Tag Archives: COVID 19

Production begins again on New Zealand’s Shortland Street series

By Katie Hinsen

The current global pandemic has shut down production all over the world. Those who can have moved to working from home, and there’s speculation about how and when we’ll get back to work again.

New Zealand, a country with a significant production economy, has announced that it will soon reopen for shoots. The most popular local television show, Shortland Street, was the first to resume production after an almost six-week break. It’s produced by Auckland’s South Pacific Pictures.

Dylan Reeve

I am a native New Zealander who has worked in post there on and off over the years. Currently I live in Los Angeles, where I am an EP for dailies and DI at Nice Shoes, so taking a look at how New Zealand is rolling things out interests me. With that in mind, I reached out to Dylan Reeve, head of post production at Shortland Street, to find out how it looked the week they went back to work under Level 3 social distancing restrictions.

Shortland Street is a half-hour soap that runs five nights a week on prime-time television. It has been on air for around 28 years and has been consistently among the highest-rated shows in the nation. It’s a cultural phenomenon. While the cast and crew take a single three-week annual break from production during the Christmas holiday season, the show has never really stopped production … until the pandemic hit.

Shortland Street’s production crew is typically made up of about 100 people; the post department consists of two editors, two assistants, a composer and Reeve, who is also the online editor. Sound mixes and complex VFX are done elsewhere, but everything else for the production is done at the studio.

New Zealand responded to COVID-19 early, instituting one of the harshest lockdowns in the world. Reeve told me that they went from alert Level 1 — basic social distancing, more frequent handwashing — to Level 3 as soon as the first signs of community transmission were detected. They stayed at this level for just two days before going to Level 4: complete lockdown. New Zealanders had 48 hours to get home to their families, shop for supplies and make sure they were ready.

“On a Monday afternoon at about 1:30pm, the studio emptied out,” explains Reeve. “We were shut down, but we were still on air, and we had about five or six weeks’ worth of episodes in various stages of production and post. I then had two days to figure out and prepare for how we were going to finish all of those and make sure they got delivered so that the show could continue to be on air.”

Shortland Street’s main production building dressed as the exterior of the hospital where the show is set, with COVID workplace safety materials on the doors.

The nature of the show’s existing workflow meant that Reeve had to copy all the media to drives and send Avids and drives home with the editors. The assistant editors logged in remotely for any work they needed to do, and Reeve took what he needed home as well to finish onlining, prepping and delivering those already-shot episodes to the broadcaster. They used Frame.io for review and approval with the audio team and with the directors, producers and network.

“Once we knew we were coming back into Level 3, and the government put out more refined guidelines about what that required, we had a number of HoD meetings — figuring out how we could produce the show while maintaining the restrictions necessary.”

I asked Reeve whether he and his crew felt safe going back to work. He reminded me that New Zealand only went back down to Level 3 once there had been a period with no remaining evidence of community transmission. Infection rates in New Zealand had spent two weeks in single digits, including two days when no new cases had been reported.

Starting Up With Restrictions
My conversation with Reeve took place on May 4, right after his first few days back at work. I asked him to explain some of the conditions under which the production was working while the rest of the country was still in isolation. Level 3 in New Zealand is almost identical to the lockdown restrictions put in place in US cities like New York and Los Angeles.

“One of the key things that has changed in terms of how we’re producing the show is that we physically have way less crew in the building. We’re working slower, and everyone’s having to do a bit more, maybe, than they would normally.

Shortland Street director Ian Hughes and camera operator Connagh Heath discussing blocking with a one-metre guide.

“When crew are in a controlled workspace where we know who everyone is,” he continues, “that allows us to keep track of them properly — they’re allowed to work within a meter of one another physically (three feet). Our policy is that we want staff to stay two meters (six feet) apart from one another as much as possible. But when we’re shooting, when it’s necessary, they can be a meter from one another.”

Reeve says the virus has certainly changed the nature of what can be shot. There are no love scenes, no kissing and no hugs. “We’re shooting to compensate for that; staging people to make them seem closer than they are.

