Tag Archives: Colorist

Mike Sowa joins Fotokem as senior DI colorist

FotoKem in Burbank has added post vet Mike Sowa as senior digital intermediate colorist. Sowa brings over 25 years of experience to his new role, and an impressive resume that includes stints at Modern VideoFilm, Universal High Def Center and jobs at other facilities in Hollywood, including LaserPacific and Technicolor.

His past work includes Kubo and the Two Strings, The Jungle Book, Oblivion, Home of the Brave and The Other Side of the Wind. Sowa is an associate member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).  “I am thrilled to be on board at FotoKem, reuniting with talented people that I have worked with in the past and with new collaborators,” says Sowa.

Sowa becomes part of a color roster that includes Alastor Arnold, David Cole, Mark Griffith, George Koran, Kostas Theodosiou, and Walter Volpatto. Contributions from the team include Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Lemon, The Nun, The Spy Who Dumped Me, Twin Peaks: The Return and The Predator, among many others.

He will be using Lustre and Resolve.

Senior colorist Nicholas Hasson joins Light Iron’s LA team

Post house Light Iron has added senior colorist Nicholas Hasson to its roster. He will be based in the company’s Los Angeles studio.

Hasson colored the upcoming Tiffany Haddish feature Nobody’s Fool and Season 2 of HBO’s Room 104. Additional past credits include Boo 2! A Madea Halloween, Masterminds, All About Nina and commercial campaigns for Apple, Samsung and Google. He worked most recently at Technicolor, but his long career has included time at ILM, Company 3 and Modern VideoFilm.

“Nicholas has a wealth of experience that makes him a great fit with our team,” says Light Iron GM Peter Cioni. “His background in color, online and VFX ensures success in meeting clients’ creative objectives and enables flexibility in working across both episodic and feature projects.”

Like Lightiron’s other LA-based colorists, led by Ian Vertovec, Hasson is able to support cinematographers working in other regions through virtual DI sessions in Panavision’s network of connected facilities. (Light Iron is a Panavision company.)

Hasson joins Light Iron during a time of high-profile streaming releases including Netflix’s Maniac and Facebook’s Sorry For Your Loss, as well as feature releases garnering awards buzz, such as Can You Ever Forgive Me? and What They Had.

“This is a significant time of growth for Panavision’s post production creative services,” concludes Cioni. “We are thrilled to have Nicholas with us as we enter this next chapter of expansion.”

Digital Domain Shanghai’s Simon Astbury talks color, projects

England-born Simon Astbury’s path to color grading wasn’t a straight one. He earned a degree in music and had vague ambitions about working in A&R. “I started working in this industry briefly in the early ‘90s and pretty much hated it,” he shares.

One day, Astbury went to sound sync and dialogue edit in a small facility in Twickenham Film Studios where they had two MkIII Rank Cintel telecines. “It was love at first sight,” he says. “The ‘Heath Robinson’ craziness of these systems, with their very limited color tools in those days, PEC master control (operated with a tweaker) and primaries.

Simon Astbury

“There was no machine control or editing, so no stopping once you’d started. It was a great way to learn the craft, to hone an instinctive reaction to an image that still serves me well today. The green radioactive glow from the tube, the smell of film all went to make grading a much more visceral experience! The early ‘90s was a period of huge change in post. Avid was this new thing that the editors mistrusted, most of them were using Steenbecks at that time.”

Astbury’s path was officially changed and he went on to work on many films, including Shakespeare in Love, Sense and Sensibility and Notting Hill. “I also worked with a bunch of film legends including Roger Pratt, Jack Cardiff, Richard Attenborough, Alan Parker, Franco Zeferelli… and The Spice Girls!”

Astbury has worked in a wide range of genres, from Oscar-winning films to iconic ad campaigns and pop promos. He has collaborated with people like Jack Cardiff, Roger Pratt, Tony Kaye, Paul WS Anderson and many more. Today, he is the head of color at Digital Domain in Shanghai.

Let’s find out more…

You’ve recently moved to Shanghai. Why the move, and are your clients’ requests or expectations there different than in London?
I felt it was time to leave my Soho comfort zone. I’d always intended to travel with the job, but the right opportunity never came up. Then when the offer to relocate came somewhat out of the blue, I consulted my family and we decided to go for it.

