Tag Archives: commercials

Cabin adds two editors, promotes another

LA-based editorial studio Cabin Editing Company has grown its editing staff with the addition of Greg Scruton and Debbie Berman. They have also promoted Scott Butzer to editor. The trio will work on commercials, music videos, branded content and other short-form projects.

Scruton, who joins Cabin from Arcade Edit, has worked on dozens of high-profile commercials and music videos throughout his career, including Pepsi’s 2019 Grammy’s spot Okurrr, starring Cardi B; Palms Casino Resort’s star-filled Unstatus Quo; and Kendrick Lamar’s iconic Humble music video, for which he earned an AICE Award. Scruton has worked with high-profile ad agencies and directors, including Anomaly; Wieden + Kennedy; 72andSunny; Goodby, Silverstein & Partners; Dave Meyers; and Nadia Lee Cohen. He uses Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere.

Feature film editor Berman joins Cabin on the heels of her successful run with Marvel Studios, having recently served as an editor on Spider-Man: Homecoming, Black Panther and Captain Marvel. Her work extends across mediums, with experience editing everything from PSAs and documentaries to animated features. Now expanding her commercial portfolio with Cabin, Berman is currently at work on a Toyota campaign through Saatchi & Saatchi. She will continue to work in features as well. She mostly uses Media Composer but can also work on Premiere.

Cabin’s Butzer was recently promoted to editor after joining the company in 2017 and honing his talent across many platforms, including commercials, music videos and documentaries. His strengths include narrative and automotive work. Recent credits include Every Day Is Your Day for Gatorade celebrating the 2019 Women’s World Cup, The Professor for Mercedes Benz and Vince Staples’ Fun! music video. Butzer has worked with ad agencies and directors, including TBWA\Chiat\Day; Wieden + Kennedy; Goodby, Silverstein & Partners; Team One; Marcus Sonderland; Ryan Booth; and Rachel McDonald. Butzer previously held editorial positions at Final Cut and Whitehouse Post. He studied film at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He also uses Media Composer and Premiere.

Biff Butler joins Work as editor, creative partner

Work Editorial has added Biff Butler to its roster as editor and creative partner. Currently based in Los Angeles, Butler will be available to work in all of the company’s locations, which also include New York and London.

Originally from the UK, Butler moved to Los Angeles in 1999 to pursue a career as a musician, releasing albums and touring the country. Inspired by the title sequence for the movie Se7en cut by Angus Wall at Rock Paper Scissors (RPS), he found himself intrigued by the craft of editing. Following the breakup of his band in 2005 Butler got a job at RPS and, as he puts it, RPS was his film school. There he found his editorial voice and satiated another interest — advertising.

(Check out an interview we did with Butler recently while he was still at RPS.)

Within a couple years, he was cutting spots for Nike, Microsoft, Lexus and Adidas, and in 2008 he made a breakthrough with the Emmy Award-winning will.i.am video Yes We Can video by then-presidential candidate Barack Obama. By 2012 his clientele spanned across both coasts and after moving to New York, he went on to collaborate on some of the era-defining work coming out of the US at the time, with Wieden +Kennedy NY, Anomaly and BBDO amongst others. Perhaps, most notably, was his involvement in the Derek Cianfrance/Dicks Sporting Goods campaign that defined a style in sports commercials.

“I’ve always had an interest in advertising and the process,” says Butler. “I love watching a campaign roll out, seeing it permeate the culture. I still get such a kick out of coming out of the subway and seeing a huge poster from something I’ve been involved with.”

Butler has been recognized for his work, winning numerous AICE, the Clio and Cannes Lion awards as well as receiving an Emmy for the six-part documentary Long Live Benjamin, which he edited and co-directed with creative director Jimm Lasser.

Work founding partner Jane Dilworth says, “I have always been aware of Biff and the great work he does. He is an editor with great feeling and instinct that not only works for the director or creative but what is right for the job.”

Behind the Title: Spot Welders’ editor Matt Osborne

After the time-consuming and sometimes stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material.

NAME: Matt Osborne

COMPANY: Spot Welders

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Spot Welders is a creative editorial company.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Offline Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I take all the footage that production shoots, make selects on the best shots and performances, and craft it into a cohesive narrative or visually engaging film. I then work with the director, agency and client to get the best out of the material and try to make sure everyone is happy with the final result.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Probably the amount of footage that editors get these days. The average person might think we just cut out the bad bits or choose the best takes and string them together, but we might get up to 30 hours of footage or more for a single 60-second commercial with no storyboard. It’s our job to somehow make sense of it all.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with directors. After the time-consuming and sometimes quite stressful part of doing selects and putting together an assembly alone, I really enjoy sitting in a room with the director and digging into the material. I like making sure we have the best moments and are telling the story in the most interesting way possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sitting for long hours. I really want to try out one of those standing desks! Also, trying to wrangle 100 different opinions into the edit without butchering it.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Probably the morning after sleeping on an edit. There’s something about coming in with fresh eyes and marveling at your wondrous edit from the previous night. Or, conversely, crying about the disaster you have in front of you that needs immediate fixing. Either way, I find this is the best time to get in the flow with new ideas and work very quickly at improving the edit.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
After high school, I spent about five years working at various ski resorts in Australia and Canada and snowboarding every day, so I guess I’d still be doing that.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
It sounds cheesy but in hindsight I was probably destined to be an editor. I was always drawn to puzzles and figuring out how things go together, and editing is a lot like a giant puzzle with no correct answers.

I made skate videos with two VHS decks as a teenager, and then I realized a few years later that you could do it on a computer and could get paid to basically do the same thing. That’s when I knew it was the job for me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Audi, Nike, BMW and a couple of very cool passion projects, which will hopefully be released soon.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
Not really. It almost always comes down to storytelling. Whether that’s narrative or purely visual, you want to make the viewer feel something, so that’s always the goal. The methods to get there are usually pretty much the same.

Cayenne

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Commercially, probably the Porsche film, Cayenne, with Rob Chiu at Iconoclast. It was a big project for the global release of a new car. They shot in amazing locations, and the footage was incredible, so I felt a lot of pressure on that one I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Personally, the Medicine music video I did with Salomon Ligthelm and Khalid Mohtaseb was a humbling experience and something I’m very proud of. It’s actually more of a narrative short film than a music video and tells the fictionalized story of a real-life couple, in which the wife is blind.

It was a very sensitive story, shot beautifully and using non-actors. It might be the only time I’ve cried watching the rushes. I think we successfully managed to instill that raw emotion into the final edit.

Medicine

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I grew up on Final Cut Pro. I taught myself to edit back on Version 2 by reading the manual while working in a factory packing carrots. I was pretty upset when they ditched it but moved over to Avid Media Composer and haven’t looked back. I love it now. Well, maybe except for the effects tool.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Yes, it’s sometimes expected these days that the offline will look and sound like the final product, so color grading, sound design, music editing, comping, etc.

Personally, if I have time, I’ll try and do some of these things on a basic level to get the edit approved, but it’s all going to be taken over by very talented professionals in their own craft who will do a much better job than I ever could. So I prefer to focus on the actual nuts and bolts — am I using the best shots? Am I telling this story in the most compelling, engaging and entertaining way possible? But sometimes you’ve got to throw a whoosh in to make people happy.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, Garmin, MacBook. Although I spent a couple weeks on beaches last year and learned we don’t really need any of it, well, at least while you’re on the beach, and not working!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’ve gotten completely addicted to running the past couple of years. I find there’s nothing better than a run at 5am to clear the mind.

RPS editors talk workflow, creativity and Michelob Ultra’s Robots

By Randi Altman

Rock Paper Scissors (RPS) is a veteran editing house specializing in commercials, music videos and feature films. Founded by Oscar-winning editor Angus Wall (The Social Network, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), RPS has a New York office as well as a main Santa Monica location that it shares with sister companies A52, Elastic and Jax.

We recently reached out to RPS editor Biff Butler and his assistant editor Alyssa Oh (both Adobe Premiere users) to find out about how they work, their editing philosophy and their collaboration on the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that premiered during this year’s Super Bowl.

Let’s find out more about their process…

Rock Paper Scissors, Santa Monica

What does your job entail?
Biff Butler: Simply put, someone hands us footage (and a script) and we make something out of it. The job is to act as cheerleader for those who have been carrying the weight of a project for weeks, maybe months, and have just emerged from a potentially arduous shoot.

Their job is to then sell the work that we do to their clients, so I must hold onto and protect their vision, maintaining that initial enthusiasm they had. If the agency has written the menu, and the client has ordered the meal, then a director is the farmer and the editor the cook.

I frequently must remind myself that although I might have been hired because of my taste, I am still responsible for feeding others. Being of service to someone else’s creative vision is the name of the game.

What’s your workflow like?
Alyssa Oh: At the start of the project, I receive the footage from production and organize it to Biff’s specs. Once it’s organized, I pass it off and he watches all the footage and assembles an edit. Once we get deeper into the project, he may seek my help in other aspects of the edit, including sound design, pulling music, creating graphics, temporary visual effects and creating animations. At the end of the project, I prep the edits for finishing color, mix, and conform.

What would surprise people about being an editor?
Oh: When I started, I associated editorial with “footage.” It surprised me that, aside from editing, we play a large part in decision-making for music and developing sound design.

Butler: I’ve heard the editor described as the final writer in the process. A script can be written and rewritten, but a lot happens in the edit room once shots are on a screen. The reality of seeing what actually fits within the allotted time that the format allows for can shape decisions as can the ever-evolving needs of the client in question. Another aspect we get involved with is the music — it’s often the final ingredient to be considered, despite how important a role it plays.

Robots

What do you enjoy the most about your job?
Oh: By far, my favorite part is the people that I work with. We spend so much time together; I think it’s important to not just get along, but to also develop close relationships. I’m so grateful to work with people who I look forward to spending the day with.

At RPS, I’ve gained so many great friendships over the years and learn a lot from everyone around me —- not just in the aspect of editorial, but also from the people at companies that work alongside us — A52, Elastic and Jax.

Butler: At the risk of sounding corny, what turns me on most is collaboration and connection with other creative talents. It’s a stark contrast to the beginning of the job, which I also very much adore — when it’s just me and my laptop, watching footage and judging shots.

Usually we get a couple days to put something together on our own, which can be a peaceful time of exploration and discovery. This is when I get to formulate my own opinions and points of view on the material, which is good to establish but also is something I must be ready to let go of… or at least be flexible with. Once the team gets involved in the room — be it the agency or the director — the real work begins.

As I said before, being of service to those who have trusted me with their footage and ideas is truly an honorable endeavor. And it’s not just those who hire us, but also talents we get to join forces with on the audio/music side, effects, etc. On second thought, the free supply of sparkly water we have on tap is probably my favorite part. It’s all pretty great.

What’s the hardest part of the job?
Oh: For me, the hardest part of our job are the “peaks and valleys.” In other words, we don’t have a set schedule, and with each project, our work hours will vary.

Robots

Butler: I could complain about the late nights or long weekends or unpredictable schedules, but those are just a result of being employed, so I count myself fortunate that I even get to moan about that stuff. Perhaps one of the trickiest parts is in dealing with egos, both theirs and mine.

Inevitably, I serve as mediator between a creative agency and the director they hired, and the client who is paying for this whole project. Throw in the mix my own sense of ownership that develops, and there’s a silly heap of egos to manage. It’s a joy, but not everyone can be fully satisfied all the time.

If you couldn’t edit for a living, what would you do?
Oh: I think I would definitely be working in a creative field or doing something that’s hands-on (I still hope to own a pottery studio someday). I’ve always had a fondness for teaching and working with kids, so perhaps I’d do something in the teaching field.

Butler: I would be pursuing a career in directing commercials and documentaries.

Did you know from a young age that you would be involved in this industry?
Oh: In all honesty, I didn’t know that this would be my path. Originally, I wanted to go into
broadcast, specifically sports broadcasting. I had an interest in television production since
high school and learned a bit about editing along the way.

However, I had applied to work at RPS as a production assistant shortly after graduating and quickly gained interest in editing and never looked back!
Butler : I vividly recall seeing the movie Se7en in the cinema and being shell-shocked by the opening title sequence. The feeling I was left with was so raw and unfiltered, I remember thinking, “That is what I want to do.” I wasn’t even 100 percent sure what that was. I knew I wanted to put things together! It wasn’t even so much a mission to tell stories, but to evoke emotion — although storytelling is most often the way to get there.

Robots

At the same time, I was a kid who grew up under the spell of some very effective marketing campaigns — from Nike, Jordan, Gatorade — and knew that advertising was a field I would be interesting in exploring when it came time to find a real job.

As luck would have it, in 2005 I found myself living in Los Angeles after the rock band I was in broke up, and I walked over to a nearby office an old friend of mine had worked at, looking for a job. She’d told me it was a place where editors worked. Turns out, that place was where many of my favorite ads were edited, and it was founded by the guy who put together that Se7en title sequence. That place was Rock Paper Scissors, and it’s been my home ever since.

Can you guys talk about the Michelob Ultra Robots spot that first aired during the Super Bowl earlier this year? What was the process like?
Butler: The process involved a lot of trust, as we were all looking at frames that didn’t have any of the robots in — they were still being created in CG — so when presenting edits, we would have words floating on screen reading “Robot Here” or “Robot Runs Faster Now.”

It says a lot about the agency in that it could hold the client’s hand through our rough edit and have them buy off on what looked like a fairly empty edit. Working with director Dante Ariola at the start of the edit helped to establish the correct rhythm and intention of what would need to be conveyed in each shot. Holding on to those early decisions was paramount, although we clearly had enough human performances to rest are hats on too.

Was there a particular cut that was more challenging than the others?
Butler: The final shot of the spot was a battle I lost. I’m happy with the work, especially the quality of human reactions shown throughout. I’m also keen on the spot’s simplicity. However, I had a different view of how the final shot would play out — a closer shot would have depicted more emotion and yearning in the robot’s face, whereas where we landed left the robot feeling more defeated — but you can’t win them all.

Robots

Did you feel extra stress knowing that the Michelob spot would air during the Super Bowl?
Butler: Not at all. I like knowing that people will see the work and having a firm airdate reduces the likelihood that a client can hem and haw until the wheels fall off. Thankfully there wasn’t enough time for much to go wrong!

You’ve already talked about doing more than just editing. What are you often asked to do in addition to just editing?
Butler: Editors are really also music supervisors. There can be a strategy to it, also knowing when to present a track you really want to sell through. But really, it’s that level of trust between myself and the team that can lead to some good discoveries. As I mentioned before, we are often tasked with just providing a safe and nurturing environment for people to create.