Additionally, everything stays within the production environment. Parts of our office have been dressed; parts of our building have been dressed. We’ll do a very low-profile exterior shoot for scenes that take place outside, but we’re not leaving the lot.”

Under Level 3, everyone is still under isolation at home. This is why, explains Reeve, social distancing has to continue at work. That way any infection that comes into the team can be easily traced and contained and affect as few others as possible. Every department maintains what they call a “bubble,” and very few individuals are allowed to cross between them.

Actors are doing their own hair and makeup, and there are no kitchen or craft services available. The production is using and reusing a small number of regular extras, with crew stepping in occasionally as well. Reeve noted that Australia was also resuming production on Neighbours, with crew members acting as extras.

“Right now in our studio, our full technical complement consists of three camera operators at the moment, just one boom operator and one multi-skilled person who can be the camera assist, the lighting assist and the second boom op if necessary. I don’t know how a US production would get away with that. There’s no chance that someone who touches lights on a union production can also touch a boom.”

Post Production
Shortland Street’s post department is still working from home. Now that they are back in production, they are starting to look at more efficient ways to work remotely. While there are a lot of great tools out there for remote post workflows, Reeve notes that for them it’s not that easy, especially when hardware and support are halfway across the world, borders are closed and supply chains are disrupted.

There are collaboration tools that exist, but they haven’t been used “simply because the pace and volume of our production means it’s often hard to adapt for those kinds of products,” he says. “Every time we roll camera, we’re rolling four streams of DNxHD 185, so nearly 800Mb/s each time we roll. We record that media directly into the server to be edited within hours, so putting that in the cloud or doing anything like that was never the best workflow solution. When we wanted feedback, we just grabbed people from the building and dragged them into the edit suite when we wanted them to look at something.”

Ideally, he says, they would have tested and invested in these tools six months ago. “We are in what I call a duct tape stage. We’re taking things that exist, that look useful, and we’re trying to tape them together to make a solution that works for us. Coming out of this, I’m going to have to look at the things we’ve learned and the opportunities that exist and decide whether or not there might be some ways we can change our future production. But at the moment, we’re just trying to make it through.”

Because Shortland Street has only just resumed shooting, they haven’t reached the point yet where they need to do what Reeve calls “the first collaborative director/editor thing” from start to finish. “But there are two plans that we’re working toward. The easy, we-know-it-works plan is that we do an output, we stick it on Frame.io, the director watches it, puts notes on it, sends it back to us. We know that works, and we do that sometimes with directors anyway.

“The more exciting idea is that we have the directors join us on a remote link and watch the episodes as they would if they were in the room. We’ve experimented with a few things and haven’t found a solution that makes us super-happy. It’s tricky because we don’t have an existing hardware solution in place that’s designed specifically for streaming a broadcast output signal over an internet connection. We can do a screen-share, and we’ve experimented with Zoom and AnyDesk, but in both those cases, I’ve found that sometimes the picture will break up unacceptably, or sync will drift — especially using desktop-sharing software that’s not really designed to share full-screen video.”

Reeve and crew are just about to experiment with a tool used for gaming called Parsec. It’s designed to share low-latency, in-sync, high-frame-rate video. “This would allow us to share an entire desktop at, theoretically, 60fps with half-second latency or less. Very brief tests looked good. Plan A is to get the directors to join us on Parsec and screen-share a full-screen output off Avid. They can watch it down and discuss with the editor in real time or just make their own notes and work through it interactively. If that experience isn’t great, or if the directors aren’t enjoying it, or if it’s just not working for some reason, we’ll fall back to outputting a video, uploading it to Frame.io and waiting for notes.

What’s Next?
What are the next steps for other productions returning to work? Shortland Street is the only production that chose to resume under Level 3. The New Zealand Film Commission has said that filming will resume eventually under Level 2, which is being rolled out in several stages beginning this week. Shortland Street’s production company has several other shows, but none have plans to resume yet.

“I think it’s a lot harder for them to stay contained because they can’t shoot everything in the studio,” explains Reeve. “Our production has an added advantage because it is constantly shooting and the core cast and crew are mostly the same every day. I think these types of productions will find it easiest to come back.”

