Tag Archives: Dan Dome

Video Chat: Posting Late Night With Seth Meyers from home

By Randi Altman

For many, late-night shows have been offering up laughs during a really tough time, with hosts continuing to shoot from dens, living rooms, backyards and country houses, often with spouses and kids pitching in as crew.

NBC’s Late Night With Seth Meyers is one of those shows. They had their last in-studio taping on March 13, followed by a scheduled hiatus week, followed by the news they wouldn’t be able to come back to the studio. That’s when his team started preproduction and workflow testing to figure out questions like “How are we going to transfer files?” and “How are we going to get it on the air?”

I recently interviewed associate director and lead editor Dan Dome about their process and how that workflow has been allowing Meyers to check in daily from his wasp-ridden and probably haunted attic.

(Watch our original Video Interview here or below.)

How are you making this remote production work?
We’re doing a combination of things. We are using our network laptops to edit footage that’s coming in for interviews or comedy pieces. That’s all being done locally, meaning on our home systems and without involving our SAN or anything like that. So we’re cutting interviews and comedy pieces and then sending links out for approval via Dropbox. Why Dropbox? The syncing features are really great when uploading and downloading footage to all the various places we need to send it.

Once a piece is approved and ready to go into the show — we know the timings are right, we know the graphics are right, we know the spelling is correct, audio levels look good, video levels look good — then we upload that back to Dropbox and back to our computers at 30 Rock where our offices are located. We’re virtually logging into our machines there to compile the show. So, yeah, there are a few bits and pieces to building stuff remotely. And then there are a few bits and pieces to actually compiling the show on our systems back at home base.

What do you use for editing?
We’re still on Adobe Premiere. We launched on Premiere when the show started in February of 2014, and we’re still using that version — it’s solid and stable, and doing a daily show, we don’t necessarily get a ton of time to test new versions. So we have a stable version that we like for doing the show composite aspect of things.

When we’re back at 30 Rock and editing remote pieces, we’re using the newer versions of Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015.2 9.2.0 (41 Build). At home we are using Premiere Pro CC 2020 14.0.4 (Build 18).

Let talk about how Seth’s been shooting. What’s his main camera?
Some of the home studio recording has been on iPads and iPhones. Then we’re using Zoom to do interviews, and there are multiple records of that happening. The files are then uploaded and downloaded between the edit team, and our director is in on the interviews, setting up cameras and trying to get it to look the best it can.

Once those interviews are done, the different records get uploaded to Dropbox. On my home computer, I use a 6TB CalDigit drive for Dropbox syncing and media storage. (Devon Schwab and Tony Dolezal, who are also editing pieces, use 4TB G-RAID drives with Thunderbolt 3.) So as soon as they tell me the file is up, I sync locally on the folder I know it’s going to, the media automatically downloads, and we simultaneously download it to our systems at 30 Rock. So it syncs there as well. We have multiple copies of it, and if we need to, we can hand off a project between me, Devin or Tony; we can do that pretty easily.

Have you discovered any challenges or happy surprises working this way?
It has been a nice happy surprise that it’s like, “Oh wow, this is working pretty well.” We did have a situation where we thought we might lose power on the East coast because of rains and winds and things like that. So we had safeguards in place for that, as far as having an evergreen show that was ready to go for that night in case we did end up losing power. It would have been terrible, but everything held up, and it worked pretty well.

So there are certainly some challenges to working this way, but it’s amazing that we are working and we can keep our mind on other things and just try to help entertain people while this craziness is going on.

You can watch our original Video Interview with Dome here:

‘Late Night with Seth Meyers’ associate director of post Dan Dome

This long-time editor talks about his path to late night television

By Randi Altman

You could say that editing runs through Dan Dome’s veins. Dome, associate director of post at Late Night with Seth Meyers, started in the business in 1994 when he took a job as a tape operator at National Video Industries (NVI) in New York.

Dome grew up around post — his dad, Art, was a linear videotape editor at NVI, working on Shop Rite spots and programming for a variety of other clients. Art had previously edited commercials for such artists as Kiss and was awarded a gold record for Kiss Alive 2. Dome loved to go in and watch his dad work. “I saw that there were a lot of machines and I knew he put videos together, but I was completely clueless to what the real process was.”

Dome’s first job at NVI was working in the centralized machine room as a tape operator. “I learned how to read a waveform monitor and a vectorscope, how to patch up Betacam SP, 1-inch and D2 machines to linear edit rooms, insert stages, graphics and audio suites. I also learned how to change the timings of the switcher through a proc amp — the nuts and bolts.”

This process proved to be invaluable. “Being able to have an understanding of signal flow on the technical side helped a ton in my career,” he explains. “A lot of post jobs are super technical. You’ve got to know the software and you’ve got to know the computers and machines; those were the fundamentals I learned in the machine room. I had to learn it all.”

While at NVI, nonlinear editing via the Avid Media Composer came on the scene. Dome took every advantage to learn this new way of working. After his 4pm-to-midnight shift as tape op, he would stay in the Avid rooms learning all he could about the software. He also befriended an editor who rented space at NVI. Christian Giornelli allowed Dome to shadow him on the Media Composer and, later, assist on different projects.

After a time, he became comfortable on the Avid. “I was working as a tape operator and editing at night at NVI, cutting promos and show reels. The first professional editing job I had was cutting the Neil Peart Test For Echo instructional drum video. Shortly after editing that video, I left NVI to pursue freelance work.”

A year into freelancing, Dome began doing work for the NBC promo department working on a little bit of everything, including cutting promos for various shows and sales tapes. During this time, freelance work also brought him to Broadway Video, MSNBC, MTV and VH1 — he was steadily building up a nice resume.

Let’s find out more about his path and how he landed at Late Night with Seth Myers...

