Tag Archives: editing

Behind the Title: Exile Editor Kyle Brown

With recent spot work that includes jobs for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan, this editor jokes, “A good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.”

Name: Kyle Brown

Company: New York- and Santa Monica-based Exile

Can you describe your company?
Exile is a bicoastal editorial and finishing boutique with spaces on both coasts.

What’s your job title?
Offline editor, with a splash of camp counselor.

What does that entail? 
As an offline editor, I take the footage that was shot and assemble it based on the script and creative vision honed on set, adding in tone and texture, rhythm and pacing. Basically, editors are given all the raw material that has been created and we turn it into a visual experience.

What’s great about editorial is you have to be honest — the footage is shot, you have what you have and nothing more, and now you have to take what’s there and stitch it together. If something does not work, you move on and make something else work. You can’t hide in the edit. You can’t say we will fix it in post. You are post! It’s the finish line, and all the preparation and hard work on the front end pays off in the edit bay. It has to.

Kyle Brown cut this Bud Light spot.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Editor can be a catch-all title — we cut music, add sound effects, edit story and script. We do rough effects, we scratch voiceover and build title lock-ups. It really feels like DIY filmmaking at times, when you’re adding lines or building some crazy comp of two scenes to get the desired reaction or pause.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Problem solving, seeing an edit work and happy accidents. I still get a kick out of an edit working, feeling a joke land or a punch connect. To be a part of movie magic is still a dream come true. I like to rough cut with my gut. I slam things together to have something to react to, and sometimes the best happy accidents come from that. I also enjoy all of the creative challenges that I’m faced with. A client might have a note that seems like a far-out ask, but the answer is always there. Edits can be a puzzle, and I like that.

What’s your least favorite?
This answer, I’m sure will not be popular… but watching dailies. I watch every frame, I swear. Part of my job is knowing all that is there and being able to recall and find it quickly. But nine times out of 10, when I’m watching dailies I have to take a break halfway through and edit a sequence or scene. It’s hard to see something you get excited by and not just start cutting it. Dailies look different after you have done a rough cut; they mean different things and usually give better solutions. So a lot of times, I cut, then I go back and review.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Double agent. Ok, I’m not that cool. Let’s say, schoolteacher.

Why did you choose this profession?
I think I love editing because I did not choose it. I actually stumbled into it. I’ve learned so much through it, as cheesy as it sounds. It’s helped me grow and achieve my goals, not only in work but in life, and it still does. I think is crazy and exciting that I do it for a living. Through necessity and curiosity, something that I fell into — without ever going through the traditional route of assistant editor — has given me a career that allows me to scratch my creative itch. I’m very lucky.

Trojan

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Lately, I’ve mostly been doing commercials: spots for Comcast, AT&T, T-Mobile and Trojan. So, basically, a good Netflix and chill Tinder date was made possible thanks to the results of my commercial work.

You have worked on all sorts of projects. Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre?
I have been lucky enough to have worked in a wide variety of genres — from comedy to docs to music videos — but I try to tackle all storytelling the same way: I work around a key moment or idea and fill in the blanks on how to get there. The best example I can use is music videos. I like to find that great part of the track, cut the visual to it, then work backwards to get to that point. This allows me to use each edit to get to the intent of that key moment. The same can be said for a good physical gag or joke. Getting that moment to land, then using what’s around it to make it work harder.

What do you use to edit?
I was a diehard Final Cut Pro guy, but then when the bottom fell out, so I switched to Avid Media Composer for the challenge. I also use Adobe Premiere, on occasion. Over the years, I’ve found that whatever I’m fastest on, meaning getting my thoughts to the screen quickest, is what works best for me. I am sure a new workflow or program will come along, and I make sure that I’m always able to adapt.

You mentioned earlier, that sometimes you provide more than just the cut. Can you talk about that?
I’ve rewritten scripts, done some finishing work, done After Effects work, been the VO artist and, sometimes, I even act as the account person to help sell something through to a client. Of course, there are people that do all these things professionally and are experts at their job, but I feel like in an edit bay we’re all there together trying to hit the deadlines with the best piece in hand, and that means we all dive in. No one can be precious about their roles; we have to be precious about our goals.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Copy and paste (seriously whoever invented that is a god), Spell Check and coffee makers.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Cook. I can’t think of editing when I’m burning stuff.

Post house Cinematic Media opens in Mexico City, targets film, TV

Mexico City is now home to Cinematic Media, a full-service post production finishing facility focused on television and cinema content   Located on the lot at Estudios GGM, the facility offers dailies, look development, editorial finishing, color grading and other services, and aims to capitalize on entertainment media production in Mexico and throughout Central and South America.

Scot Evans

In its first project, Cinematic Media provided finishing services for the second season of the Netflix series Ingobernable.

CEO Scot Evans brings more than 25 years of post experience and has managed large-scale post production operations in the United States, Mexico and Canada. His recent posts include executive VP at Technicolor PostWorks in New York, managing director of Technicolor in Vancouver and managing director of Moving Picture Company (MPC) in Mexico City.