Reeve says that anyone coming into their building has to sign in and deliver a health declaration — recent travel, contact with any sick person, other work they’ve been engaged in. “I think if you can do some of that reasonable contact tracing with the people in your production, it will be easier to start again. The more contained you can keep it, the better. It’s going to be hard for productions that are on location, have high turnover or a large number of extras — anything where they can’t keep within a bubble.

“From a post point of view, I think we’re going to get a lot more comfortable working remotely,” he continues. “And there are lots of editors who already do that, especially in New Zealand. If that can become the norm, and if there are tools and workflows that are well established to support that, it could be really good for post production. It offers a lot of great opportunities for people to essentially broaden their client essentially or the geographic regions in which they can work.

Productions are going to have to make their own sort of health and safety liability decisions, according to Reeve. “All of the things we are doing are effectively responding to New Zealand government regulation, but that won’t be the case for everyone else.”

He sees some types of production finding an equilibrium. “Love Island might be the sort of reality show you can make. You can quarantine everyone going into that show for 14 days, make sure they’re all healthy, and then shoot the show because you’re basically isolated from the world. Survivor as well, things like that. But a reality show where people are running around the streets isn’t happening anymore. There’s no Amazing Race, that’s for sure.”


After a 20-year career talent-side, Katie Hinsen turned her attention to building, developing and running post facilities with a focus on talent, unique business structures and innovative use of technology. She has worked on over 90 major feature and episodic productions, founded the Blue Collar Post Collective, and currently leads the dailies & DI department at Nice Shoes.

Sound Devices producing 30,000 face shields per day

During times of crisis, people and companies step up. One of those companies is Wisconsin-based pro audio equipment manufacturer Sound Devices, wnhich is producing more than 30,000 face shields each day to help keep frontline workers safe in the fight against COVID-19. The company has pulled together a coalition of local manufacturers in the Reedsburg, Wisconsin, area to achieve this number, including Columbia Parcar, VARC, Cellox and Hankscraft AJS.

Sound Devices realized it could simultaneously play a direct role in helping protect health care workers and keep local area production-line workers employed. Around 100 people in the Reedsburg area are working daily to bring in material, assemble and ship the FS-1 face shields. Sound Devices sells the shields at a nonprofit price and has already shipped nearly a quarter million shields around Wisconsin and the rest of the US.

“The real heroes in this operation have been our line workers,” says Lisa Wiedenfeld, VP of finance and operations at Sound Devices. “They have been coming in day after day and cranking out these face shields while maintaining strict safety standards including wearing face masks, 10-foot distancing and extensive sanitation procedures. Under normal circumstances, ramping up manufacturing on a high volume of a new product is challenging enough, let alone avoiding a dangerous virus at the same time. My hat is off to all of our workers.”

“We started production of our FS-1 and FS-1NL face shields on March 24th, producing about 400 per day. As we’ve increased production to 30,000 per day, one of the most difficult aspects has been procuring enough parts to build consistently,” said Matt Anderson, CEO /president of Sound Devices. “Luckily, we have an extremely resourceful purchasing team. They have tapped our excellent network of Wisconsin-based suppliers. When our production levels outstripped what our suppliers here could do, our overseas suppliers pitched in to augment the supply of parts. But getting parts sent to us has been extremely difficult due to the reduced capacity of shippers. This whole experience has been very challenging but rewarding.”

Sound Devices now has FS-1 (original) and FS-1NL (latex-free) shields in stock. Face shields may be purchased by anyone in the US directly from store.sounddevices.com or by contacting sales@sounddevices.com.

How VFX house Phosphene has been working remotely

By Randi Altman

In our ongoing coverage of how studios are working remotely, we reached out to New York City-based visual effects house Phosphene. Founded in 2010 by Vivian Connolly and John Bair, Phosphene specializes in photorealistic VFX for film and television, and is particularly known for their detailed CG environments and set extensions.

This four-time Emmy-nominated (Mildred Pierce and Boardwalk Empire Season 3, Season 5, Escape at Dannemora) studio’s more recent work includes The Plot Against America, The Hunters, A Beautiful Day in The Neighborhood and Motherless Brooklyn.

