Tag Archives: Dolby Vision

SGO Mistika Boutique at IBC with Dolby Vision, color workflows

At IBC, SGO will be showing enhancements and upgrades of its subscription-based finishing solution, Mistika Boutique. The company will demo color management solutions as well as HDR content delivery workflows with recently integrated Dolby Vision support.

This professional color grading toolset combined with the finishing functionality of Mistika Boutique will be showcased running on a Mac Pro workstation with Tangent Arc control panels and output to a Canon 4K HDR reference display through Blackmagic Design DeckLink I/O.

Mistika Boutique is hardware-agnostic and runns on both Windows and MacOS.

SGO is offering a variety of sessions highlighting the trending topics for the content creation industry that feature Mistika Boutique as well as Mistika Workflows and Mistika VR at their stand.

While at the show, SGO is offering a special IBC promotion for Mistika Boutique. Anyone who subscribes by September 30, 2019 will get the Professional Immersive Edition for €99/month or €990/year (or whatever your bank’s conversion rate is), which represents a saving of over 65% from the normal price. The special IBC promotional price will be maintained as long as the subscription is not canceled and remains active.

GLOW’s DP and colorist adapt look of new season for Vegas setting

By Adrian Pennington

Netflix’s Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (GLOW) are back in the ring for a third round of the dramatic comedy, but this time the girls are in Las Vegas. The glitz and glamour of Sin City seems tailor-made for the 1980s-set GLOW and provided the main creative challenge for Season 3 cinematographer Chris Teague (Russian Doll, Broad City).

DP Chris Teague

“Early on, I met with Christian Sprenger, who shot the first season and designed the initial look,” says Teague, who was recently nominated for an Emmy for his work on Russian Doll. “We still want GLOW to feel like GLOW, but the story and character arc of Season 3 and the new setting led us to build on the look and evolve elements like lighting and dynamic range.”

The GLOW team is headlining the Fan-Tan Hotel & Casino, one of two main sets along with a hotel built for the series and featuring the distinctive Vegas skyline as a backdrop.

“We discussed compositing actors against greenscreen, but that would have turned every shot into a VFX shot and would have been too costly, not to mention time-intensive on a TV schedule like ours,” he says. “Plus, working with a backdrop just felt aesthetically right.”

In that vein, production designer Todd Fjelsted built a skyline using miniatures, a creative decision in keeping with the handcrafted look of the show. That decision, though, required extensive testing of lenses, lighting and look prior to shooting. This testing was done in partnership with post house Light Iron.

“There was no overall shift in the look of the show, but together with Light Iron, we felt the baseline LUT needed to be built on, particularly in terms of how we lit the sets,” explains Teague.

“Chris was clear early on that he wanted to build upon the look of the first two seasons,” says Light Iron colorist Ian Vertovec. “We adjusted the LUT to hold a little more color in the highlights than in past seasons. Originally, the LUT was based on a film emulation and adjusted for HDR. In Season 1, we created a period film look and transformed it for HDR to get a hybrid film emulation LUT. For Season 3, for HDR and standard viewing, we made tweaks to the LUT so that some of the colors would pop more.”

The show was also finished in Dolby Vision HDR. “There was some initial concern about working with backdrops and stages in HDR,” Teague says. “We are used to the way film treats color over its exposure range — it tends to desaturate as it gets more overexposed — whereas HDR holds a lot more color information in overexposure. However, Ian showed how it can be a creative tool.”

Colorist Ian Vertovec

“The goal was to get the 1980s buildings in the background and out the hotel windows to look real — emulating marquees with flashing lights,” adds Vertovec. “We also needed it to be a believable Nevada sky and skyline. Skies and clouds look different in HDR. So, when dialing this in, we discussed how they wanted it to look. Did it feel real? Is the sky in this scene too blue? Information from testing informed production, so everything was geared toward these looks.”

