us had to compromise but there was never any friction; ideas and concepts flowed. Working with a new band requires looking back at their previous work and getting a feel for the aesthetic.

Gracie and Rachel: Collaborating with people you haven’t yet worked with is always a unique experience. You really get to hone your skills when it comes to thinking on your feet and practicing the art of give-and-take. Compromise is important, and so is staying true to your artistic values. If you can learn from others how to expand on what you already know, you’re gaining something powerful.

What is Upside Down about?
Salisbury: Upside Down is a video about emotional unraveling. Gracie portrays a girl whose world literally turns upside down as her mental state deteriorates. She is attached via a long rope to her shadow self, portrayed by Rachel, who takes control of her, pulling her across the floor and suspending her in the air. I co-authored the concept, co-directed and co-edited the video with Adam.

The original concept involved the fabrication of a complicated camera rig that would rotate both the actor and camera together. Imagine a giant rotisserie with the actor strapped in on one side and the camera on another, all rotating together. Just three days before our shoot date, the machine fabricator let us know that there were safety and liability issues which meant they couldn’t give us a finished rig. Adam and I scrambled to put together a modified concept using rope rigging in place of this ill-fated machine.

Khan: Upside Down is abstract; it was our job to make it tangible.

Gracie, you actually performed in upside down. What was that like, and what did you learn from that experience?
Yes, I really was suspended upside down! I trained for that for only about an hour or two prior to the actual shoot with some really lovely aerialist professionals. It was surprising to learn what your body feels like after doing dozens of takes upside down!

Can you talk about the digital glitches in the video?
Salisbury: On set, one of the monitors was seriously glitching out. I took a video of the glitched monitor with my phone and showed it to Adam, saying, “This is what our video needs to look like!”

We tried to match the footage of the glitching monitor on set, manipulating our footage in After Effects. We developed a scrambling technique for randomly generating white blocks on screen. As much as we liked those effects, the original phone video of the glitched monitor ended up making it into the final video.

People might be surprised by how much animation goes into a live-action project that they would never notice. For a project like Upside Down, a lot of invisible animation goes into it, like matting the edges of the spotlight’s spill on the stage floor. Not all animation jobs look like Steamboat Willie.

This video had a few invisible animated elements, like removing stunt wire, removing a spot on the stage, and cleaning up the black portions of the frame.

What did you shoot on?
Khan: This video was shot with a Red Epic Dragon rocking the Fujinon 19-90.

What tools were used for post?
Salisbury: The software used on this video was Adobe Premiere and After Effects—Premiere for the basic assembly of the footage, and After Effects for the heavy graphical lifting and color correct. Everything looks better coming out of After Effects.

Are there tools that you wish you had access to?
Salisbury: Personally, I was pretty happy with the tools we had access to. For this concept, we had everything we needed, tool-wise.

Khan: Faster computers.

How much of what you do is music video work? Do you work differently depending on the genre?
Khan: My focus is music videos, though you can find me working on all types of projects. From the production standpoint, things are the same. The real difference comes from what can be done in front of the camera. In a music video, one does not need to follow the rules. In fact, it is encouraged to break the rules.

Salisbury: I get hired to direct music videos every so often. The budget tends to be what dictates the experience, whether it’s going to be a video of a band rocking out shot on a DSLR or a high-intensity animated spectacle. Music videos can be a chance to establish wild aesthetics without the burden of having to justify them in your film’s world. You can go nuts. It’s a music video!

Where do you find inspiration?
Khan: Inspiration comes from past filmmakers and artists alike. I also pay close attention to my peers, there is some incredible stuff coming out. For this project, we pulled from Gracie and Rachel’s previous songs and visuals.

Salisbury: I find that I’m usually most influenced by old video games, but that wasn’t going to be a good fit for this band. My initial intention was to combine Gracie and Rachel’s aesthetic with a Quay Brothers aesthetic, but things shifted a bit by the end of the project.

Posting director Darren Lynn Bousman’s horror film, St. Agatha

Atlanta’s Moonshine Post helped create a total post production pipeline — from dailies to finishing — for the film St. Agatha, directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Saw II, Saw III, Saw IV, Repo the Genetic Opera). 