Truly, anybody can sit and hit copy and paste all day. I think it’s my job to hold on to that initial seed or idea or vision, and protect it through the final stages of post production. This includes ensuring the color correction, finishing and sound mix all reflect intentions established days or weeks ahead when we were still fresh enough in our thinking to be acting on instinct.

I believe that as creative professionals, we are who we are because of our instincts, but as a job drags on and on, we are forced to act more with our heads than our hearts. There is a stamina that is required, making sure that what ends up on the TV is representative of what was initially coming out of that instinctual artistic expression.

Does your editing hat change depending on the type of project you are cutting?
Butler: No, not really. An edit is an edit. All sessions should involve laughter and seriousness and focus and moments to unwind and goof off. Perhaps the format will determine the metaphorical hat, or to be more specific, the tempo.

Selecting shots for a 30- or 60-second commercial is very different than chasing moments for a documentary or long-form narrative. I’ll often remind myself to literally breathe slower when I know a shot needs to be long, and the efficiency with which I am telling a story is of less importance than the need to be absorbed in a moment.

Can you name some of your favorite technology?
Oh: My iPhone and all the apps that come with it; my Kindle, which allows me to be as indecisive as I want when it comes to picking a book and traveling; my laptop; and noise-cancelling headphones!

Butler: The carbonation of water, wireless earphones and tiny solid-state hard drives.

Using editing to influence the tone of a spot

By Maury Loeb

We all have a basic understanding about what editing consists of. In the simplest terms, editors stitch together raw footage to create a cohesive and coherent story. But one of the most vital features of a “good edit” is the establishment of tone. Tone is the aspect of a piece that describes its particular mood, character, atmosphere and flavor. Dictating the proper tone of an ad is a deceivingly sophisticated endeavor that goes beyond the simple mechanics of a few well-spliced shots. Editors need to tell a cohesive story, but we also have to tell the right story.

While some commercials can be ill-conceived and fundamentally “tone-deaf,” trying too hard to project “cool,” the best commercials make viewers feel connected to something. Wieden + Kennedy’s original Go Forth work for Levi’s is a great example. It’s a hipster anthem, but one that makes bold tonal choices in the edit to unique and memorable effect.

Another is the hilarious It’s a Tide Ad, which so precisely and successfully recreates the tonal doppelgangers of existing ads that it’s actually deceiving at first. The ability to produce a very specific, intentional flavor from disparate, raw ingredients is what elevates editing from a craft into an art. The script might be the script, and the footage might be the footage but creating the right tone for a spot not only honors the vision of the ad, but also enhances and elevates the finished piece.

This requires an editor’s technical skill of manipulating and synthesizing their raw ingredients, but more importantly, it relies on an editor’s taste, creativity and sensibility. In the commercial world, offline editors are uniquely positioned to get the first crack at establishing the tone of a spot and the opportunity to shepherd a spot through its finishing, making sure that the intended tone of the ad is realized at the end. It takes the brilliance of talented colorists, sound designers, musicians and animators to achieve a polished finished product, but a good offline editor can sketch out a comprehensive “tonal roadmap” for a spot.

Sound, picture and pace are the most fundamental determinants of tone. Editors manipulate these elements by employing an infinite arsenal of weapons in order to achieve the intended tone of a commercial.

Sound
Sound and our emotions have a primal relationship. Sound is essentially a form of “invisible touch” that is processed in the same part of our brains that processes emotion and perception, making it an ideal parameter of tone. Music is probably the most effective, immediate and raw influencer of tone. It is quite literally a construct designed to create an emotional response. Throw three different pieces of music against the same footage and you will walk away with three entirely different experiences. As far as weapons in an editor’s arsenal go, its standard issue for a reason. Would ASPCA ads be as iconic with any other track besides Sara McLachlan’s “In the Arms of the Angel” even if they were equally as cloying and maudlin?

A thousand different tracks could have complemented Sony’s famous Balls spot, but would it have had the same impact without Jose Gonzalez’s dreamy, slightly unexpected version of “Heartbeats”? Tone can be equally dictated by an editor’s approach to sound design. Google Chrome’s “Speed Tests” dynamically toggled between hyper-real and overtly stylized sounds, creating a piece that’s both observational and awe-inspiring. The result is a unique tonal voice that is utterly engaging with just the right amount of cheekiness.

Color
Editors can inform the tone of a spot beyond the images initially captured in the camera. Manipulating the color palette of the film colors the character of a spot in profound ways. Editors can dial through a range of emotions as they dial through the color spectrum, capitalizing on a color’s ability to elicit specific emotions — from the isolation and melancholy found in blue tones and the menace and danger found in greens to the welcoming warmth of rich reds and golds. A film’s light and dark tones can telegraph an impressive amount of information to an audience as well. Consider the flat palette of Skittles commercials and the way it helps enhance their awkward, comedic tone. Or the way crunchy contrast and saturated colors can make a tabletop spot look punchy and appetizing.

Pacing
Editors also set tone by the pace at which a commercial is cut, both in the tempo of the edits and the speed of the footage itself. The tonal adrenaline of Nike’s Write the Future is due in large part to its dynamic edit as it jerks the audience through kinetic bursts of flurried cuts and pregnant lulls of over-cranked shots. Likewise, Ikea’s Lamp wouldn’t feel nearly as sad if it weren’t for the deliberately paced, measured editing. Nike’s Michael Jordan ad Frozen moments played out in real time would feel like a trite highlight reel, but the deftly handled ramping between super slow motion and real time creates an epic grandeur that amplifies the message of the spot.

Double Duty
Commercials have the unique role of being little films in the greater service of advertising something while also representing a particular brand. In commercials, an editor’s sensibility is key. Is the tone of a particular spot congruous with its message? Does its tone align with the sensibility of the brand? Commercial editors have the dual duty of approaching their task as both stewards of the filmmaking process and stewards of the brand itself. Our role is crucial in making sure the end result both conveys the intended message of an ad in a way that jibes with how a brand wants to be perceived.

Editors are crucial at establishing tone in broad-strokes, but also on a granular level, understanding how a particular line is delivered or graphics are placed can have an impact on the overall tone and experience of a spot. It’s important that brands and agencies see editors as more than just craftspeople who know how to cut footage together using certain programs. Good, experienced commercial editors are tonal specialists who understand how to influence the tone of an ad and make it just feel right.


Maury Loeb is the co-founder of and editor at PS260 , a creative editorial company in New York City, Boston and Venice, California. Check out his reel here.

Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.

Behind the Title: MPC creative director Rupert Cresswell

This Brit is living in New York while working on spots, directing and playing dodgeball.

NAME: Rupert Cresswell

COMPANY: MPC

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
MPC has been one of the global leaders in VFX for nearly 50 years, with industry-leading facilities in London, Vancouver, Los Angeles, Bangalore, New York, Montréal, Shanghai, Amsterdam and Paris. Well-known for adding visuals for advertising, film and entertainment industries, some of our most famous projects include blockbuster movies such as The Jungle Book, The Martian, the Harry Potter franchise, the X-Men movies and the upcoming The Lion King, not to mention famous advertising campaigns for brands such as Samsung, BMW, Hennessy and Apple. I am based in New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director (and Director)

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Lots of things, depending on the project. I am repped by MPC to direct commercials, so my work often mixes live action with some form of visual effects or animation. I’m constantly pitching for jobs; if I am successful, I direct the subsequent shoot, then oversee a team of artists at MPC through the post process until delivery.

VeChain 

When I’m not directing, I work as a creative director, leading teams on animation and design projects within MPC. It’s mostly about zeroing in on a client’s needs and offering a creative solution. I critique large teams of artists’ work — sometimes up to 60 artists across our global network — ensuring a consistent creative vision. At MPC we are expected to keep the highest standards of work and make original contributions to the industry. It’s my job to make sure we do.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I feel like the lines between agency, production company and VFX studio can be blurred these days. In my job, I’m often called on for a wide range of disciplines such as writing the creative, directing actors, and even designing large-scale print and OOH (out of the home) advertising campaigns.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There’s always a purity to the concepts at the pitch stage, which I tend to get really enthusiastic about, but the best bit is to get to travel to shoot. I’ve been super-lucky to film in some awesome places like the south of France, Montreal, Cape Town and the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Additionally, the industry is full of funny, cool, creative characters, and if you can take a beat to remind yourself of that, it’s always a blast working with them. The usual things can bother you, like stress and long hours; also, no one likes it when ideas with great potential get compromised. But more often than not, I’m thankful for what I get to do.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
There’s a sweet spot in the morning after I’ve had some caffeine and before I get hungry for lunch — that’s when the heavy lifting happens.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always knew I wanted to go to art school but never really knew what to do after that. It took years to figure out how to turn my interests into a career. There’s a lot to be said for stubbornly refusing to do something less interesting.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I finished a big campaign for Timberland, which was a great experience. I worked directly with the client, first on the creative, then I directed the shoot in Montreal. I then I oversaw the post and the print campaign, which seemed to go up everywhere I went in the city. It was a huge technical and creative challenge, but great to be involved from the very start to the very end of the process.

I also worked on one of the first brand campaigns for the blockchain currency, VeChain. That was a huge VFX undertaking and lots of fun — we created a love letter to some classic sci-fi films like Star Wars and Blade Runner, which turned out pretty sweet.

In complete contrast, my most favorite recent experience was to work on the branding for the cult Hulu comedy Pen15. The show is so funny, it was a bit of a dream project. It was refreshing to go from such a large technical endeavor as Timberland with a big VFX team to working almost solo, and mostly just illustrating. There was something really cathartic about it. The job required me to spend most of the day doodling childish pictures — I got a real kick out of the puzzled faces around the office wondering if I’d had some kind of breakdown.

Pen15

WHAT OTHER PROJECTS STAND OUT?
Some of my stuff won glittery awards, but I am super-proud that I made a short film, called Charlie Cloudhead, that got picked up by many festivals. I always wanted to try writing and directing narrative work, and I wanted something that could showcase more of my live-action direction.

It was an unusually personal film, which I still feel a little awkward about, but I am really proud that I put in the effort to make it. It was amazing to work with two fantastic actors (Paul Higgins and Daisy Haggard), and I’m still humbled by all the hard work a big team of people put in just for some kooky little idea that I dreamed up.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The idea of no phone and no Internet gives me anxiety. Add to the horror by taking away AC during a New York summer and I’d be a weeping mess.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m pretty much addicted to scrolling through Instagram, but I’m lazy at posting stuff. Maybe it’ll become Myspace 2.0 and we’ll all laugh at all those folks with thousands of followers. Until then, it’s very useful for seeing inspiring new work out there.

I’m also a Brit living abroad in the US, so I’m rather masochistically glued to any news of the whole Brexit thing going down.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I do. Music is incredibly influential. Most of the time when I’m working on a project, it will be inspired by a song. It helps me create a mood for the film and I’ll listen to it repeatedly while I’m working on script or walking around thinking about it. For example, my short film was inspired by a song by Cate Le Bon.

My taste is pretty random to be honest. Recently I’ve been re-visiting Missy Elliott and checking out Rosalia, John Maus and the new Karen O stuff. I’m also a bit obsessed with an artist from Mali called Oumou Sangaré. I was introduced to her by a late-night Lyft driver recently, and she’s been helping set the mood for this Q&A right now.

I should add, I work in an open-plan studio and access to the Bluetooth speaker takes a certain restraint and responsibility to prevent arguments — I’m not necessarily the right guy for that. I usually try and turn the place into Horse Meat Disco.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I recently joined a dodgeball league. I had no idea how to play at first, and I’m actually very bad at it. I’m treating it as a personal challenge — learning to embrace being a laughable failure. I’m sure it’ll do me good.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Ned Borgman

This editor’s path began early. “I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials,” he says.

Name: Ned Borgman

Company: PS260

Can you describe your company?
PS260 is a post house built for ideas, creative solutions and going beyond the boards. We have studios in New York, Venice, California and Boston. I am based in New York.

What’s your job title?
Film editor, problem solver, cleaner of messes.

What does that entail?
My job is to make everything look great. Every project takes an entire team of super-talented people who bring their expertise to bear to tell a story. They create all of the puzzle pieces that end up in the dailies, and I put them together in such a way that they can all shine their best.

Facebook small business campaign

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think it would be the sheer amount of stuff that can become an editor’s responsibility. So many details go into crafting a successful edit, and an editor needs to be well-versed in all of it. Color grading, visual effects, design, animation, music, sound design, the list goes on. The point isn’t to be a master of all of those things, (that’s why we work with other amazing people when it comes to finishing), but to know the needs of each of those parts and how to make sure every detail can get properly addressed.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
It’s the middle part. When we’re all in the middle of the edit, up to our necks in footage and options and ideas. Out of all of that exploration the best bits start to stand out. The sound design element from that cut and the music track from that other version and a take we tried last night. It all starts to make sense, and from there it’s about making sure the best bits can work well together.

What’s your least favorite?
Knowing there are always some great cuts that will only ever exist inside a Premiere Pro bin. Not every performance or music track or joke can make it into the final cut and out into the world and that’s ok. Maybe those cuts are airing in some other parallel universe.

What is your most productive time of the day?
Whenever the office is empty. So either early in the morning or late at night.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Probably something with photography. I’m too attached to visual storytelling, and I’m a horrible illustrator.

Why did you choose this profession? How early on did you know this would be your path? 
I’ve always been enamored with commercials. I was the kid who would talk during the TV show and then pay attention to the commercials. I remember making my first in-camera edit in third grade when I was messing around with the classroom camcorder set up on a tripod. I had recorded myself in front of the camera and then recorded a bit of the empty classroom. Playing it back, it looked like I had vanished into thin air. It blew my eight-year-old mind.

Burger King

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
Let’s see, Burger King’s flame-broiled campaign with MullenLowe was great. It has a giant explosion, which is always nice. Facebook’s small business campaign with 72andSunny was a lot of fun with an amazing team of people. And some work for the Google Home Hub launch with Google Creative Labs was fun because launching stuff is exciting.

Do you put on a different hat when cutting for a specific genre? 
Not exactly. Every genre has its specific needs, but I think the fundamentals remain the same. I need to pay attention to rhythm, to performances, to music, to sound design, to VO — all of that stuff. It’s about staying in tune with how all of these ingredients interact with each other to create a reaction from the audience, no matter the reaction you’re striving for.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
I grew up obsessed with practical effects in movies, so I’d have to say Burger King “Gasoline Shuffle”. It has a massive explosion that was shot in camera and it looks incredible. I wish I was on set that day.

What do you use to edit?
Adobe Premiere Pro all the way. I like to think that one day I’ll be back on Avid Media Composer though.

What is your favorite plugin?
I don’t have one. Just give me that basic install.

