Tag Archives: color grading

Colorist Chat: FotoKem’s Phil Beckner talks My Spy film, more

Phil Beckner comes to the world of color grading through his digital intermediate editing background, which includes his work on Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Over his nearly 10-year tenure at FotoKem, he has worked as the additional colorist on many studio titles, including The Nun, Aquaman and Shazam!

Beckner’s early titles include work as 3D colorist on 2016’s The Great Wall and as additional colorist on Kong: Skull Island. He moved up to lead colorist on The Director and the Jedi (a full-length BTS documentary for home release). His work can be seen on the upcoming releases My Spy, Lovebirds and Holler.

My Spy

Burbank’s FotoKem is a full-service finishing house specializing in many aspects of post and production support. Services include 2D/3D digital intermediate color grading, 4K/UHD SDR and HDR file-based mastering, digital on-set dailies, and media management and distribution.

Let’s dig a little deeper…

Can you describe the general look for My Spy and how you worked with DP Larry Blanford and director Peter Segal to achieve what they wanted?
My Spy is a great mash-up of “family buddy comedy” and “action movie,” so one of our main goals was to have the film flow seamlessly between those two worlds. We wanted to enhance the drama of the action sequences by really embracing the world that Larry created on set — paying extra attention to the shadows and contrast, for instance — all while making sure not to step on any of the lighter moments in the dialogue.

In contrast, there are interactions between Dave Bautista and the young co-star, Chloe Coleman, that feel very natural and charming. During those scenes we took the opportunity to make it feel like a more traditional comedy — poppy, warm and inviting. The goal being to blend the two looks so that they work in conjunction with each other throughout the film.

I was in contact with Larry before we started the DI and he sent still images along that he liked to get the process started. Once we got rolling and could get everyone in the theater together, it was a very collaborative effort between Pete, Larry and myself. A fun one to work on, for sure!

What format was My Spy shot on? How did that influence your approach to the film?
My Spy was primarily shot with an ARRI Alexa SXT and ARRI Alexa Mini, with some Phantom and GoPro mixed in. Having worked on many ARRI shows over the years, I was familiar with the color science and I knew right away that there would be no compromise in image quality, especially with DP Larry Blanford at the helm. Knowing all of this up front was great because we could immediately dive in and start creating the world that you see on screen.

MY SPY

What color system did you use? Why did it serve the needs of this project?
This show was finished on Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, which has been rapidly improving over the past few years and it was perfect for this show. The conform, color correction and even a handful of VFX were done in Resolve in the DI theater, which was great because there is virtually no delay in showing the filmmakers the end result.

Now on to more general questions:

Throughout your career, you have worked alongside a variety of Hollywood’s top colorists. What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?
One of the most valuable lessons I’ve learned is that there is no “right” answer! In many aspects of filmmaking, you know immediately if you’ve succeeded or missed the mark, which is not really the case with color. Color grading is an ongoing collaboration between the colorist and the filmmakers with the end goal being to bring out the best aspects in every image. The communication and rapport you have with the filmmakers in the theater is just as important as knowing which knob to turn.

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
One thing that may surprise people is how technical the job can be. As a colorist in 2020, it’s important to have a real understanding of the entire image pipeline. The colorist is often looked to for their technical expertise throughout the entire process — many times before shooting even begins — so it’s vital to have a solid technical understanding to help usher the image from set, through VFX, ultimately to the big screen.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
I really enjoy being a part of the team that ultimately creates the visual aesthetic you see on screen. Being able to give the filmmakers exactly the image that they know they captured on set or to show them something new that they hadn’t considered before is very satisfying.

What’s your least favorite?
The dark! I try and go for a lap around the block every so often to get some sunshine.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
I finished a comedy for Paramount/MRC called The Lovebirds, starring Kumail Nanjiani and Issa Rae and directed by Michael Showalter. I also wrapped up Holler, a very cool film shot on 16mm, written and directed by Nicole Riegel.

Where do you find inspiration?
Obviously, I find inspiration in the work of my peers. There are a lot of great-looking movies and TV shows that come out every year, and I love seeing what other artists are doing. But maybe, most importantly, I try to be present in the moment. There are a lot of things vying for your attention on a daily basis but when you slow down and start looking with a critical eye at every different environment you find yourself in, there is a lot of information to gain. Whether I’m on the beach at sunset or in a school auditorium, I’m paying attention to how the light is reacting or what skin tones look like and putting that in my mental toolbox for use in the future.

Colorist Chat: Framestore LA senior colorist Beau Leon

Veteran colorist Beau Leon recently worked with director Spike Jonze on a Beastie Boys documentary and a spot for cannabis retailer MedMen.

What’s your title and company?
I’m senior colorist at LA’s Framestore

Spike Jonze’s MedMen

What kind of services does Framestore offer?
Framestore is a multi-Oscar-winning creative studio founded over 30 years ago, and the services offered have evolved considerably over the decades. We work across film, television, advertising, music videos, cinematic data visualization, VR, AR, XR, theme park rides… the list is endless and continues to change as new platforms emerge.

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
Despite creative direction or the equipment used to shoot something, whether it be for film or TV, people might not factor in how much color or tone can dictate the impact a story has on its audience. As a colorist, my role often involves acting as a mediator of sorts between various creative stakeholders to ensure everyone is on the same page about what we’re trying to convey, as it can translate differently through color.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Earlier in my career, the process was more collaborative with DPs and directors who would bring color in at the beginning of a project. Now, particularly when it comes to commercials with tighter deadlines and turnarounds, many of those conversations happen during pre-production without grading factored in until later in the pipeline.

Rihanna’s Needed Me

Building strong relationships and working on multiple projects with DPs or directors always allows for more trust and creative control on my end. Some of the best examples I’ve seen of this are on music video projects, like Rihanna’s Needed Me, which I graded here at Framestore for a DP I’d grown up in the industry with. That gave me the opportunity to push the creative boundaries.

What system do you work on?
FilmLight Baselight

You recently worked on the new Beastie Boys documentary, Beastie Boys Story. Can you talk a bit about what you did and any challenges relating to deadlines?
I’ve been privileged to work with Spike Jonze on a number of projects throughout my career, so going into Beastie Boys Story, we already had a strong dialogue. He’s a very collaborative director and respectful of everyone’s craft and expertise, which can be surprisingly rare within our industry.

Spike Jonze’s Beatie Boys Story

The unique thing about this project was that, with so much old footage being used, it needed to be mastered in HDR as well as reworked for IMAX. And with Spike being so open to different ideas, the hardest part was deciding which direction to choose. Whether you’re a hardcore Beastie Boys fan or not, the documentary is well worth watching once it will air on AppleTV+ in April.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
As an audience, our eyes have evolved a great deal over the last few decades. I would argue that most of what we see on TV and film today is extremely oversaturated compared to what we’d experience in our real environment. I think it speaks to how we treat consumers and anticipate what we think they want — colorful, bright and eye-catching. When it’s appropriate, I try to challenge clients to think outside those new norms.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
Whether it’s working with a DP or director, the more involved I can be early on in the conversation, the more seamless the process becomes during post production and ultimately leads to a better end result. In my experience, this type of access is more common when working on music videos.

Most one-off commercial projects see us dealing with an agency more often than the director, but an exception to the rule that comes to mind is on another occasion when I had the chance to collaborate on a project with Spike Jonze for the first ever brand campaign for cannabis retailer MedMen called The New Normal. He placed an important emphasis on grading and was very open to my recommendations and vision.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look?
A conversation is always the best way to receive feedback versus a written interpretation of imagery, which tends to become very personal. An example might be when a client wants to create the feeling of a warm climate in a particular scene. Some might interpret that as adding more warm color tones, when in fact, if you think about some of the hottest places you’ve ever visited, the sun shines so fiercely that it casts a bright white hue.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
That’s an easy answer — to me, it’s all about the amazing people you meet in this industry and the creative collaboration that happens as a result. So many of my colleagues over the years have become great friends.