The project, from producers Seth and Sara Michaels, was co-edited by Moonshine’s Gerhardt Slawitschka and Patrick Perry and colored by Moonshine’s John Peterson.

St. Agatha is a horror film that shot in the town of Madison, Georgia. “The house we needed for the convent was perfect, as the area was one of the few places that had not burned down during the Civil War,” explains Seth Michaels. “It was our first time shooting in Atlanta, and the number one reason was because of the tax incentive. But we also knew Georgia had an infrastructure that could handle our production.”

What the producers didn’t know during production was that Moonshine Post could handle all aspects of post, and were initially brought in only for dailies. With the opportunity to do a producer’s cut, they returned to Moonshine Post.

Time and budget dictated everything, and Moonshine Post was able to offer two editors working in tandem to edit a final cut. “Why not cut in collaboration?” suggested Drew Sawyer, founder of Moonshine Post and executive producer. “It will cut the time in half, and you can explore different ideas faster.”

“We quite literally split the movie in half,” reports Perry, who, along with Slawitschka, cut on Adobe Premiere “It’s a 90-minute film, and there was a clear break. It’s a little unusual, I will admit, but almost always when we are working on something, we don’t have a lot of time, so splitting it in half works.”

Patrick Perry

Gerhardt Slawitschka

“Since it was a producer’s cut, when it came to us it was in Premiere, and it didn’t make sense to switch over to Avid,” adds Slawitschka. “Patrick and I can use both interchangeably, but prefer Premiere; it offers a lot of flexibility.”

“The editors, Patrick and Gerhardt, were great,” says Sara Michaels. “They watched every single second of footage we had, so when we recut the movie, they knew exactly what we had and how to use it.”

“We have the same sensibilities,” explains Gerhardt. “On long-form projects we take a feature in tandem, maybe split it in half or in reels. Or, on a TV series, each of us take a few episodes, compare notes, and arrive at a ‘group mind,’ which is our language of how a project is working. On St. Agatha, Patrick and I took a bit of a risk and generated a four-page document of proposed thoughts and changes. Some very macro, some very micro.”

Colorist John Peterson, a partner at Moonshine Post, worked closely with the director on final color using Blackmagic’s Resolve. “From day one, the first looks we got from camera raw were beautiful.” Typically, projects shot in Atlanta ship back to a post house in a bigger city, “and maybe you see it and maybe you don’t. This one became a local win, we processed dailies, and it came back to us for a chance to finish it here,” he says.

Peterson liked working directly with the director on this film. “I enjoyed having him in session because he’s an artist. He knew what he was looking for. On the flashbacks, we played with a variety of looks to define which one we liked. We added a certain amount of film grain and stylistically for some scenes, we used heavy vignetting, and heavy keys with isolation windows. Darren is a director, but he also knows the terminology, which gave me the opportunity to take his words and put them on the screen for him. At the end of the week, we had a successful film.”

John Peterson

The recent expansion of Moonshine Post, which included a partnership with the audio company Bare Knuckles Creative and a visual effects company Crafty Apes, “was necessary, so we could take on the kind of movies and series we wanted to work with,” explains Sawyer. “But we were very careful about what we took and how we expanded.”

They recently secured two AMC series, along with projects from Netflix. “We are not trying to do all the post in town, but we want to foster and grow the post production scene here so that we can continue to win people’s trust and solidify the Atlanta market,” he says.

Uncork’d Entertainment’s St. Agatha was in theaters and became available on-demand starting February 8. Look for it on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, Fandango Now, Xbox, Dish Network and local cable providers.

Behind the Title: Spot Welders’ Benjamin Entrup

NAME: Benjamin Entrup

COMPANY: Spot Welders

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Spot Welders is a bicoastal editorial house founded by executive producer David Glean and editor Robert Duffy.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Offline Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Assembling footage for the first time and constructing story and structure out of sounds and images. There is always a script, often a storyboard and sometimes previz. But once you get the footage, it might be very different from what was planned. Finding the right structure, assembling everything and seeing it for the first time coming together is something I love.