Are you often asked to do more than edit? If so, what else are you asked to do?
Sure. I’ll often record the scratch VO when there’s one needed. My voice is…serviceable. What that means is that as soon as the real VO talent gets placed in the cut, everyone’s thrilled with how much better everything sounds. That’s cool by me.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my Shure in-ear headphones, and an extra long charging cable.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Change some diapers. My wife and I just had our first kid last August, and she’s incredible. A game of peek-a-boo can really change your perspective.

Timber finishes Chipotle ‘Fresh Food’ campaign

In Chipotle’s new Fresh Food campaign, directed by Errol Morris for Moxie Pictures out of agency Venables Bell & Partners, real-life employees of the food chain talk about the pride they take in their work while smashing guacamole and cutting peppers, cilantro and other fresh ingredients.

The food shots are designed to get all five of your senses moving by grabbing the audience with the visually appealing, fresh food served and leading them to taste, smell, and hear the authentic ingredients.

The four spots — Bre – Just BraggingCarson – Good Food Good Person, Krista – Fresh Everyday
Robbie – Microwaves Not Welcome — are for broadcast and the web.

For Chipotle, Santa Monica’s Timber handled online, finishing and just a splash of cleanup. They used Flame on the project. According to Timber head of production Melody Alexander, “The Chipotle project was based on showcasing the realness of the products the restaurants use in their food. Minimal clean-up was required as the client was keen to keep the naturalness of the footage. We, at Timber, use a combination of finishing tools when working on online projects. The Chipotle project was completely done in Flame.”

Quick Chat: Digital Arts’ Josh Heilbronner on Audi, Chase spots

New York City’s Digital Arts provided audio post on a couple of 30-second commercial spots that presented sound designer/mixer Josh Heilbronner with some unique audio challenges. They are Audi’s Night Watchman via agency Venables Bell & Partners in New York and Chase’s Mama Said Knock You Out, featuring Serena Williams from agency Droga5 in New York.

Josh Heilbronner

Heilbronner, who has been sound designing and mixing for broadcast and film for almost 10 years, has worked on large fashion brands like Nike and J Crew to Fortune 500 Companies like General Electric, Bank of America and Estee Lauder. He has also mixed promos and primetime broadcast specials for USA Network, CBS and ABC Television. In addition to commercial VO recording, editing and mixing, Heilbronner has a growing credit list of long-form documentaries and feature films, including The Broken Ones, Romance (In the Digital Age), Generation Iron 2, The Hurt Business and Giving Birth in America (a CNN special series).

We recently reached out to Heilbronner to find out more about these two very different commercial projects and how he tackled each.

Both Audi and Chase are very different assignments from an audio perspective. How did these projects come your way?
On Audi, we were asked to be part of their new 2019 A7 campaign, which follows a security guard patrolling the Audi factory in the middle of night. It’s sort of James Bond meets Night at the Museum. The factory is full of otherworldly rooms built to put the cars through their paces (extreme cold, isolation etc.). Q Department did a great job crafting the sounds of those worlds and really bringing the viewer into the factory. Agency Venables & Bell were looking to really pull everything together tightly and have the dialogue land up-front, while still maintaining the wonderfully lush and dynamic music and sound design that had been laid down already.

The Chase Serena campaign is an impact-driven series of spots. Droga5 has a great reputation for putting together cinematic spots and this is no exception. Drazen Bosnjak from Q Department originally reached out to see if I would be interested in mixing this one because one of the final deliverables was the Jumbotron at the US Open in Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Digital Arts has a wonderful 7.1 Dolby approved 4K theater, so we were able to really get a sense of what the finals would sound and look like up on the big screen.

Did you have any concerns going into the project about what would be required creatively or technically?
For Audi our biggest challenge was the tight deadline. We mixed in New York but we had three different time zones in play, so getting approvals could sometimes be difficult. With Chase, the amount of content for this campaign was large. We needed to deliver finals for broadcast, social media (Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter), Jumbotron and cinema. Making sure they played back as loud and crisp as they could on all those platforms was a major focus.

What was the most challenging aspect for you on the project?
As with a lot of production audio, the noise on set was pretty extreme. For Audi they had to film the night watchman walking in different spaces, delivering the copy at a variety of volumes. It all needed to gel together as if he was in one smaller room talking directly to the camera, as if he were a narrator. We didn’t have access to re-record him, so we had to use a few different denoise tools, such as iZotope RX6, Brusfri and Waves WNS to clear out the clashing room tones.

The biggest challenge on Chase was the dynamic range and power of these spots. Serena beautifully hushed whisper narration is surrounded by impactful bass drops, cinematic hits and lush ambiences. Reigning all that in, building to a climax and still having her narration be the focus was a game of cat and mouse. Also, broadcast standards are a bit restrictive when it comes to large impacts, so finding the right balance was key.

Any interesting technology or techniques that you used on the project?
I mainly use Avid Pro Tools Ultimate 2018. They have made some incredible advancements — you can now do everything on one machine, all in the box. I can have 180 tracks running in a surround session and still print every deliverable (5.1, stereo, stems etc.) without a hiccup.

I’ve been using Penteo 7 Pro for stereo 5.1 upmixing. It does a fantastic job filling in the surrounds, but also folds down to stereo nicely (and passes QC). Spanner is another useful tool when working with all sorts of channel counts. It allows me to down-mix, rearrange channels and route audio to the correct buses easily.

Director Lee J. Ford joins Interrogate

Director Lee J. Ford has joined LA/NY/Sydney-based production house Interrogate. A British native, Ford worked as a creative in the advertising industry for years before pivoting to directing. Ford’s agency experience allows him to “understand the politics and daily struggles the creatives are facing throughout the process and will continue to face” long after he’s done directing the piece.

Ford’s interest in film started early. He grew up next to a video store and would stay up late re-watching The Hills Have Eyes, The Exorcist, Exterminator and other banned-in-the-UK movies until he failed his classes. This led him to drop out and go to art school to study graphic design. Studying at The University of Brighton and the Central Saint Martins school of art helped inform Ford’s preferred minimalist aesthetic, and gave him his first hands-on experience with art direction.

After graduation, Ford worked his way through the advertising industry as a creative, with stints at various ad agencies, including 180 Amsterdam, Ogilvy London, TBWA London and Saatchi & Saatchi London, to name a few. While he ended up as a creative director, Ford never forgot his dream of directing, so when the opportunity to direct Top Gear came his way while working at an agency in Amsterdam, Ford jumped at the chance.

His work includes a New African Icons for SportsPesa, a spot for Audi, and a short film for fashion designer Roland Mouret based on Mouret’s childhood memories of watching his father, who was a butcher.

Ford, who was previously repped by Prettybird in the US and UK, knew Interrogate was the right home for him when he met executive producers and partners George Meeker and Jeff Miller. Their first project together was a spot for Blizzard Games’ Diablo III out of Omelet LA.

MPC directs, provides VFX, color for Fiji Water spot

To launch the new Fiji Sports Cap bottle, Wonderful Agency came up with the concept of a drop of rain from the clouds high above Fiji making its way down through the pristine environment to showcase the source of their water. The story then transitions to the Fiji Water Sports Cap bottle being used by athletes during a tough workout.

To bring that idea to life, Wonderful Agency turned to MPC with creative director Michael Gregory, who made making his MPC directorial debut, helming both spots while also leading his VFX team. These spots will air on primetime television.

Gregory’s skills in visual effects made him the perfect fit as director of the spots, since it was essential to seamlessly depict the raindrop’s fast-paced journey through the different environments. MPC was tasked with building the CG water droplet that falls from the sky, while reflecting and magnifying the beauty of the scenes shot in Fiji.

“It was key to film in low light, cloudy conditions in Fiji,” explains Gregory. “We shot over five days with a drone in the most remote parts of the main island, taking the drone above the clouds and shooting many different angles on the descent, so we had all the textures and plates we needed.”

For the Fiji section, Gregory and team used the Zenmuse X7 camera that sits on a DJI Inspire 2 drone. “We chose this because logistically it was easier to get it to Fiji by plane. It’s a much smaller drone and isn’t as battery-hungry. You can only travel with a certain amount of batteries on a plane, and the larger drones that carry the Reds and Alexas would need the batteries shipped by sea. Being smaller meant it had much longer flying times. That meant we could have it in the air at height for much longer periods. The footage was edited in Adobe Premiere.”

MPC’s VFX team then got to work. According to lead compositor Oliver Caiden, “The raindrop itself was simulated CG geometry that then had all of the different textures refracted through the UV map. This process was also applied to the droplet reflections, mapping high dynamic range skies onto the outside, so we could achieve a more immersive and richer effect.”

This process enabled the compositors to animate the raindrops and have full control over motion blur, depth of focus, refraction and reflections, making them as realistic and multifaceted as possible. The shots were a mixture of multiple plates, matte painting, 2D and CG clouds, which ultimately created a sequence that felt seamless with reality. The spot was graded by MPC’s colorist Ricky Gausis.

The tools used by MPC were Autodesk Maya, Side Effects Houdini, Adobe Photoshop as well as Foundry Nuke for the VFX and FilmLight Baselight for color.

The latest Fiji campaign marks a continued partnership between MPC and Wonderful Agency — they previously handled VFX for Wonderful Pistachios and Wonderful Halos spots — but this latest campaign sees MPC managing the production from start to finish.

Therapy Studios provided the final audio mix.

 

Carbon creates four animated thrill ride spots

Carbon was called on once again by agency Cramer-Krasselt to create four spots — Railblazer, Twisted Timbers, Steel Vengeance and HangTime — for Cedar Fair Entertainment Company, which owns and operates 11 amusement parks across North America.

Following the success of Carbon’s creepy 2017 teaser film for the ride Mystic Timbers, Cramer-Krasselt senior art director David Vaca and his team presented Carbon with four ideas, each a deep dive into the themes and backstories of the rides.

Working across four 30-second films simultaneously and leading a “tri-coastal” team of artists, CD Liam Chapple shared directing duties with lead artists Tim Little and Gary Fouchy. The studio has offices in NYC, LA and Chicago.

According to Carbon executive producer/managing director Phil Linturn, “We soaked each script in the visual language, color grades, camera framing and edits reminiscent of our key inspiration films for each world — a lone gun-slinger arriving to town at sundown in the wild west, the carefree and nostalgic surf culture of California, and extreme off-roading adventures in the twisting canyons of the southwest.”

Carbon’s technical approach to these films was dictated by the fast turnaround and having all films in production at the same time. To achieve the richness, tone and detail required to immerse the viewer in these worlds, Carbon blended stylized CGI with hyper-real matte paintings and realistic lighting to create a look somewhere between their favorite children’s storybooks, contemporary manga animation, the Spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone and one or two of their favorite Pixar films.

Carbon called on Side Effects Houdini (partially for their procedural ocean toolkit), Autodesk Maya’s nCloth and 3ds Max, Pixologic’s Zbrush for 3D sculpting and matte painting, Foundry’s Nuke and FilmLight’s Baselight for color.

“We always love working with Cramer-Krasselt,” concludes Linturn. “They come with awesome concepts and an open mind, challenging us to surprise them with each new deck. This was a fantastic opportunity to expand on our body of full CGI-direction work and to explore some interesting looks and styles. It also allowed us to come up with some very creative workflows across all three offices and to achieve two minutes of animation in just a few weeks. The fact that these four films are part of a much bigger broadcast campaign comprising 70-plus broadcast spots is a testament to the focus and range of the production team.”

Behind the Title: Lucky Post editor Elizabeth V. Moore

NAME: Elizabeth V. Moore

COMPANY: Lucky Post

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The studio combines creative editorial, graphic design, sound design, mixing, color, compositing,VFX and finish

I feel very lucky to call Lucky my home for the past five and a half years. It’s a collection of driven co-workers who truly interact like a team. Together, we infuse art and care into the projects that come through our office.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am one of the four editors here.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to take their concept and make it a reality. With the footage I’m provided, I get to be a storyteller. I add my creative perspective and collaborate with clients to craft a story or message that is hopefully even better than what they had envisioned possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a cut we’re all happy with. It’s not just me in a room by myself, editing. There’s a responsibility to your clients not just to edit something for them, but also to help facilitate a space where they feel comfortable and are happy to come to every day. My goal is to have them leave Lucky Post at the end of the day confident in the cut and feeling good in general… with smiles on their faces.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is seeing the edit take shape… to get to the end of a project and see the final resul, and reflect on what it took for that to manifest. That is a very satisfying feeling.

This CostaDelMar Slam spot is a recent project edited by Moore.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I try not to focus too much on my least favorite aspects of anything, but if pressed I’d have to say going through footage and making selects. I feel anxious to start my favorite part of the job — seeing the edit take shape — but in order to get the best result you have to focus and find the best pieces amidst all the content.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I wouldn’t consider myself a morning person, so I’d have to say early afternoon. When I have a deadline to hit, however, late at night is when I can really surprise myself with the amount and quality of work I can produce under pressure.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve asked myself that question, and I honestly can’t think of a better answer than what I’m doing now. Even though I had no idea when I was younger that this is where I’d end up, in retrospect, it makes the most sense.

My personal set of talents and interests throughout my development have helped give me the arsenal of skills it takes to enjoy editing and do it well.

SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t have any idea I would end up in this career until college. I was originally a business major with a minor in film, because I always loved movies. Quickly into my first semester it dawned on me that I could actually pursue a career in something I was passionate about, not just what I thought was expected of me. I switched to film and, as I learned more about all the different departments, I knew editing was where my talents and skills could thrive. And the more I did it, the more I fell in love with the art.

AS A WOMAN EDITOR, WHO DID YOU LOOK UP TO WHEN STARTING OUT?
I didn’t think too much about who I looked up to based on being a woman. I had my films and editors that inspired me and I aspired to emulate editorially. However, I would say that my biggest female inspiration was editor Sally Menke (who died in an accident in 2010). Pulp Fiction was one of my favorite movies at the time, and the way the story was edited and structured was a large part of that.

Once I looked deeper into her career, I realized she was the editor for all of Quentin Tarantino’s films. It inspired me greatly that she was able to not only be an editor during a time that was very much a male-dominated field, but also maintain an ongoing, collaborative relationship that shaped both of their careers. I wanted to be the kind of editor that was not only worth working with, but worth working with again and again.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE MEDIA CHAMPIONING MORE FEMALE CREATIVES AND LEADERS IN OUR INDUSTRY?
I think it’s extremely important. To continue to push our industry to greater heights, new and different perspectives are needed to keep things evolving and growing. Media plays a big role in our society and culture, and women need to be well represented and their voices heard. Similar to my own story, a lot of opportunities are missed if they’re unknown or seem impossible. More women in leadership and creative positions will help young women see themselves in these roles.