When you and I were first in contact, you were out in LA working on the Conan O’Brien show on TBS.
Yes. My early work with NBC’s promo department led me to NBC’s post team, and they started booking me on gigs for Dateline, The Today Show and, every now and then, as an editor on Late Night With Conan O’Brien. I developed a great relationship with the writers and the other editors on Conan. When the transition to HD happened, they chose to use in a nonlinear system, Avid DS, which I learned. That helped me work on the first HD season of Saturday Night Live through the 2008 season.

Late Night With Conan O’Brien had two primary show editors and another editor cutting remote packages. I started falling into that group more and more, and close to the time Conan was taking over for Jay Leno on The Tonight Show, two of the editors retired. Myself and another editor ended up seeing Conan’s Late Night off the air.

During that time, I developed a great relationship with the associate director and mentioned that I wouldn’t mind moving out to California if they needed an editor. They did. I started working with Conan on The Tonight Show and continued on when he went over to do Conan on TBS. All in all, I was out in LA for almost five years.

How did you end up back in New York and working on Seth Meyers?
While I did enjoy California, I got a little homesick. I heard that Seth was taking over for Late Night from Jimmy Fallon and threw my hat in the ring for that show.

Let’s talk about Seth’s show. Did you help to set up the post workflow?
Late Night with Seth Meyers was the third show I’d launched as a lead editor — there was Conan’s Tonight Show, then Conan’s show on TBS and then Late Night with Seth. It was great to be at Late Night from the ground up, and now, with the title of associate director/lead editor,

 I worked with our engineers at NBC as far as folder structure on the SAN, what our workflow was going to be, what NLE we were going to use, what plug-ins we needed — we worked very closely on workflow and how we were going to deliver the show to air and the web.

A lot of those systems had already been in place, but there are always new technologies to consider. We went through the whole workflow and got it as streamlined as possible.

You are using Adobe Premiere, can you tell us why that was the right tool for this show?
Well, Final Cut 7 wasn’t going to grow any more, and I wasn’t convinced about Final Cut X. If we went with Avid, we’d need all the Avid-approved gear. We already knew we were going to be on Macs, and we would use AJA Kona cards with Premiere. We based this show’s post model off some of the other shows already using Premiere.

Do you use other parts of the Adobe suite?
The entire post team is using Creative Cloud. I edit, and I have an editor, Devon Schwab, and an assistant, Tony Dolezal. We’re primarily working in Premiere, Audition and Media Encoder. Our graphics artists are in Illustrator, Photoshop and After Effects. Every now and then we editors will dip into After Effects if we need to rotoscope something out, or we’ll use Mocha Pro for motion tracking when something in the show has to be censored or if we are making mattes for color grading.

You guys are live-to-tape — could you walk us through that?
We shoot the show live-to-tape between 6:30pm and 7:30pm. During the first act I’m watching the show as well as listening to the director, the production AD and the control room from my edit suite. If there are camera ISO fixes that need to be addressed, I’m hearing that from the director. If there are any issues with standards, like a word has to be bleeped or content has to be removed, I’m getting those notes from the producers and from the lawyers.

Tony, Dan and Devon.

Tony, Dan and Devon.

As soon as the first act is done, my assistant stops ingest and then starts it back up again, so now I have act one: seven ISO cameras and one program record. The program record file has the show as it’s cut for the audience, so all the graphics are already baked into it, and it’s a 5.1 mix coming from our audio rooms. I bring those eight QuickTime files into Premiere through an app called Easy Find and start laying the show out.

I try and finish all that needs to be done in the first act by the time second act of the show is done being ingested. Once all six acts are done, we’ll have a good idea if the show’s over or under in time. If it’s over, we figure out what we are going to cut. If it’s a little bit under, let’s say 20 or 30 seconds, then we may decide to run credits that night.

So taping is done by 7:30?
Yes. At that point the director, the show producers, segment producers and writers come down. We start editing the entire the show together for air. At that point I’ve already built the main project for the show to be edited. I then save a version of my project for my editor and my assistant editor and assign acts for them to edit.

How many do you cut personally?
I’ll usually end up doing three out of the six acts. My editor will do two interview acts, and my assistant will do one, usually the musical act. As the show is being put together for air, I keep track of the show time on an Excel spreadsheet. There’s a lot of communication among us during this time.

Once I do have the show close to time, I start sending individual acts to the Broadcast Operations Center at NBC, so they can start their QC process. That’s between 8:00pm or 8:15pm. As they are getting the six acts and they’ve begun to QC them, I release my timing sheet so they can confirm the show is on time. It’s 41 minutes and 20 seconds, and they get it ready to go to what they call a “composite” after QC. They composite the show between 10:30pm and 11:30pm with all the commercials put in. I’m completely done for the night when the show hits the air at 12:35am… if there have been no emergencies.

Taking a step back, how do you cut the pre-packaged bits?
Usually those go to my editor Devon. He will be editing, mixing audio and I will be doing the color grade — all within Premiere. If it’s a two- or three-camera shoot, I’ll get a look established for the A, B and the C cameras and have the segment director give notes on the color grade. Once the grade is approved, Devon can then just apply the color to the finished piece. Sometimes we are finessing pre-tapes right up until show record time at 6:30pm.

One recent color grade I did, that Devon edited, was a pre-taped piece called Reasonable Max, which was about Seth’s deleted scenes from the film Mad Max: Fury Road.

Anything you want to add before we wrap up?
I feel very lucky to have had all these experiences in the TV business. I want to thank my dad for introducing me to it and all the people who helped me get where I am today. The most talented people in the business staff all the shows that I have been lucky enough to work on. Watch Late Night With Seth Meyers, weeknights at 12:35 on NBC!