Benjamin Entrup edited “The Passenger” for Deutsche Bahn and starring Iggy Pop.

The other part of the job requires a lot of diplomatic sensibilities, working closely with your director and helping them to fulfill their vision, communicating with the other post departments and, later on, managing the expectations of agencies, clients and everybody else.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
You often end up being the link between the many post departments, and this can make the job the opposite from the dark and lonely room that people might think you work in.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Editing a piece can be a very emotional process. Combining sounds, pictures and music for the first time and realizing that something works, and that you’ve found the right tonality and rhythm for a piece, amazes me every time.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I do love every part of the job, but watching something for the first time with an audience can be an uncomfortable but necessary experience.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The quiet time of early mornings or late evenings.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I always had a passion for architecture and building structure — constructing something out of nothing, creating emotion with form. That’s something you can do as an editor or an architect.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
My parents worked in radio, so working in this realm was always something I considered. Then I fell in love with Steven Spielberg movies.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I recently edited my first feature film since film school and really enjoyed the contrast to the short form projects I mostly work on.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON A VARIETY OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I love the different challenges of editing commercials, documentaries and feature films. But independent from genre, every new project presents new challenges and every director works differently. So you have to adjust your approach every time to the shooting style and the to way each story should be told.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Hard to say, but probably We Miss You, a film I worked on back in film school. This project opened many doors and was the starting point of a great friendship and working alliance with its director, Hanna Maria Heidrich. Film school was the start of many great collaborations and it’s amazing being able to work with people you can also call your friends.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I started editing on Final Cut Pro, but now work mostly on Avid, although I sometimes use Premiere as well. It’s great having different tools at your disposal, and sometimes editing in Premiere can be great and right for a project, but I love Avid’s responsiveness, stability and how customizable it is.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Gaming mice — I love the precision of a good mouse.
Coffee machines — life without caffeine would be very hard for me.
My phone — sadly, I spend too much time staring at screens, but I love my apps.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
When in LA, I love taking road trips or to go hiking. Leaving the city and all this technology behind feels very necessary sometimes.

Black Panther editors Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver

By Amy Leland

Black Panther was a highly anticipated film that became a massive hit with audiences and critics alike. Just the fact that it’s a Marvel film would have been enough to create both anticipation and success, but this movie went beyond that, breaking barriers as well as box office records. The film was nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.

Instead of being referred to as a great superhero film, it was simply called a great film. It’s also the kind of high-quality offering you would expect from director Ryan Coogler, whose prior credits include Fruitvale Station and Creed, both of which feature Michael B. Jordon, who is also in Black Panther.

Michael Shawver

I had a chance to talk with the Black Panther editing team — Debbie Berman and Michael Shawver — about the film and their process co-editing such a huge project.

How did you both end up on this project?
Michael Shawver: I’ve known Ryan since our days in film school at the University of Southern California. We met back in 2009 in a directing class, and he was making short films that were just above and beyond everybody else. They were about society, race, culture, everything, and they really made you feel and think. That’s the kind of thing that I always wanted to do, the whole reason I wanted to make movies.

One day after class I went up to him and said, “I’d love to work with you. I can edit a little bit.” Things then fell into place, and I was able to work on a short film we did in school. From there he fought to keep me and the rest of the short film team involved in Fruitvale Station. Then we worked on Creed and then Black Panther.

Debbie Berman: For me it was kind of a serendipitous backstory. I was awarded an editing fellowship to the Sundance Institute in 2012, and as part of the fellowship I went to the Sundance Film Festival and went to the awards ceremony for the first time. That was the year that Fruitvale won Sundance. So I was actually there watching Ryan’s career begin, and I remember absolutely loving the movie and really being drawn to him as a filmmaker. I thought Creed was absolutely brilliant. I ugly cried through most of Creed. I think it’s phenomenal.

Debbie Berman

When I was working on Spider-Man: Homecoming, I kept talking about Black Panther. As a South African, it was a film that really spoke to me, and really felt like it was going to be important to me. So Marvel connected us.