The Plot Against America

Like many others, Phosphene tasked with developing secure remote workflows, so we reached out to director of IT Jimmy Marrero and head of operations and strategy Beck Dunn to find out more.

How is Phosphene weathering this storm? Do you have most of your folks working remotely?
Beck Dunn: We were fortunate to be able to switch to remote work very quickly and are extremely grateful for our team who had been preparing for this major change. We are grateful we are in a position to support staff and productions who are able to continue working remotely.

Can you talk about what it took to get artists setup from their homes and walk us through that workflow?
Jimmy Marrero: Luckily, we’ve had experience with using PCOIP technology in the past and were in a good place to transition smoothly to remote work. We had a good number of workstations already set up with PCOIP remote workstation cards. We also leveraged AWS to create cloud workstations that are connected to our office via a VPC (virtual private cloud). This gives us the capability to securely increase our capacity for work way beyond any physical hardware limitations.

What tools are you using to make sure these folks stay connected?
Marrero: We all communicate with each other via chat using an open-source tool called Rocket.Chat. Producers connect via BlueJeans video conference.

For anyone setting up a remote pipeline, I would also recommend taking advantage of cloud-based software like Slack for communication, Trello for organization, and AnyDesk to allow IT to help troubleshoot any issues that might occur during the setup process.

What about security and working remotely?
Marrero: Security was the driving force for us to investigate the advantages of PCOIP technology. Having remote workstation cards installed at the office allows us to stream encrypted screen information directly to the artists monitors and eliminates the need for any data to be hosted outside of Phosphene’s internal network.

Using PCOIP combined with only being able to access our network via VPN with two-factor authentication, we were able to address many security concerns from our clients, which was a key factor in our being able to work remotely.

PCOIP technology also allows us to easily use all the tools on our internal network, with no change in set up, or compromise to security. Once logged in, artists are able to access Nuke, Hiero, 3dsMax, Houdini and Deadline as though they are in the office.

What types of work are you guys doing at the moment?
Dunn: We can’t talk about any of our current work, but one project we recently finished is HBO’s The Plot Against America, created by Ed Burns and David Simon. The show is based on Philip Roth’s 2004 novel depicting the lives of US citizens in an alternate history where Franklin D.Roosevelt loses the 1940 presidential election to Charles Lindbergh.

Phosphene worked with show-side VFX supervisor Jim Rider on a wide range of visual effects for the show, including creating period-accurate aerial views of 1940’s Manhattan, exteriors of Newark Airport and a British Navy base, and extensive crowd duplication shots inside Madison Square Garden. In total, Phosphene delivered 274 shots for the limited series.

The Plot Against America

Any tips for those companies who are just starting to get set up remotely or even those who are currently working remotely?
Marrero: Be nice to your IT department. (Smiles) Working remotely has many moving parts that need to all work perfectly for things to go smoothly. Expect delays in the beginning as all the kinks are worked out.

What has helped staffers get settled into working from home?
Dunn: I’ll let them speak for themselves.

VFX producer Matthew Griffin: I found it really helpful to set up a dedicated mini-office rather than just working on a laptop from the couch. When I sit down at my workspace, I feel like I am still “going into” the office. Holding team meetings via video chat and maintaining rituals like having my morning coffee at the same time also helps me to stay in a familiar rhythm. We also have a dog, so walking him at the end of the day makes the workday feel complete. I close the laptop, walk the dog, and once I’m home, it’s like my commute is over and it’s time to relax.

VFX producer Steven Weigle: Producers are used to working remotely for short stints, so this hasn’t been an entirely foreign experience. I did recently add a KVM switch to my home setup, to use my full-sized keyboard, mouse and monitor to control my work laptop but be able to switch back to my personal machine with the click of a button. It’s a small, basic upgrade but it helps me maximize my desk space while still separating my “work brain” from my “home brain.”


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

More words of wisdom from editor Jesse Averna, ACE

We are all living in a world we’ve never had to navigate before. People’s jobs are in flux, others are working from home, and anxiety is a regular part of our lives. Through all the chaos, Jesse Averna has been a calming voice on social media, so postPerspective reached out to ask him once again to address our readership directly. You can see his last column here.

