Tag Archives: Colorist

Yoomin Lee joins MPC London as senior colorist

Yoomin Lee has joined Moving Picture Company’s color team in London. Lee got her start working for some of Australia’s top post houses including Frame Set & Match, The Lab and Cutting Edge, before joining Jogger Studios London in 2016.

While at Jogger, she worked on many campaigns, including those for Google, Valentino, FIFA and Samsung. A collaboration with director Anton Corbijn has seen her grade projects for Depeche Mode and U2, including the visuals for the latter’s The Joshua Tree Tour in 2017, which played across the world’s largest concert screen.

You can check out her work here.

Behind the Title: DigitalFilm Tree colorist Patrick Woodard

This colorist, who works on episodic TV series, says, “There are so many talented colorists and photographers on Instagram. It’s where I get my daily inspiration.”

NAME: Patrick Woodard

COMPANY: DigitalFilm Tree (@digitalfilmtree)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Independently owned DigitalFilm Tree is a post, consulting and software development company. DFT has played a role in designing post and IT workflows for the media and entertainment industry since 1998.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THE COLORIST TITLE?
People often think colorists are the finishing artists, but we are often brought on early in the process — during preproduction meetings — to get involved with the other creatives (DPs, directors, producers). Key decisions such as general visual aesthetic, camera choices and on-set lookup tables are typically developed with the colorist input.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
I work on a custom-built Linux workstation running Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Yes. I get requests that are outside the traditional color category on every job. Requests such as stabilizes, paint-outs, wrinkle removal/beauty, sky replacements and minor compositing have become very common. The challenge is managing time and staying within the color budget.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love photography, and as a kid I loved the excitement of seeing a roll of film developed. I get that same satisfaction when a scene comes together and everything is working. In addition, I love overcoming creative or technological challenges.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Most positions in post require a lot of hours and strict deadlines. I have two young children, and it can be challenging juggling work and family life.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I love editing and still photography and would be happy doing either.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?Editing was my main focus, but I found my way to color through my interest in photography. Once I started it felt very natural, and by my second year the two shows I worked on had nominations for Emmys in single-camera cinematography.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
NCIS Los Angeles, American Housewife, I Feel Bad, UnReal and Angie Tribeca.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
NCIS Los Angeles just passed its 10th season, and I feel very fortunate to have worked on it during its run.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I try to watch as many movies and scripted series as possible, and I follow the work of a lot of gifted photographers who also inspire me.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve, Boris FX Mocha Pro and Adobe Photoshop.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram. There are so many talented colorists and photographers on Instagram. It’s where I get my daily inspiration.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Outside of work, my life revolves mostly around being in the ocean or hanging at the beach.

Tony Dustin joins Efilm as senior colorist

Tony Dustin has joined the Deluxe Creative Services team as senior colorist at Hollywood’s  Efilm. He will also be doing some work for sister company Encore. With more than 20 years of experience in color grading, Dustin’s work spans styles and genres, with a talent for revealing details in the darker palettes of many of his projects. He will be using Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve.

Dustin’s credits include the Netflix dramatic series Sense8, for which he was nominated for an HPA Award; Hulu horror series Castle Rock; Best Picture Academy Award-nominee Silver Linings Playbook, directed by David O. Russell; and Gran Torino, directed by Clint Eastwood.

Dustin’s first project for Efilm is the biographical drama Harriet, working with Oscar-winning cinematographer John Toll, with whom Dustin previously collaborated with on Sense8.

He comes to Efilm from Technicolor, where he spent nearly 17 years. He’s also held various color-centric roles at Westwind Media and Efilm sister company Encore. Dustin got his start in post by discovering the color grading process through his work in the vault at Editel while attending college. Having spent many hours developing negatives in a photo lab as a youth, Dustin has a well-honed eye and deep appreciation for cinematic visuals.

Colorist Peter Doyle joins Warner Bros. De Lane Lea’s picture services division

World-renown and respected supervising colorist Peter Doyle, whose large body of work includes The Lord of the Rings trilogy, has joined London’s Warner Bros. De Lane Lea’s (WBDLL) new picture services division. Doyle brings with him extensive technical and creative expertise acquired over a 40-year career.