Shawver: When we met with Debbie, we just kind of knew. Ryan and I both knew a few minutes in that she was the right choice and that this was going to be the right fit. Between her work ethic, her worldview, her passion and what she focuses on to tell a story and to bring characters alive, I think it all just rang true with how we felt and our process.
And you never know. It’s tough when you co-edit with somebody because you kind of just go on one date and then you’re married. You never know how it’s going to work out. And there’s always creative discussion; there’s always, “What if this is better? What if that’s better?” But everybody left their egos at the door. We’re all “movies first.” We don’t take anything personally, and we help each other not take anything personally, and we support each other. It couldn’t have worked out better.

Berman: I totally agree. It’s like one day you’re married, but you’re married during a world war. You’re going through a very stressful time together. I did feel an instant kinship with Mike and Ryan the second we all met. It just felt like meeting old family. I’ve been passionate about filmmaking my entire life, and they have the same amount of passion. And as Mike said, we always put the film first, and with having that shared love of this movie in particular, it really just got us through everything.

I got to meet Ryan at a screening of Fruitvale Station, and I was struck by how humble he is. As a leader of a project, he must bring that to the environment. Did you all feel that when you were working with him?
Shawver: Oh yeah. That’s what he’s really like. I tell people that he’s a great director, but he’s a hundred times better person. He believes that people who make the movies are more important than the movie itself. That humility that he has allows him to learn. He’ll be the first one to say that he’s not the smartest person in the room, even though everybody would disagree with him. He understands that when you can admit that you don’t know everything, you can start to learn.

I think that, much like T’Challa does in the movie, Ryan feeds off of the people around him. There’s a reason we have certain members of the team that have stayed with Ryan for so long, and he would fight for us. When he brought Debbie into the fold, it was the same way. We all feel like we have so much to learn, and we’re so grateful to be in the position that we’re in. We can’t see operating any other way.

Berman: Ryan insists on honesty from his crew, and never feels that anything you say is a critique of him or his work. He understands that everything you say is just trying to make the film better. There is an open environment where it’s okay to say anything you want. It’s a safe environment to fail because out of a hundred ideas, if you get three that are great then it was worth the other 97 that maybe weren’t so great, because it’s all for the greater good of the film.

Were you both on the project from the beginning, and how did that process work with the two of you cutting the film together?
Berman: Mike started a bit before me, but the film as you see today is something we built from scratch together. We mostly worked on separate scenes. A film this big, it’s good to take ownership of certain sections, because there’s so much to track in terms of the visual effects load. But we collaborated on everything, we always watched each other’s work and we always gave input, suggestions and feedback. There were a couple of scenes we handed back and forth. If someone had an idea for something, then they would take over that scene and do a pass on it. It was basically a good mixture of complete ownership and collaboration all at the same time.

Shawver: I think the key for us was to work as organically as possible and never let anybody’s creative idea or creative juices go to waste. If Debbie came in one day just raring to go on a scene and had a dream about it, an epiphany about it or something, and wanted to dig in and explore more and see if she could elevate a moment, we would be dumb to get in the way of her doing that.

I think we understood that we had to find a balance of feeling of ownership over the scenes, the moments and the movie as a whole, but also understand that this is a story that needs to speak to everybody. We had a very diverse post team, and that’s not by accident. It’s because diversity can bring about the greatest art. Even down to some of our production assistants, who we would bring in to watch certain things just to give us thoughts, and that would always be filtered to Ryan. With a beast of a movie as big as Black Panther — what was it, like, 500 hours of footage.

As the editors, we’re the first audience. We’re the gatekeepers for everything else. So we have to focus on the details, and the movie as a whole. And with a thing that size and with that many people on a team, it helps to break it down but never be hard and fast with those boundaries.

Berman: One thing that was really important to me was all of the strong female characters in the film. I really focused on the ladies, and just making sure they were the most spectacular, powerful representations they could be. And, of course, we both worked on everything, but I think Mike probably took a bit more of T’Challa. It was such a difficult mix to have our central character surrounded by all of these other strong characters, but still make him feel like the strong and central presence. We both worked quite a lot on Killmonger, because we had to try creating an empathetic villain. It would have been easy to veer in either direction too far. We just had to keep the balance of, you can empathize with the point he’s making, but he’s going about it in the wrong way.