Digital Domain has an incredible body of work and a global presence. It was also an opportunity to develop and grow a grading department worldwide in a company that is primarily focused on VFX.

Managing client expectations is always very important, but in China the client really is king or queen. Making sure that the work remains good and not diluted by overthinking and over-tweaking is sometimes a very delicate negotiation.

How have you gone about building or enhancing the grading department at Digital Domain China?
So far I’ve introduced some enhanced workflows and defined training for the juniors and assistants. I’m also attempting to make remote grading available to any of our other offices around the world. Additionally, I’m promoting increased co-operation between our Shanghai and Beijing offices.

You’ve worked on all sorts of projects, from documentaries to features to commercials. Is there a genre you enjoy grading the most?
If it doesn’t sound trite, I would say that good, well-executed work is the most enjoyable to grade. I love commercials because they afford the opportunity to go into detail and occasionally push things creatively.

I love documentaries because the grade can enhance the story in so many different ways. I love dramas because the story arc and mood can be helped immensely by a good grade. I love movies because in my heart I’m a film nut and the opportunity to have your work in a cinema is an incredible buzz that will never ever get old.

What work are you most proud of?
There are a few things that stand out for me, most recently a grade for the wonderful director Nieto at Stink for Wu Fang Zhai. It was great fun to throw away the rulebook and do some crazy stuff.

There are a bunch of things that I’ve done over the years that I remember fondly, a travelogue for BBC4 called Travels With a Tangerine, which was amazingly well shot on SD DVCAM. Also some beautiful films for Volvo directed by Martin Swift, and some epic stuff for Audi directed by Paul WS Anderson. There is also the amazing multi-screen art installation “Mother’s Day” for artist Smadar Dreyfuss about dispossessed stateless children in Israel.

Working with younger directors like Stella Scott has been a great experience for me. Passing on knowledge and at the same time learning new visual languages helps to keep everything fresh. At the other end of the spectrum is The Human Centipede trilogy — it’s not often that you get to be involved in a cultural phenomenon.

Wu Fang Zha

Can you describe a recent project and what tools were particularly beneficial?
The Wu Fang Zhai project was shot on greenscreen with matte-painted backgrounds and sometimes with complicated comps. It was really easy to assemble rough comps in my FilmLight Baselight to ensure the grade looked correct. Layer mode composite settings were particularly useful.

Baselight Editions is also a brilliant tool for VFX-heavy jobs. We have a top-secret project on at the moment and the ability to have a renderless workflow between Baselight and Nuke is invaluable.

As a colorist what are your biggest strengths?
I’ve been doing it for a long time and can come up with creative solutions for most eventualities. Sometimes the client wants you to drive the session and come up with all the ideas, sometimes they want you to do as you are told, and sometimes they want it to be a collaboration. I’m comfortable with any of these scenarios, but the client is paying for my eyes and my interpretation, so sometimes you have to be the guide, even when the client has very definite ideas.

You also have to be the arbiter of taste. So on occasion you have to be firm, particularly when bad decisions are being made. I try to separate my ego from the work and create a calm-but-creative atmosphere in the grade suite. Music is hugely important, as well as a fully stocked drink trolley!

The wonderful colorist Bob Festa has said that he asks people what they want their films to say, rather than how they want them to look, and that’s pretty much my approach. I’ve been compared to an airline pilot or cruise ship captain more than once….I’ll take that (he smiles).

You’ve been a colorist for over 20 years and witnessed the time when color correction was processed in film labs. What are your thoughts today about film versus digital?
I worked exclusively in film for about half my career and I love it. It is tactile, it smells great, it feels good in your hands and, of course, many of the most memorable images in cinema were shot on it. The soft detail, intensity and richness of color, the roll off into the whites and blacks is something that digital still finds hard to replicate.

Gucci commercial

Also, the recent resurgence in Europe and the USA of film in shorts, commercials and promos is great to see. However, I find myself thinking about all those things I don’t miss about film, such as weave, cell scratches, grain, wet gate TK and that buttock-clenching moment when the lab manager tells you the reel had broken in the bath and 300 feet of neg had been destroyed. X-ray fogging! Oh my goodness, I have so many film horror stories.