WHAT SHOULD OR CAN WE DO TO ENCOURAGE MORE WOMEN TO BECOME EDITORS?
To be an editor, you have to be passionate about it and love the process. We can’t make women be interested in the art, but we can reinforce the confidence in the ones who are. We have to be the ones to say, “There’s no reason to be intimidated by pursuing this career path. This industry is always looking for fresh, original perspectives and we, as women, have a unique voice to offer. The quality of your craft will speak for itself and that is what will draw clients to work with you.”

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Within the past year I’ve worked on campaigns for Crate & Barrel, Charles Schwab, AT&T and Soraa.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I wouldn’t say that I wear a different hat when working on different genres, because at the end of the day the goal is the same: to tell a good story in as creative a way as the content allows.

However, what I’m looking for out of the footage will change depending on the type of project. So much of my select-making process is based on feelings that arise while viewing a scene. I select the pieces that give me the reaction I want the audience to feel based on the genre of the piece.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a different sense of pride for all the projects I work on. Sometimes it’s because of the level of quality of the work, and sometimes it’s because of the challenges that had to be overcome. But I’d say that I’m still most proud of one of my first pieces I did at Lucky Post. It was back when I was an assistant editor; I was given access to footage for a music video for a musician named Jesse Woods and was told to just have fun with it and use it as an opportunity to practice.

Even though I wasn’t the official editor on it, I took the challenge seriously and spent hours exploring possibilities, pushing my craft farther than I ever had to that point. The director was impressed enough that it became the final cut he and the artist used. I still look back on that as one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve produced. It was the turning point in my career, where not only did others see and recognize my talent, but I saw what I was capable of and this gave me the confidence that led me to where I am now.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I’ve used a few different editing software programs throughout my career and my favorite, and what I currently use, is Adobe Premiere Pro.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Even though I’m only asked to edit, a big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a final cut. Sometimes that means being a good listener or a positive force for them when things get stressful.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A computer is number one, since I can’t edit without it. I’d like to believe I’d still be interested in the art of editing if I had to do it via the cut and splice method, but it would be a very different process and experience for me. Second would be my television. I love watching great movies, shows and well-done commercials, so it’s both a leisure activity and it inspires me as an editor. Lastly, my cell phone because we now live in a society where it’s becoming hard to work and stay connected without it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Besides my passion for the visual arts, like movies, my favorite escape is music. I love to go to shows to see live bands or get lost in music being played by DJs and dance. When I’m in those moments, all the stress from the week is forgotten and I’m living in the present.

VFX house Kevin adds three industry veterans

Venice, California-based visual effects house Kevin, founded by Tim Davies, Sue Troyan and Darcy Parsons, has beefed up its team even further with the hiring of head of CG Mike Dalzell, VFX supervisor Theo Maniatis and head of technology Carl Loeffler. This three-month-old studio has already worked on spots for Jaguar, Land Rover, Target and Old Spice, and is currently working on a series of commercials for the Super Bowl.

Dalzell brings years of experience as a CG supervisor and lead artist — he started as a 3D generalist before focusing on look development and lighting — at top creative studios including Digital Domain, MPC and Psyop, The Mill, Sony Imageworks and Method. He was instrumental in look development for VFX Gold Clio and British Arrow-winner Call of Duty Seize Glory and GE’s Childlike Imagination. He has also worked on commercials for Nissan, BMW, Lexus, Visa, Cars.com, Air Force and others. Early on, Dalzell honed his skills on music videos in Toronto, and then on feature films such as Iron Man 3 and The Matrix movies, as well as The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

Maniatis, a Flame artist and on-set VFX supervisor, has a wide breadth of experience in the US, London and his native Sydney. “Tim [Davies] and I used to work together back in Australia, so reconnecting with him and moving to LA has been a blast.”

Maniatis’s work includes spots for Apple Watch 3 + Apple Music’s Roll (directed by Sam Brown), TAG Heuer’s To Jack (directed by and featuring Patrick Dempsey), Destiny 2’s Rally the Troops and Titanfall 2’s Become One (via Blur Studios), and PlayStation VR’s Batman Arkham and Axe’s Office Love, both directed by Filip Engstrom. Prior to joining Kevin, Maniatis worked with Blur Studios, Psyop, The Mill, Art Jail and Framestore.

Loeffler is creating the studio’s production model using the latest Autodesk Flame systems, high-end 3D workstations and render nodes and putting new networking and storage systems into place. Kevin’s new Culver City studio will open its doors in Q1, 2018 and Loeffler will guide the current growth in both hardware and software, plan for the future and make sure Kevin’s studio is optimized for the needs of production. He has over two decades of experience building out and expanding the technologies for facilities including MPC and Technicolor.

Image: (L-R) Mike Dalzell, Carl Loeffler and Theo Maniatis.

Behind the Title: Prism director Nick Spooner

NAME: Nick Spooner

COMPANY: Brooklyn-based Prism

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Prism is a production company and creative studio, with the ability to tell brand-building stories across the full spectrum of disciplines. From traditional commercial and branded content to emerging technologies, interactive live experiences and installations.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I basically make product-driven stories to help cheer up sad consumers. Whatever the ratio, format or platform.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
That the Director’s Guild doesn’t supply us with personalized monocles and jodhpurs!

It’s far less glamorous than you might think. There’s a ton of work – on spec – that’s required to just win a job in the first place. If you do get the gig, every project then requires an intense focus and attention to detail, with an increasingly short amount of time for production. And a large part of that time is spent accommodating many different opinions, personalities and expectations, all in the interest of making an effective, funny commercial.

Directors are not alone in the process of making content of any kind, and I think that’s where some encounter difficulties, when they aren’t comfortable with the necessary, collaborative side of the business. You might be a great director, but if you can’t handle the “people” aspect of making commercials, you won’t last very long. But that’s just my take on it. Maybe I’m doing it wrong.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is when a take cracks up the crew. That’s when you know you’ve got something good.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
About 15 minutes after wrap, when the afterglow begins to subside.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d probably be a P.A. trying to figure out how to get this job.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I acted in local commercials as a kid, and everyone on the set seemed to be having a good time. I pretty much knew then that I wanted in.

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT ATTRACTED YOU?
The personalized monocles and jodhpurs. Imagine my disappointment when neither were forthcoming.

Nick Spooner directed the sci-fi/thriller short, The Call of Charlie.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT DIRECTING THAT CONTINUES TO KEEP YOU INTERESTED?
Every job presents a new creative and production puzzle, and I love solving them. For me, being on the set – especially when working with actors — provides a performance-based adrenaline rush that’s like playing onstage in a hardcore band, or acting in a live theatrical performance (both of which I’ve done). It’s addictive.

HOW DO YOU PICK THE PEOPLE YOU WORK WITH ON A PARTICULAR PROJECT?
That is actually both the best and worst part of the business. If you’ve been doing it a while, you accumulate a roster of great talent — actors, DPs, production designers, casting directors, grips, gaffers, stylists and so on — who you value as professionals and like as people.

The downside is you can’t hire everyone on every job, which can lead to a lot of people having The Sadz. It’s a bummer. And then there are always new folks you want to work with. But if it’s any consolation, the same exact thing happens to directors with agencies.

Every project starts with getting the right DP on board, and his or her go-to keys. Depending upon what city or country we’re in, I then have my favorite crewmembers and production people I like to work with — having shared production experience with crew always saves time and energy on the set. I always work with the same few line producers — they know what I like and don’t like, and I think the ones I work with are the best in the business. As for actors, I prefer to work with new people on every shoot to keep things fresh — recurring ensemble casts for every project only works if you’re Christopher Guest.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I did a fun campaign for CarGurus that’s been airing like crazy, and a recent North Carolina Lottery spot, which is a parody of Home Shopping Network programs — that one was especially fun because it’s presented in a distinctly “non-commercial” form, as if we accidentally switched channels. It’s very odd. Both projects had great casts, which always makes for a fun shoot.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Usually, I say the one that just wrapped but in general I take a lot of pride in making funny commercials that successfully do what they’re supposed to do: sell a product or promote a brand.

I did a Tide commercial (Princess Dress) that was supposed to run for one cycle more than five years ago, and it’s still airing all over the place. It just won’t go away. And there is the CarGurus campaign I did that helped the company launch Boston’s first tech IPO of 2017 – I don’t understand what any of that means, but I’ve been told it’s a big deal.

Non-commercially, I did a dark comedy based on H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos, which has played in 84 festivals around the world and won more than 40 awards. That’s been pleasantly humblebraggy. Last year I directed my first short film called The Call of Charlie.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Netflix, my laptop, and my robot spouse.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Wait…I’m allowed to do that?

Saddington Baynes adds senior lighting artist Luis Cardoso

Creative production house Saddington Baynes has hired Luis Cardoso as a senior lighting artist, adding to the studio’s creative team with specialist CGI skills in luxury goods, beauty and cosmetics. He joins the team following a four-year stint at Burberry, where he worked on high-end CGI.

He specializes in Autodesk 3ds Max, Chaos Group’s V-Ray and Adobe Photoshop. Cardoso’s past work includes imagery for all Burberry fragrances, clothing and accessories and social media assets for the Pinterest Cat Lashes campaign. He also has experience under his belt as senior CG artist at Sectorlight, and later in his career Assembly Studios.

At Saddington Baynes, Cardoso will be working on new motion cinematic sequences for online video to expand the beauty, fragrance, fashion and beverage departments and take the expertise further, particularly in regards to video lighting.

According to executive creative director James Digby-Jones, “It no longer matters whether elements are static or moving; whether the brief is for a 20,000-pixel image or 4K animation mixed with live action. We stretch creative and technical boundaries with fully integrated production that encompasses everything from CGI and motion to shoot production and VR capability.”

Sonic Union adds Bryant Park studio targeting immersive, broadcast work

New York audio house Sonic Union has launched a new studio and creative lab. The uptown location, which overlooks Bryant Park, will focus on emerging spatial and interactive audio work, as well as continued work with broadcast clients. The expansion is led by principal mix engineer/sound designer Joe O’Connell, now partnered with original Sonic Union founders/mix engineers Michael Marinelli and Steve Rosen and their staff, who will work out of both its Union Square and Bryant Park locations. O’Connell helmed sound company Blast as co-founder, and has now teamed up with Sonic Union.

In other staffing news, mix engineer Owen Shearer advances to also serve as technical director, with an emphasis on VR and immersive audio. Former Blast EP Carolyn Mandlavitz has joined as Sonic Union Bryant Park studio director. Executive creative producer Halle Petro, formerly senior producer at Nylon Studios, will support both locations.

The new studio, which features three Dolby Atmos rooms, was created and developed by Ilan Ohayon of IOAD (Architect of Record), with architectural design by Raya Ani of RAW-NYC. Ani also designed Sonic’s Union Square studio.

“We’re installing over 30 of the new ‘active’ JBL System 7 speakers,” reports O’Connell. “Our order includes some of the first of these amazing self-powered speakers. JBL flew a technician from Indianapolis to personally inspect each one on site to ensure it will perform as intended for our launch. Additionally, we created our own proprietary mounting hardware for the installation as JBL is still in development with their own. We’ll also be running the latest release of Pro Tools (12.8) featuring tools for Dolby Atmos and other immersive applications. These types of installations really are not easy as retrofits. We have been able to do something really unique, flexible and highly functional by building from scratch.”

Working as one team across two locations, this emerging creative audio production arm will also include a roster of talent outside of the core staff engineering roles. The team will now be integrated to handle non-traditional immersive VR, AR and experiential audio planning and coding, in addition to casting, production music supervision, extended sound design and production assignments.

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Halle Petro, Steve Rosen, Owen Shearer, Joe O’Connell, Adam Barone, Carolyn Mandlavitz, Brian Goodheart, Michael Marinelli and Eugene Green.

 

Deb Oh joins Nylon Studios from Y&R

Music and sound boutique Nylon Studios, which has offices in NYC and Sydney, has added Deb Oh as senior producer. A classically trained musician, Oh has almost a decade of experience in the commercial music space, working as a music supervisor and producer on both the agency and studio sides.

She comes to Nylon from Y&R, where she spent two years working as a music producer for Dell, Xerox, Special Olympics, Activia and Optum, among others. Outside of the studio, Oh has continued to pursue music, regularly writing and performing with her band Deb Oh & The Cavaliers and serving as music supervisor for the iTunes podcast series, “Limetown.”

A lifelong musician, Oh grew up learning classical piano and singing at a very early age. She began writing and performing her own music in high school and kept up her musical endeavors while studying Political Science at NYU. Following graduation, she made the leap to follow her passion for music full time, landing as a client service coordinator at Headroom. She was then promoted to music supervisor. After five years with the audio shop, she made the leap to the agency side to broaden her skillset and glean perspective into the landscape of vendors, labels and publishers in the commercial music industry.

 

Digging Deeper: The Mill Chicago’s head of color Luke Morrison

A native Londoner, Morrison started his career at The Mill where worked on music videos and commercials. In 2013, he moved across to the Midwest to head up The Mill Chicago’s color department.

Since then, Morrison has worked on campaigns for Beats, Prada, Jeep, Miller, Porsche, State Farm, Wrigley’s Extra Gum and a VR film for Jack Daniel’s.

Let’s find out more about Morrison.

How early on did you know color would be your path?
I started off, like so many at The Mill, as a runner. I initially thought I wanted to get into 3D, and after a month of modeling a photoreal screwdriver I realized that wasn’t the path for me. Luckily, I poked my nose into the color suites and saw them working with neg and lacing up the Spirit telecine. I was immediately drawn to it. It resonated with me and with my love of photography.

You are also a photographer?
Yes, I actually take pictures all the time. I always carry some sort of camera with me. I’m fortunate to have a father who is a keen photographer and he had a darkroom in our house when I was young. I was always fascinated with what he was doing up there, in the “red room.”

Photography for me is all about looking at your surroundings and capturing or documenting life and sharing it with other people. I started a photography club at The Mill, S35, because I wanted to share that part of my passion with people. I find as a ‘creative’ you need to have other outlets to feed into other parts of you. S35 is about inspiring people — friends, colleagues, clients — to go back to the classic, irreplaceable practice of using 35mm film and start to consider photography in a different way than the current trends.

State Farm

In 2013, you moved from London to Chicago. Are the markets different and did anything change?
Yes and no. I personally haven’t changed my style to suit or accommodate the different market. I think it’s one of the things that appeals to my clients. Chicago, however, has quite a different market than in the UK. Here, post production is more agency led and directors aren’t always involved in the process. In that kind of environment, there is a bigger role for the colorist to play in carrying the director’s vision through or setting the tone of the “look.”