Any least favorites?
There isn’t much that I don’t love about my job, but I have witnessed a change over the years in the way that our industry has begun to undervalue relationships, which I think is a shame.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would be an art teacher. It combines my passion for color and visual inspiration with a forum for sharing knowledge and fostering creativity.

How early did you know this would be your path?
In my early 20s, I started working on dailies (think The Dukes of Hazzard, The Karate Kid, Fantasy Island) at a place in The Valley that had a telecine machine that transferred at a frame rate faster than anywhere else in LA at the time. It was there that I started coloring (without technically realizing that was the job I was doing, or that it was even a profession).

Soon after, I received a call from a company called 525 asking me to join them. They worked on all of the top music videos during the prime “I Want My MTV” era, and after working on music videos as a side hustle at night, I knew that’s where I wanted to be. When I first walked into the building, I was struck by how much more advanced their technology was and immediately felt out of my depth. Luckily, someone saw something in me before I recognized it within myself. I worked on everything from R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion” to TLC’s “Waterfalls” and The Smashing Pumpkins’ “Tonight, Tonight.” I found such joy in collaborating with some of the most creative and spirited directors in the business, many of whom were inspiring artists, designers and photographers in their spare time.

Where do you find inspiration?
I’m lucky to live in a city like LA with such a rich artistic scene, so I make a point to attend as many gallery openings and exhibitions as I can. Some of my favorite spaces are the Annenberg Space for Photography, the Hammer Museum and Hauser & Wirth. On the weekends I also stop by Arcana bookstore in Culver City, where they source rare books on art and design.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
I think I would be completely fine if I had to survive without technology.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
After a long day, cooking helps me decompress and express my creativity through a different outlet. I never miss a trip to my local farmer’s market, which also helps to keep me inspired. And when I’m not looking at other people’s art, I’m painting my own abstract pieces at my home studio.

Assimilate intros live grading, video monitoring and dailies tools

Assimilate has launched Live Looks and Live Assist, production tools that give pros speed and specialized features for on-set live grading, look creation, advanced video monitoring and recording.

Live Looks provides an easy-to-set-up environment for video monitoring and live grading that supports any resolution, from standard HD up to 8K workflows. Featuring professional grading and FX/greenscreen tools, it is straightforward to operate and offers a seamless connection into dailies and post workflows. With Live Looks being available on both macOS and Windows, users are, for the first time, free to use the platform and hardware of their choice. You can see their intro video here.

“I interact regularly with DITs to get their direct input about tools that will help them be more efficient and productive on set, and Live Looks and Live Assist are a result of that,” says Mazze Aderhold, product marketing manager at Assimilate. “We’ve bundled unique and essential features with the needed speed to boost their capabilities, and enabling them to contribute to time savings and lower costs in the filmmaking workflow.”

Users can run this on a variety of places — from a  laptop to a full-blown on-set DIT rig. Live Looks provides LUT-box control over Flanders, Teradek and TVLogic devices. It also supports video I/O from AJA, Bluefish444 and Blackmagic for image and full-camera metadata capture. There is also now direct reference recording to Apple ProRes on macOS and Windows.

Live Looks goes beyond LUT-box control. Users can process the live camera feed via video I/O, making it possible to do advanced grading, compare looks, manage all metadata, annotate camera input and generate production reports. Its fully color-managed environment ensures the created looks will come out the same in dailies and post. Live Looks provides a seamless path into dailies and post with look-matching in Scratch and CDL-EDL transfer to DaVinci Resolve.

With Live Looks, Assimilate takes its high-end grading tool set beyond Lift, Gamma, Gain and CDL by adding Powerful Curves and an easy-to-use Color Remapper. On-set previews can encompass not just color but realtime texture effects, like Grain, Highlight Glow, Diffusion and Vignette — all GPU-accelerated.

Advanced chroma keying lets users replace greenscreen backgrounds with two clicks. This allows for proper camera angles, greenscreen tracking/anchor point locations and lighting. As with all Assimilate software, users can load and play back any camera format, including raw formats such as Red raw and Apple ProRes raw.

Live Assist has all of the features of Live Looks but also handles basic video-assist tasks, and like Live Assist, it is available on both macOS and Windows. It provides multicam recording and instant playback of all recorded channels and seamlessly combines live grading with video-assist tasks in an easy-to-use UI. Live Assist automatically records camera inputs to file based on the Rec-flag inside the SDI signal, including all live camera metadata. It also extends the range of supported “edit-ready” capture formats: Apple ProRes (Mov), H264 (MP4) and Avid DNxHD/HR (MXF). Operators can then choose whether they want to record the clean signal or record with the grade baked in.

Both Live Looks and Live Assist are available now. Live Looks starts at $89 per month, and Live Assist starts at $325 per month. Both products and free trials are available on the Assimilate site.

The-Artery sees red, creates VFX for Huawei’s AppGallery

The-Artery recently worked on a global campaign for agency LH in Israel, and consumer electronics brand Huawei’s official app distribution platform, AppGallery.

The campaign — set to an original musical track called Explore It by artist Tomer Biran — is meant to show the AppGallery as more than a mobile app store, but rather as a gate to an endless world of digital content that comes with data protection and privacy.

Each scene features the platform’s signature red square logo but shown in a variety of creative ways thanks to The-Artery’s visual effects work. This includes floating Tetris-like cubes that change with the beat of the music, camera focuses, red-seated subway cars with a floating red cube and more.

“Director Eli Sverdlov, editor Noam Weissman and executive producer Kobi Hoffman all have distinct artistic processes that are unforgiving to conventional storytelling,” explains founder/executive creative director Vico Sharabani. “We had ongoing conversations about how to create a deeper connection between the brand and audiences. The agency, LH, gave us the freedom to really explore the fun, convenience and security behind downloading apps on the Huawei AppGallery.”

Filming took place across the globe in Kiev, Ukraine, via production company Jiminy Creative Tel Aviv, while editing, design, animation, visual effects and color grading were all done under one roof in The-Artery’s New York studio. The entire production was completed in only 16 days.

The studio used Autodesk’s Flame and 3DS Max, Side Effects Houdini, Adobe’s After Effects and Photoshop for the visual effects and graphics. Colorist: Steve Picano called on Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. Asaf Bitton provided sound design.

Senior colorist Tony D’Amore joins Picture Shop

Burbank’s Picture Shop has beefed up its staff with senior colorist Tony D’Amore, who will also serve as a director of creative workflow. In that role, he will oversee a team focusing on color prep and workflow efficiency.

Originally from rural Illinois, D’Amore made the leap to the West Coast to pursue an education, studying film and television at UCLA. He started his career in color in the early ‘90s, gaining valuable experience in the world of post. He has been working closely with color and post workflow since.

While D’Amore has experience working on Autodesk Lustre and FilmLight Baselight, he primarily grades in Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve. D’Amore has contributed color to several Emmy Award-winning shows nominated in the category of “Outstanding Cinematography.”

D’Amore has developed new and efficient workflows for Dolby Vision HDR and HDR10, coloring hundreds of hours of episodic programming for networks including CBS, ABC and Fox, as well as cable and streaming platforms such as HBO, Starz, Netflix, Hulu and Amazon.

D’Amore’s most notable project to date is having colored a Marvel series simultaneously for IMAX and ABC delivery. His list of color credits include, Barry (HBO), Looking for Alaska (Hulu), Legion (FX), Carnival Row (Amazon), Power (Starz), Fargo (FX), Elementary (CBS), Hanna (Amazon), and a variety of Marvel series, including Jessica Jones, Daredevil, The Defenders, Luke Cage and Iron Fist. All of these are available on streaming platforms

Colorist Chat: Nice Shoes’ Maria Carretero on Super Bowl ads, more

This New York-based colorist, who worked on four Super Bowl spots this year, talks workflow, inspiration and more.