Doyle has graded 12 of the 100 highest-grossing films of all time including the Harry Potter film series. His recent credits include Darkest Hour (see our interview with him here), The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and both Fantastic Beasts films.

Doyle will be working alongside BAFTA-winning colorist Asa Shoul (Mission Impossible: Fallout, Baby Driver, Amazon’s Tin Star), who joined WBDLL at the end of last year. The additions of Doyle and Shoul beef up WBDLL’s picture division to match the studio’s sound facilities De Lane Lea.

Speaking of joining the company, Doyle says, “I first worked with Warner Bros. on The Matrix in 1999. Since then, grading and delivering films to Warner Bros. for filmmakers such as Tim Burton, David Yates, Dick Zanuck and David Heyman has always felt like a partnership. Warner Bros. always brought tremendous passion to the projects and a deep desire to best represent the creative intent of the filmmakers. WBDLL represents a third-generation post facility; it’s been conceived with the philosophy that origination and delivery are part of the same process. It’s managed by a newly assembled crew that over the course of their careers have answered some of the most complex post production challenges the industry has devised. WBDLL is an environment and indeed a concept I feel London has needed for many years.”

The new facilities at WBDLL include two 4K HDR FilmLight Baselight X grading theatres, Autodesk Flame online suites, digital dailies facilities, dark fiber connectivity and a mastering and QC department. WBDLL has additional facilities based at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden, including a 50-seat 4K screening room, 4K VFX review theater and in-facility and on-location digital dailies, offering clients a full end-to-end service.

WBDLL has been the choice for many large features including Dumbo, Wonder Woman, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Fantastic Beasts, Early Man, Mission Impossible: Fallout and Outlaw King. Its roster of high-end TV clients include Netflix, Amazon, Starz, BBC and ITV.

Last year the company announced it was cementing its future in Soho by moving to the purpose-built Ilona Rose House in 2021, which is currently under construction.

Keep Me Posted adds senior colorist Aidan Stanford

Burbank’s Keep Me Posted, a FotoKem company specializing in creative and technical episodic post services, has brought Aidan Stanford as senior colorist. He will work on episodic and feature projects.

With over 25 years of experience, Stanford’s work history ranges from photochemical color timing to digital color grading and includes DI, broadcast, commercials and shorts. His varied background includes color timing 65mm film for Lawrence of Arabia (IMAX 2002 restoration/release); the DI, HDR and all video deliverables for the Oscar-winning Get Out; and multiple seasons of Emmy Award-winning television series. His credits include the features Happy Death Day, Insidious: The Last Key and Benji and his episodic credits include Modern Family, Drunk History, You’re the Worst and Fresh Off the Boat.

At Keep Me Posted, Stanford will be working on Nucoda and Resolve.

“Aidan brings a deep knowledge of film, an artistic eye and a keen technical ability to help our creative customers bring their vision to reality,” says Mike Brodersen, FotoKem’s chief strategy officer. “His comprehensive skill set in combination with his expertise in color have made him a trusted collaborator with many filmmakers and showrunners.”

Color Chat: Light Iron’s Sean Dunckley

Sean Dunckley joined Light Iron New York’s studio in 2013, where he has worked on episodic television and features films. He finds inspiration in many places, but most recently in the photography of Stephen Shore and Greg Stimac. Let’s find out more…

NAME: Sean Dunckley

COMPANY: LA- and NYC-based Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Iron is a Panavision company that offers end-to-end creative and technical post solutions. I color things there.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I like to get involved early in the process. Some of the most rewarding projects are those where I get to work with the cinematographer from pre-production all the way through to the final DCP.

Ongoing advances in technology have really put the spotlight on the holistic workflow. As part of the Panavision ecosystem, we can offer solutions from start to finish, and that further strengthens the collaboration in the DI suite. We can help a production with camera and lens choices, oversee dailies and then bring all that knowledge into the final grade.

Recently, I had a client who was worried about the speed of his anamorphics at night. The cinematographer was much more comfortable shooting the faster spherical lenses, but the film and story called for the anamorphic look. In pre-production, I was able to show him how we can add some attributes of anamorphic lenses in post. That project ended up shooting a mix of anamorphic and spherical, delivering on both the practical and artistic needs.