I still strive to keep that collaboration with the director and DP in the color session whether it’s a phone call to discuss ahead of the session, doing some grade tests or looping them in with a remote grade session. There is definitely a difference in the suite dynamics, too. I found very quickly I had to communicate and translate the client’s and my creative intent differently here.

What sort of content do you work on?
We work on commercials, music promos, episodics and features, but always have an eye on new ways to tell narratives. That’s where the pioneering work in the emerging technology field comes into play. We’re no longer limited and are constantly looking for creative ways to remain at the forefront of creation for VR, AR, MR and experiential installations. It’s really exciting to watch it develop and to be a part of it. When Jack Daniel’s and DFCB Chicago approached us to create a VR experience taking the viewer to the Jack Daniel’s distillery in Kentucky, we leapt at the chance.

Do you like a variety of projects?
Who doesn’t? It’s always nice to be working on a variety, keeping things fresh and pushing yourself creatively. We’ve moved into grading more feature projects and episodic work recently, which has been an exciting way to be creatively and technically challenged. Most recently, I’ve had a lot of fun grading some comedy specials, one for Jerrod Carmichael and one for Hasan Minhaj. This job is ever-changing, be it thanks to evolving technology, new clients or challenging projects. That’s one of the many things I love about it.

Toronto Maple Leafs

You recently won two AICE awards for best color for your grade on the Toronto Maple Leafs’ spot Wise Man. Can you talk about that?
It was such a special project to collaborate on. I’ve been working with Ian Pons Jewell, who directed it, for many years now. We met way back in the day in London, when I was a color assistant. He would trade me deli meats and cheeses from his travels to do grades for him! That shared history made the AICE awards all the more special. It’s incredible to have continued to build that relationship and see how each of us have grown in our careers. Those kinds of partnerships are what I strive to do with every single client and job that comes through my suite.

When it comes to color grading commercials, what are the main principles?
For me, it’s always important to understand the idea, the creative intent and the tone of the spot. Once you understand that, it influences your decisions, dictates how you’ll approach the grade and what options you’ll offer the client. Then, it’s about crafting the grade appropriately and building on that.

You use FilmLight Baselight, what do your clients like most about what you can provide with that system?
Clients are always impressed with the speed at which I’m able to address their comments and react to things almost before they’ve said them. The tracker always gets a few “ooooooh’s” or “ahhhh’s.” It’s like they’re watching fireworks or something!

How do you keep current with emerging technologies?
That’s the amazing thing about working at The Mill: we’re makers and creators for all media. Our Emerging Technologies team is constantly looking for new ways to tell stories and collaborate with our clients, whether it’s branded content or passion projects, using all technologies at our disposal: anything is at our fingertips, even a Pop Llama.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Well, I’ve got to have my Contax T2, an alarm clock, otherwise I’d never be anywhere on time, and my bicycle.

Would you say you are a “technical” colorist or would you rather prioritize instincts?
It’s all about instincts! I’m into the technical side, but I’m mostly driven by my instincts. It’s all about feeling and that comes from creating the correct environment in the suite, having a good kick off chat with clients, banging on the tunes and spinning the balls.

Where do you find inspiration?
I find a lot of inspiration from just being outside. It might sound like a cliché but travel is massive for me, and that goes hand in hand with my photography. I think it’s important to change your surroundings, be it traveling to Japan or just taking a different route to the studio. The change keeps me engaged in my surroundings, asking questions and stimulating my imagination.

What do you do to de-stress from it all?
Riding my bike is my main thing. I usually do a 30-mile ride a few mornings a week and then 50 to 100 miles at the weekend. Riding keeps you constantly focused on that one thing, so it’s a great way to de-stress and clear your mind.

What’s next for you?
I’ve got some great projects coming up that I’m excited about. But outside of the suite, I’ll be riding in this year’s 10th Annual Fireflies West ride. For the past 10 years, Fireflies West participants have embarked on a journey from San Francisco to Los Angeles in support of City of Hope. This year’s ride has the added challenge of an extra day tacked onto it making the ride 650 miles in total over seven days, so…I best get training! (See postPerspectives’ recent coverage on the ride.)

Director Jon Barber joins Raucous Content

Hollywood-based production house Raucous Content has added trilingual director Jon Barber to its roster. Over the past decade, Barber has worked with agencies such as BBDO, Crispin Porter Bogusky, Leo Burnett, McCann Erikson, Mullen, Publicis, Saatchi & Saatchi, Sid Lee, Taxi and Y&R. He has directed spots for brands as varied as Burger King, BMW, Coke, Chobani, Doritos, FedEx, Mercedes, Timberland and McDonald’s, among others.

Barber fell in love with filmmaking as an Army brat based in Germany, where he spent much of his young adult life. Barber went on to study at the University of Vermont and the University of Salzburg in Austria before ending up in Los Angeles to gain production experience and kick-start his directing career.

In 2006, Barber relocated to Montreal and worked extensively throughout Canada, Europe and the US on everything from commercials to short films and music videos. Joining Raucous means Barber will call Los Angeles home.

Only a year old, Raucous Content has continued to grow its pool content creators. The Raucous directorial roster includes Ben Callner, Keith Ehrlich, Luis Gerard, Adam Gunser, Chris Hooper, Paul Iannachino, Vance Malone, Rob McElhenney, Matt Rainwaters, Daniel Strange and Matt Shakman, who recently helmed two episodes of Game of Thrones, including the bombastic Loot Train fight at the end of the episode “Spoils of War.”

Big Block adds comedy director Richard Farmer

Who doesn’t like to laugh? No one. Well hardly no one. So when a director is able to evoke that sort of response from an audience, it’s amazing. That was the thinking behind Big Block’s addition of comedy director Richard Farmer.

This Oklahoma native began his career as an agency producer in Los Angeles after spending time post-college living in London, Seattle and Prague, working on indie films and videos. After a few years, he went on to produce for Mindfield, a production, editorial, and animation company for commercial television and music videos.

Since stepping behind the lens, Farmer has directed a prolific amount of commercials, each featuring his absurdist humor. Whether it’s carnivorous bunnies for Wendy’s, a magically appearing Fancy Bear for Free Credit Score or creating ’90s R&B songs about iconic memes for LG V20 phones, Farmer knows just how to create a memorable and compelling spot.

The recent LG spots are an example of Farmer’s style. Shot exclusively on the LG V20 phone, Farmer took well-known memes, from Double Rainbow to Damn Daniel and “remastered” them in high quality, showcasing a mash-up of his skills across the realms of narrative, music and VFX. Farmer has already hit the ground running at Big Block, having just booked a job for Simon Malls.

We asked Farmer what he likes about working with editors on his projects: “I love it when the editor really embraces that they are a partner in the process and know they have the freedom to take risks. Editors that are brave enough to push the creative and what was shot to new areas. Freak me out. Open it up and move the boundary. Show me new possibilities. I’m always blown away when that magic happens.”

 

Director Elle Ginter joins Sanctuary Content

Culver City-based production company Sanctuary Content has grown its roster with the addition of director Elle Ginter, who was recently selected as one of 13 directors worldwide for the DGA and AICP’s Commercial Directors Diversity Showcase.

Ginter’s first project with Sanctuary, a Father’s Day spot for Buffalo Wild Wings out of TBWA/Chiat/Day/LA, showcases her skill for capturing honest, intimate moments in its sweet simplicity as a young girl bonds with her father while watching sports. She also wrote and directed the short Why We Wake, in which she explores depression in an honest and artful way.

Ginter found her way to directing in an interesting way. After getting her degree in journalism, she moved to Boston where she began working on a whale-watching boat. A chance meeting with a casting director led to work as a PA on local feature sets. She quickly worked her way into the camera department, eventually becoming a 1st AC before finally landing back in New York City as a writer and art director on commercial shoots.

Sanctuary Content was launched by EP/founder Preston Lee a year and a half ago — they are made up of a lean and diverse roster of directors who create content across all mediums, including advertising, film, music videos and television.

After meeting Ginter, he knew she would be a nice addition to the team, “I’ve been watching Elle’s work for some time. She’s passionate, excited, hungry, and incredibly creative — and, at 29-years old, she’s just getting started.”

Ginter says she knew a traditional, larger production company wouldn’t be the right fit for her: “My career has been fairly untraditional at this point. When I talked to Preston I realized he’s a really out-of-the-box person and inspires that kind of thinking in everyone around him. Every time I talk to him I leave feeling energized.”

Behind the Title: Nylon Studios creative director Simon Lister

NAME: Simon Lister

COMPANY: Nylon Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Nylon Studios is a New York- and Sydney-based music and sound house offering original composition and sound design for films and commercials. I am based in the Australia location.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I help manage and steer the company, while also serving as a sound designer, client liaison, soundtrack creative and thinker.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
People are constantly surprised with the amount of work that goes into making a soundtrack.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
I use Avid Pro Tools, and some really cool plugins

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is being able to bring a film to life through sound.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
At times, clients can be so stressed and make things difficult. However, sometimes we just need to sit back and look at how lucky we are to be in such a fun industry. So in that case, we try our best to make the client’s experience with us as relaxing and seamless as possible.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunchtime.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Anything that involves me having a camera in my hand and taking pictures.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I was pretty young. I got a great break when I was 19 years old in one of the best music studios in New Zealand and haven’t stopped since. Now, I’ve been doing this for 31 years (cough).

Honda Civic spot

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In the last couple of months I think I’ve counted several different car brand spots we’ve worked on, including Honda, Hyundai, Subaru, Audi and Toyota. All great spots to sink our teeth and ears into.

Also we have been working on the great wildlife series Tales by Light, which is being played on National Geographic and Netflix.

For Every Child

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It would be having the opportunity to film and direct my own commercial, For Every Child, for Unicef global rebranding TVC. We had the amazing voiceover of Liam Neeson and the incredible singing voice of Lisa Gerard (Gladiator, Heat, Black Hawk Down).

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My camera, my computer and my motorbike.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I ride motorbikes throughout Morocco, Baja, Himalayas, Mongolia, Vietnam, Thailand, New Zealand and in the traffic of India.

Catherine Finkenstaedt joins Slim as EP

Commercial and music video producer Catherine Finkenstaedt has joined Slim, a creative production company based in Venice, California. She comes to Slim from from GO Film, Wondros and, most recently, Spears and Arrows. Finkenstaedt will be working with various directors at Slim, including Karen Cunningham, ZCDC, Thomas Garber, Jason Headley, Vincent Urban, Pet & Flo, Brad Morrison, Jeff Baena and Wondo.

Finkenstaedt has executive produced campaigns for various companies, including Target, Toyota, Nike, AT&T, Comcast, Activision, Visa, Macy’s and the Tokyo Olympic Committee. She has also worked with directors Jake Scott, Sam Bayer, The Malloys, Patrick Daughters, Anton Corbijn, Chris Cunningham, Mark Romanek, David Kellogg, Matthew Rolston, McG, Antoine Fuqua, Sophie Muller and Hype Williams. Musical artists she’s collaborated with include Ricky Martin, Britney Spears, *NSYNC, Metallica, and Oasis.

Raised outside of Cambridge, England, Finkenstaedt attended Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusettes, where she studied theatre and film. She currently resides in Los Angeles with her pet-loving husband and her five furry children.

“I could not be happier to be joining executive producer Tom Weissferdt (who I worked with in the past) in this very important next phase of my career and in the growth of Slim,” says Finkenstaedt. “We are in a sea of change in commercial and integrated production and I am excited to help support the directors and to also help identify others whose voices are yet to be heard in traditional or integrated marketing content.”

Audio post vet Rex Recker joins Digital Arts in NYC

Rex Recker has joined the team at New York City’s Digital Arts as a full-time audio post mixer and sound designer. Recker, who co-founded NYC’s AudioEngine after working as VP and audio post mixer at Photomag recording studios, is an award-winning mixer with a long list of credits. Over the span of his career he has worked on countless commercials with clients including McCann Erickson JWT, Ogilvy & Mather, BBDO, DDB, HBO and Warner Books.

Over the years, Recker has developed a following of clients who seek him out for his audio post mixer talents — they seek his expertise in surround sound audio mixing for commercials airing via broadcast, Web and cinemas. In addition to spots, Recker also mixes long-form projects, including broadcast specials and documentaries.

Since joining the Digital Arts team, Recker has already worked on several commercial campaigns, promos and trailers for such clients as Samsung, SlingTV, Ford, Culturelle, Orvitz, NYC Department of Health, and HBO Documentary Films.

Digital Arts, owned by Axel Ericson, is an end-to-end production, finishing and audio facility.

Behind the Title: Sibling Rivalry director Gerald Ding

NAME: Gerald Ding

COMPANY: Sibling Rivalry

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Sibling Rivalry is a creative studio that combines immersive storytelling with a distinct design sensibility. It was founded by Joe Wright, Mikon van Gastel and Maggie Meade in 2011.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Directing a commercial, short film or music video is similar to being a chef at a restaurant. You handpick a team of individuals based on their specific talents to execute the vision you have in mind. It’s up to the director to bring out the best performance from each person working on the film for it to become what you imagined.

House of Marley

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think the misconception about directing is that you’ve got to be difficult to work with if you want to be respected in this industry. I don’t believe that. I think how you present yourself and treat others is just basic common sense and respect. You can find your way of communicating what’s important to you while staying focused on the bigger picture.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When there’s a genuine mutual respect and trust between the artists you’re collaborating with; it really elevates the project and raises my expectations because it evolves into something greater than what I first imagined it as.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job is not working!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
The time that I can get a coffee in my hand.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d like to think I’d still be making something that I could show or share with my friends.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I think the excitement of watching films as a kid never left me. I still remember each film and how it affected me, and I loved talking about them after and retelling the stories I had seen. I got into directing so I could tell my own stories, but now the process of making a film is more exciting to me than watching one.

I got into directing through animation because I saw Akira as a kid and wanted to be an animator. As a character animator you’re stoked on just owning a sequence or portion of the film, but eventually I just wanted to work on the whole story and got into directing.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
HPE Tech Actually, G-Dragon x Airbnb Superstar Superhost, Google Android Handshake and House of Marley The Get Together.

Tech Actually

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I’m currently working on a short documentary about this female fighter; we just filmed a portion of it in Belarus. It’s nowhere close to being finished right now but there’s a lot of great talent involved and it’s a story I’m really excited about.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My 35mm film camera Fuji Klasse S film camera (RIP, I’m sorry I broke you), my future Contax T3 35mm point-and-shoot and my Miele washing machine (it’s a life goal after years of renting apartments in New York).

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Filming on set I don’t listen to music unless it’s a part of the scene. I always have hip-hop and RnB in my head but when I’m writing treatments or scripts I usually listen to Frank Ocean or some sad girl pop. I don’t know why, but it works.