“Ian has been on the first two seasons, so he knows the look inside and out and has a great eye,” Teague continues. “It’s nice to come into a room and have his point of view. Sometimes when you are staring at images all day, it’s easy to lose your objectivity, so I relied on Ian’s insight.” Vertovec grades the show on FilmLight’s Baselight.

As with Season 2, GLOW Season 3 was a Red Helium shoot using Red’s IPP2 color pipeline in conjunction with Vertovec’s custom LUTs all the way to post. Teague shot full 8K resolution to accommodate his choice of Cooke anamorphic lenses, desqueezed and finished in a 2:1 ratio.

“For dailies I used an iPad with Moxion, which is perhaps the best dailies viewing platform I’ve ever worked with. I feel like the color is more accurate than other platforms, which is extremely useful for checking out contrast and shadow level. Too many times with dailies you get blacks washed out and highlights blown and you can’t judge anything critical.”

Teague sat in on the grade of the first three of the 10 episodes and then used the app to pull stills and make notes remotely. “With Ian I felt like we were both on the same page. We also had a great DIT [Peter Brunet] who was doing on-set grading for reference and was able to dial in things at a much higher level than I’ve been able to do in the past.”

The most challenging but also rewarding work was shooting the wrestling performances. “We wanted to do something that felt a little bigger, more polished, more theatrical,” Teague says. “The performance space had tiered seating, which gave us challenges and options in terms of moving the cameras. For example, we could use telescoping crane work to reach across the room and draw characters in as they enter the wrestling ring.”

He commends gaffer Eric Sagot for inspiring lighting cues and building them into the performance. “The wrestling scenes were the hardest to shoot but they’re exciting to watch — dynamic, cinematic and deliberately a little hokey in true ‘80s Vegas style.”


Adrian Pennington is a UK-based journalist, editor and commentator in the film and TV production space. He has co-written a book on stereoscopic 3D and edited several publications.

Deluxe opens 4,000-square-foot color grading theater

Deluxe has opened a new color grading theater called Stage One. It is equipped with a large Stewart and RealDs screens and Barco projectors, as well as advanced color grading, audio and editorial systems. Located in Deluxe Audio Seward at Hollywood’s Glen Glenn Sound building, the 4,000-square-foot space features plush seating and “perfect” black levels.

“I’ve been dreaming of a space like Stage One since I started color finishing,” says senior colorist Skip Kimball, whose recent credits include Deadpool 2 at Efilm. “We’re set up to handle any format and have a fleet of projectors so I can grade on a screen that’s comparable to exhibition; it’s much easier to evaluate the picture and address any issues when you can see it on a 60-foot screen. And the size of Stage One is incredible; it can comfortably accommodate 120 people, so we can handle conform, color and VFX all in one space, with the director and cinematographer for a more streamlined process.”

Deluxe’s Stage One features a RealD Ultimate Screen with a 45’x21’7” maximum image and a Stewart Filmscreen SnoMatte 100 screen with 41’3”x22’4” maximum image, and can accommodate the latest display monitors, allowing production to view content in whatever format is needed throughout production.

The space is also equipped with two Christie Dolby Vision Eclipse laser projectors, capable of providing 108-nit brightness, as well as high frame rate projection and 4K resolution; a Barco DP4K-P reference projector for theatrical grading at 48 nits in 4K resolution; and a Barco DP4K-32B projector for RealD stereo theatrical grading at up to 48 nits in 4K resolution. Available color grading and editorial systems include Blackmagic Resolve, Autodesk Lustre and Flame, and Filmlight Baselight.

Pixelogic adds d-cinema, Dolby audio mixing theaters to Burbank facility

Pixelogic, which provides localization and distribution services, has opened post production content review and audio mixing theaters within its facility in Burbank. The new theaters extend the company’s end-to-end services to include theatrical screening of digital cinema packages as well as feature and episodic audio mixing in support of its foreign language dubbing business.