Modern cameras produce amazingly clear images with great color and response to light with far less in the way of insurmountable problems, and I don’t see either as particularly better. Actually, I think decent glass and proper lighting are just as important as what camera or format you shoot on.

What are the biggest challenges you face today as a colorist?
There are a few, but I don’t think they’re specific to colorists. Content is becoming continually more disposable. It’s more important than ever that respect for the craft — not only of color grading but the whole production and post process — becomes central to every production. The proliferation of display devices is also a big subject, making sure that the grade looks good on phones, tablets, laptops and TVs is an issue that will only get more challenging.

Do you have a routine when grading?
Yes, definitely. Although color is incredibly subjective, I personally think that your process shouldn’t be. I strongly believe there’s a right and wrong way of going about a grade. Every colorist has a different process but there are definitely ways that work and ways that don’t.

The longer I do the job, the more important the psychological aspect of it becomes — how your choices in the grade affect the thoughts and emotions of the viewer… what really matters and what doesn’t. I’m always on a quest to distil the essence of a grade. A lot of the content I see now, in my opinion, is over-graded. We have such comprehensive tools now, so you don’t have to throw the kitchen sink at every shot. “Keep it simple” is a mantra I try to impress upon my juniors.

Baselight is your main tool?
I’ve been working on Baselight for just shy of a decade. My favorite thing about Baselight is what I call “redundancy of process,” by which I mean there are multiple ways of doing most grading operations — hue angle not working? Then try Dkey. Dkey no good? Then try RGB key or curves, etc, etc.

What advice would you give to a junior colorist starting out today?
Be patient, there are no shortcuts, although I think it takes less time nowadays than it did due to the absence of telecines. Be a geek about your industry, cameras, lighting and lenses. Watch movies, ads and everything that’s good. Study art and artists, if only to have common points of reference. Remember that the grading part is only a portion of what makes a good colorist. You’re the host, therapist, barman and ringmaster.

You have to be someone people don’t mind spending 12 hours in a dark room with or they’ll never use you again. With difficult client requests try to say yes and then work out how you’re going to do it; if you can’t do it, suggest an alternative rather than saying no. Social media, especially Instagram is a brilliant medium for colorists, but be careful not to post things just for the sake of it.

Main Image Caption: Wu Fang Zhai 

Behind the Title: Carbon senior colorist Julien Biard

NAME: Julien Biard

COMPANY: Carbon in Chicago

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Carbon is a full-service creative studio specializing in design, color, visual effects and motion graphics, with offices in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for grading the work to get the most out of the material. Color has a lot of potential to assist the storytelling in conveying the emotion of a film. I also oversee the running of the Chicago color department.

National Trust

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Most of the time people are surprised this job actually exists, or they think I’m a hair colorist. After many years this still makes me smile every time!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There are many aspects of the job I enjoy. The main part of the job is the creative side, giving my input and taste to a piece makes the job personally and emotionally involving. I get a lot of satisfaction from this process, working with the team and using color to set the mood and tone of the spot or film.

Finally, by far the best part of the job is to educate and train the next generation of colorists. Having been part of the same process at the beginning of my career, I feel very proud to be able to pass on my knowledge, what I have learned from peers and worked out for myself, and to help as many youngsters to get into color grading as possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I miss 35mm…

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning type of guy, so getting on my bike nice and early, taking photographs or getting straight to work. Mornings are always productive for me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be an art buyer! Realistically, I’d probably be a mountain guide back home in the French Alps where I grew up.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In all honesty, this was very unexpected as I originally trained to become a professional football player until quite an advanced age — which I’m now glad wasn’t meant to be my path. It was only when I moved to London after graduating that I fell into the post world where I started as a tea boy. I met the colorist there, and within the first day I knew this would be something I’d enjoy doing and could be good at. I trained hard and worked alongside some of the best colorists in the industry, learning from them while finding my own tune and it worked out pretty well.

Ted Baker

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
National Trust
Run the Jewels
Royal Blood
Rapha
Ted Baker

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
There are many projects I’m proud of, and picking only one is probably not possible. I think what I’m the most proud of is the relationship I have built with some of the industry’s most creative talents — people like Crowns and Owls, David Wilson, Thomas Bryant, Andrew Telling and Ninian Doff, to name a few. Also, being able to bring my contribution to the edifice in this stimulating world is what I’m the proudest of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My sound system, my camera, a corkscrew and my bike, of course!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mainly Instagram; it’s all about the visuals.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Is there such thing as grading without music?! I need my music when I work. It helps me get in the zone and also helps me with timings. An album is around the hour mark, so I know where I am.