“We’re excited about the future for entertainment production in Mexico,” says Evans. “Netflix opened the door and now Amazon is in Mexico. We expect film production to also grow. Through its geographic location, strong infrastructure and cinematic history, Mexico is well-positioned to become a strong producer of content for the world market.”

Cinematic Media has been built from the ground up with a workflow modeled after top-tier facilities in Hollywood and geared toward television and cinema finishing. Engineering design was supervised by John Stevens, whose four decades of post experience includes stints at Cinesite, Efilm, The Post Group, Encore Hollywood, MTI Film and, currently, the Foundation.

Resources include a DI theater with DaVinci Resolve, 4K projection and 7.1 surround sound, four color suites supporting 2K, 4K and HDR, multiple editorial finishing suites, and a Colorfront On-Set Dailies system. The facility also offers look development services to assist productions in creating end-to-end color pipelines, as well as quality control and deliverable services for streaming, broadcast and cinema. Plans to add visual effects services are in the works.

“We can handle six or seven series simultaneously,” says Evans. “There is a lot of redundancy built into our pipeline, making it incredibly efficient and virtually eliminating downtime. A lot of facilities in Hollywood would be envious of what we have here.”

Cinematic Media features high-speed connectivity via the private network Sohonet. It will be employed to share media with studios, producers and distributors around the globe securely and efficiently. It will also be used to facilitate remote collaboration with directors, cinematographers, editors, colorists and other production partners.

Evans cites as a further plus Cinematic Media’s location within Estudios GGM, which has six sound stages, production and editorial office space, grip and lighting resources and more. Producers can take projects from concept to the screen from within the confines of the site. “We can literally walk down a flight of stairs to support a project shooting on one of the stages,” he says. “Proximity is important. We expect many productions to locate their offices and editorial teams here.”

Managing director Arturo Sedano will oversee day-to-day operations. He has supervised post for thousands of hours of television and cinema content on behalf of studios and producers from around the globe, including Netflix, Telemundo, Sony Pictures, Viacom, Lionsgate, HBO, TV Azteca, Grupo Imagen and Fox.

Other key staff includes senior colorist Ana Montaño whose experience as a digital colorist spans facilities in Mexico City, Barcelona, London, Dublin and Rome; producer and post supervisor Cyntia Navarro, previously with Lejana Films and Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (IMCINE). Her credits span episodic television, feature film and documentaries, and include projects for IFC Films, Canal Once, UPI, Discovery Channel, Netflix and Amazon.

Additional staff includes chief technology officer Oliver De Gante, previously with Ollin VFX, where his credits included the hit films Chappie, Her, Tron: Legacy and The Social Network, as well as the Netflix series House of Cards; technical director Gabriel Kerlegand, a workflow specialist and digital imaging technologist with 18 years of experience in cinema and television; and coordinator and senior conform editor Humberto Flores, formerly senior editor at Zenith Adventure Media.

Video editing and VFX app HitFilm gets an upgrade

FXhome has upgraded its video editing and VFX software app. The new HitFilm Version 11.0 features Surface Studio, a new VFX plugin modeled from Video Copilot’s Damage and Decay and Cinematic Titles tutorials. Based on customer requests, this new VFX tool enables users to create smooth or rough-textured metallic and vitreous surfaces on any text or in layers. By dropping a clear PNG file onto the HitFilm timeline, text titles instantly turn into weathered, rusty and worn metallic signs.

HitFilm’s Surface Studio also joins FXhome’s expanding library of VFX plugins, Ignite Pro. This set of plugins is available on Mac and PC platforms, and is compatible with 10 of the most used host software, including Adobe Creative Cloud, Apple Final Cut Pro X, Avid, DaVinci Resolve and others.

Last month, FXhome added to its product family with Imerge Pro, a non-destructive RAW image compositor with fully flexible layers and advanced keying for content creators. FXhome is also integrating a number of Imerge Pro plugins with HitFilm, including Exposure, Outer Glow, Inner Glow and Dehaze. New Imerge Pro plugins are tightly integrated with HitFilm V.11.0’s interface ensuring smooth, uninterrupted workflows.

Minimum system requirements are for Apple are: Mac OS 10.13 High Sierra, OS X 10.12 Sierra or OS X 10.11 El Capitan. And for Windows: Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 (64-bit)

HitFilm 11.0 is available immediately from the FXhome store for $299. FXhome is also celebrating this holiday season with its annual sale. Through December 4, 2018, they are offering a 33% discount when users purchase the FXhome Pro Bundle, which includes HitFilm 11.0, Action, Ignite and Imerge.

Post studio Nomad adds Tokyo location

Creative editorial/VFX/sound design company Nomad has expanded its global footprint with a space in Tokyo, adding to a network that also includes offices in New York, Los Angeles and London. It will be led by managing director Yoshinori Fujisawa and executive producer Masato Midorikawa.