Name: Maria Carretero

Company: Nice Shoes

What kind of services does Nice Shoes offer?
Nice Shoes is a creative studio with color, editorial, animation, VFX, AR and VR services. It’s a full-service studio with offices in NYC, Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis and Toronto, as well as remote locations throughout North America.

Michelob Ultra’s Jimmy Works It Out

As a colorist, what would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I think people are surprised when they discover that there is a visual language in every single visual story that connects your emotions through all the imagery that we’ve collected in our brains. This work gives us the ability to nudge the audience emotionally over the course of a piece. Color grading is rooted in a very artistic base — core, emotional aspects that have been studied in art and color theory that make you explore cinematography in such an interesting way.

What system do you work on?
We use FilmLight Baselight as our primary system, but the team is also versed in Blackmagic Resolve.

Are you sometimes asked to do more than just color on projects?
Sometimes. If you have a solid relationship with the DP or the director, they end up consulting you about palettes, optics and references, so you become an active part of the creativity in the film, which is very cool. I love when I can get involved in projects from the beginning.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
My favorite moment is when you land on the final look and you see that the whole film is making visual sense and you feel that the story, the look and the client are all aligned — that’s magic!

Any least favorites?
No, I love coloring. Sometimes the situation becomes difficult because there are technical issues or disagreements, but it’s part of the work to push through those moments and make things work

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would probably be a visual artist… always struggling to keep the lights on. I’m kidding! I have so much respect for visual artists, I think they should be treated better by our society because without art there is no progress.

How early did you know this would be your path?
I was a visual artist for seven years. I was part of Nives Fernandez’s roster, and all that I wanted at that time was to try to tell my stories as an artist. I was freelancing in VFX to get some money that helped me survive, and I landed on the VFX side, and from there to color was a very easy switch. When I landed in Deluxe Spain 16 years ago and started to explore color, I quickly fell in love.

It’s why I like to say that color chose me.

Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network

You recently worked on a number of Super Bowl spots. Can you talk a bit about your work on them, and any challenges relating to deadlines?
This year I worked on four Super Bowl spots Michelob Ultra PureGold: 6 for 6 Pack, Michelob Ultra: Jimmy Works It Out, Walmart: United Towns and Avocados From Mexico: Shopping Network.

Working on these kinds of projects is definitely a really interesting experience. The deadlines are tight, the pressure is enormous, but at the same time, the amount of talent and creativity involved is gigantic, so if you survive (laughs) you always will be a better professional. As a colorist I love to be challenged. I love dealing with difficult situations where all your resources and your energy is being put to the test.

Any suggestions for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
Thousands! Technical understanding, artistic involvement, there are so many… But definitely trying to create something new, special, different; embracing the challenges and pushing beyond the boundaries are the keys to delivering good work.

How do you prefer to work with the DP or director?
I like working with both. Debating with any kind of artist is the best. It’s really great to be surrounded by someone that uses a common “language.” As I mentioned earlier, I love when there’s the opportunity to get the conversation going at the beginning of a project so that there’s more opportunity for collaboration, debate and creativity.

How do you like getting feedback in terms of the look? Photos, films, etc.?
Every single bit of information is useful. I love when they verbalize what they’re going for using stories, feelings — when you can really feel they’re expressing personality with the film.

Where do you find inspiration? Art? Photography?
I find inspiration in living! There are so many things that surround us that can be a source of inspiration. Art, landscapes, the light that you remember from your childhood, a painting, watching someone that grabs your attention on a train. New York is teeming with more than enough life and creativity to keep any artist going.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
The Tracker, Spotify and FaceTime.

This industry comes with tight deadlines. How do you de-stress from it all?
I have a sense of humor and lots of red wine (smiles).

Sony adds 4K HDR reference monitors to Trimaster range

Sony is offering a new set of high-grade 4K HDR monitors as part of its Trimaster range. The PVM-X2400 (24-inch) and the PVM-X1800 (18.4-inch) professional 4K HDR monitors were demo’d at the BSC Expo 2020 in London. They will be available in the US starting in July.

The monitors provide ultra-high definition with a resolution of 3840×2160 pixels and a brightness of all-white luminance of 1000 cd/m2. For optimum film production, their wide color gamut matches the BVM-HX310 Trimaster HX master monitor. This means both monitors feature accurate color reproduction and greyscale, which helps filmmakers make critical imaging decisions and deploy faithful color matching throughout the workflow.

The monitors, which are small and portable, are designed to expand footprints in 4K HDR production, including applications such as on-set monitoring, nonlinear video editing, studio wall monitoring and rack-mount monitoring in OB trucks or machine rooms.

The monitors also feature new Black Detail High/Mid/Low, which helps maintain accurate color reproduction by reducing the brightness of the backlight to reproduce the correct colors and gradations in low-luminance areas. Another new function, Dynamic Contrast Drive, changes backlight luminance to adapt to each scene or frame when transferring images from PVM-X2400/X1800 to an existing Sony OLED monitor.  This functionality allows filmmakers to check the highlight and low-light balance of the contents with both bright and dark scenes.

Other features include:
• Dynamic contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1 by Dynamic Contrast Drive, a new backlight driving system that dynamically changes the backlight luminance to adapt for each frame of a scene.
• 4K/HD scopes with HDR scales that are waveform/vector.
• Quad View display and User 3D LUT functionality.
• 12G/6G/3G/HD-SDI with auto configuration.

Visible Studios produces, posts Dance Monkey music video

If you haven’t heard about the Dance Monkey song by Tones and I, you soon will.  Australia’s Visible Studios provided production and post on the video to go with the song that has hit number one in more than 30 countries, went seven times platinum and remained at the top of the charts in Australia for 22 weeks. The video has been viewed on YouTube more than half a billion times.

Visible Studios, a full production and post company, is run by producer Tim Whiting and director and editor Nick Kozakis. The company features a team of directors, scriptwriters, designers, motion graphic artists and editors working on films, TV commercials and music videos.

For Dance Monkey, Visible Studios worked directly with Tones and I to develop the idea for the video. The video, which was shot on Red cameras at the beginning of the song’s meteoric rise, was completed in less than a week and on a small budget.

“The Dance Monkey music video was made on an extremely quick turnaround,” says Whiting. “[Tones] was blowing up at the time, and they needed the music video out fast. The video was shot in one day, edited in two, with an extra day and a half for color and VFX.”  Visible Studios called on Blackmagic Resolve studio for edit, VFX and color.

Dance Monkey features the singer dressed as Old Tones, an elderly man whisked away by his friends to a golf course to dance and party. On the day of production, the sun was nowhere to be found, and each shot was done against a gray and dismal background. To fix this, the team brought in a sky image as a matte and used Resolve’s match move tool, keyer, lens blur and power windows to turn gray footage to brilliant sunshine.

“In post we decided to replace the overcast skies with a cloudy blue sky. We ended up doing this all in Resolve’s color page and keyed the grass and plants to make them more lush, and we were there,” says Whiting.

Editor/directors Kozakis and Liam Kelly used Resolve for the entire editing process. “Being able to edit 6K raw footage smoothly on a 4K timeline, at a good quality debayer, means that we don’t have to mess around with proxies and that the footage gets out of the way of the editing process. The recent update for decompression and debayer on Nvidia cards has made this performance even better,” Kozakis says.

 

Colorist Chat: Light Iron supervising colorist Ian Vertovec

“As colorists, we are not just responsible for enhancing each individual shot based on the vision of the filmmakers, but also for helping to visually construct an emotional arc over time.”

NAME: Ian Vertovec

TITLE: Supervising Colorist

COMPANY: Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE IN THE COMPANY?
A Hollywood-based collaborator for motion picture finishing, with a studio in New York City as well.