THIS IS A HIGH-STRESS JOB WITH DEADLINES AND CLIENT EXPECTATIONS. WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just try to do my best each time and show up prepared because it’s a privilege for me to be here and I embrace all of it, good and bad. I’ve been training in Brazilian Jiu jitsu for quite some time so hard sparring with your friends is a great way to get rid of stress (as well as your ego).

Hush adds Eloise Murphy as senior producer

Design agency Hush has expanded its creative production team with the addition of senior producer Eloise Murphy. In her new position at Hush, Murphy will oversee all project phases and develop relationships with new and existing vendors.

During her career, Murphy has worked in the UK and North America for companies such as the BBC, TED and Moment Factory. Her resume is diverse, working on projects that range from content production for Madonna’s Rebel Heart Tour to experiential production for TED Talks in Rio de Janeiro. Her experience spans digital design, content production and experiential activations for brands including Samsung, Intel and BBC Radio 1.

“Having worked with a variety of brands, artists and companies, I have a solid understanding of how to manage projects optimally within different settings, parameters and environments,” says Murphy. “It has enabled me to be highly adaptable, flexible and develop a strong knack for pre-empting, identifying and resolving issues promptly and successfully. I believe my international experience has made me well-versed in managing complex projects and I’m looking forward to bringing new ideas to the table at Hush.”

Whitehouse editor Lisa Gunning moves from London to LA

Whitehouse Post editor Lisa Gunning has relocated from the company’s London headquarters to its Los Angeles office. The move allows her to cut more long-form projects in addition to her spot work.

Gunning’s arrival at Whitehouse LA coincided with her editing the feature film Newness for commercial and narrative director Drake Doremus. The film was completed in only three months and premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Well known for her commercial work, Gunning wrapped Adidas’ Basketball Without Creativity starring James Harden for frequent director collaborator Stacy Wall in late 2016. In recent years, she has also teamed up with Wieden+Kennedy, 72 and Sunny, Y&R and BBH to work on brands including Nike, Corona, Landrover and Johnnie Walker.

Regarding her decision to relocate, Gunning explains that LA offers an opportunity to expand her commercial portfolio and cater to her long-form interests. “I feel like I’m in the epicenter of where my work is based now.”

Along with her spot work, Gunning has lent her editing talent to films including Nowhere Boy, Seven Psychopaths and Fifty Shades of Grey.

In addition to editing, Gunning has grown her directing skills with several projects, including three short films in collaboration with Nowness and Mini and multiple music videos. “Directing is great for editing, and what I learn on commercials is great for working in long-form,” she explains. “The varied experiences make me a better director and editor because I’m able to empathize with all of the processes and think of them as a whole, as opposed to just one side of it.”

Behind the Title: Composer Michael Carey

NAME: Michael Carey (@MichaelCarey007)

COMPANY: Resonation Music

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative director/composer (film/commercials/TV) and songwriter/producer/mixer (album work).

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
For commercials, film and TV projects, I work closely with the director, producer and agency to come up with something that meets their needs and the needs of the project. I develop an understanding of their overall vision, and then I conceptualize, compose and produce original music to capture the essence of this vision, in a complimentary way.

i-want-to-say-composer-main-title-opening-scenes

Michael Carey was composer of the main title theme and the opening scenes for ‘I Want to Say.’

This includes themes, underscore, source, main titles, end titles, etc. When it comes to album projects and soundtrack songs, I often write for (or with) the featured artist or band and produce the track from end to end. This means that I am also the engineer, programmer, session player and often mixer for a project.

On large projects that require fast turnaround, I wear the “creative director” hat, and I assemble and manage a specific team of colleagues to collaborate with me — those I know can get the job done at the highest level. I keep things focused and cohesive, and strive to maintain a consistent musical voice.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Whichever medium I’m working in, be it music-for-picture or album work, the underlying fundamentals are surprisingly similar. In both instances, it’s ultimately about storytelling – conveying maximum emotional impact in a compelling way. Using dynamics, melody, tension, release, density and space to create memorable moments and exciting transitions to keep the viewer or listener engaged.

I’m always striving to support the “main event.” In film, it’s visuals and dialog. In album work it’s the singer’s performance. I see my job as building a metaphorical “frame” around the picture. Enhance, reinforce, compliment, but never distract.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Two parts, really. First, the satisfaction of achieving a collective goal. Helping a filmmaker/artist realize their vision, while finding a way to authentically express my own musical vision and make a deeper connection with the audience experiencing the work.

There are moments in the course of a project when you hit on something that’s undeniable. Everyone involved immediately feels it. Human connections are made. Those are great moments, and ultimately you want the whole piece to feel like that.

The second part is the inspiration that comes from working collaboratively (usually with people at the top of their game) with those talented peers who challenge and push you in directions you might not have taken otherwise.

WHAT IS YOUR PROCESS FOR SCORING? HOW DO YOU BEGIN?
1) Watch film/read script. 2) Discuss with director, get a sense of their vision. 3) Create musical sketches and build a sonic palette. If there’s already some picture available to work with, then I’ll tackle a scene that feels representative of the rest of the project and refine it with input from the director. My goal is to create a musical/sonic “voice” or “sound” for the film that becomes an inextricable part of its personality.

CAN YOU WALK US THROUGH YOUR WORKFLOW?
Once overall direction has been established and scenes have been spotted, my first step with a scene is to map things out tempo/timing-wise, making note of any significant cuts, events or moments that need to be hit (or avoided) musically.

By defining this structure first, it frees me up to explore musically and texturally with a clear understanding of where “ins” and “outs” are. By then, I usually have a pretty clear sense of what I want to hear as it pertains to realizing the vision of the director, and from that point it is about execution —programming, recording live instrumentation, processing/manipulation and mixing — whatever is required to make the scene “feel” the way it does in my head.

DOES YOUR PROCESS CHANGE DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PROJECT? FILM VS. SPOT, ETC?
There are certain nuances that have to be considered when approaching these different types of projects. Nailing the details in short form (commercials) is often more crucial because you have an entire world of information to convey in 30 seconds or less. There can be no missed moment or opportunity. It needs to feel cohesive with a cinematic story arc, and a compelling payoff at the end, all in an incredibly compressed window of time.

This is less evident in long-form projects. With feature films or TV, you often have the luxury to build musical movements more naturally as a scene progresses.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
That’s a tough one. As a kid I wanted to be an anthropologist. At 21, I went to a cooking school in Paris for a month thinking that that might be cool. More recently, I’ve been dabbling with building websites for friends using template-based platforms like Squarespace.

I think the common themes with these other interests are curiosity, experimentation, creativity and storytelling. Bringing an idea to life, making the abstract tangible. At the end of the day, music still allows me to do these things with a greater degree of satisfaction.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew music would be my path by age 14. I was playing guitar in local bands at the time, and then moved into steady club gigs. By the time I was 18, I was in a signed band, recording and touring. I couldn’t have imagined doing anything else. When I hit my 20s, I knew that writing and composing was the path ahead (vs. being a “gun for hire” guitarist).

I still played in bands and did lots of session work, but I focused more on songwriting and learning about recording and production. During that time, I had the opportunity to work with some legendary British engineer producers. At one point, a well-known video director who had shot some videos with one of my bands had started doing commercials, and he was unhappy with the music that an ad agency had put in one of his spots. So he recruited me to take a shot a composing a new score. It all clicked, and that opened the door to a couple of decades of high-profile commercial spots, as well as consistent work from major ad agencies and brands.

Eventually, this journey led me down the road of TV and film. All the while, I kept a foot in the album world, writing for and producing artists in the US and internationally.

andy-vargas-the-beat-2016-hmma-winner-producer-songwriterCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I Want To Say— Composer: Main Title and opening scenes (Healdsburg International Film Festival – Best Documentary).
LBS– Songwriter/Producer: End Title Track feat. J.R. Richards of Dishwalla (Sundance Official Selection, Independent Spirit Awards nominee)
• Andy Vargas/The Beat (Producer/Songwriter – Winner 2016 Hollywood Music in Media Awards “R&B/Soul”)
• Escape The Fate/Alive (Songwriter — hit single, #26 Active Rock, album #2 Billboard Hard Rock charts)

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s hard to pick one. Some of the projects listed above are contenders. There’s a young band I’m developing and producing right now called Bentley. I will be very proud when that is released. They’re fantastic.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Pro Tools. It’s my “instrument” as much as any guitar or keyboard. It’s allowed me to be incredibly productive and make anything I hear in my head a reality. Steven Slate, Sound Toys and PSP plug-ins. Vibe, warmth, color, saturation, detail. My extensive collection of vintage gear (amps, mics, mic pres, compressors, guitars, boutique pedals, etc.). Not sure if these qualify as “technology,” but they all have buttons and knobs and make great noises!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (to a lesser extent lately).

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have an amazing family who helps keep me centered with my eyes on the big picture. Running and exercise (not enough, but feels great when I do) and, increasingly, I try to meditate each morning. A friend and colleague whose studio demeanor I’ve always admired turned me onto it. He’s consistently calm and focused even in the midst of total drama and chaos. I’d like to think I’m getting there.

Main Image: Patricia Maureen Photography-P.M.P

TwoPoint0 adds editors Debbie McMurtrey and David Cornman

TwoPoint0 has added two veteran editors to its New York-based studio: David Cornman and Debbie McMurtrey.

Cornman is a commercial editor who has cut comedy, effects-driven, dramatic and documentary-style spots for clients such as AIG, GE, Accenture, Bank of America, Staples, Verizon and Computer Associates. He has won awards from the AICE, AICP, Clio and Addys, and he has an Emmy nom in the Best Commercial category.

Cornman’s recent projects include a package of Crayola spots for McGarry-Bowen and P&G work out of Havas, as well as a several digital projects for Facebook’s Creative Shop. A recent passion project included shooting and editing a piece for Atria Senior Living in Rye Brook, New York, which gave residents the chance to try rowing for the first time. Rowers ranged in age from 85-97. “That was fun to be part of,” he says.

McMurtrey started her career at Crew Cuts in 1999. In 2007, she was hired as the first editor at Nomad’s East Coast office. From there she worked at Cutting Room, Red Car and Alkemy X. In addition to spots and branded web content, she has also cut short films that have screened in over 30 festivals, a sitcom pilot for VH1, and parody commercials for Saturday Night Live. She recently collaborated with director/producer Greg Kohs on his feature documentary, The Great Alone, which chronicles the comeback journey of four-time Iditarod champion Lance Mackey. McMurtrey considers her specialty to be docu-style. She excels at taking raw footage and finding the narrative in order to shape the story. She also enjoys editing dialogue and comedy.

McMurtrey has recently worked with director Zack Resnicoff of Impressionista Films on three campaigns for Fisher Price, including 20 individual spots.They have previously worked together on projects for Macy’s, Blue Cross and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Other recent projects completed by McMurtrey include the “We the Voters” campaign and a series of films for Stephens Bank, including a bio of Alexander Hamilton. She has also edited projects this fall for Facebook, Hewlett Packard and Nintendo.

To view Cornman’s and McMurtrey’s reels on the studio’s site.

Behind the Title: Sound mixer/sound designer Rob DiFondi

Name: Rob DiFondi

Company: New York City’s Sound Lounge

Can you describe your company?
Sound Lounge is an audio post company that provides creative services for TV and radio commercials, feature films, television series, digital campaigns, gaming and other emerging media. Artist-owned and operated, we’re made up of an incredibly diverse, talented and caring group of people who all love the advertising and film worlds.

We recently celebrated Sound Lounge’s 18th birthday. I’m proud to say I’ve been a part of the SL family for over 13 years now, and I couldn’t ask for a better group of friends to hang out with every day.

What’s your job title?
Senior Mixer/Sound Designer

What does that entail?
I have actors in my booth all day recording VO (voiceover) for different commercials. My clients (usually brands, ad agencies, production companies, or editorials) hang in my room, and together we get the best possible read from the actor while they’re in the booth. I then craft sound design for the spot by either pulling sound effects from my library or recreating the necessary sounds myself (a.k.a. “Foley”). Once that’s set, I’ll take the lines the actor recorded, the sound effects I created, and any music, and then mix them all together so the spot sounds perfect (and is legal for TV broadcast)!

Being a mixer in the advertising post world isn’t easy. I also have to be able to provide a solid lunch recommendation — I always need to make sure I know where my clients can get the best sushi in the Flatiron district!

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
That most of us are musicians who wanted to be rock stars but thought better of it. Maybe that isn’t so surprising though.

Sound Lounge

What’s your favorite part of the job?
The people, and the social part of the advertising industry. This business is filled with so many kind, funny and talented people, and it’s so nice to have them be a part of your life. And how can you beat partying every year at the MOMA for the AICP Gala?

What’s your least favorite?
Probably the lack of travel. I love our office, but it would be fun to do my job in different cities once in a while.

What is your favorite time of the day?
Walking in my front door and seeing my wife and kids.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
Something that involves beaches and nice weather.

How early on did you know this would be your path?
I totally fell into this profession. I went to school to become a music engineer/producer. I had no idea there was a whole industry for mixing TV spots. Once I got into it though, I knew immediately that I loved it.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I worked on some really nice pieces for Maybelline, Google, Lincoln and TD Ameritrade.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
Miracle Stain, a Super Bowl commercial that I mixed for Tide a few years back. I finished the mix at 10pm on Thursday and got a call at 2am that there had been some changes, so I had to come back to work in the middle of the night. I tweaked the mix until the sun came up and had it ready to ship by 9am. It was one of those very epic projects that had all the classic markings of a Super Bowl spot.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
My iPhone, my DSLR camera and iZotope RX.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’m a big Instagram guy. I love seeing people’s lives told through photos. Facebook is so 2015.

Do you listen to music while you work? Care to share your favorite music to work to?
Since I work in audio I can’t listen to music while I work, but when I’m not working I listen to a lot of modern country music, Dave Matthews Band (not afraid to say it!), prog metal and pretty much everything in between.

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I just leased a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited. There’s nothing like putting the top down and taking a drive to the beach!

Napoleon Audio launched, Gregg Singer named EP

Veteran agency and audio producer Gregg Singer has joined The Napoleon Group in New York City as executive producer of its newly-launched Napoleon Audio.

Singer intends to integrate Napoleon’s audio capabilities with the group’s soup-to-nuts offerings, which span previz through live action production and post. “We’re creating a true full-service audio production company within The Napoleon Group,” he explains. “This will encompass everything from audio recording and mixing to in-studio direction and supervision, creative writing, sound design, original and stock music, music supervision and licensing, voice-over work and on-camera casting.”

gregg_singerNapoleon Audio’s rooms have mirrored gear and shared ISDN capabilities, a common network and separate isolation booths that can be linked or paired with either control room for simultaneous recording. Alongside the suites is an acoustically-treated stage that connects to the control rooms and enables the capture of live performances. In addition to audio post, the new division will offer trafficking, talent services, location recording and foreign language services, he adds.