Shawver: With anything you do as an editor, these things are hard. I’m not going to lie. You’re second-guessing yourself. We all need to find our story in it, but also how we can share ourselves in each of these characters. What we focused on a lot, in our own ways, were the relationships in the movie. Because if you boil it down, the relationships make that world go upwards, downwards, leftward, rightwards. My son had just turned one at the time, so the theme of fathers and sons that’s achieved in the movie really resonated with me. Just like Debbie with the female characters. Female characters often don’t get what they deserve on screen, but we made sure that they did. Debbie really took guardianship of that, shepherding it through. I think those are some of the strongest points in the movie.

Berman: Mike was really incredible at putting emotion into scenes. The fight scenes, for example. There are these amazing Warrior Falls scenes, which are action scenes, but they’re so emotional. Most of that is the work Mike put in, like folding it around the characters watching the action, and how you’re filtering your own audience reaction through what they’re experiencing.

I remember there was a lot of talk in the press when the movie came out about representation and inclusion in the film, especially for an action or superhero film. As a woman, I really felt like, “Wow this is an action movie that’s showing people I can relate to on screen.”
Berman: Every time I watched a scene, I would do a pass where I would try to watch it through the female gaze. One of the examples of that editorially is right at the end, when the Dora Milaje are surrounded and the Jabari save them. Originally the Jabari warriors were all male. So I had a conversation with Ryan and I said, “You know, we go through this entire movie with these absolutely spectacular female warriors and then at the end of the film the men save them. I think that it undercuts a lot of what we have built up with them over the course of the film.” But I didn’t know what the solution was.

Ryan, in his brilliance, was like, “Well, what if we make some of the Jabari warriors female?” Which I thought was amazing. But, of course, they’d already shot this massive, complicated action sequence. Luckily, in additional photography, Marvel supported that idea, and they created Jabari female warriors. The very first warrior to break through the force field and save them is this absolutely kick-ass Jabari female warrior. It really made such a difference, not only to that moment, which is one of the coolest moments in the film to me, but just throughout the entire film with what we’re trying to say.

When you first started working, was there any sense of, “Okay, Michael, you’ve been working on the indie film side, so you start with some of the dialogue scenes. Debbie you just came from another Marvel film, so work on the action scenes”? How did you decide who was working on what scenes?

Shawver: We didn’t want to keep it separate in that way. I know for myself, and Debbie as well, if there’s something that we’re not as strong at as an editor, we use the opportunity to be able to edit and get better at those things.

Debbie was on Spider-Man, and I went to Atlanta a little early to start on Panther because I’d never done one of these before, and I was terrified. Every morning I woke up having to pinch myself that I was working on a movie like this. But then the whole rest of the day was, “Don’t screw this up. Don’t screw this up.” Then, when Debbie came in, and said, “This would be a good idea if we did it this way. Here’s what you can do to help this process move along faster. Here’s what you can do to have more specific discussions with the effects teams.” Just those in and outs of having gone through a process like that with Spider-Man helped us immensely. Debbie and I are strong editors. We have our strengths and we have a couple of weaknesses, but I feel like we’re both pretty well rounded. In certain ways, Debbie is stronger than I am, and she would critique certain things and give me notes.

We had a discussion early on. Ryan said he felt better when both of his editors touched a scene, because that way both of our stories could be told. He’d also say that if both of us agreed on something and he didn’t, he’d go with our idea because, “You guys are smart. If you guys say this is better and you both agree on it, then we’re going to do it.”

Berman: We actually pushed each other to go further, because there might be a point where you’re like, “Yeah, I’m happy with the scene” and then someone comes in and prompts you and questions things, and it forces you to re-evaluate and see if you can make every single moment just a little bit better.

I had just done Spider-Man, but I’d also done some indie films. I wasn’t too far removed from understanding what the knowledge gaps would be, ‘because I’d only filled those knowledge gaps myself about five seconds earlier. So I felt like I came from the same world, and I understood what they needed to know based on what I had just learned from my past experience.