Pixelogic now operates a total of six projector-lit screening rooms within its facility. Each room was purpose-built from the ground up to include HDR picture and immersive sound technologies, including support for Dolby Atmos and DTS:X audio. The main theater is equipped with a Dolby Vision projection system and supports Dolby Atmos immersive audio. The facility will enable the creation of more theatrical content in Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, which consumers can experience at Dolby Cinema theaters, as well as in their homes and on the go. The four larger theaters are equipped with Avid S6 consoles in support of the company’s audio services. The latest 4D motion chairs are also available for testing and verification of 4D capabilities.

“The overall facility design enables rapid and seamless turnover of production environments that support Digital Cinema Package (DCP) screening, audio recording, audio mixing and a range of mastering and quality control services,” notes Andy Scade, SVP/GM of Pixelogic’s worldwide digital cinema services.

MTI Film updates Cortex for V.4, includes Dolby Vision HDR metadata editing

MTI Film is updating its family of Cortex applications and tools, highlighted by Cortex V.4. In addition to legacy features such as a dailies toolset, IMF and AS-02 packaging and up-res algorithms, Cortex V.4 adds DCP packaging (with integrated ACES color support), an extended edit tool and officially certified Dolby Vision metadata editing capabilities.

“We allow users to manipulate Dolby Vision HDR metadata in the same way that they edit segments of video,” says Randy Reck, MTI Film’s director of development. “In the edit tool, they can graphically trim, cut and paste, add metadata to video, analyze new segments that need metadata and adjust parameters within the Dolby Vision metadata on a shot-by-shot basis.”

With the integration of the Dolby Vision ecosystem, Cortex V.4 provides a method for simultaneously QC-ing HDR and SDR versions of a shot with Dolby Vision metadata. For delivery, the inclusion of the Dolby Vision “IMF-like” output format allows for the rendering and delivery of edited Dolby Vision metadata alongside HDR media in one convenient package.

Cortex V.4’s Edit Tool has been updated to include industry-standard trimming and repositioning of edited segments within the timeline through a drag-and-drop function. The entire look of the Edit Tool (available in the Dailies and Enterprise editions of Cortex) has also been updated to accommodate a new dual-monitor layout, making it easier for users to scrub through media in the source monitor while keeping the composition in context in the record monitor.

MTI Film is also offering a new subscription-based DIT+ edition of Cortex. “It doesn’t make sense for productions to purchase a full software package if their schedule includes a hiatus when it won’t be used,” explains Reck.

DIT+ contains all aspects of the free DIT version of Cortex with the added ability to render HD ProRes, DNx and H.264 files for delivery. A DIT+ subscription starts at $95 per month, and MTI Film is offering a special NAB price of $595 for the first year.

Digging Deeper: Dolby Vision at NAB 2016

By Jonathan Abrams

Dolby, founded over 50 years ago as an audio company, is elevating the experience of watching movies and TV content through new technologies in audio and video, the latter of which is a relatively new area for their offerings. This is being done with Dolby AC-4 and Dolby Atmos for audio, and Dolby Vision for video. You can read about Dolby AC-4 and Dolby Atmos here. In this post, the focus will be on Dolby Vision.

First, let’s consider quantization. All digital video signals are encoded as bits. When digitizing analog video, the analog-to-digital conversion process uses a quantizer. The quantizer determines which bits are active or on (value = 1) and which bits are inactive or off (value = 0). As the bit depth for representing a finite range increases, the greater the detail for each possible value, which directly reduces the quantization error. The number of possible values is 2^X, where X is the number of bits available. A 10-bit signal has four times the number of possible encoded values than an 8-bit signal. This difference in bit depth does not equate to dynamic range. It is the same range of values with a degree of quantization accuracy that increases as the number of bits used increases.