The Tokyo office has three client suites, an assistant support suite, production office and machine room. The tools for post workflow include Adobe Creative Cloud (Premiere, After Effects, Photoshop), Flame, Flame Assist, Avid Pro Tools and other various support tools.

Nomad partner/editor Glenn Martin says the studio often works with creatives who regularly travel between LA and Tokyo. He says Nomad will support the new Tokyo-based group with editors and VFX artists from our other offices whenever larger teams are needed.

“The role of a post production house is quite different between the US and Japan,” says Fujisawa and Midorikawa, jointly. “Although people in Japan are starting to see the value of the Western-style post production model, it has not been properly established here yet. We are able to give our Japanese directors and creatives the ability to collaborate with Nomad’s talented editors and VFX artists, who have great skills in storytelling and satisfying the needs of brands. Nomad has a comprehensive post-production workflow that enables the company to execute global projects. It’s now time for Japan to experience this process and be a part of the future of global advertising.”

Main Image: (L-R) Yoshinori Fujisawa and Masato Midorikawa

Industry vets launch hybrid studio, Olio Creative

Colorist Marshall Plante, producer Natalie Westerfield and director/creative director Justin Purser founded hybrid studio Olio Creative, which has opened its doors in Venice, California.

Olio features vintage-style décor and an open floor plan and the space is adaptable for freelancers, mobile artists and traveling talent, with two color suites and a suite set up to toggle between editorial and Flame work.

Marshall Plante is a well-known colorist who has built his career at shops such as Digital Magic, Riot, Syndicate and, most recently, at Ntropic where he headed up the color department. His commercial credits include Samsung, Audi, Olay, Nike, Honda, Budweiser, and direct-to-brand projects for Apple and Riot Games. Recently, the Nick Jr. Girls in Charge: Girl Power campaign he graded won an Emmy for Outstanding Daytime Promo Announcement Brand Image Campaign, and the Uber campaign he graded, Rolling With the Champion with Lebron James, won a bronze Cannes Lion.

Marshall’s long-time producer, Natalie Westerfield, has over 10 years of experience producing at companies including The Mill and Ntropic. As executive producer, Westerfield will provide oversight to guide all projects that come through Olio’s pipeline.

The third member of the team is director/creative director Justin Purser. As a director, Purser has worked at production companies A Band Apart and Anonymous Content. He was one of the original creators and directors behind Maker Studios (acquired by Walt Disney Corp.) that pioneered the multi-channel YouTube-centric companies of today.

The three partners will bring an element of experimentation and collaboration to the post production field. “The ability to be chameleons within the industry keeps us open to fresh ideas,” says Pursur. “Our motto is, ‘Try it. If it doesn’t work, pivot.’ And if we thrive in a new way of working, we’re going to share that with everyone. We want to not only make noise for ourselves, but for others in the same business.”

Tom Cross talks about editing First Man

By Barry Goch

As a child, First Man editor Tom Cross was fascinated with special effects and visual effects in films. So much so that he would take out library books that went behind the scenes on movies and focused on special effects. He had a particular interest in the artists who made miniature spacecraft, which made working on Damien Chazelle’s First Man feel like it was meant to be.

“When I learned that Damien wanted to use miniatures and do in-camera effects on this film, my childhood and adulthood kind of joined hands,” shares Cross, who is now a frequent collaborator of Chazelle’s, having cut Whiplash, La La Land and now First Man.

We recently spoke with Cross about his work on this Universal Pictures film, which stars another Chazelle favorite, Ryan Gosling, and follows the story of Neil Armstrong and the decade leading up to our country’s first mission to the moon.

Which sci-fi films influenced the style of First Man?
I remember seeing the original Star Wars movies as a kid, and they were life changing… seeing those in the theater really transported me. They opened my eyes to other movies and other movie experiences, like 2001: A Space Odyssey. Along the way, I saw and loved The Right Stuff and Apollo 13.

Tom Cross

Damien is a big fan of all those movies as well, but he really wanted to try a different stylistic approach. He knew that 2001 owns that particular look and style, where you’re super high resolution, antiseptic and sleek in a futuristic way.

For First Man, Damien decided to go with something more personal and intimate. He watched hours of 16mm NASA archival footage, which was often shot by astronauts. He loved the idea of First Man feeling like we put a documentary cameraman in the space capsules. He also saw that these spacecrafts appeared more machine-age than space-age. All the gauges and rivets looked like they belonged in a tank from World War II. So I think all of that lo-fi, analog feel informed the cinema vérité-style that he chose.

As a creative editor, you have animatics, previz or temp comps in the Avid, how do you determine the pacing? Could you talk about the creative process working on a big visual effects film?
Damien preplans everything down to the letter. He did that on Whiplash and La La Land, and he did that on First Man, especially all of the big action set pieces — the X-15, the Gemini 8 and Apollo 11 scenes. He had storyboards done, and animatics that he cut with some rough sound effects. So I always used those as a starting point.