Singer himself has an eclectic background, spanning everything from TV and radio production, marketing, advertising and creative development to sales, management, budgeting and strategic planning.  A film and television graduate of the Newhouse School at Syracuse, he got his start working on commercial shoots in New York. He then transitioned to the agency side and worked his way up through the production department, working as a producer, senior producer and head of production at such shops as JWT, BBDO, Bozell/Eskew, Cline Davis Mann and Kirshenbaum & Bond.

Singer left the agency world and joined audio post facility Sound Lounge in 2002 to launch a full-service audio production company. He left Sound Lounge in 2011 and was most recently partner and EP at Propeller Music Group.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Alex Hagon

Name: Alex Hagon

Company: PS260 in New York

Can you describe your company?
We are a media company offering editorial, post production, visual effects and graphic solutions across all viewable platforms.

PS260 is a lovely place to work as we have some of the most creative, talented and friendly people and, in my opinion, also some of the nicest offices in our industry. We started in New York and recently opened our second location in Venice, California. So we now have two amazing spaces.

Job Title?
Film Editor

What does that entail?
Being a film editor, you have to wear many hats — you’re responsible for creating a narrative from a director’s or agency’s vision. Sometimes you start with a treatment and a storyboard. Sometimes you have been on set and had plenty of time to discuss the project with the director and team. And other times, you get many hours of footage for an unscripted spot and are given the brief to make it “great, enthralling, engaging.”

army

Hagon edited this spot for the Army Reserve.

Once you have footage cut together, you are adding music, sound design and visual effects, all of which add layers to the story. Having the knowledge to do these well ultimately helps sell the vision to the brand.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Once you are presenting an edit to the director and agency, you have to have good negotiating skills and be able to “sell” your point of view. You also need to interpret what may be very different points of view in the room, and then work out how to best achieve those goals.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Being able to bring something to a project that no one was expecting, whether that’s finding a different perspective on a story or even coming up with an interesting music track.

What’s your least favorite?
Not being able to do a great job when schedules clash.

What is your favorite time of day?
I like the early evening, when the sun is setting, especially since I have a nice view of Manhattan from my office!

Not a bad view!

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be a vet.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I thought I was going to be a drummer for a living, but when that didn’t pan out, editing was a natural fit. I started as a runner and worked my way up, working under three very different editors, all of whom were generous enough to share their skills. I also learned a lot from how they would interact with clients, adopting what I thought were their best characteristics, and I continue to learn from the people around me, even to this day.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I recently did a project for Prudential with Droga5, directed by Matt Bieler at Reset. There was also an AT&T project via BBDO and directed by Brian Billow at O Positive. Another one was a project for the Army Reserve for McCann, directed by Brett Froomer at Radical Media.

What is the project you are most proud of?
I loved working with Marcus Svanberg at Blink on the Blackberry campaign featuring Alicia Keys, Neil Gaiman and Robert Rodriguez for BBDO. It was beautiful footage to edit and it was a lot of fun creating the narrative from the fascinating interviews that Marcus managed to coax out of each of the characters.

Blackberry with Alicia Keys.

What social media channels do you follow?
Most of them, but Instagram is my favorite.

What kind of music do you listen to while you work?
I listen to a large variety of music, usually via Spotify, and I tend to play certain albums to death. This week it’s been Beck’s Morning Phase, Dr. John’s Swamp Blues, The Budos Band’s self-titled album, Wise Up Ghost from Elvis Costello and the Roots, Bob Marley and the Wailers Live! and Grimes’ Art Angels.

What Do You Do To De-Stress From It All?
I tend not to get too stressed out as I love what I do, but I do the Alexander Technique and meditate.

Director Zach Math joins Caviar

Production company Cavier, which has offices in Los Angeles, London, Brussels and Paris, has added director Zach Math to its directorial roster. Math’s series of spots for K-Mart (“Ship My Pants”) got over 50 million views on YouTube and won a Webby Award, and two of his branded shorts are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

His documentary feature, The Final Member, premiered at the Toronto Hot Docs International Film Festival and played festivals all over the world. The distribution rights were purchased by Drafthouse Films and it was released on Netflix. Since then, he’s worked with brands such as Fox Sports, Nissan, AT&T, Comcast and the NFL.

While Math is excited to continue working in the advertising and commercial world, he is also looking forward to taking advantage of Caviar’s film and television capabilities to develop his own long format projects.

“Zach has proven his directorial expertise throughout the branded content world,” says Caviar Los Angeles executive producer Jasper Thomlinson. “His sophisticated visual style, skills as a writer and comedic sensibility fit in here perfectly.”

Behind the Title: Nutmeg creative director Dave Rogan

NAME: Dave Rogan

COMPANY: New York City’s Nutmeg Creative

CAN YOU DESCRIBE NUTMEG?
We are a single-resource creative partner that brings targeted communications to life for brands, networks and ad agencies. A post resource for nearly 40 years, Nutmeg also provides audio, editing, color and graphics, in addition to interactive, identity and social.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
It depends on the day, on the project and on the client. In some cases, I am acting in the traditional role of agency creative director, coming up with original ideas that meet stated goals for the project. In many other cases, I am guiding a project from genesis to completion, adding a creative perspective or ensuring that our clients’ expectations are met or surpassed.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Almost anything can fall under that title — from original concepting and scripting, to “MacGyvering” a makeshift tracking marker out of a stick on set for an effects-heavy spot.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I was an ad agency CD, it was almost impossible getting the creative, production and post talent on the same page at the same time, to my satisfaction. Half of my job was making sure everyone was current on any rolling changes, adaptations to, or special challenges presented by the creative. But because Nutmeg has creative, interactive, production and post all under one roof, we’re able to think through every stage of the project together from the get-go. Instances of something unexpected popping up are almost non-existent because so many heads are in the game at the same time.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I seem to always be flying the day before or after a holiday. Last year, I flew home from a shoot on Thanksgiving morning. Wasn’t in love with that, I must admit.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning person — I love waking up before the sun and watching it rise.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be trying to convince Dream Theater they need a second keyboard player.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew I wanted to be in a creative professional environment from a very early age — before college. I’ve been lucky enough to ride industry trends and continual reinvention to a place where I am still able to continue to shape creative communications in any number of ways on a day-to-day basis.

ParagardCAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
My current projects range from working on a critically celebrated pharma campaign for a disease called nontuberculous mycobacteria — NTM, for short —to a series of hilarious spots for a female contraceptive to an animated PSA aimed at wiping out polio in the Third World. There is also the forthcoming launch of a famous Broadway reboot. It varies every day with no rhyme or reason, and I love it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Scale-wise, it certainly pales in comparison to most of the projects I’m involved in here, but I take a special amount of pride in Nutmeg’s semi-finalist submission to the Doritos’ Crash the Super Bowl (image below) contest a year ago. It was a spot I wrote, directed and co-produced with our internal production team with almost no budget. To know that people really enjoyed it was thrilling and very satisfying for all of us.

Doritos Crash the Superbowl-Dave RoganNAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My iPhone, laptop and my ancient, but beloved, Korg Trinity.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, mostly.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Only with headphones! Lately, I’ve been listening to Dream Theater’s prog metal opera, “The Astonishing.” I think my coworkers would tear their earballs out if I played it at any kind of audible volume.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I wish I had a more interesting answer than this, but I find my clients enjoyable, not stress inducing. When I worked at agencies, the dynamic was different and I definitely felt under the gun on a daily basis. At Nutmeg, it’s different. The clients really want our perspective and guidance, and, in most cases, we’re very much partners with the same goals.

Adam Schwartz and Jim Ulbrich join Nomad Editing

Nomad Editing has expanded its New York staff with the addition of editors/partners Jim Ulbrich and Adam Schwartz. Their hiring comes on the heels of EP/partner Jennifer Lederman and editor/partner Jai Shukla joining the studio earlier this year.

Jim Ulbrich comes to Nomad  — an Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere house — after working at a variety of New York-based editorial shops. Since joining Nomad, Ulbrich has worked on projects for Saatchi & Saatchi NY and Toyota with Droga5. He is now finishing a campaign with Grey. He collaborates on many projects with director Matt Smukler from Community Films.

Ulbrich began his career at Berlin Cameron and then moved to 89 Edit. He then moved to Mad River and then Beast where he became a partner in the company. He has edited campaigns for AT&T, Cheerios, Hanes and Coke.

Schwartz has followed a similar career trajectory to Ulbrich. His client list includes big brands such as Google, HP, Verizon, Reebok and Nike. Schwartz has worked with high-profile directors, including Janusz Kaminski, Errol Morris, Jared Hess and Wes Anderson. He’s worked on several projects since joining Nomad, and is now editing with BBDO NY. Schwartz began editing at Lost Planet before he became a founding partner at Beast.

 

Commercial and film director Jessica Sanders joins Sanctuary

Sanctuary in Culver City has added director Jessica Sanders to its roster. Sanders, who has a background in documentaries and character-driven storytelling, got her big break in advertising with a Sony “make.believe” short film, for which she won a Cannes Young Director Award. The film also got the attention of Steve Jobs, who personally handpicked her to direct the launch ad for the Apple iPad.

During her career, the filmmaker has earned an Oscar nomination for Sing, a short doc on aspiring young vocalists. She also got a Sundance Special Jury Prize for After Innocence, her documentary about wrongfully convicted men cleared by DNA that serves as the basis for her upcoming feature film, Picking Cotton.

Sanders, whose resume also includes campaigns for Amazon, Samsung, Procter & Gamble, Honda and Toyota, is currently working on a three-film campaign for Land Rover out of agency Spark44’s London office. She will be also be directing a short film for Refinery29’s SmashBox Anthology Series, produced by Sanctuary and Sanders.

Main Photo: Elisabeth Caren

ArsenalCreative beefs up with head of 2D Chris Noellert

LA-based ArsenalCreative has brought on Chris Noellert as head of 2D. He brings with him over 20 years of experience in VFX, Flame and post. During Noellert’s two-decade career, he’s been a Flame artist and served as VFX supervisor at shops including Chimney, Syndicate, Mirada Studios. Most recently, he spent nearly four years at Carbon VFX, where he held the title of creative director/lead Flame.

At ArsenalCreative, Noellert had already worked on the “Not Just New, Better” campaign for Hyundai, continuing his longtime collaboration with agency partner Innocean. “I had done a fair amount of work for Innocean at my previous shop, including leading two of their three Hyundai Super Bowl ads, First Date and Ryan Town, and over the years we really hit a nice stride,” he says. “It’s fantastic when you have the opportunity to consistently work with creative directors and teams where you have developed a creative shorthand. You can anticipate and fulfill their needs successfully thru the project — from concepting and participating on-set, to sitting in the bay and pulling it all together. So when Innocean called with ‘Not Just New, Better,’ I was super excited to get them introduced to my new cohorts at Arsenal.”

In addition to the Hyundai and Principal Financial campaigns — Noellert led the revamped logo rollout and brand campaign — ArsenalCreative is also releasing 17 web films for Toyota in partnership with Saatchi & Saatchi LA and Superlounge’s Jordan Brady.

“From the outset, I was looking for an established boutique-style shop positioned to expand into the latest media trends and technologies” he explains. “I also knew I was looking for a shop that fosters open relations with clientele – allowing me to take a collaborative leading role in the creative process, not being the guy in the Flame suite in the corner at a two-man shop, or a cog in a wheel of hundreds.”

Editor Trish Fuller joins Work Editorial in NYC

Work Editorial, which has expanded from London to New York and Los Angeles, has added editor Trish Fuller to its NYC-based studio. Fuller, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, got her start at Whitehouse Post London before moving to New York for the launch of Whitehouse’s New York office in 2002.

Fuller’s previous editing credits include Macy’s campaigns with Barry Levinson; Liberty Mutual with Tony Goldwyn and Stylewar; Verizon with Phil Morrison; a Drug Free America campaign for Hill Holiday, directed by Eric Stoltz; a Martini Campaign starring George Clooney and directed by Francois Girard; Glamour’s series of short films directed by Jennifer Aniston and Kate Hudson; and a Sprint campaign for F&P directed by Stacy Wall.

Fuller joins editors Cass Vanini and Ben Jordan, as well as partners editor Rich Orrick and executive producer Jane Dilworth, who also both relocated to Work’s New York office just over a year ago joining New York executive producer Erica Thompson.

Fuller will be available for projects at all Work offices, both domestic and abroad. “Work has relationships with directors and agencies in both the US and the UK,” she says, “and that fluidity is incredibly appealing to me. I get the best of both worlds — signing on with Work is like a new beginning, and also a coming home.”

VFX supervisor Michael Gregory joins MPC LA as head of 2D

MPC Los Angeles has brought on veteran VFX supervisor/lead artist Michael Gregory as head of its 2D department. He comes on board from MPC London, where for the past 13 years he has focused on commercials, working with directors such as Jonathan Glazer, Traktor, Nick Gordon, Noam Murro, Mark Romanek, Tom Tagholm and Neil Gorringe. Gregory has a numbe of industry awards on his resume, including a VES honor for Outstanding Animated Commercial for Cadbury Spots v Stripes.

Gregory joins MPC LA as they get ready to move into to a new 25,000-square-feet studio space in Culver City this summer. At the new facility, the studio is putting VFX, content production, color grading, VR and film pre-production and VFX supervision onto one floor. “It’s going to be fantastic to have every department on the same floor,” says Gregory. “The best work always comes from collaboration. Great communication between different disciplines always achieves the greatest results.”

“Michael joining from the London studio will help us maintain the MPC culture as we expand,” shares Paul O’Shea, creative director, MPC LA. “His work ethic, creative values and passion to create work of the highest standards make him a great mentor for the team. These days we work with MPC teams globally on projects, so moving talent between offices is very healthy for us. And, he supports the finest football team in England — West Ham — which also helps!”

Gregory loves working in VFX. “Every time I receive a script it excites me more than the last. One week it will be a dragon fighting Vikings, the next, a girl who explodes into a 1,000 butterflies. When you read, ‘… and a dragon rises from the ocean,’ what more inspiration do you really need?”

Brian Butcher joins production house Iron Claw as EP

Brian Butcher has joined LA-based production studio Iron Claw as executive producer. Butcher, who has an Emmy nom under his belt, has over 10 years of experience in the industry. He will work with Iron Claw’s founder/executive creative director Sean Koriakin to help build the company’s resume of work in commercials, main titles, video games, broadcast and design.