Hulu’s Fyre Fraud doc.

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Filmlight’s Baselight. Its color management tools offer with strong paint capabilities, and the Blackboard 2 panel is very user-friendly.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Now that DI systems have expanded their tools, I can integrate last-minute fixes during the DI sessions without having to stop and export a shot to another application. Baselight’s paint tools are very strong and have allowed me to easily solve many client issues in the room. Many times, this has saved valuable time against strict deadlines.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
That’s easy. It is the first day of a new project. It feels like an artistic release when I am working with filmmakers to create style frames. I like to begin the process by discussing the goals of color with the film’s creative team.

I try to get their take on how color can best serve the story. After we talk, we play for a little while. I demonstrate the looks that have been inspired by their words and then form a color palette for the project. During this time, it is just as important to learn what the client doesn’t like as much as what they do like.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I think the hours can be tough at times. The deadlines we face often battle with the perfectionist in me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Architecture is a field I would have loved to explore. It’s very similar, as it is equal parts technical and creative.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I had always been interested in post. I used to cut skateboard videos with friends in high school. In film school, I pursued more of an editing route. After graduation, I got a job at a post house and quickly realized I wanted to deviate and dive into color.

Late Night with Emma Thompson. Photo by Emily Aragones

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Recent film titles I worked on include Late Night and Brittany Runs a Marathon, both of which got picked up at Sundance by Amazon.

Other recent projects include Amazon Studio’s Life Itself, and the Fyre Fraud documentary on Hulu. Currently, I am working on multiple episodic series for different OTT studios.

The separation that used to exist between feature films, documentaries and episodics has diminished. Many of my clients are bouncing between all types of projects and aren’t contained to a single medium.

It’s a unique time to be able to color a variety of productions. Being innovative and flexible is the name of the game here at Light Iron, and we’ve always been encouraged to follow the client and not the format.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s impossible to pick a single project. They are all my children!

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I go through phases but right now it’s mostly banal photography. Stephen Shore and Greg Stimac are two of my favorite artists. Finding beauty in the mundane has a lot to do with the shape of light, which is very inspiring to me as a colorist.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I need my iPhone, Baselight and, of course, my golf course range finder.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I follow Instagram for visuals, and I keep up with Twitter for my sports news and scores.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have young children, so they make sure I leave those stresses back at the office, or at least until they go to bed. I also try to sneak in some golf whenever I can.

Phil Azenzer returns to Encore as senior colorist

Industry veteran and senior colorist Phil Azenzer, one of Encore’s original employees, has returned to the company, bringing with him a credit list that includes TV and features. He was most recently with The Foundation.

When he first started at Encore he was a color assistant, learning the craft and building his client base. Over his post production career, Azenzer has collaborated with many notable directors including David Lynch, Steven Spielberg and David Nutter, as well as high-profile DPs such as Robert McLachlan and John Bartley.

His credits include The X-Files, Six Feet Under, Entourage, Big Love, Bates Motel, Bloodline and most recently, seasons four and five of Black-ish and seasons one and two of Grown-ish.

“Coming back to Encore is really a full circle journey for me, and it feels like coming home,” shared Azenzer. “I learned my craft and established my career here. I’m excited to be back at Encore, not just because of my personal history here, but because it’s great to be at an established facility with the visibility and reputation that Encore has. I’m looking forward to collaborating with lots of familiar faces.”

Azenzer is adept at helping directors and cinematographers create visual stories. With the flexibility to elevate to a variety of desired looks, he brings a veteran’s knowledge and skillset to projects requiring anything from subtle film noir palettes to hyper-saturated stylized looks. Upon departing Encore in 2001, Azenzer spent time at Technicolor and Post Group/io Film before returning to Encore from 2009-2011. Following his second stint at Encore, he continued work as a senior colorist at Modern Videofilm, NBC Universal and Sony.

While his main tool is Resolve, he has also worked with Baselight and  Lustre.

Behind the Title: DigitalFilm Tree colorist Dan Judy

This color vet finds inspiration for his work in everyday sights, such as sunsets, views of the city and even music.