I rely heavily on sound. I really try to use it to help illustrate what we’re looking at, especially if we’re using placeholder shots. In general, I’m most reliant on the performances to help me time things out. What the actors bring is really the heartbeat of any action scene. If you don’t identify with the character or get into a point of view, then the action scene becomes something else. It might work on some formal level, but it’s less subjective, which is the opposite of what Damien was going for.

Can you talk about him capturing things in-camera?
Damien made the choice with production designer Nathan Crowley, VFX supervisor Paul Lambert and cinematographer Linus Sandgren to try to shoot as many things in-camera as possible. The backgrounds that you see out all the spacecraft windows were projected on LED screens and then captured in-camera. Later, our VFX artists would improve, or sometimes replace, those windows. But the beautiful thing that in-camera gave us were these amazing reflections on the visors, faces and eyes. That sort of organic play of light is very difficult to replicate later. Having the in-camera VFX was invaluable to me when I was editing and great for rough cut screenings.

A big part of the film played with only the point of view of the astronaut and feeling like it’s a VR experience. Could you talk about that?
It came down to what Damien and Ryan Gosling would refer to as “the moon and the kitchen sink.” That meant that the movie would hinge on the balance between the NASA space missions and the personal domestic storylines. For the earthbound scenes with Neil and his family, Damien wanted the audience to feel like a fly on the wall in their home. He wanted it to feel intimate, and that called for a cinema verité documentary approach to the camera and the cutting.

He wanted to continue that documentary style inside the space capsules but then take it even further. He wanted to make those scenes as subjective as possible. He shot these beautiful POV shots of everything that Neil sees — the Gemini 8 seat before he climbs in, the gauges inside, the view out the window — and we intercut those with Ryan’s face and eyes. Damien really encouraged me to lean into a simple but effective cutting pattern that went back and forth between those elements. It all had to feel immersive.

What about the sound in those POV shots?
It was brilliantly created by our sound designer Ai-Ling Lee and then mixed by Ai-Ling, Frank Montano and Jon Taylor. Damien and I sketched out where all those sounds would be in our Avid rough cuts. Then Ai-Ling would use our template and take it to the next level. We played around with sound in a way that we hadn’t done on Whiplash or La La Land. We made room for sound. We would linger on POV shots of the walls of the space capsule so that we’d have room to put creaks and metal groans from Ai-Ling. We really played those moments up and then tried to answer those sounds with a look from Neil or one of the other astronauts. The goal was to make the audience feel like they were experiencing what the astronauts were experiencing. I never knew how close they were to not even making it to the lunar surface.

There was that pressure of the world watching as alarms are going off in this capsule, and was fuel running out. It was very dramatic. Damien always wanted to honor how heroic these astronauts were by showing how difficult their missions were. They risked everything. We tried to illustrate this by creating sequences that were experiential. We tried to do that through subjective cutting patterns, through sound and by using the big screen in certain ways.

Can you talk about working in IMAX?
Damien is a big canvas director. He always thinks about the big screen. On La La Land, he and Linus shoot in Fox’s original Cinemascope aspect ratio, which is 2:55.

On First Man, he again wanted to tell the story on a wide canvas but then, somehow, take it up a notch at the appropriate moment. He wanted to find a cinematic device that would adequately transport the audience to another world. He came up with this kind of Wizard of Oz transition where the camera passes through the hatch door and out onto the moon. The image opens up from 2.40 to full 1.43 IMAX.

The style and the pace changes after that point. It slows down so that the audience can take in the breathtaking detail that IMAX renders. The scene becomes all about the shadows and the texture of the lunar surface. All the while, we linger even longer on the POV shots so that the viewer feels like they are climbing down that ladder.

What editing system did you use?
We edited on the Avid Media Composer using DNxHD 115. I found that resolution really helpful to assess the focus and detail of the image, especially because we shot a lot of 16mm and 35mm 2-perf.

Tom Cross

I would love to give a shout out to your team, for your assistants and apprentices and anybody else that helped.
I was pretty blessed with a very strong editorial crew. If it weren’t for those guys we’d still be editing the movie since Damien shot 1.75 million feet of film. I need to give credit to my editing team’s great organizational prowess. I also had two great additional editors who worked closely with me and Damien — Harry Yoon and John To. They’re great storytellers and they inspired me everyday with their work.

Ryan Chavez, our VFX editor, also did a lot of great cutting. At the same time, he kept me on target with everything VFX-related. Because of our tight schedule, he was joined by a second VFX editor Jody Rogers, who I had previously worked with on David O. Russell’s movie Joy. She was fantastic.

Then I had two amazing first assistants: Jennifer Stellema and Derek Drouin. Both of them were often sent on missions to find needles in haystacks. They had to wade through hundreds of hours of NASA radio comms, stock footage, and also a plethora of insert shots of gauges and switches. Somehow they always knew where to find everything. The Avid script was also an indispensable resource and that was set up and maintained by Assistant Editors Eric Kench and Phillip Trujillo.