Now, why is quantization relevant to Dolby Vision? In 2008, Dolby began work on a system specifically for this application that has been standardized as SMPTE ST-2084, which is SMPTE’s standard for an electro-optical transfer function (EOTF) and a perceptual quantizer (PQ). This work is based on work in the early 1990s by Peter G. J. Barten for medical imaging applications. The resulting PQ process allows for video to be encoded and displayed with a 10,000-nit range of brightness using 12 bits instead of 14. This is possible because Dolby Vision exploits a human visual characteristic where our eyes are less sensitive to changes in highlights than they are to changes in shadows.

Previous display systems, referred to as SDR or Standard Dynamic Range, are usually 8 bits. Even at 10 bits, SD and HD video is specified to be displayed at a maximum output of 100 nits using a gamma curve. Dolby Vision has a nit range that is 100 times greater than what we have been typically seeing from a video display.

This brings us to the issue of backwards compatibility. What will be seen by those with SDR displays when they receive a Dolby Vision signal? Dolby is working on a system that will allow broadcasters to derive an SDR signal in their plant prior to transmission. At my NAB demo, there was a Grass Valley camera whose output image was shown on three displays. One display was PQ (Dolby Vision), the second display was SDR, and the third display was software-derived SDR from PQ. There was a perceptible improvement for the software-derived SDR image when compared to the SDR image. As for the HDR, I could definitely see details in the darker regions on their HDR display that were just dark areas on the SDR display. This software for deriving an SDR signal from PQ will eventually also make its way into some set-top boxes (STBs).

This backwards-compatible system works on the concept of layers. The base layer is SDR (based on Rec. 709), and the enhancement layer is HDR (Dolby Vision). This layered approach uses incrementally more bandwidth when compared to a signal that contains only SDR video.  For on-demand services, this dual-layer concept reduces the amount of storage required on cloud servers. Dolby Vision also offers a non-backwards compatible profile using a single-layer approach. In-band signaling over the HDMI connection between a display and the video source will be used to identify whether or not the TV you are using is capable of SDR, HDR10 or Dolby Vision.

Broadcasting live events using Dolby Vision is currently a challenge for reasons beyond HDTV not being able to support the different signal. The challenge is due to some issues with adapting the Dolby Vision process for live broadcasting. Dolby is working on these issues, but Dolby is not proposing a new system for Dolby Vision at live events. Some signal paths will be replaced, though the infrastructure, or physical layer, will remain the same.

At my NAB demo, I saw a Dolby Vision clip of Mad Max: Fury Road on a Vizio R65 series display. The red and orange colors were unlike anything I have seen on an SDR display.

Nearly a decade of R&D at Dolby has been put into Dolby Vision. While Dolby Vision has some competition in the HDR war from Technicolor and Philips (Prime) and BBC and NHK (Hybrid Log Gamma or HLG), it does have an advantage in that there have been several TV models available from both LG and Vizio that are Dolby Vision compatible. If their continued investment in R&D for solving the issues related to live broadcast results in a solution that broadcasters can successfully implement, it may become the de-facto standard for HDR video production.

Jonathan S. Abrams is the Chief Technical Engineer at Nutmeg, a creative marketing, production and post resource.

Dolby Cinema combines 
HDR video, immersive surround sound

By Mel Lambert

In addition to its advances in immersive surround sound, culminating in the new object-based Atmos format for theatrical and consumer playback, Dolby remains committed to innovating video solutions for the post and digital cinema communities.

Leveraging video technologies developed for high-resolution video monitors targeted at on-location, colorist and QC displays, the company also has been developing Dolby Cinema, which combines proprietary high dynamic range (HDR) Dolby Vision with Dolby Atmos immersive sound playback.

The first Dolby Cinema installations comprise a joint venture with AMC Entertainment — the nation’s second-largest theater chain — and, according AMC’s EVP of US operations, John McDonald, the companies are planning to unveil up to 100 such “Dolby Cinema at AMC Prime” theaters around the world within the next decade. To date, approximately a dozen such premium large format (PLF) locations have opened in the US and Europe.