Jesse is a five-time Emmy-winning ACE editor living in LA and working in the animation feature world.


Hey,

How are you holding up? I just wanted to check in and offer a few more words.

This sucks. It isn’t good for anyone. And it’s okay to admit that. It’s healthy. This isn’t an opportunity you’ve been given. It’s a crisis. Sure, you’re at home, if you’re one of the lucky ones, but your life has been rocked.

Sometimes the best thing you can do is simply survive. In case no one else in your life is telling you this: Give yourself a break. Please take a pause before you carve new ruts to fall into, and realize that your mental health is of the upmost importance.

How are you? Are you adapting? Are you alone and lonely? Are you having live video meetings and editing from home while juggling kids? No matter your personal situation, it’s uncomfortable, full of unexpected challenges and likely wearing you out.

If you need a hand, ask for it. If you need to talk to someone, reach out. If you need a moment of peace, go jump in the shower. Do whatever you need to do to find peace in your day. You deserve that. While you’re setting these new patterns to fall into, please keep yourself a priority. Because here’s the truth: You are very important to the other people in the home you’re now in all the time.

You’re important to your friends and family. You’re important to your coworkers. You are a wonderful, one-of-a-kind jewel that’s under pressure at the moment. This moment will pass. You will go on. This is a horrible tragedy. There is no downplaying that. Nor should we. Just know that we need you. We need you next month. We need you next year. Please take good care of yourself. You are looked up to. You are loved. You are missed. You are valued. You are the only “you” we are going to get. So, please, check in with yourself. Prioritize yourself. Be kind to yourself. You’re doing great. Hang in there.

Jesse
@dr0id


Jesse Averna, who was co-founder of the popular Twitter chat and Facebook group @PostChat, works at Disney Animation Studio and is a member of the American Cinema Editors.He recently edited is a primetime special for Sesame Street, which first aired on April 14. If you missed the special’s debut, you can catch Sesame Street’s “Elmo’s Playdate” on HBO and PBS streaming apps.

Talking localization with Deluxe’s Chris Reynolds

In a world where cable networks and streaming services have made global content the norm, localization work is more important than ever. For example, Deluxe’s global localization team provides content creators with transcription, scripting, translation, audio description, subtitling and dubbing services. Their team is made up of 1,300 full-time employees and a distributed workforce of over 6,000 translators, scripting editors, AD writers and linguistic quality experts that cover more than 75 languages.

Chris Reynolds

We reached out to Chris Reynolds, Deluxe’s SVP/GM of worldwide localization, to find out more.

Can you talk about dubbing, which is a big part of this puzzle?
We use our own Deluxe-owned studios across the globe, along with our extensive partner network of more than 350 dubbing studios around the world. We also have technology partners that we call on for automated language detection, conform, transcription and translation tools.

What technology do you use for these services?
Our localization solution is part of Deluxe’s cloud-based platform, Deluxe One. It uses cloud-based automation and integrated web applications for our workforce to help content creators and distributors who need to localize content in order to reach audiences.

You seem to have a giant well of talent to pull from.
We’ve been building up our workforce for over 15 years. Today’s translations and audio mixes have to be culturally adapted so that content reflects the creative and emotional intent of writers, directors and actors. We want the content to resonate and the audience to react appropriately.

How did Deluxe build this network?
Deluxe launched its localization group over 15 years ago, and from the beginning we believed that you need a global workforce to support the demands of global audiences so they could access high-quality localized content quickly and affordably.

Because our localization platform and services have been developed to support Deluxe’s end-to-end media supply chain offering, we know how to provide quality results across multiple release windows.

We continue to refine our services to simplify reuse of localized assets across theatrical, broadcast and streaming platforms. The build-up of our distributed workforce was intentional and based on ensuring that we’re recruiting talent whose quality of work supports these goals. We match our people to the content and workflows that properly leverage their skill sets.