Were you in edit rooms next to each other?
Berman: We had separate edit suites. But every time someone was finished with a scene we would sit together, either just the two of us or if Ryan was around sometimes the three of us together. We were on the same floor, a few doors away from each other, but we’re working on our own systems pretty much most of the day, and then checking in with each other. We also sat in the effects reviews together, making sure that the visual effects were serving the story and serving the way we created the scenes. We were also in the sound mix together.

Shawver: One of the things that I learned from Ryan, and about Ryan, is you just have to trust him. There are times as an editor, especially when you have a team of dozens and dozens of people, when they are looking at you and needing a scene to be done or a decision to be made, but we haven’t fully gotten it there yet. Ryan said to me, I think it was an Abraham Lincoln quote, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I’ll spend the first four sharpening the ax.” He told me that right after I was getting very nervous about a deadline we had, because he had to go to a bunch of other meetings and stuff like that, and that really put things into perspective.

There were times that we’d just sit and talk for an hour or two. The days are long — 10-, 12-hour days, sometimes longer. But we would have conversations; they’d be conversations about specific scenes, current events, our daily lives, how we feel, if one of us is going through something. First of all, if someone’s not having a good day, Ryan’s going to notice as soon as they step foot in the building, and he’s going to drop everything to make sure that that person is okay and find out if they need to go home. Whether it’s a personal tragedy, national tragedy, anything like that.

Berman: Whether it’s one of his key crew, or one of the PAs, he’ll notice.

Shawver: Yeah, it doesn’t matter who you are. The movie is a political movie. T’Challa’s a politician, and it has to do with world events and current events, and I think we’d be mistaken to not discuss those and see how we feel. But not just discuss, because the three of us probably agree on a lot of things that maybe a good amount of viewers in the world wouldn’t agree on. We talked from all different sides. That’s where that diversity comes in, and that love for making this movie that really is about bringing people together.

Berman: Yeah, that was very interesting to me, because I’m not used to sitting and talking so much. I’m used to like, “Editing! Editing! Editing!” It worked its way into the film. You spend a few hours chatting and you get to know each other, but it’s all working its way into the film. You’re connecting to each other as human beings and making this piece of art together, so it all works its way in… and it all makes the film better.

What’s up next for both of you?
Shawver: I’m working on a movie called Honest Thief. It’s starring Liam Neeson. It’s about a bank robber looking for redemption. It’s nice to be back on a movie just about relationships and small interpersonal drama to help sharpen those skills. It’s directed by Mark Williams, a really talented director.

Berman: I’m working on Captain Marvel, at the moment, sort of the final sprint to the finish line right now.


Amy Leland is a film director and editor. Her short film, “Echoes”, is now available on Amazon Video. She also has a feature documentary in post, a feature screenplay in development, and a new doc in pre-production. She is an editor for CBS Sports Network and recently edited the feature “Sundown.” You can follow Amy on social media on Twitter at @amy-leland and Instagram at @la_directora.

Sundance Videos: Watch our editor interviews

postPerspective traveled to Sundance for the first time this year, and it was great. In addition to attending some parties, brunches and panels, we had the opportunity to interview a number of editors who were in Park City to help promote their various projects. (Watch here.)

Billy McMillin

We caught up with the editors on the comedy docu-series Documentary Now!, Michah Gardner and Jordan Kim. We spoke to Courtney Ware about cutting the film Light From Light, as well as Billy McMillin, editor on the documentary Mike Wallace is Here. We also chatted with Phyllis Housen, the editor on director Chinonye Chukwu’s Clemency and Kent Kincannon who cut Hannah Pearl Utt’s comedy, Before you Know It. Finally, we sat down with Bryan Mason, who had the dual roles of cinematographer and editor on Animals.

We hope you enjoy watching these interviews as much as we enjoyed shooting them.

Don’t forget, click here to view!

Oh, and a big shout out to Twain Richardson from Jamaica’s Frame of Reference, who edited and color graded the videos. Thanks Twain!