GLOW

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
As colorists, we are not just responsible for enhancing each individual shot based on the vision of the filmmakers, but also for helping to visually construct an emotional arc over time. For example, a warm scene feels warmer coming out of a cool scene as opposed to another warm scene. We have the ability and responsibility to nudge the audience emotionally over the course of the film. Using color in this way makes color grading a bit like a cross between photography and editing.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Once in a while, I’ll be asked to change the color of an object, like change a red dress to blue or a white car to black. While we do have remarkable tools at our disposal, this isn’t quite the correct way to think about what we can do. Instead of being able to change the color of objects, it’s more like we can change the color of the light shining on objects. So instead of being able to turn a red dress to blue, I can change the light on the dress (and only the dress) to be blue. So while the dress will appear blue, it will not look exactly how a naturally blue dress would look under white light.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There is a moment with new directors, after watching the first finished scene, when they realize they have made a gorgeous-looking movie. It’s their first real movie, which they never fully saw until that moment — on the big screen, crystal clear and polished — and it finally looks how they envisioned it. They are genuinely proud of what they’ve done, as well as appreciative of what you brought out in their work. It’s an authentic filmmaking moment.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Working on multiple jobs at a time and long days can be very, very draining. It’s important to take regular breaks to rest your eyes.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Something with photography, VFX or design, maybe.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I was doing image manipulation in high school and college before I even knew what color grading was.

Just Mercy

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Just Mercy, Murder Mystery, GLOW, What We Do in the Shadows and Too Old to Die Young.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Sometimes your perspective and a filmmaker’s perspective for a color grade can be quite divergent. There can be a temptation to take the easy way and either defer or overrule. I find tremendous value in actually working out those differences and seeing where and why you are having a difference of opinion.

It can be a little scary, as nobody wants to be perceived as confrontational, but if you can civilly explain where and why you see a different approach, the result will almost always be better than what either of you thought possible in the first place. It also allows you to work more closely and understand each other’s creative instincts more accurately. Those are the moments I am most proud of — when we worked through an awkward discord and built something better.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?
I have a fairly extensive library of Pinterest boards — mostly paintings — but it’s real life and being in the moment that I find more interesting. The color of a green leaf at night under a sodium vapor light, or how sunlight gets twisted by a plastic water bottle — that is what I find so cool. Why ruin that with an Insta post?

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
FilmLight Baselight’s Base Grade, FilmLight Baselight’s Texture Equalizer and my Red Hydrogen.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram mostly.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
After working all day on a film, I often don’t feel like watching another movie when I get home because I’ll just be thinking about the color.  I usually unwind with a video game, book or podcast. The great thing about a book or video games is that they demand your 100% attention. You can’t be simultaneously browsing social media or the news  or be thinking about work. You have to be 100% in the moment, and it really resets your brain.

Review: FilmConvert Nitrate for film stock emulation

By Brady Betzel

If you’ve been around any sort of color grading forums or conferences, you’ve definitely heard some version of this: Film is so much better than digital. While I don’t completely disagree with the sentiment, let’s be real. We are in a digital age, and the efficiency and cost associated with digital recording is, in most cases, far superior to film.

Personally, I love the way film looks; it has an essence that is very difficult to duplicate — from the highlight roll-offs to the organic grain — but it is very costly. That is why film is hard to imitate digitally, and that is why so many companies try and often fail.

Sony A7iii footage

One company that has had grassroots success with digital film stock emulation is FilmConvert. The original plugin, known as FilmConvert Pro, works with Adobe’s Premiere and After Effects, Avid Media Composer and as an OFX plugin for apps like Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

Recently, FilmConvert expanded its lineup with the introduction of Nitrate, a film emulation plugin that can take Log-based video and transform it into full color corrected media with a natural grain similar to that of commonly loved film stocks. Currently, Nitrate works with Premiere and After Effects, with an OFX version for Resolve. A plugin for FCPX is coming in March.

The original FilmConvert Pro plugin works great, but it adjusts your image through an sRGB pipeline. That means FilmConvert Pro adjusts any color effects after your “base” grade is locked in while living in an sRGB world. While you download camera-specific “packs” that apply the film emulation — custom-made based on your sensor and color space — you are still locked into an sRGB pipeline, with little wiggle room. This means sometimes blowing out your highlights and muddying your shadows with little ability to recover any details.

SonyA7iii footage

I imagine FilmConvert Pro was introduced at a time when a lot of users shot with cameras like Canon 5D or other sRGB cameras that weren’t shooting in a Log color space. Think of using a LUT and trying to adjust the highlights and shadows after the LUT; typically, you will have a hard time getting any detail back, losing dynamic range even if your footage was shot Log. But if you color before a LUT (think Log footage), you can typically recover a lot of information as long as your shot was recorded properly. That blown-out sky might be able to be recovered if shot in a Log colorspace. This is what FilmConvert is solving with its latest offering, Nitrate.

How It Works
FilmConvert’s Nitrate works in a Cineon-Log processing pipeline for its emulation, as well as a full Log image processing pipeline. This means your highlights and shadows are not being heavily compressed into an sRGB color space, which allows you to fine-tune your shadows and highlights without losing as much detail. Simply, it means that the plugin will work more naturally with your footage.

In additional updates, FilmConvert has overhauled its GUI to be more natural and fluid. The Color Wheels have been redesigned, a new color tint slider has been added to quickly remove any green or magenta color cast, a new Color Curve control has been added, and there is now a Grain Response curve.

Grain Response

The Grain Response curve takes adding grain to your footage up a notch. Not only can you select between 8mm and 35mm grain sizes (with many more in between) but you can adjust the application of that grain from shadows to highlights. If you want your highlights to have more grain response, just point the Grain Response curve higher up. In the same window you can adjust the grain size, softness, strength and saturation via sliders.

Of the 19 film emulation options to choose from, there are many unique and great-looking presets. From the “KD 5207 Vis3” to the “Plrd 600,” there are multiple brands and film stocks offered. For instance, the “Kodak 5207 Vis3” is described on Kodak’s website in more detail:

“Vision3 250D Film offers outstanding performance in the extremes of exposure — including increased highlight latitude, so you can move faster on the set and pull more detail out of the highlights in post. You’ll also see reduced grain in shadows, so you can push the boundaries of underexposure and still get outstanding results.”

One of my favorite emulations in Nitrate — “Fj Velvia 100” or Fujichrome Velvia 100 — is described on FilmConvert’s website:

“FJ Velvia 100 is based on the Fujichrome Velvia 100 photographic film stock. Velvia is a daylight-balanced color reversal film that provides brighter ultra-high-saturation color reproduction. The Velvia is especially suited to scenery and nature photography as well as other subjects that require precisely modulated vibrant color reproduction.”

Accurate Grain

FilmConvert’s website offers a full list of the 19 film stocks, as well as examples and detailed descriptions of each film stock.

Working With FilmConvert Nitrate
I used Nitrate strictly in Premiere Pro because the OFX version (specifically for Resolve) wasn’t available at the time of this review.

Nitrate works pretty well inside of Premiere, and surprisingly plays back fluidly — this is probably thanks to its GPU acceleration. Even with Sony a7 III UHD footage, Premiere was able to keep up with Lumetri Color layered underneath the FilmConvert Nitrate plugin. To be transparent I tested Nitrate on a laptop with an Intel i7 CPU and an Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU, so that definitely helps.

At first, I struggled to see where I would fit FilmConvert’s Nitrate plugin into my normal workflow so I could color correct my own footage and add a grade later. However, when I started cycling through the different film emulations, I quickly saw that they were adding a lot of life to the images and videos. Whether it was the grain that comes from the updated 6K grain scans in Nitrate or the ability to identify which camera and color profile you used when filming via the downloadable camera packs, FilmConvert’s Nitrate takes well-colored footage and elevates it to finished film levels.