Taste wise? Oh dear, the list could be long. If the beat is good and there are instruments, I’m in. I do struggle with pop music a lot. But I’m open to anything else.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I ride my bike, anywhere I can. I climb. I enjoy photography very much too. Since I’m in a dark room most of the time at work, I spend as much of my spare time outside as possible

Colorist Asa Shoul joins Warner Bros. De Lane Lea

Warner Bros. De Lane Lea (WBDLL) has added colorist Asa Shoul to its new picture services department, which will launch this September. Shoul’s recent credits include Mission Impossible: Fallout, Baby Driver, Amazon’s Tin Star and he recently received a BAFTA craft award for his work on the multi award-winning Netflix series The Crown.

Shoul will be joined by his assistant Katie McCulloch, senior post producer Louise Stewart and online editor Gareth Parry, as well as additional industry-leading creative, technical and operations staff, yet to be announced.

The expansion will include the launch of two new 4K HDR grading theaters, in addition to online suites, mastering, content handling services and dark fibre connectivity for both Dolby UK and Leavesden Studios. A full-service production dailies offering based at Warner Bros. Studios Leavesden will also launched to help service the needs of productions.

Recent features at WBDLL include Wonder Woman; Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri; Fantastic Beasts and Early Man. It also has an impressive roster of high-end television clients including Netflix, Amazon, Starz, BBC and ITV.

Last year the company announced it will cement its future in Soho by moving to a new purpose-built post production facility located in the centre of Soho, which is currently under construction. WBDLL will be the anchor tenant within the Ilona Rose building which is slated to open in 2021.

Quick Chat: Technicolor’s new finishing artist, VP Pankaj Bajpai

By Randi Altman

Veteran colorist Pankaj Bajpai will be joining Technicolor’s Los Angeles studio in August as VP, finishing artist and business development. He comes to Technicolor from his long-tenured position at Encore.

Bajpai’s long list of television credits include House of Cards, Sex in the CityCarnivàle, The Newsroom, True Detective, Justified, Fear the Walking Dead, Genius: Einstein and Picasso, Snowfall and many more. He brings with him a background in both film cinematography and digital post.

Bajpai joins Technicolor’s roster of episodic colorists in Los Angeles who include Sparkle, Tim Vincent, Tony Dustin, Tom Forletta, Roy Vasich and Doug Delaney.

“I’m thrilled to start a new chapter at such a vibrant time in our industry’s landscape,” says Bajpai on joining Technicolor. “With the support of Sherri Potter (Technicolor’s president of worldwide post production), and the team of artists and engineers at Technicolor, I’m excited to continue to push the boundaries of technology and creativity to bring our clients’ vision and passion to all screens, in all formats, for all to enjoy.”

We reached out to Bajpai to find out more:

Why was now the right time to make this change, especially after being at one place for so long?
Consumers’ relationship with content has been disrupted, the entertainment industry has shifted, and as a result the dynamics of post are changing dramatically. Lines are blurring between “feature” and “episodic” content — the quality of the story and the production, the craft, the expectation by all stakeholders, etc. is now almost universally the same for all pieces of content regardless of distribution platform. I believe Technicolor understands this dynamic shift and is supporting the singular demand for stunning content regardless of distribution “genre,” and that made it the right time for me to join.

How do you divide your time between your colorist duties and your biz dev duties?
I believe that the role of the colorist is no longer a singular duty. It is my responsibility to be the center of collaboration across the post process — from a client perspective, a craft perspective and a workflow perspective. We no longer live in a silo’d industry with clear hand-offs. I must understand the demands that 4K, HDR and beyond have on workflows, the craft and the ever-tightening delivery deadlines.

I believe in being the catalyst for collaboration across the post process, uniting the technology and artistry to serve our clients’ visions. It’s not about wearing one hat at a time. It’s about taking my role as both artists and client ambassador seriously, ultimately ensuring that the experience is as flawless as possible, and the picture is stunning.