On the VFX end, we were very lucky to have our VFX producer Kevin Elam down the hall. We also had two incredible postviz artists — John Weckworth and Joe DiValerio — who fed us shots constantly. It was a very challenging schedule, which got more difficult once we got into film festivals.

Fortunately, our great post supervisors from La La Land —Jeff Harlacker and Jason Miller — were onboard. They’re the ones who really kept us all on track and had the big picture in mind. Together, with our trusted post PA Ryan Cunningham, we were covered.

The truly unsung heroes of this project had to be the families and loved ones of our crew. As we worked the long hours to make this movie, they supported us in every way imaginable. Without them, none of this would be possible.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at The Foundation, a boutique post facility in the heart of Burbank’s Media District. He is also an instructor for post production at UCLA Extension. You can follow him on Twitter @gochya

Adobe launches Premiere Rush CC for social video

At the Adobe Max Creativity Conference, Adobe introduced Adobe Premiere Rush CC, the first all-in-one video editing app for social media creators that simplifies video creation and sharing on platforms such as YouTube and Instagram.

Designed specifically for online video creators, Premiere Rush CC integrates capture, intuitive editing, simplified color, audio and motion graphics with seamless publishing to leading social platforms, such as YouTube and Instagram, all in one easy-to-use solution.

With Premiere Rush CC, content creators do not have to be video, color or audio experts to publish professional-quality videos. Premiere Rush CC harnesses the power of Premiere Pro CC and After Effects CC; offers built-in access to professionally designed Motion Graphics templates in Adobe Stock to get started quickly; and features a Sensei-powered, one-click auto-duck feature to adjust music and normalize sound. It also allows access anywhere, enabling users to create compelling video projects — optimized for social distribution — on one device and publish from another with a consistent user experience across desktop and mobile.

Premiere Rush CC is available now on Windows and macOS and via the iOS App Store. (Google Play store availability is coming in 2019.) Adobe offers a variety of pricing plans tailored for customers’ needs:

• Premiere Rush CC is available for $9.99/month to individuals, $19.99/month to teams and $29.99/month to enterprise customers. Premiere Rush CC is also included as part of All Apps, Student and Premiere Pro CC single app plans and comes with 100 GB of CC storage. Additional storage options, up to 10 TB, are also available for purchase.

• Premiere Rush CC Starter Plan: Available for free, the Starter Plan gives customers access to all Premiere Rush CC features, use of desktop and mobile apps and the ability to create an unlimited number of projects and export up to three projects for free.

HP offerings from Adobe Max 2018

By Brady Betzel

HP workstations have been a staple in the post community, especially for anyone not using a Mac or the occasional DIY/custom build from companies like Puget Systems or CyberPower PCs. The difference comes with customers who need workstation-level components and support. Typically, a workstation is run through much tougher and stringent tests so the client can be assured of 24/7/365 up-time. HP continues to evolve and become, in my opinion, a leader for all non-Apple dedicated workflows.

At Adobe Max 2018, HP announced updated components to its Z by HP line of mobile workstations, including the awesome ZBook Studio x360, ZBook Studio, ZBook 15 and ZBook 17. I truly love HP’s mobile workstation offerings. The only issue I constantly come up against is can I — or any freelance worker for that matter — justify the cost of their systems?

I always want the latest and greatest, and I feel I can get that with the updated performance options in this latest update to the ZBook line. They include the increased 6-core Intel i9 processors; expanded memory of up to 32GB (or 128GB in some instances); a really interesting M.2 SSD RAID-1 configuration from the factory that allows for constant mirroring of your boot drive (if one drive fails, the other will take over right where you left off); the ZBook Studio and Studio x360 getting a GPU increase with the Nvidia Quadro P2000; and the anti-glare touchscreen on the x360. This is all in addition to HP’s DreamColor option, which allows for 100% Adobe RGB coverage and 600 nits of brightness. But again, this all comes at a high cost when you max out the workstation with enough RAM and GPU horsepower. But there is some good news for those that don’t have a corporate budget to pull from: HP has introduced the pilot program Z Club.

The Z Club is essentially a leasing program for HP’s Z series products. At the moment, HP will take 100 creators for this pilot program, which will allow you to select a bundle of Z products and accessories that fit your creative lifestyle for a monthly cost. This is exactly how you solve the problem of getting prosumer and freelance workers who can’t quite justify a $5,000 price tag for purchase, but can justify a $100 a month payment. HP has touted categories of products for editors, photographers and many others. With monthly payments that range from $100 to $250, depending on what you order, this is much more manageable for mid-range end users who need the power of a workstation but up until now couldn’t afford it.

So what will you get if you are accepted to the Z Club pilot program? You can choose the products you want and not pay for three months. And you can continue or return your products, you can switch products and you will have access to a Z Club concierge service for any questions and troubleshooting.

On the call I had with HP, they mentioned that a potential bundle for a video editor could be an HP Z series mobile workstation or desktop, along with a DreamColor display, and an external RAID storage system to top it off.