Can you talk about your workflow/supply chain? What tools do you call on?
We’ve been widening our use of automation and AI technologies. The goal is always to speed up our processes while maintaining pristine quality. This means expanding our use of automated speech recognition (ASR) and machine translation (MT), as well as implementing automated QC, conversion, conform, compare and task assignment features to streamline our localization supply chain. The integration of these technologies into our cloud-based localization platform has been a significant focus for us.

Is IMF part of that workflow?
IMF is absolutely a part of the workflow, In fact, driving its adoption is the rapid growth of localized international iterations for over-the-top (OTT), video on demand (VOD), and subscription video on demand (SVOD). Deluxe has been using localized component workflows since their inception, which is the core concept that IMF uses to simplify versioning.

Is the workflow automated?
To an extent … adding new technology into our workflow is designed to make things more efficient. And these technologies are not meant as a replacement for our talent. Automation helps free up those artists from the more manual tasks and allows them to focus on the more creative aspects of localization.

By using automation in our workflows, we have been able to take on additional projects and explore new areas in M&E localization. We will continue to use workflow automation and AI/ML in our work.

Can you talk about transcription and how you handle that process?
Transcription is a critical part of the localization process and is a step that demands the highest possible quality. Whether we’re creating a script, delivering live or prerecorded captions, or creating an English template for subsequent translations, the initial transcription must be accurate.

Our teams use ASR to help speed up the process, but because the expectation is so high and many transcription tasks also require annotation that current AI technologies can’t deliver, our human workforce must review, qualify, amend and adapt the ASR output.

All of our transcription work undergoes a secondary QA at some point. Sometimes the initial deliverable is immediate, as is the case with live captions, but even then, revisions are often made during secondary key-outs or before the file is delivered for subsequent downstream use.

What are some of the biggest challenges for localization?
The rise in original content distribution and global distribution and the need to localize that content faster than ever is probably the biggest general challenge. We also continue to see new competitors entering the already crowded market.

And it’s not just competitors — customers are challenging our industry standards too, with some bringing localization in house. To accommodate this change, we’re always adapting and refining workflows to fit what our customers need. We are always checking in with them to make sure our teams can anticipate change and create solutions that solve challenges before they impact the rest of the supply chain.

What are some projects that you’ve worked on recently?
Some examples are Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, The Mandalorian, The Irishman, Joker, Marriage Story and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

Finally, taking into account the COVID-19 crisis, I imagine that worldwide content will be needed even more. How will this affect your part of the process?
The demand for in-home entertainment continues to climb, mainly driven by an uptick in OTT and gaming in light of these unprecedented events. We are working with creators, media owners and platforms to provide localization services that can help respond to this recent influx in the global distribution of films and series.

Unfortunately, because several productions and dubbing studios around the world have had to shut down, there will be delays getting new content out. We’re working closely with our customers to complete as much work as we can during this time so that everyone can ramp up quickly once things start back up.

We’re also seeing big increases in catalog content orders for streaming platforms. Our teams are helping by providing large-scale subtitle and audio conforms, creating any new subtitles as needed, and creating dubbed audio versions for those languages that are not affected by studio closures.

Aris EP offering free editing courses during COVID crisis

Aris, a full-service production and post house based in Los Angeles, is partnering with ThinkLA to offer free online editing classes for those who want to sharpen their skills while staying close to home during this worldwide crisis. The series will be taught by Aris EP/founder Greg Bassenian, who is also an award-winning writer and director. He has also edited numerous projects for clients including Coca-Cola, Chevy and Zappos.

“As the production industry has come to a rapid halt, these are challenging times for everyone. Thankfully, our post artists are able to continue their work remotely,” says Bassenian. “But we began to think about a way we could give back during these extraordinarily difficult times, and how we could offer something of assistance to both industry and non-industry professionals. We hope that this can provide people with some assistance and benefit, and hopefully some inspiration as we all try to get through this situation together.”

ThinkLA is a nonprofit organization with a mission to connect, inspire and educate the Los Angeles marketing community. The course is the first in a three-course series throughout the two companies are offering through the month of April. The Fundamentals of Editing covers how to set up a project, the basics of working with footage, and finishing and exporting your completed piece. The virtual course is a primer for those interested in learning the principles of video editing unfolding over three one-hour lessons held on consecutive Fridays – April 3rd, 10th, and 17th – at 11 am PDT.