You are an artist first, but what do you get from doing the other parts as well?
We no longer work within independent processes. Being that center of collaboration that I referenced earlier influences my approach to color finishing as much as my role as an artist helps to bring perspective to the technology and operational demands of projects these days.

How does your background in cinematography inform you color work?
My work will always be informed by my clients, but my background in cinematography allows us to speak the same language — the language of lens and light, the language of photography. I find it is a very easy way of communicating visual ideas and gets us on the same page much faster. For instance, when a DP shares with me that they will be using a particular set of lenses and filters in combination with specific gels and lights, I’m able to visualize their creative intent quickly. Instinctively, we know what that image needs to be from the start without talking about it too much. Establishing such trust on demanding episodic shooting and finishing schedules is critical to stay true to my clients’ creative ideas.

Understanding and respecting the nuances of a cinematographer’s work in this way goes far in my ability to create a successful color finishing process in the end.

The world of color is thriving right now. How has the art changed since you started?
Art at its essence will always be about creative people seeing something come to life from within their own unique perspective. What has changed is the fact that the tools we now have at our disposal allow me as a finishing artist to create all new approaches to my craft. I can go deeper into an image and its color space now; it’s freeing and exciting because it allows for collaboration with cinematographers and directors on a continually deeper level.

What is the most exciting thing going on in color right now? HDR? Something else?
It really feels like the golden age of content across all platforms. Consumers’ expectations are understandably high across any type of content consumed in any environment or any screen. I think everyone involved on a show feels that and feels the excitement and continues to raise the bar for the quality of the storytelling, the craft and the overall consumer engagement. To be a contributor work, which is now easily seen globally, is very exciting.

Has the new technology changed the way you work or is your creative process essentially the same?
Technology will continue to change, workflows will be impacted and, as an industry, we’ll always be looking to challenge what is possible. My creative process continues to be influenced by the innovative tools that I get to explore.

For instance, it’s vital for me to understand an array of new digital cameras and the distinctive images they are capable of producing. I frequently use my toolset for creative options that can be deployed right within those cameras. To be able to help customize images non-destructively from the beginning of the shoot and to collaborate with directors and cinematographers to aid storytelling with a unique visual style all the way to the finish, is hugely satisfying. For innovation in the creative process today, the sky is the limit.

Colorist Arianna Shining Star joins Apache

Santa Monica-based color and finishing boutique Apache has added colorist Arianna Shining Star to its roster at this Santa Monica color and finishing boutique. She is the studio’s first woman colorist.

Star’s commercial work includes spots and branded shorts for Apple, Nike, Porsche, Budweiser, Tommy Hilfiger, Spotify and Coca-Cola. Her music video credits include the MTV VMA-nominated videos Wild Thoughts for Rihanna and Justin Bieber’s visual album for Purpose. Her longform work includes newly released Netflix feature film Ibiza, a comedy co-produced by Adam McKay and Will Ferrell’s Gary Sanchez Productions.

After studying Cinematic Arts and Psychology at USC, Shining Star cut her teeth at Company 3 as an assistant colorist. She then worked as a Baselight specialist for FilmLight before joining Paramount Pictures, where she remastered feature films in HDR. She was then brought on as colorist at Velem to spearhead the post production department of Milk Studios.

“Arianna worked with us before, and we’ve always had our eye on her,” says managing partner LaRue Anderson. “She’s super-talented and a true go-getter who’s amassed an awesome body of work in a relatively short time.”

With Northern California roots, Arianna’s distinctive middle name (she goes by her first and middle names professionally) comes from her parents, who met at a Grateful Dead concert during a performance of the Jerry Garcia classic song, “Shining Star.” Something of a next-gen Dead Head herself, she admits to having seen the current iteration of the band over 30 times.

Her background and interest in psychology is clear as she explains what attracts her most to color grading: “It has the ability to elevate not only production value and overall aesthetic, but can help guide the viewers’ emotional journey through the piece,” Star says.  “I love the opportunity to put the finishing touches on a piece, too. After countless people have poured their heart and soul into crafting a film, it’s an immense privilege to have the last creative touch.”

On adding the first woman colorist to the Apache roster, Anderson says it’s a testament to Star’s creative skills that she’s flourished in what’s largely a male-dominated category of post production. “There’s a lack of role models for women coming up in the creative ranks of color and visual effects,” she explains. “Women have to work hard to get on the playing field. Arianna is not only on the field, she owns the field. She’s established herself as a specialist who DPs and directors lean on for creative collaboration.”