NAME: Colorist Dan Judy

COMPANY: DigitalFilm Tree (DFT)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
DFT provides cloud post services and software that evolve file-based workflows, simplify the creative process, and dramatically reduce production cost.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
How creative the process is — it’s an amazing collaborative effort between the production team and color. Our attention to detail, both broad and minute, are almost surgical. It’s micro and macro. Oh, and having the right snacks available are absolutely critical!

Dan Judy

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
Blackmagic’s Resolve.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Nearly every project will have requests that are specific and non-color related. I was once asked to dry off an actress who was perspiring too much. At that time I didn’t have the towel function on my color corrector.

We are asked to help out with beauty fixes, add lens flares, light matches, remove footprints in sand . . . you get the idea.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
It is the satisfaction of the finished project, knowing that I got to contribute to the end result. It’s the confidence at the end of that process and putting the piece out there for people to enjoy.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
My first love was athletics, especially football. Would I have been a player? I had my shot and, well, I’m here. I’m sure my path would have continued in that direction.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I had no clue this position was even a thing. I got an internship at a post facility through my masters program in Florida. They offered me a position at the end of the internship and my career began. A lot of bumps and bruises later and, well, I feel blessed to be where this path has led me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The 100, Last Man on Earth, the Roseanne relaunch, Falling Skies and a few years ago, The Walking Dead.

The 100

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I would say with a wink, the next one. I know it’s a cliché, but it’s like saying which of your children do you like better? I have been extraordinarily lucky that all my shows have given me a great deal of freedom to be really creative.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
Honestly, from life. Watching amazing sunsets, experiencing great expanses of nature. I also like having uplifting music on while I work.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
I would say electricity is a big one, big smile here. Professionally? A bitchin’ hero monitor, a great calibrated scope and Resolve.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hanging with my family! They ground me every day and keep me honest. Their love is what keeps me wanting tomorrow to happen.

Mike Sowa joins Fotokem as senior DI colorist

FotoKem in Burbank has added post vet Mike Sowa as senior digital intermediate colorist. Sowa brings over 25 years of experience to his new role, and an impressive resume that includes stints at Modern VideoFilm, Universal High Def Center and jobs at other facilities in Hollywood, including LaserPacific and Technicolor.

His past work includes Kubo and the Two Strings, The Jungle Book, Oblivion, Home of the Brave and The Other Side of the Wind. Sowa is an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).  “I am thrilled to be on board at FotoKem, reuniting with talented people that I have worked with in the past and with new collaborators,” says Sowa.

Sowa becomes part of a color roster that includes Alastor Arnold, David Cole, Mark Griffith, George Koran, Kostas Theodosiou, and Walter Volpatto. Contributions from the team include Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Lemon, The Nun, The Spy Who Dumped Me, Twin Peaks: The Return and The Predator, among many others.

He will be using Lustre and Resolve.

Senior colorist Nicholas Hasson joins Light Iron’s LA team

Post house Light Iron has added senior colorist Nicholas Hasson to its roster. He will be based in the company’s Los Angeles studio.

Hasson colored the upcoming Tiffany Haddish feature Nobody’s Fool and Season 2 of HBO’s Room 104. Additional past credits include Boo 2! A Madea Halloween, Masterminds, All About Nina and commercial campaigns for Apple, Samsung and Google. He worked most recently at Technicolor, but his long career has included time at ILM, Company 3 and Modern VideoFilm.

“Nicholas has a wealth of experience that makes him a great fit with our team,” says Light Iron GM Peter Cioni. “His background in color, online and VFX ensures success in meeting clients’ creative objectives and enables flexibility in working across both episodic and feature projects.”

Like Lightiron’s other LA-based colorists, led by Ian Vertovec, Hasson is able to support cinematographers working in other regions through virtual DI sessions in Panavision’s network of connected facilities. (Light Iron is a Panavision company.)

Hasson joins Light Iron during a time of high-profile streaming releases including Netflix’s Maniac and Facebook’s Sorry For Your Loss, as well as feature releases garnering awards buzz, such as Can You Ever Forgive Me? and What They Had.

“This is a significant time of growth for Panavision’s post production creative services,” concludes Cioni. “We are thrilled to have Nicholas with us as we enter this next chapter of expansion.”