It’s pretty remarkable; I came in thinking FilmConvert was essentially a preset LUT plugin and wasn’t ready for it to be great. To my surprise, it was great and it will add the extra edge of professional feeling to your footage quickly and easily.

Test 1
In my first test, I threw some clips I had shot on a Sony a7 III camera in UHD (at SLog3 — SGamut3) into a timeline, applied the FilmConvert Nitrate plugin and realized I needed to download the Sony camera packs. This pack was about 1GB, but others —like the Canon 5D Mark II — came in at just over 300MB. Not the end of the world, but if you have multiple cameras, you are going to need to download quite a few packs and the download size will add up.

Canon 5D

I tried using just the Nitrate plugin to do color correction and film emulation from start to finish, but I found the tools a little cumbersome and not really my style. I am not the biggest fan of Lumetri color correction tools, but I used those to get a base grade and apply Nitrate over that grade. I tend to like to keep looks to their own layer, so coloring under Nitrate was a little more natural to me.

A quick way to cycle through a bunch of looks quickly is to apply Nitrate to the adjustment layer and hit the up or down arrows. As I was flicking through the different looks, I noticed that FilmConvert does a great job processing the film emulations with the specified camera. All of the emulations looked good with or without a color balance done ahead of time.

It’s like adding a LUT and then a grade all in one spot. I was impressed by how quickly this worked and how good they all looked. When I was done, I rendered my one-minute sequence out of Adobe Media Encoder, which took 45 seconds to encode a ProResHQ and 57 seconds for an H.264 at 10Mb/s. For reference, the uncolored version of this sequence took 1:17 for the ProResHQ and :56 for the H.264 at 10Mb/s. Interesting, because the Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU definitely kicked in more when the FilmConvert Nitrate effect was added. That’s a definite plus.

Test 2
I also shot some clips using the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera (BMPCC) and the Canon 5D Mark II. With the BMPCC, I recorded CinemaDNG files in the film color space, essentially Log. With the 5D, the videos were recorded as Movie files wrapped in MP4 files (unless you shoot with the Magic Lantern hack, which allows you to record in the raw format). I brought in the BMPCC CinemaDNG files via the Media Browser as well as imported the 5D Movs and applied the FilmConvert Nitrate plugin to the clips. Keep in mind you will need to download and install those camera packs if you haven’t already.

Pocket Cinema Camera

For the BMPCC clips I identified the camera and model as appropriate and chose “Film” under profile. It seemed to turn my CinemaDNG files a bit too orange, which could have been my white balance settings and/or the CinemaDNG processing done by Premiere. I could swing the orange hue out by using the temperature control, but it seemed odd to have to knock it down to -40 or -50 for each clip. Maybe it was a fluke, but with some experimentation I got it right.

With the Canon 5D Mark II footage, I chose the corresponding manufacturer and model as well as the “Standard” profile. This worked as it should. But I also noticed some other options like Prolost, Marvel, VisionTech, Technicolor, Flaat and Vision Color — these are essentially color profiles people have made for the 5D Mark II. You can find them with a quick Google search.

Summing Up
In the end, FilmConvert’s Nitrate will elevate your footage. The grain looks smooth and natural, the colors in the film emulation add a modern take on nostalgic color corrections (that don’t look too cheesy), and most cameras are supported via downloads. If you don’t have a large budget for a color grading session you should be throwing $139 at FilmConvert for its Nitrate plugin.

Nitrate in Premiere

When testing Nitrate on a few different cameras, I noticed that it even made color matching between cameras a little bit more consistent. Even if you have a budget for color grading, I would still suggest buying Nitrate; it can be a great starting block to send to your colorist for inspiration.

Check out FilmConvert’s website and definitely follow them on Instagram, where they are very active and show a lot of before-and-afters from their users  — another great source of inspiration.

Main Image: Two-year-old Oliver Betzel shot with a Canon 5D with KD P400 Ptra emulsion applied.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Talking with Franki Ashiruka of Nairobi’s Africa Post Office

By Randi Altman

After two decades of editing award-winning film and television projects for media companies throughout Kenya and around the world, Franki Ashiruka opened Africa Post Office, a standalone, post house in Nairobi, Kenya. The studio provides color grading, animation, visual effects, motion graphics, compositing and more. In addition, they maintain a database of the Kenyan post production community that allows them to ramp up with the right artists when the need arises.

Here she talks about the company, its workflow and being a pioneer in Nairobi’s production industry.

When did you open Africa Post Office, and what was your background prior to starting this studio?
Africa Post Office (APO) opened its doors in February 2017. Prior to starting APO, I was a freelance editor with plenty of experience working with well-established media houses such as Channel 4 (UK), Fox International Channels (UK), 3D Global Leadership (Nigeria), PBS (USA), Touchdown (New Zealand), Greenstone Pictures (New Zealand) and Shadow Films (South Africa).

In terms of Kenya-based projects, I’ve worked with a number of production houses including Quite Bright Films, Fat Rain Films, Film Crew in Africa, Mojo Productions, Multichoice, Zuku, Content House and Ginger Ink Films.

I imagine female-run, independent studios in Africa are rare?
On the contrary, Kenya has reached a point where more and more women are emerging as leaders of their own companies. I actually think there are more women-led film production companies than male-led. The real challenge was that before APO, there was nothing quite like it in Nairobi. Historically, video production here was very vertical — if you shot something, you’d need to also manage post within whatever production house you were working in. There were no standalone post houses until us. That said, with my experience, even though hugely daunting, I never thought twice about starting APO. It is what I have always wanted to do, and if being the first company of our kind didn’t intimidate me, being female was never going to be a hindrance.

L-R: Franki Ashiruka, Kevin Kyalo, Carole Kinyua and Evans Wenani

What is the production and post industry like in Nairobi? 
When APO first opened, the workload was commercial-heavy, but in the last two years that has steadily declined. We’re seeing this gap filled by documentary films, corporate work and television series. Feature films are also slowly gaining traction and becoming the focus of many up-and-coming filmmakers.

What services do you provide, and what types of projects do you work on?
APO has a proven track record of successful delivery on hundreds of film and video projects for a diverse range of clients and collaborators, including major corporate entities, NGOs, advertising and PR agencies, and television stations. We also have plenty of experience mastering according to international delivery standards. We’re proud to house a complete end-to-end post ecosystem of offline and online editing suites.

Most importantly, we maintain a very thorough database of the post production community in Kenya.
This is of great benefit to our clients who come to us for a range of services including color grading, animation, visual effects, motion graphics and compositing. We are always excited to collaborate with the right people and get additional perspectives on the job at hand. One of our most notable collaborators is Ikweta Arts (Avatar, Black Panther, Game of Thrones, Hacksaw Ridge), owned and run by Yvonne Muinde. They specialize in providing VFX services with a focus in quality matte painting/digital environments, art direction, concept and post visual development art. We also collaborate with Keyframe (L’Oréal, BMW and Mitsubishi Malaysia) for motion graphics and animations.

Can you name some recent projects and the work you provided?
We are incredibly fortunate to be able to select projects that align with our beliefs and passions.

Our work on the short film Poacher (directed by Tom Whitworth) won us three global Best Editing Awards from the Short to the Point Online Film Festival (Romania, 2018), Feel the Reel International Film Festival (Glasgow, 2018) and Five Continents International Film Festival (Venezuela, 2019).

Other notable work includes three feature documentaries for the Big Story segment on China Global Television Network, directed by Juan Reina (director of the Netflix Original film Diving Into the Unknown), Lion’s Den (Quite Bright Films) an adaptation of ABC’s Shark Tank and The Great Kenyan Bake Off (Showstopper Media) adopted from the BBC series The Great British Bake Off. We also worked on Disconnect, a feature film produced by Kenya’s Tosh Gitonga (Nairobi Half Life), a director who is passionate about taking Africa’s budding film industry to the next level. We have also worked on a host of television commercials for clients extending across East Africa, including Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan and Uganda.