In the end, I think HP (much like Blackmagic’s Resolve in the NLE/color world) is at the front of the pack. They are listening to what creatives are saying about Apple — how this giant company is not listening to their customers in an efficient and price-conscious way. Creating essentially a leasing program for mid- to high-range products with support is the future. It’s essentially Apple’s own iPhone program but with computers!

Hopefully this program takes off, and if you are lucky enough to be accepted into the pilot program, I would be curious to hear your experience, so please reach out. But with HP making strides in the workstation security initiatives like Sure Start, a privacy mode for mobile systems, and military-grade testing known as MIL-spec, HP is going from being a standard in the media and entertainment post industry. For those leaving Apple for a Windows-based PC, you should apply for the Z Club pilot program. Go to www.hp.com to find out more or follow along on Twitter @AdobeMax, @HP or using #AdobeMax.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Veteran editor Antonio Gómez-Pan joins Therapy Studios

Los Angeles-based post house Therapy Studios has added editor Antonio Gómez-Pan to its team. Born in Madrid, and currently splitting his time between his hometown of Barcelona and LA, Gómez-Pan earned a Bachelor of Arts in film editing at cinema school ESCAC.

He says his journey to editing was “sort of a Darwinian process” after he burnt his hands on some fresnel lights and “discovered the beauty of film editing.” While still in school, he edited Mi Amigo Invisible (2010), which premiered at Sundance Film Festival and Elefante (2012), which won the Best Short Film Award at the LA Film Festival and the Sitges Film Festival, along with many others.

Gómez-Pan’s feature work includes Puzzled Love, Hooked Up and Othello, which won Best European Independent Film at ÉCU 2013. On the advertising side, he has worked with global brands like Adidas, Coca-Cola, Chanel, Unicef, Volkswagen, Nike, Ikea, Toyota and many more. Recently, he was appointed an Academic by the Spanish Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Academy, on top of winning the Gold Medal for Best Editing in Berlin.

When asked what his favorite format is, Gómez-Pan couldn’t choose, saying, “I love commercials because of their immediacy and the need to be able to synthesize, but feature films can be more personal and narratively engaging. Music videos are where you are freer to experiment and the editor’s hand is more visible. Documentaries are so rewarding because they’re created in the editing room more than any other genre. I really cannot choose among them.” His enthusiasm for working across the scale is part of why he was drawn to Therapy, where he says, “They do everything, from broadcast campaigns to long-format shows like HBO’s Sonic Highways.”

Gómez-Pan joins Therapy’s existing roster of editors, which includes Doobie White, Kristin McCasey, Lenny Mesina, Meg Ramsay, Steve Prestemon and Jake Shaver. Gómez-Pan says, “Editorial houses don’t exist in Spain, so we are also the ones dealing with the salary, the schedule and all other non-creative parts of the process. That puts you in a tricky position even before you sit down in the editing suite. The role is incredibly rewarding and the editor is held in high esteem, but already I’ve found that we’re much more protected and respected here in the States.”

Review: Mobile Filmmaking with Filmic Pro, Gnarbox, LumaFusion

By Brady Betzel

There is a lot of what’s become known as mobile filmmaking being done with cell phones, such as the iPhone, Samsung Galaxy and even the Google Pixel. For this review, I will cover two apps and one hybrid hard drive/mobile media ingest station built specifically for this type of mobile production.

Recently, I’ve heard how great the latest mobile phone camera sensors are, and how those embracing mobile filmmaking are taking advantage of them in their workflows. Those workflows typically have one thing in common: Filmic Pro.

One of the more difficult parts of mobile filmmaking, whether you are using a GoPro, DSLR or your phone, is storage and transferring the media to a workable editing system. The Gnarbox, which is designed to help solve this issue, is in my opinion one of the best solutions for mobile workflows that I have seen.

Finally, editing your footage together in a professional nonlinear editor like Adobe Premiere Pro or Blackmagic’s Resolve takes some skills and dedication. Moreover, if you are doing a lot of family filmmaking (like me), you usually have to wait for the kids to go to sleep to start transferring and editing. However, with the iOS app LumaFusion — used simultaneously with the Gnarbox — you can transfer your GoPro, DSLR or other pro camera shots, while your actors are taking a break, allowing you to clear your memory cards or get started on a quick rough cut to send to executives that might be waiting off site.

Filmic Pro
First up is Filmic Pro V.6. Filmic Pro is an iOS and Android app that gives you fine-tuned control over your phone’s camera, including live image analyzation features, focus pulling and much more.

There are four very useful live analytic views you can enable at the top of the app: Zebra Stripes, Clipping, False Color and Focus Peaking. There is another awesome recording view that allows simultaneous focus and exposure adjustments, conveniently placed where you would naturally rest your thumbs. With the focus pulling feature you can even set start and end focus points that Filmic Pro will run for you — amazing!