Most recently, Butcher was senior producer at Imaginary Forces, working in both the New York and Los Angeles offices. During his five years there, he worked on commercial projects for Toyota, Nike, Ram Trucks, Sapporo, Powerade, AT&T and Propel; main title sequences for the Starz drama Black Sails and the Guillermo del Toro-directed feature Pacific Rim; as well as installations for The Times Square Alliance. He also led teams in the creation of cinematics for Sony’s God of War video game franchise.

Before that, Butcher was senior producer at Perception NYC. He has also worked as a freelance producer at Psyop, MassMarket, Thornberg & Forester, Spontaneous, Charlex and Click 3X, among others.

Editor Erin Nordstrom joins Spot Welders

Editor Erin Nordstrom, whose resume includes spots, documentaries and music videos, has joined creative editorial shop Spot Welders. While based at the studio in LA, she will also be available for the New York office and East Coast-based agency clients. Her editing tools of choice are Adobe Premiere Pro and Avid Media Composer. See her work here.

Nordstrom joins Spot Welders from the Santa Monica office of Optimus, where she worked for the past six years. Prior to that she spent seven years freelancing for a range of agencies and post companies in Southern California. A graduate of Indiana University, she started her career with a small editorial company in LA that worked frequently for the boutique creative agency Ground Zero. She eventually joined the agency as its staff editor.

Her advertising work includes spots that range from emotional to comedic for such brands as Activision, Columbia Sportswear, Samsung, Taco Bell, Motorola, Honda and many others.

Nordstrom describes her freelance years as a time when her work “ran the gamut of what you could do as an editor. It was a great learning experience, and forced me to exercise lots of creative muscles.” She made countless connections with filmmakers, creatives and producers, many of which have opened doors for her creatively.

One example is during her stint at Optimus, her EP connected her with a producer who was working on a passion project about a headstrong artist who frequently clashed with the patrons who hired him to carve intricate caves out of desert sandstone formations.  The resulting film, Cave Digger, directed by Jeffrey Karoff, was nominated for an Academy Award in 2014.

“Erin’s background is a great complement to her skills as an editor,” says Joanne Ferraro, EP at Spot Welders’ New York office. “She has an insider’s knowledge of how to collaborate with and support agency creatives, and her freelance years have let her sample the best approaches to problem-solving at post houses all over LA. Combine that with her long-form work with documentary and music video directors and you have a formidable talent with a deep perspective on her craft.

Behind the Title: Butter senior producer Annick Mayer

NAME: Annick Mayer

COMPANYButter Music + Sound (Facebook)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY? Butter is a group of talented composers and producers, who all happen to love working with each other. We create original music for moving picture, with a focus in the world of advertising. We also act as music supervisors when clients are looking to license rather than compose.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As the senior producer at Butter, I am a face and a name to our clients, and the liaison between the clients and our composers. I organize and oversee the briefs, have input on the creative process, manage the schedule and handle the budgets from start to finish. I am wearing two hats at all times: supporting my clients, while remaining a driving facilitator to our team of composers. My main concern is getting the job done well. That means painlessly for our clients, while making sure our composers are able to create the best and most creative product. This is key for me. I also work in the music supervision aspect of what we do at Butter, conducting searches/music research in Butter’s Library, as well as reaching out to publishers, etc., for outside licensing.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Making lunch! At Butter Music + Sound’s west coast office, where I moved a little over a year ago, we often make lunch for clients in our outdoor kitchen. Our LA EP Marcus Nelson and I love to cook, so we jump at the opportunity to share this with our team and clients. Our special is lamb burger Friday’s — seriously delicious.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Dropbox for all things file sharing… we collaborate with artists all over the world, so Dropbox, along with Skype, makes these relationships possible. Spotify is amazing for music research — I love going down the rabbit hole on different genres and artists. I also love a good old-fashioned phone call; this solves the smallest to biggest issue that can easily be lost in translation over email.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB? 

When I am reviewing submissions from composers and go, “Yup, this is the one!” Music is very difficult to talk about for many people, and when we nail what agency creatives are describing it is so satisfying.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When pieces of music that we love die in the demo process. In our business, especially for the composers, you have to learn not to get too attached to your idea, as it can change and even die at the drop of a hat. C’est la vie.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunch with the team. It’s a 30-minute block where we can relax and debrief or talk about something completely stupid, depending on what we need that day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Working with my hands somewhere outdoors.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I started working in this niche of the music industry when I was around 23, so fairly early! Before that I was writing about music for a culture magazine and waiting tables for a paycheck.

Clash of the Clan with Liam Neeson.

Clash of Clans with Liam Neeson for SuperCell.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just wrapped a five-spot package for Honda (RPA) where we pre-scored everything. It was super fun to help them bring these stories to life from the get-go. In June, we worked on an awesome spot for Android (Droga5.) We were asked to create an original song for an Android spot that would launch on June 30 in tandem with the addition of a leap-second to the world clock. I love, love, love what we came up with. We also work on lots of Supercell spots (Boom Beach, Clash of Clans) for Barton F. Graf 9000, and most recently put together a massive live orchestra that we recorded at Avatar studios, one of my favorite places in New York!

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Wow, tough question! I loved working on the DirecTV Fantasy Football spots with the Manning brothers (Grey, NY.) There were many logistical hoops to record the Mannings live on set, but our team made it happen. The project was super fun and gained over a million views on YouTube within a few days of going live.

Also, we recently worked on a German spot for Immowelt, one of Germany’s biggest real estate portals. It was a really exciting and creative brief, and what our composers came up with blew my mind.

In my first year at Butter, we recorded a huge ensemble at Avatar Studios with some of New York’s most talented jazz session musicians for a Kayak spot (Barton F. Graf, 9000)… as a huge jazz nerd, that was an amazing day on the job for me!

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, iPhone and iPhone.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have two dogs, so anything from lounging to hiking with them is a good de-stresser. I actually bring one of them to work with me and she is probably the most amazing de-stressing tool. Aside from that, cooking, yoga, running …anything outdoors.

Aardman to buy majority share of NYC’s Nathan Love

London-based Aardman will acquire a majority share in New York City-based animation studio Nathan Love. The new company, to be re-branded Aardman Nathan Love, signals the animation powerhouse’s first permanent production facility outside the UK and further establishes its commitment to the advertising business.

Nathan Love, which was founded by Joe Burrascano in 2007, produces advertising for a number of high-profile clients and brands including Kellogg’s, Kraft, Pepsi, NBC Universal and Nickelodeon.

“Teaming up with an existing company gives us the opportunity to hit the ground running and a solid base from which to grow,” explained David Sproxton, co-founder/executive chairman of Aardman. “This venture is not about sending work back to the UK. It’s about building a new business in New York for American agencies, and we feel we can do this more effectively by being there.”

“The partnership feels very natural, our values and philosophy are closely aligned, and the potential for what we can do together is incredibly inspiring,” said Burrascano. “We hope agencies and clients will feel the same way, and that in working with us they will have access to a unique wealth of talent and storytelling experience.”

Photo caption: L-R: Peter Lord, Joe Burrascano and David Sproxton.

Deluxe hires producer Joanna Woods for Beast, CO3, Method in Chicago

Deluxe Creative Services has brought on producer Joanna Woods, who will oversee projects in Chicago for co-located sister companies Beast, Company 3 and Method Studios.

Woods (pictured above) has worked on TV, radio, video and web content for brands including Allstate, Walmart, Coors Light, Sprint, KFC and more. She comes to the team from Music Dealers, where she worked closely with agency and post house producers, as well as in-house engineers. She has also held production roles at Another Country studios and Chicago Recording Company.

“It’s rare in Chicago for one facility to have centralized production encompassing editorial, finishing, color and graphics all under one roof. Beast, Company 3 and Method all have great standing in our community in terms of both caliber of work and client relations,” says Woods.

In other employee news, Kendall Fash (pictured right), who was previously in the producer role, has been named national director of marketing for Beast. She will remain based in Chicago.

Fash has been with Beast’s Chicago office for five years, most recently in the role of senior producer across Beast, Company 3 and Method. In her new position she will oversee marketing initiatives for all seven Beast facilities across the US. Fash has shepherded many projects through the Chicago office, working with brands such as Nike, McDonald’s, Michelob Ultra and Yelp, and top ad agencies in both the local market and nationwide.

MPC LA adds five veteran 3D artists, promotes one

MPC in Los Angeles had added five veteran artists to its 3D advertising division. Steward Burris joins as head of animation, Zach Tucker as VFX supervisor, George Saavedra as rigging lead, Brian Broussard as texture and look development supervisor and Matthew Maude as head of lighting. In addition, Charles Trippe has been promoted to head of FX after two years on staff as FX TD.

“Our new 3D team has collaborated on some of the most renowned films and commercials of recent years and, along with being frontrunners in their FX specialties, they have extensive experience as problem solvers,” says MPC LA managing director Andrew Bell.

Burris brings 20 years of experience at studios such as Digital Domain, Psyop, The Mill, Framestore and Rhythm and Hues to his new role. His credits include spots for Kia (remember the hamsters?), Call of Duty and Acura; the TV series Breaking Bad and The X Files; and films The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, George of the Jungle and Alvin and the Chipmunks.

Tucker’s experience includes time at Weta Digital in New Zealand, where he worked on The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and The Two Towers. Domestically he has been at Digital Domain, Asylum, Riot, Radium and Mirada. Additional film credits are Pacific Rim and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, as well as spots for Lexus, Porsche, Under Armour and Microsoft.

Saavedra has spent time at Sony Pictures Imageworks, Method Studios, Psyop and Digital Domain. He has worked on films such as Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2, X-Men: First Class, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief and Star Trek. His spot resume includes work for Kia, Intel and DirecTV.

Broussard worked on Robert Stromberg’s Cannes Lion-winning, branded film What Lives Inside for Intel and Dell and Call of Duty: Advanced trailer Warfare Discover Your Power, both while a freelancer at MPC LA. An AICP honored trailer for Destiny, Become Legend, is another credit for Broussard, this one while at Digital Domain.

Maude has worked at studios all over the world, including Cinesite in London, Double Negative Singapore, Asylum, Method LA, Wildfire Studios in New Orleans and, most recently, Atomic Fiction in Montreal. He has collaborated on feature films such as Fast & Furious 6, Twelve Years A Slave, X-Men: Days of Future Past and Into the Woods. Spot work includes Apple’s iPhone, GMC, Diet Dr. Pepper and Hershey’s.

The new head of FX, Trippe has been instrumental on some of the Los Angeles studio’s most highly touted commercials, including the Kia 2014 Super Bowl spot and Fiat Godzilla.

10 fun editing how-to’s from Sean Stender

Cut+Run’s Sean Stender has been a working editor for nine years, but that wasn’t the professional path he initially set out on.  After graduating college, his goal was to be a director of photography.

“I always had a fascination with photography, but never took it seriously or really studied the craft until I was in college,” he explains. “I worked for Clarimont Camera as a sales assistant while a student, and I was able to leverage those contacts to get my foot in the door at various commercial production companies.”

After working as freelance camera assistant for a couple years, Stender (@smstender) soon realized that being on set wasn’t right for him. Shortly after, he took a job at production company Reactor Films as a vault manager. This is where he started cutting his teeth as an editor — he started cutting director’s cuts for Steve Chase, Chris Applebaum, Warren Kushner and Thom Higgins. A few years later he decided to make the jump to post, and the managing director of Cut+Run, Michelle Eskin, brought him on board in 2008, where he has been editing ever since.

Levis_5-2
Levi’s and XO Mints

Over the years Stenger, who is based at Cut+Run’s LA studio and uses an Avid Media Composer, has cut projects for Neato Robotics, ARCO, Starbucks, Levi’s, Fiat and XO Mints, among other humorous commercial campaigns. During this time he picked up some valuable experience, and is sharing it here as lighthearted tips. Enjoy…

How to break a creative block…
Pull your assistant into the bathroom for a mid-stream brainstorming session.

How to get a break after 12 hours behind the screen…
Pound on the keyboard and walk out of the room while yelling for your assistant to come in to re-start the Avid because it “crashed.”

How to work through lunch…
Order a smoothie with a long straw (hands free).

How to successfully pull off the all-nighter…
Berocca, hand sanitizer and lots of PG Tips (wonderful British tea).

How to keep smiling in difficult situations….
Make sure your desk is facing a wall.

How to nudge your client down the right creative path…
Break out the Blueberry Kush.

How to help your family forget the holiday(s) you missed…
Adopt a puppy.

How to keep cutting great creative work…
Surround yourself with amazing talent.

How to end a project on a high note….
Nobu.

How to succeed in life….
Work hard and be nice to everyone.

A little more about Sean Stender: His favorite show is PBS’ California’s Gold and his podcast queue includes WTF With Marc Maron and Freakonomics. In his spare time he can be found at Dodger Stadium, behind a still camera or hanging out with his French bulldog named Sammy Davis Jr. 

Stir Post Audio ups Matt Holmes to sound designer/mixer

Stir Post Audio, which has multiple locations in Chicago, has promoted associate engineer Matt Holmes to sound designer/mixer. Holmes, who has a Bachelor of Science in Recording Arts from Indiana University’s prestigious Jacob’s School of Music, joined the company for launch last June. Since that time he has mixed spots for Lay’s, Bud Light, Ziploc, Hunt’s Sauces and Hebrew National.

“With his great ears, easy going manner, and technical proficiency, Matt, in a very short time, has become an in-demand team member who adds value to our client’s sound design and mixing projects,” says EP David Kaplan, who is partnered in Stir with Mindy Verson and Greg Allan.

A multi-talented instrumentalist, who plays drums, guitar, bass and piano, Holmes also mans the drum chair in the indie acoustic band, Valaska, with whom he has recorded two CDs, and also regularly gigs around Chicago at the Beat Kitchen and Schubas, as well as other venues in the Midwest and nationally. In 2013, the band released their first CD, “Natural Habitat,” and, earlier this year, followed up with “Thing,” which he also recorded and mixed.

“Matt’s background as a musician and a member of a band affords him the ability to work well in a team structure and percolate ideas that help the client’s work reach its highest potential,” says Verson. “We see him as someone who will grow and thrive within the vision we have for Stir.”

Adds Allan, “He has been mixing for us over the past year and the response has been so positive, we decided to make his move up official.”

Behind the Title: Composer Tonalli Magana-Guzman

NAME: Tonalli Magana-Guzman (@tonallimagana)

COMPANY: Coatepec, Veracruz, Mexico’s Media Music Deli

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We write original music for motion pictures, commercials and video games.

Media Music Deli is a dream that came true two years ago after my wife and I — who had previously been writing concert music — decided to move to a beautiful rainforest with our little boy. Where better to raise a son and write music?

Just some background… before our son was born, as a side project to support our living Continue reading