The only prerequisite is that students have an Adobe Premiere Pro subscription before the classes begin. You can download a free 30-day trial here. The course is limited to 50 members per session — on a first come first serve basis — and no prior editing experience is necessary. You can sign up for the classes here.

Apple and Avid offer free temp licenses during COVID-19 crisis

Apple is offering free 90-day trials of Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X apps for all in order to help those working from home and looking for something new to master, as well as for students who are already using the tools in school but don’t have the apps on their home computers.

Apple Final Cut X

Apple is extending what is normally a 30-day trial for Final Cut Pro X, while a free trial is new to Logic Pro X. The extension to 90 days is for a limited time and will revert to 30 days across both apps in the future.

Trials for both Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X are now available. Customers can download the free trials on the web pages for Final Cut Pro X  and Logic Pro X. The 90-day extension is also available to customers who have already downloaded the free 30-day trial of Final Cut Pro X.

For its part, Avid is offering free temp licenses for remote users of the company’s creative tools. Commercial customers can get a free 90-day license for each registered user of Media Composer | Ultimate, Pro Tools, Pro Tools | Ultimate and Sibelius | Ultimate. For students whose school campuses are closed, any student of an Avid-based learning institution that uses Media Composer, Pro Tools or Sibelius can receive a free 90-day license for the same products.

The offer is open through April 17.

Main Image: Courtesy of Avid

Updated: Product makers offer support to cope with COVID-19 disruption

This is a weird time for our industry and the world. The best we can do is try to keep working and stay safe. For our part, postPerspective will continue to report industry news and tell stories about workflows, artists and tools, in addition to running pieces about how pros are working remotely… and keeping sane.

In fact, if you have a story about how you are working remotely and keeping on keeping on, please share it with us (info@postPerspective.com). Even though we can’t see each other face to face right now, keeping a sense of community has never been more important.

A number of companies are releasing updates, offering discounts, and even making their remote services free for a limited time in order to help everyone keep working through this pandemic. Here is a bit of news from some of those companies, and we will add more companies to this list as the news comes in, so watch this space.

mLogic
mLogic is offering a 15% discount on its mTape Thunderbolt 3 LTO-7 and LTO-8 solutions The discount applies to orders placed on the mTape website through April 20th. Use discount code mLogicpostPerspective15%.

Xytech
Xytech has launched “Xytech After Dark,” a podcast focusing on trends in the media and broadcasting industries. The first two episodes are now available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcasting platforms.

Xytech’s Greg Dolan says the podcast “is not a forum to sell, but instead to talk about why create the functionality in MediaPulse and the types of things happening in our industry.”

Hosted by Xytech’s Gregg Sandheinrich, the podcast will feature Xytech staff, along with special guests. The first two episodes cover topics including the recent HPA Tech Retreat (featuring HPA president Seth Hallen), as well as the cancellation of the NAB Show, the value of trade shows and the effects of COVID-19 on the industry.

Nvidia
Nvidia is expanding its free virtual GPU software evaluation to 500 licenses for 90 days to help companies support their remote workers with their existing GPU infrastructure. Nvidia vGPU software licenses — including Quadro Virtual Workstation — enable GPU-accelerated virtualization so that content creators, designers, engineers and others can continue their work. More details are available here.  Nvidia has also posted a separate blog on virtual GPUs to help admins who are working to support remote employees

Object Matrix 
Object Matrix is offering video tips for surviving working from home. The videos, hosted by co-founder Nicholas Pearce, are here.

Adobe
Adobe shared a guide to best practices for working from home. It’s meant to support creators and filmmakers who might be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide here.

Adobe’s principal Creative Cloud evangelist, Jason Levine, hosted a live stream — Video Workflows With Team Projects ±that focus on remote workflows.

Additionally, Karl Soule, Senior Technical Business Development Manager, hosed a stream focusing on Remote video workflows and collaboration in the enterprise. If you sign up on this page, you can see his presentation.