What APO is most proud of though, is our clients’ ambitions and determination to contribute toward the growth of the African film industry. This truly resonates with APO’s mantra.

You recently added a MAM and some other gear. Can you talk about the need to upgrade?
Bringing on the EditShare EFS 200 nodes has significantly improved the collaborative possibilities of APO. We reached a point where we were quickly growing, and the old approach just wasn’t going to cut it.

Prior to centralizing our content, projects lived on individual hard disks. This meant that if I was editing and needed my assistant to find me a scene or a clip, or I needed VFX on something, I would have to export individual clips to different workstations. This created workflow redundancies and increased potential for versioning issues, which is something we couldn’t afford to be weighed down with.

The remote capabilities of the EditShare system were very appealing as well. Our color grading collaborator, Nic Apostoli of Comfort and Fame, is based in Cape Town, South Africa. From there, he can access the footage on the server and grade it while the client reviews with us in Nairobi. Flow media asset management also helps in this regard. We’re able to effectively organize and index clips, graphics, versions, etc. into clearly marked folders so there is no confusion about what media should be used. Collaboration among the team members is now seamless regardless of their physical location or tools used, which include the Adobe Creative Suite, Foundry Nuke, Autodesk Maya and Maxon Cinema 4D.

Any advice for others looking to break out on their own and start a post house?
Know what you want to do, and just do it! Thanks Nike …


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

The Mill opens boutique studio in Berlin

Technicolor’s The Mill has officially launched in Berlin. This new boutique studio is located in the heart of Berlin, situated in the creative hub of Mitte, near many of Germany’s agencies, production companies and brands.

The Mill has been working with German clients for years. Recent projects include the Mercedes’ Bertha Benz spot with director Sebastian Strasser; Netto’s The Easter Surprise, directed in-house by The Mill; and BMW The 8 with director Daniel Wolfe. The new studio will bring The Mill’s full range of creative services from color to experiential and interactive, as well as visual effects and design.

The Mill Berlin crew

Creative director Greg Spencer will lead the creative team. He is a multi-award winning creative, having won several VES, Cannes Lions and British Arrow awards. His recent projects include Carlsberg’s The Lake, PlayStation’s This Could Be You and Eve Cuddly Toy. Spencer also played a role in some of Mill Film’s major titles. He was the 2D supervisor for Les Misérables and also worked on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. His resume also includes campaigns for brands such as Nike and Samsung.

Executive producer Justin Stiebel moves from The Mill London, where he has been since early 2014, to manage client relationships and new business. Since joining the company, Stiebel has produced spots such as Audi’s Next Level and the Mini’s “The Faith of a Few” campaign. He has also collaborated with directors such as Sebastian Strasser, Markus Walter and Daniel Wolfe while working on brands like Mercedes, Audi and BMW.

Sean Costelloe is managing director of The Mill London and The Mill Berlin.

Main Image Caption: (L-R) Justin Stiebel and Greg Spencer

Company 3 ups Jill Bogdanowicz to co-creative head, feature post  

Company 3 senior colorist Jill Bogdanowicz will now share the title of creative head, feature post with senior colorist Stephen Nakamura. In this new role she will collaborate with Nakamura working to foster communication among artists, operations and management in designing and implementing workflows to meet the ever-changing needs of feature post clients.

“Company 3 has been and will always be guided by artists,” says senior colorist/president Stefan Sonnenfeld. “As we continue to grow, we have been formalizing our intra-company communication to ensure that our artists communicate among themselves and with the company as a whole. I’m excited that Jill will be joining Stephen as a representative of our feature colorists. Her years of excellent work and her deep understanding of color science makes her a perfect choice for this position.”

Among the kinds of issues Bogdanowicz and Nakamura will address: Mentorship within the company, artist recruitment and training and adapting for emerging workflows and client expectations.

Says Bogdanowicz, “As the company continues to expand, both in size and workload, I think it’s more important than ever to have Stephen and me in a position to provide guidance to help the features department grow efficiently while also maintaining the level of quality our clients expect. I intend to listen closely to clients and the other artists to make sure that their ideas and concerns are heard.”

Bogdanowicz has been a leading feature film colorist since the early 2000s. Recent work includes Joker, Spider-Man: Far From Home and Dr. Sleep, to name a few.

Behind the Title: MPC’s CD Morten Vinther

This creative director/director still jumps on the Flame and also edits from time to time. “I love mixing it up and doing different things,” he says.

NAME: Morten Vinther

COMPANY: Moving Picture Company, Los Angeles

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
From original ideas all the way through to finished production, we are an eclectic mix of hard-working and passionate artists, technologists and creatives who push the boundaries of what’s possible for our clients. We aim to move the audience through our work.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director and Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I guide our clients through challenging shoots and post. I try to keep us honest in terms of making sure that our casting is right and the team is looked after and has the appropriate resources available for the tasks ahead, while ensuring that we go above and beyond on quality and experience. In addition to this, I direct projects, pitch on new business and develop methodology for visual effects.

American Horror Story

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I still occasionally jump on Flame and comp a job — right now I’m editing a commercial. I love mixing it up and doing different things.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Writing treatments. The moments where everything is crystal clear in your head and great ideas and concepts are rushing onto paper like an unstoppable torrent.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Writing treatments. Staring at a blank page, writing something and realizing how contrived it sounds before angrily deleting everything.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early mornings. A good night’s sleep and freshly ground coffee creates a fertile breeding ground for pure clarity, ideas and opportunities.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be carefully malting barley for my next small batch of artisan whisky somewhere on the Scottish west coast.

Adidas Creators

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I remember making a spoof commercial at my school when I was about 13 years old. I became obsessed with operating cameras and editing, and I began to study filmmakers like Scorsese and Kubrick. After a failed career as a shopkeeper, a documentary production company in Copenhagen took mercy on me, and I started as an assistant editor.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
American Horror Story, Apple Unlock, directed by Dougal Wilson, and Adidas Creators, directed by Stacy Wall.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
If I had to single one out, it would probably be Apple’s Unlock commercial. The spot looks amazing, and the team was incredibly creative on this one. We enjoyed a great collaboration between several of our offices, and it was a lot of fun putting it together.

Apple’s Unlock

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, laptop and PlayStation.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Some say social media rots your brains. That’s probably why I’m an Instagram addict.

CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Odesza, SBTRKT, Little Dragon, Disclosure and classic reggae.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I recently bought a motorbike, and I spin around LA and Southern California most weekends. Concentrating on how to survive the next turn is a great way for me to clear the mind.

2019 HPA Award winners announced

The industry came together on November 21 in Los Angeles to celebrate its own at the 14th annual HPA Awards. Awards were given to individuals and teams working in 12 creative craft categories, recognizing outstanding contributions to color grading, sound, editing and visual effects for commercials, television and feature film.

Rob Legato receiving Lifetime Achievement Award from presenter Mike Kanfer. (Photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging)

As was previously announced, renowned visual effects supervisor and creative Robert Legato, ASC, was honored with this year’s HPA Lifetime Achievement Award; Peter Jackson’s They Shall Not Grow Old was presented with the HPA Judges Award for Creativity and Innovation; acclaimed journalist Peter Caranicas was the recipient of the very first HPA Legacy Award; and special awards were presented for Engineering Excellence.