There are many options under the hood of Filmic Pro, including the ability to record at almost any frame rate and aspect ratio, such as 9:16 vertical video (Instagram TV anyone?). You can also film at one particular frame rate, such as 120fps and record at a more standard frame rate of 24fps, essentially processing your high-speed footage in the phone. Vertical video is one of those constant questions that arises when producing video for mobile viewing. If you don’t want the app to automatically change to vertical video recording mode, you can set an orientation lock in the settings. When recording video there are four data rate options: Filmic Extreme, with 100Mb/s for any frame size 2K or higher and 50Mb/s for 1080p or lower; Filmic Quality, which limits the data rate to 35Mb/s (your phone’s default data rate); or Economy, which you probably don’t need to use.

I have only touched on a few of the options inside of Filmic Pro. There are many more, including mic input selections, sample rate selections (including 48kHz), timelapse mode and, in my opinion, the most powerful feature, Log recording. Log recording inside of a mobile phone can unlock some unnoticed potential in your phone’s camera chip, allowing for a better ability to match color between cameras or expose details in shadows when doing color correction in post.

The only slightly bad news is that on top of the $14.99 price for the Filmic Pro app itself, to gain access to the Log ability (labeled Cinematographer’s Toolkit) you have to pay an additional $9.99. In the end, $25 is a really, really, really small price to pay for the abilities that Filmic Pro unlocks for you. And while this won’t turn your phone into an Arri Alexa or Red Helium (yet), you can raise your level of mobile cinematography quickly, and if you are using your phone for some B-or C-roll, Filmic Pro can help make your colorist happy, thanks to Log recording.

One feature that I couldn’t test because I do not own a DJI Osmo is that you can control the features on your iOS device from the Osmo itself, which is pretty intriguing. In addition, if you use any of the Moondog Labs anamorphic adapters, Filmic Pro can be programmed to de-squeeze the footage properly.

You can really dive in with Filmic Pro’s library of tutorials here.

Gnarbox 1.0
After running around with GoPro cameras strapped to your (or your dog’s) head all day, there will be some heavy post work to get it offloaded onto your computer system. And, typically, you will have much more than just one GoPro recording during the day. Maybe you took some still photos on your DSLR and phone, shot some drone footage and had GoPro on a chest mount.

As touched on earlier, the Gnarbox 1.0 is a stand-alone WiFi-enabled hard drive and media ingestion station that has SD, microSD, USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports to transfer media to the internal 128GB or 256GB Flash memory. You simply insert the memory cards or the camera’s USB cable and connect to the Gnarbox via the App on your phone to begin working or transferring.

There are a bunch of files that will open using the Gnarbox 1.0 iOS and Android apps, but there are some specific files that won’t open, including ProRes, H.265 iPhone recordings, CinemaDNG, etc. However, not all hope is lost. Gnarbox is offering up the Gnarbox 2.0 via IndieGogo and can be pre-ordered. Version 2.0 will offer compatibility with file types such as ProRes, in addition to having faster transfer times and app-free backups.

So while reading this review of the Gnarbox 1.0, keep Version 2 in the back of your mind, since it will likely contain many new features that you will want… if you can wait until the estimated delivery of January 2019.

Gnarbox 1.0 comes in two flavors: a 128GB version for $299.99, and the version I was sent to review, which is 256GB for $399.99. The price is a little steep, but the efficiency this product brings is worth the price of admission. Click here for all the lovely specs.

The drive itself is made to be used with an iPhone or Android-based device primarily, but it can be put into an external hard drive mode to be used with a stand-alone computer. The Gnarbox 1.0 has a write speed of 132MB/s and read speed of 92MB/s when attached to a computer in Mass Storage Mode via the USB 3.0 connection. I actually found myself switching modes a lot when transferring footage or photos back to my main system.

It would be nice to have a way to switch to the external hard drive mode outside of the app, but it’s still pretty easy and takes only a few seconds. To connect your phone or tablet to the Gnarbox 1.0, you need to download the Gnarbox app from the App Store or Google Play Store. From there you can access content on your phone as well as on the Gnarbox when connected to it. In addition to the Gnarbox app, Gnarbox 1.0 can be used with Adobe Lightroom CC and the mobile NLE LumaFusion, which I will cover next in the review.

The reason I love the Gnarbox so much is how simply, efficiently and powerfully it accomplishes its task of storing media without a computer, allowing you to access, edit and export the media to share online without a lot of technical know-how. The one drawback to using cameras like GoPros is it can take a lot of post processing power to get the videos on your system and edited. With the Gnarbox, you just insert your microSD card into the Gnarbox, connect your phone via WiFi, edit your photos or footage then export to your phone or the Gnarbox itself.

If you want to do a full backup of your memory card, you open the Gnarbox app, find the Connected Devices, select some or all of the clips and photos you want to backup to the Gnarbox and click Copy Files. The same screen will show you which files have and have not been backed up yet so you don’t do it multiple times.