Streambox
Streambox has introduced a pay-as-you-go software plan for video professionals who use its Chroma 4K, Chroma UHD, Chroma HD and Chroma X streaming encoder/decoder hardware. Since the software has been “decoupled” from the hardware platform, those who own the hardware can rent the software on a monthly basis, pause the subscription between projects and reinstate it as needed. By renting software for a fixed period, creatives can take on jobs without having to pay outright for technology that might have been impractical.

And last week’s offerings as well

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Adobe

Frame.io 
Through the end of March, Frame.io is offering 2TB of free extra storage capacity for 90 days. Those who could use that additional storage to accommodate work from home workflows should email rapid-response@frame.io to get it set up.

Frame.io is also offering free Frame.io Enterprise plans for the next 90 days to support educational institutions, nonprofits and health care organizations that have been impacted. Please email rapid-response@frame.io to set up this account.

To help guide companies through this new reality of remote working, Frame.io is launching a new “Workflow From Home” series on YouTube, hosted by Michael Cioni, with the first episode launching Monday, March 23rd. Cioni will walk through everything artists need to keep post production humming as smoothly as possible. Subscribe to the Frame.io YouTube channel to get notified when it’s released.

EditShare
EditShare has made its web-based, remote production and collaboration tool, Flow Media Management, free through July 1st. Flow enables individuals as well as large creative workgroups to collaborate on story development with capabilities to perform extensive review approval from anywhere in the world. Those interested can complete this form and one of EditShare’s Flow experts will follow up.

Veritone 
Veritone will extend free access to its core applications — Veritone Essentials, Attribute and Digital Media Hub — for 60 days. Targeted to media and entertainment clients in radio, TV, film, sports and podcasting, Veritone Essentials, Attribute, and Digital Media Hub are designed to make data and content sharing easy, efficient and universal. The solutions give any workforce (whether in the office or remote) tools that accelerate workflows and facilitate collaboration. The solutions are fully cloud-based, which means that staff can access them from any home office in the world as long as there is internet access.

More information about the free access is here. Certain limitations apply. Offer is subject to change without notice.

SNS
In an effort to quickly help EVO users who are suddenly required to work on editing projects from home, SNS has released Nomad for on-the-go, work-from-anywhere, remote workflows. It is a simple utility that runs on any Mac or Windows system that’s connected to EVO.

Nomad helps users repurpose their existing ShareBrowser preview files into proxy files for offline editing. These proxy files are much smaller versions of the source media files, and therefore easier to use for remote work. They take up less space on the computer, take less time to copy and are easier to manage. Users can edit with these proxy files, and after they’re finished putting the final touches on the production, their NLE can export a master file using the full-quality, high-resolution source files.

Nomad is available immediately and free to all EVO customers.

Ftrack
Remote creative collaboration tool ftrack Review is free for all until May 31. This date might extend as the global situation continues to unfold. ftrack Review is an out-of-the-box remote review and approval tool that enables creative teams to collaborate on, review and approve media via their desktop or mobile browser. Contextual comments and annotations eliminate confusion and reduce reliance on email threads. ftrack Review accepts many media formats as well as PDFs. Every ftrack Review workspace receives 250 GB of storage.

DejaSoft
DejaSoft is offering editors 50% off all their DejaEdit licenses through the end of April. In addition, the company will help users implement DejaEdit in the best way possible to suit their workflow.

DejaEdit allows editors to share media files and timelines automatically and securely with remote co-workers around the world, without having to be online continuously. It helps editors working on Avid Nexis, Media Composer and EditShare workflows across studios, production companies and post facilities ensure that media files, bins and timelines are kept up to date across multiple remote edit stations.

Adobe
Adobe has shared a guide to best practices for working from home, created in support of creators and filmmakers who may be shifting to remote work and need to stay connected with their teams and continue to complete projects. You can find the guide below and here.

Adobe’s Jason Levine and Karl Soule will also be hosting two livestreams this week that focus on remote workflows, in the hopes of offering helpful tips during this uncertain time – details are below.

Cinedeck 
Cinedeck’s cineXtools allows editing and correcting your file deliveries from home.
From now until April 3rd, pros can get a one month license of cineXtools free of charge.

Main Image: Courtesy of Frame.io