The winners of the 2019 HPA Awards are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Theatrical Feature

WINNER: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”
Natasha Leonnet // Efilm

“First Man”
Natasha Leonnet // Efilm

“Roma”
Steven J. Scott // Technicolor

Natasha Leonnet (Photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging)

“Green Book”
Walter Volpatto // FotoKem

“The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”
Tom Poole // Company 3

“Us”
Michael Hatzer // Technicolor

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature

WINNER: “Game of Thrones – Winterfell”
Joe Finley // Sim, Los Angeles

 “The Handmaid’s Tale – Liars”
Bill Ferwerda // Deluxe Toronto

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – Vote for Kennedy, Vote for Kennedy”
Steven Bodner // Light Iron

“I Am the Night – Pilot”
Stefan Sonnenfeld // Company 3

“Gotham – Legend of the Dark Knight: The Trial of Jim Gordon”
Paul Westerbeck // Picture Shop

“The Man in The High Castle – Jahr Null”
Roy Vasich // Technicolor

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial  

WINNER: Hennessy X.O. – “The Seven Worlds”
Stephen Nakamura // Company 3

Zara – “Woman Campaign Spring Summer 2019”
Tim Masick // Company 3

Tiffany & Co. – “Believe in Dreams: A Tiffany Holiday”
James Tillett // Moving Picture Company

Palms Casino – “Unstatus Quo”
Ricky Gausis // Moving Picture Company

Audi – “Cashew”
Tom Poole // Company 3

 

Outstanding Editing – Theatrical Feature

Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

WINNER: “Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood”
Fred Raskin, ACE

“Green Book”
Patrick J. Don Vito, ACE

“Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese”
David Tedeschi, Damian Rodriguez

“The Other Side of the Wind”
Orson Welles, Bob Murawski, ACE

“A Star Is Born”
Jay Cassidy, ACE

 

Outstanding Editing – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature (30 Minutes and Under)

VEEP

WINNER: “Veep – Pledge”
Roger Nygard, ACE

“Russian Doll – The Way Out”
Todd Downing

“Homecoming – Redwood”
Rosanne Tan, ACE

“Withorwithout”
Jake Shaver, Shannon Albrink // Therapy Studios

“Russian Doll – Ariadne”
Laura Weinberg

 

Outstanding Editing – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature (Over 30 Minutes)

WINNER: “Stranger Things – Chapter Eight: The Battle of Starcourt”
Dean Zimmerman, ACE, Katheryn Naranjo

“Chernobyl – Vichnaya Pamyat”
Simon Smith, Jinx Godfrey // Sister Pictures

“Game of Thrones – The Iron Throne”
Katie Weiland, ACE

“Game of Thrones – The Long Night”
Tim Porter, ACE

“The Bodyguard – Episode One”
Steve Singleton

 

Outstanding Sound – Theatrical Feature

WINNER: “Godzilla: King of Monsters”
Tim LeBlanc, Tom Ozanich, MPSE // Warner Bros.
Erik Aadahl, MPSE, Nancy Nugent, MPSE, Jason W. Jennings // E Squared

“Shazam!”
Michael Keller, Kevin O’Connell // Warner Bros.
Bill R. Dean, MPSE, Erick Ocampo, Kelly Oxford, MPSE // Technicolor

“Smallfoot”
Michael Babcock, David E. Fluhr, CAS, Jeff Sawyer, Chris Diebold, Harrison Meyle // Warner Bros.

“Roma”
Skip Lievsay, Sergio Diaz, Craig Henighan, Carlos Honc, Ruy Garcia, MPSE, Caleb Townsend

“Aquaman”
Tim LeBlanc // Warner Bros.
Peter Brown, Joe Dzuban, Stephen P. Robinson, MPSE, Eliot Connors, MPSE // Formosa Group

 

Outstanding Sound – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature

WINNER: “The Haunting of Hill House – Two Storms”
Trevor Gates, MPSE, Jason Dotts, Jonathan Wales, Paul Knox, Walter Spencer // Formosa Group

“Chernobyl – 1:23:45”
Stefan Henrix, Stuart Hilliker, Joe Beal, Michael Maroussas, Harry Barnes // Boom Post

“Deadwood: The Movie”
John W. Cook II, Bill Freesh, Mandell Winter, MPSE, Daniel Colman, MPSE, Ben Cook, MPSE, Micha Liberman // NBC Universal

“Game of Thrones – The Bells”
Tim Kimmel, MPSE, Onnalee Blank, CAS, Mathew Waters, CAS, Paula Fairfield, David Klotz

“Homecoming – Protocol”
John W. Cook II, Bill Freesh, Kevin Buchholz, Jeff A. Pitts, Ben Zales, Polly McKinnon // NBC Universal

 

Outstanding Sound – Commercial 

WINNER: John Lewis & Partners – “Bohemian Rhapsody”
Mark Hills, Anthony Moore // Factory

Audi – “Life”
Doobie White // Therapy Studios

Leonard Cheshire Disability – “Together Unstoppable”
Mark Hills // Factory

New York Times – “The Truth Is Worth It: Fearlessness”
Aaron Reynolds // Wave Studios NY

John Lewis & Partners – “The Boy and the Piano”
Anthony Moore // Factory

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Theatrical Feature

WINNER: “The Lion King”
Robert Legato
Andrew R. Jones
Adam Valdez, Elliot Newman, Audrey Ferrara // MPC Film
Tom Peitzman // T&C Productions

“Avengers: Endgame”
Matt Aitken, Marvyn Young, Sidney Kombo-Kintombo, Sean Walker, David Conley // Weta Digital

“Spider-Man: Far From Home”
Alexis Wajsbrot, Sylvain Degrotte, Nathan McConnel, Stephen Kennedy, Jonathan Opgenhaffen // Framestore

“Alita: Battle Angel”
Eric Saindon, Michael Cozens, Dejan Momcilovic, Mark Haenga, Kevin Sherwood // Weta Digital

“Pokemon Detective Pikachu”
Jonathan Fawkner, Carlos Monzon, Gavin Mckenzie, Fabio Zangla, Dale Newton // Framestore

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Episodic (Under 13 Episodes) or Non-theatrical Feature

Game of Thrones

WINNER: “Game of Thrones – The Bells”
Steve Kullback, Joe Bauer, Ted Rae
Mohsen Mousavi // Scanline
Thomas Schelesny // Image Engine

“Game of Thrones – The Long Night”
Martin Hill, Nicky Muir, Mike Perry, Mark Richardson, Darren Christie // Weta Digital

“The Umbrella Academy – The White Violin”
Everett Burrell, Misato Shinohara, Chris White, Jeff Campbell, Sebastien Bergeron

“The Man in the High Castle – Jahr Null”
Lawson Deming, Cory Jamieson, Casi Blume, Nick Chamberlain, William Parker, Saber Jlassi, Chris Parks // Barnstorm VFX

“Chernobyl – 1:23:45”
Lindsay McFarlane
Max Dennison, Clare Cheetham, Steven Godfrey, Luke Letkey // DNEG

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Episodic (Over 13 Episodes)

Team from The Orville – Outstanding VFX, Episodic, Over 13 Episodes (Photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging)

WINNER: “The Orville – Identity: Part II”
Tommy Tran, Kevin Lingenfelser, Joseph Vincent Pike // FuseFX
Brandon Fayette, Brooke Noska // Twentieth Century FOX TV

“Hawaii Five-O – Ke iho mai nei ko luna”
Thomas Connors, Anthony Davis, Chad Schott, Gary Lopez, Adam Avitabile // Picture Shop

“9-1-1 – 7.1”
Jon Massey, Tony Pirzadeh, Brigitte Bourque, Gavin Whelan, Kwon Choi // FuseFX

“Star Trek: Discovery – Such Sweet Sorrow Part 2”
Jason Zimmerman, Ante Dekovic, Aleksandra Kochoska, Charles Collyer, Alexander Wood // CBS Television Studios

“The Flash – King Shark vs. Gorilla Grodd”
Armen V. Kevorkian, Joshua Spivack, Andranik Taranyan, Shirak Agresta, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

The 2019 HPA Engineering Excellence Awards were presented to:

Adobe – Content-Aware Fill for Video in Adobe After Effects

Epic Games — Unreal Engine 4

Pixelworks — TrueCut Motion

Portrait Displays and LG Electronics — CalMan LUT based Auto-Calibration Integration with LG OLED TVs

Honorable Mentions were awarded to Ambidio for Ambidio Looking Glass; Grass Valley, for creative grading; and Netflix for Photon.