“I want to be seen for the quality of my work and nothing else,” she says. “What makes me unique as a colorist is not my gender, but my aesthetic and approach to collaboration — my style runs the gamut from big and bold to soft and subtle.”

She cites her work on Ibiza as an example of this versatility. “Comedies typically play it safe with color, but from day one we sought to do something different and color outside the lines,” she says. “Director Alex Richanbach and cinematographer Danny Modor set me up with an incredibly diverse palette that allowed us to go bold and use color to further enhance the three different worlds seen in the film: New York, Barcelona and Ibiza. Narrative work really allows you to take your viewer on a journey with the color grade.”

At Apache, Star says she’s found a home where she can continue to learn the craft. “They’re true veterans who know the ins and outs of this wild industry and are incredible leaders,” she says of Anderson and her partners, Shane Reed and Steve Rodriguez. “And their three key core tenets drew me. One, we’re a creatively driven company. Two, we’re consistently re-evaluating the playbook and figuring out what works and what we can improve. And three, we truly operate like a family and support one another. We’ve got a crew of talented artists, and it’s a privilege to work alongside them.”

In growth mode, Deluxe NY hires features, episodic colorist Sam Daley

Senior colorist Sam Daley has joined Deluxe post operations in New York, where he will lead final color finishing for feature films and television. Daley has working in the New York post market for over 20 years.

Prior to joining Deluxe, Daley spent time at Technicolor, Postworks and Tapehouse. He began his career in color at Du Art, where he worked with Deluxe president/GM TV post production Dominic Rom, who says, “I am very excited to be working with him again. I’ve watched and shared his career growth since he first came into the New York market. He’s an ideal anchor for our growing final color roster with tremendous industry knowledge. More than ever, directors and DPs are working across formats and Sam’s multifaceted experience in features and television is invaluable.”

Daley’s recent feature credits include The Florida Project, Beirut and the upcoming Sorry to Bother You. Previously, he finished the first season of Girls, and season one of The Deuce, as well as the HBO miniseries Show Me a Hero, which earned him a 2015 HPA Award nomination for Best TV Series Color Correction. Daley brings a deep knowledge of color finishing techniques to Deluxe, including the nuances of working in Dolby Vision and HDR10.

Daley will be based out of Deluxe’s New York location on West 18th Street. In addition to final HDR and SDR color, the facility also provides dailies color (including UHD dailies), online editorial and various deliverables. Visual effects services are available through co-located sister company Method Studios.

Efilm adds veteran colorist Skip Kimball

Skip Kimball has joined Efilm as senior colorist. Kimball brings more than 30 years of experience to this post house, spanning features, television, music videos and commercials.

He recently finished work on seasons 1 and 2 of the Netflix’s Stranger Things for executive producer Shawn Levy, and is currently working on Deadpool 2 for Fox and director David Leitch. Other feature credits for Kimball include Downsizing and Nebraska for Alexander Payne; Logan for Fox and James Mangold and the Terminator 2 remaster for James Cameron and Lightstorm.

Kimball joins Deluxe’s Efilm from Technicolor, where he spent nearly six years as senior colorist. His previous experience also includes over 15 years at Modern VideoFilm where he worked on dozens of projects, including Gone Baby Gone, Tropic Thunder and James Cameron’s 3D epic Avatar. He began his career at Anderson Video, where he first learned his craft on 35mm film.

Kimball joins current Efilm colorists Natasha Leonnet, Mitch Paulson, Tom Reiser, Jason Hanel, Kevin O’Connor, Steve Delman, Adrian DeLude, Ben Estrada and Matt Wallach.

Behind the Title: MTI Senior Colorist Trent Johnson

NAME: Trent Johnson

COMPANY: MTI Film

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
MTI Film works in multiple post production disciplines, including TV and feature post, film restoration and software development.

AS A SENIOR COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
In order to be excellent in this profession you have to be obsessive about the details, because it is in the composite of details that the whole mood and tempo of the show comes alive.