When editing photos or video there are many options. If you are simply trimming down a video clip, stringing out a few clips for a highlight reel, adding some color correction, and even some music, then the Gnarbox app is all you will need. With the Gnarbox 1.0, you can select resolution and bit rates. If you’re reading this review you are probably familiar with how resolutions and bit rates work, so I won’t bore you with those explanations. Gnarbox 1.0 allows for 4K, 2.7K. 1080p and 720p resolutions and bitrates of 65 Mbps, 45Mbps, 30Mbps and 10Mbps.

My rule of thumb for social media is that resolution over 1080p doesn’t really apply to many people since most are watching it on their phone, and even with a high-end HDR, 4K, wide gamut… whatever, you really won’t see much difference. The real difference comes in bit rates. Spend your megabytes wisely and put all your eggs in the bit rate basket. The higher the bit rates the better quality your color will be and there will be less tearing or blockiness. In my opinion a higher bit rate 1080p video is worth more than a 4K video with a lower bit rate. It just doesn’t pay off. But, hey, you have the options.

Gnarbox has an awesome support site where you can find tutorial GIFs and writeups covering everything from powering on your Gnarbox to bitrates, like this one. They also have a great YouTube playlist that covers most topics with the Gnarbox, its app, and working with other apps like LumaFusion to get you started. Also, follow them on Instagram for some sweet shots they repost.

LumaFusion
With Filmic Pro to capture your video and with the Gnarbox you can lightly edit and consolidate your media, but you might need to go a little further in the editing than just simple trims. This is where LumaFusion comes in. At the moment, LumaFusion is an iOS only app, but I’ve heard they might be working on an Android version. So for this review I tried to get my hands on an iPad and an iPad Pro because this is where LumaFusion would sing. Alas, I had to settle for my wife’s iPhone 7 Plus. This was actually a small blessing, because I was afraid the app would be way too small to use on a standard iPhone. To my surprise it was actually fine.

LumaFusion is an iOS-based nonlinear editor, much like Adobe Premiere or FCPX, but it only costs $19.99 in the App store. I added LumaFusion to this review because of its tight integration with Gnarbox (by accessing the files directly on the Gnarbox for editing and output), but also because it has presets for Filmic Pro aspect ratios: 1.66:1, 17:9, 2.2:1, 2.39:1, 2.59:1. LumaFusion will also integrate with external drives like the Western Digital wireless SSD, as well as cloud services like Google Drive.

In the actual editing interface LumaFusion allows for advanced editing with titles, music, effects and color correction. It gives you three video and audio tracks to edit with, allowing for J and L cuts or transitions between clips. For an editor like me who is so used to Avid Media Composer that I want to slip and trim in every app, LumaFusion allows for slips, trims, insert edits, overwrite edits, audio track mixing, audio ducking to automatically set your music levels — depending on when dialogue occurs — audio panning, chroma key effects, slow and fast motion effects, titles with different fonts and much more.

There is a lot of versatility inside of LumaFusion, including the ability to export different frame rates between 18, 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 48, 50, 59.94, 60, 120 and 240 fps. If you are dealing with 360-degree video, you can even enable the 360-degree metadata flag on export.

LumaFusion has a great reference manual that will fill you in on all the aspects of the app, and it’s a good primer on other subjects like exporting. In addition, they have a YouTube playlist. Simply, you can export for all sorts of social media platforms or even to share over Air Drop between Mac OS and iOS devices. You can choose your export resolution such as 1080p or UHD 4K (3840×2160), as well as your bit rate, and then you can select your codec, whether it be H.264 or H.265. You can also choose whether the container is a MP4 or MOV.

Obviously, some of these output settings will be dictated by the destination, such as YouTube, Instagram or maybe your NLE on your computer system. Bit rate is very important for color fidelity and overall picture quality. LumaFusion has a few settings on export, including: 12Mbps, 24Mbps, 32Mbps and 50Mbps if in 1080p, otherwise 100 Mbps if you are exporting UHD 4k (3840×2160).

LumaFusion is a great solution for someone who needs the fine tuning of a pro NLE on their iPad or iPhone. You can be on an exotic vacation without your laptop and still create intricately edited highlight reels.

Summing Up
In the end, technology is amazing! From the ultra-high-end camera app Filmic Pro to the amazing wireless media hub Gnarbox and even the iOS-based nonlinear editor LumaFusion, you can film, transfer and edit a professional-quality UHD 100Mbps clip without the need for a stand-alone computer.

If you really want to see some amazing footage being created using Filmic Pro you should follow Richard Lackey on all social media platforms. You can find more info on his website. He has some amazing imagery as well as tips on how to shoot more “cinematic” video using your iPhone with Filmic Pro.

The Gnarbox — one of my favorite tools reviewed over the years — serves a purpose and excels. I can’t wait to see how the Gnarbox 2.0 performs when it is released. If you own a GoPro or any type of camera and want a quick and slick way to centralize your media while you are on the road, then you need the Gnarbox.

LumaFusion will finish off your mobile filmmaking vision with titles, trimming and advanced edit options that will leave people wondering how you pulled off such a professional video from your phone or tablet.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.