Dolby Vision requires two specially modified, HDR Christie Digital 4K laser projectors, together with state-of-the-art optics and image processing, to provide an HDR output with light levels significantly greater than conventional Xenon digital projectors. Dolby Vision’s HDR output, with enhanced color technology, has been lauded by filmmakers for its enhanced contrast, high brightness and gamut range that is said to more closely match human vision.

Unique to the Dolby Vision projection system, beyond its brightness and vivid color reproduction, is its claimed ability to deliver HDR images with an extended contrast ratio that exceeds any other image technology currently on the market. The result is described by Dolby as a “richer, more detailed viewing experience, with strikingly vivid and realistic images that transport audiences into a movie’s immersive world.”

During a recent system demo at AMC16 in Burbank, Doug Darrow, Dolby’s SVP of Cinema, said, “Today’s movie audiences have an insatiable appetite for experiences. They want to be moved, and they want to feel [the on-screen action]. The combination of our Dolby Vision technology and Dolby Atmos offers audiences an immersive audio-video experience.”

The new proprietary system offers up to 31-foot-Lamberts of screen brightness for 2D Dolby Vision content, more than twice the 14 fL required by the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) specification.

Recent films released in Dolby Cinema include Sony’s The Perfect Guy; Paramount’s Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation; Fox’s Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials; Fox’s The Martian, Warner’s Pan; and Universal’s’ Everest. Upcoming releases include Warner’s In the Heart of the Sea; Lionsgate’s The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 and Disney’s The Jungle Book.

During a series of endorsement videos shown at the Burbank showcase, Wes Ball, director of Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, said, “It’s the only way I want to show movies.”

The new theatrical presentation format fits into existing post workflows, according to Stuart Bowling, Dolby’s director of content and creative relations. “Digital cameras are capable of capturing images with tremendous dynamic range that is suitable for Dolby Vision, which is capable of delivering a wide P3 color gamut. Laser projection can also extend the P3 color space to exceed Rec. 2020 [ITU-R Recommendation BT.2020], which is invaluable for animation and VFW. For now, however, we will likely see filmmakers stay within the P3 gamut.”

For enhanced visual coverage, the large-format screens extend from wall to wall and floor to ceiling, with matte-back side wall and fittings to reduce ambient light scattering that can easily diminish the HDR experience. “Whereas conventional presentations offer maybe 2,000:1 contrast ratios,” Bowling stressed, “Dolby Vision offers 1,000,000:1 [dynamic range], with true, inky blacks.”

Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

NAB 2015 Wrap-Up: The final days

By Will Rogers

That was quite a week. Wednesday and Thursday at the NAB Show were much less hectic than Monday and Tuesday — no long lines for freshly squeezed product releases or swaths of spectators with tunnel vision. But don’t be fooled… every day of NAB is jam-packed and fast-paced, but the latter part of the week brought more of a wander-and-observe atmosphere.

I forgot to set my alarm for the same time every day, so I got into Wednesday’s FCC keynote a
little late. I caught the tail end of Tom Wheeler’s talk, but after the crowd was released, I Continue reading

SGO Mistika to support Dolby Vision

SGO’s color grading and finishing platform Mistika will support Dolby Vision technology in its next available version, enabling the display of high dynamic range (HDR) images with wider color gamut capabilities.

SGO, working in close collaboration with Dolby, intends to make the Dolby Vision workflow capabilities available in Mistika from V.8.2, which was previewed at NAB and is due for release shortly after IBC 2014.

Dolby Vision allows creative teams to use the full gamut of colors, peak brightness and local contrast, knowing that those will be reproduced on televisions that feature Dolby Vision.

Said Roland Vlaicu, Senior Director, Broadcast Imaging, Dolby, “Films and TV shows will look more like the real world, and viewers will notice details that might have previously gone unseen.”

“All the necessary underlying requirements are already in place, guaranteeing our customers a future-proof return in their investment,” said SGO’s Director of Global Sales and Operations Geoff Mills. “Dolby Vision delivers vivid imagery, and we’re absolutely thrilled to be one of the first in our industry to make this technology a reality.”