At this point in the post process, I may even become more passionate about certain aspects of the project than the clients. With years of experience under my belt, I have mastered many tricks of the trade that clients may or may not be aware of. I can see what needs to be corrected in lighting and color to make the director, cinematographer and producer’s vision for the piece become a reality.

It is my responsibility to make it right and I take this responsibility very seriously and down to the tiniest detail. For example, I can unify inconsistent shots, change the time of day, augment special effects that have to be married into practical photography, tint color to affect an emotional response from the audience and enhance the appearance of characters, to name a few. The addition of my creative input to the creative process – at the direction of the creative heads of a project – serves as the icing on the cake. It’s the final perfection of the product before it’s delivered and released.

WHAT SYSTEMS DO YOU WORK ON?
I am proficient on Nucoda, Resolve and Baselight.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS? IF SO, CAN YOU DESCRIBE?
I take on light editorial tasks: compositing, speed changes, titling, etc. For a restoration project it could be sifting through various elements to choose the best quality.

The Emoji Movie

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I have lots of favorites. First is working with very talented creative clients who know what they want and how to communicate a vision. Sitting in a theatre with these creative giants, over a period of several days, an atmosphere of camaraderie develops. This has resulted in many wonderful working relationships.

Second, I love being given a challenge on a film or TV project and then being able to meet or exceed expectations. I have always said there are two kinds of people in this world: those who give you reasons why they can’t do something and those who give you reasons why something that seems impossible can be done. I like to be the guy that figures out how to make it happen for a client, even though it may be out of the wheelhouse of most color correctors.

Third, once I meet a challenge and succeed in enhancing the creative vision of the client to an unexpected level, I like reviewing what I colored and how it’s made everything come together according to the vision. I thoroughly enjoy looking at what I colored yesterday and liking it, not to mention witnessing my client’s satisfaction with the final product.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Rushing through the grade. I’m a perfectionist and like to refine a look until everyone in the room is pleased. I’m willing to put the time to get it right.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I edited as well as colored early in my career. I could have easily pursued editing, as I enjoy it quite a lot. I like focusing on performances and finding the magic moments in shots and scenes and piecing it all together to move the story forward. I bring these skills into the color bay every day and draw on them by using color to amplify and strengthen the storyline of the project I’m working on.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
As a child I binge-watched TV shows and movies and developed a love of classic Hollywood. I can walk into a room and glance at a movie and usually know what the title is. My kids get a kick out of that. I have a bit of a photographic memory in that sense. This has come in handy because I not only remember the movie, but the color and lighting as well, and how it was used in that particular instance to create a mood.

As I grew into my teens, I decided to make that movie-watching time investment pay off. I bought a Super 8 camera in high school and began making movies with my friends. I’ve never looked back. I majored in film production at the collegiate level at USC and San Diego State University. I started my career at Complete Post in Hollywood, and the rest is history.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I recently worked on Overboard for MGM, Proud Mary for Screen Gems and The Emoji Movie for Sony/Columbia.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I’ve worked on all the Smurfs movies. I started on the animated TV series early in my career and was hired to color correct all three of the motion pictures. The most challenging aspect of these movies early on was the combination live action and animation.

I became known as the “Smurf Blue guy” for keeping the characteristic blue color of the characters consistent. I especially enjoyed working with the animation clients on these shows because they are extremely precise, and I respect that.

A close second favorite is the motion picture Burlesque. The cinematography on that film was executed brilliantly; it featured dramatic dance numbers enhanced with creative lighting, had an avant-garde cast and was a throw-back to old Hollywood.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
I feel as connected to the old as to the new. Technology is always morphing, and the way movies are made constantly in flux. This is a source of fascination to me, and I’m inspired by the way all forms of art both reflect and influence culture. I study how camerawork and lighting techniques come and go, and how they were and are effectively used artistically in movies past and present. How to communicate different facets of life is the fundamental inspiration for art. What I do is a technical art form, so it draws deeply on these principles.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
XM Radio, television, my iPhone and my coffeemaker.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I thoroughly enjoy reading blogs, and especially listening to podcasts of cinematographers and other colorists to stay current on innovation trends. Anything to do with the industry on Facebook, YouTube, etc. is always interesting to me.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Sinatra, classic radio shows and pastry. Actually, it’s my sense of humor that keeps me going. Also, coming home to my loving family and being highly involved in my children’s lives is my lifeblood.