Color Chat: Light Iron’s Corinne Bogdanowicz

Corinne Bogdanowicz colorist at Light Iron, joined the post house in 2010 after working as a colorist and digital compositor for Post Logic/Prime Focus, Pacific Title and DreamWorks Animation.

Bogdanowicz, who comes from a family of colorists/color scientists (sister and father), has an impressive credit list, including the features 42, Flight, Hell or High Water, Allied and Wonder. On the episodic side, she has colored all five seasons of Amazon’s Emmy-winning series Transparent, as well as many other shows, including FX’s Baskets and Boomerang for BET. Her most recent work includes Netflix’s Dolemite is My Name and HBO’s Mrs. Fletcher.

HBO’s Mrs. Fletcher

We reached out to find out more…

NAME: Corinne Bogdanowicz

COMPANY: Light Iron

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Light Iron is a post production company owned by Panavision. We have studios in New York and Los Angeles.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think that most people would be surprised that we are the last stop for all visuals on a project. We are where all of the final VFX come together, and we also manage the different color spaces for final distribution.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
Yes, I am very often doing work that crosses over into visual effects. Beauty work, paint outs and VFX integration are all commonplace in the DI suite these days.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The collaboration between myself and the creatives on a project is my favorite aspect of color correction. There is always a moment when we start color where I get “the look,” and everyone is excited that their vision is coming to fruition.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Maybe farming? (laughs) I’m not sure. I love being outdoors and working with animals.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I have an art background, and when I moved to Los Angeles years ago I worked in VFX. I quickly was introduced to the world of color and found it was a great fit. I love the combination of art and technology, as well as constantly being introduced to new ideas by industry creatives.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Where’d You Go, Bernadette?, Sextuplets, Truth Be Told, Transparent, Mrs. Fletcher and Dolemite is My Name.

Transparent

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
This is a hard question because I feel like I leave a little piece of myself in everything that I work on.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, the coffee maker and FilmLight Baselight.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM THE PRESSURES OF THE JOB?
I have two small children at home, so I think I de-stress when I get to work (laughs)!

VFX house Blacksmith now offering color grading, adds Mikey Pehanich

New York-based visual effects studio Blacksmith has added colorist Mikey Pehanich to its team. With this new addition, Blacksmith expands its capabilities to now offer color grading in addition to VFX.

Pehanich has worked on projects for high-profile brands including Amazon, Samsung, Prada, Nike, New Balance, Marriott and Carhartt. Most recently, Pehanich worked on Smirnoff’s global “Infamous Since 1864” campaign directed by Rupert Sanders, Volkswagen’s Look Down in Awe spot from Garth Davis, Fisher-Price’s “Let’s Be Kids” campaign and Miller Lite’s newly launched Followers spot, both directed by Ringan Ledwidge.

Prior to joining Blacksmith, Pehanich spent six years as colorist at The Mill in Chicago. Pehanich was the first local hire when The Mill opened its Chicago studio in 2013. Initially cutting his teeth as color assistant, he quickly worked his way up to becoming a full-fledged colorist, lending his talent to campaigns that include Michelob’s 2019 Super Bowl spot featuring Zoe Kravitz and directed by Emma Westenberg, as well as music videos, including Regina Spektor’s Black and White.

In addition to commercial work, Pehanich’s diverse portfolio encompasses several feature films, short films and music videos. His recent longform work includes Shabier Kirchner’s short film Dadli about an Antiguan boy and his community, and Andre Muir’s short film 4 Corners, which tackles Chicago’s problem with gun violence.

“New York has always been a creative hub for all industries — the energy and vibe that is forever present in the air here has always been a draw for me. When the opportunity presented itself to join the incredible team over at Blacksmith, there was no way I could pass it up,” says Pehanich, who will be working on Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve.

 

Color grading Empire State Building’s immersive exhibits

As immersive and experiential projects are being mounted in more and more settings — and as display technology allows for larger and more high-resolution screens to be integrated into these installations —colorists are being called on to grade video and film content that’s meant to be viewed in vastly different settings than in the past. No longer are they grading for content that will live on a 50-inch flat screen TV or a 9-inch tablet —they’re grading for wall-sized screens that dominate museum exhibits or public spaces.

James Tillett

A recent example is when the Manhattan office of Squint /Opera, a London-based digital design studio, tapped Moving Picture Company colorist James Tillett to grade content that has taken over floor-to-ceiling screens in the new Second Floor Experience in the iconic Empire State Building. Comprising nine interactive and immersive galleries that recreate everything from the building’s construction to its encounter with its most famous visitor and unofficial mascot, King Kong, the 10,000-square-foot space is part of the building’s multimillion dollar renovation.

Here, Tillett discusses what went into grading for such a large-scale experiential project such as this.

How did this project come about?
Alvin Cruz, one of our creative directors here in New York, has a designer colleague who put us in contact with the Squint/Opera team. We met with them and they quickly realized they’d be able to do everything on this project except the color grade. That’s where we came in.

How did this project differ from the more traditional color grading work you usually do?
You have to work in a different color space if the final product will be shown in a theater versus, say, broadcast TV or online. The same thinking goes here, but as every experiential project is different, you have to evaluate based on the design of the space and the type of screen or projection system being used, and then make an educated guess on how the footage will respond.

What were the steps you took to tackle this kind of project?
The first thing we did when we got the footage from Squint/Opera was to bring it into the suite and view it in that environment. Then my executive producer, Ed Koenig, and I jumped on the Q train and went into the space at the Empire State Building to see how the same footage looked in the various gallery settings. This helped us to get a feel for how it will ultimately be seen. I also wanted to see how those spaces differed visually from our grading suite. That informed my process going forward.

What sections of the Experience required extra consideration?
The “Construction Area” gallery, which documents the construction of the building, has very large screens. This meant paying close attention to the visual details within each of the films. For example, zooming in close to certain parts of the image and keeping an eye on noise and grain structure.

The “Site Survey” gallery gives the visitor a sense of what it would be like on the ground as the building surveyors are taking their measurements. Visitors are able to look through various replica surveying devices and see different scenes unfolding. During the grade (I use FilmLight Baselight), we had a prototype device in the suite that Squint/Opera created with a 3D printer. This allowed us to preview the grade through the same type of special mirrored screen that’s used in the actual replica surveying devices in the exhibit. In fact, we actually ended up setting the calibration of these screens as part of the grading process and then transferred those settings over to the actual units at the ESB.

In the “King Kong” gallery, even though the video content is in black and white, it was important that the image on the screens was consistent with the model of King Kong’s hand that reaches into the physical space, which has a slightly reddish tone to it. We started off just trying to make the footage feel more like a vintage black and white film print, but realized we needed to introduce some color to make it sit better in the space. This meant experimenting with different levels of red/sepia tint to the black and white and exporting different versions, with a final decision then made on-site.

Were you able to replicate what the viewing conditions would be for these films while working in the color suite? And did this influence the grade?
What’s important about grading for experiential projects like this is that, while you can’t replicate the exact conditions, you still have to give the footage a grade that supports the theme or focus of the film’s content. You also have to fully understand and appreciate where it’s going to be seen and keep that top of mind throughout the entire process.

 

 

 

 

Nice Shoes Toronto adds colorist Yulia Bulashenko

Creative studio Nice Shoes has added colorist Yulia Bulashenko to its Toronto location. She brings over seven years of experience as a freelance colorist, working worldwide across on projects with such top global clients as Nike, Volkswagen, MTV, Toyota, Diesel, Uniqlo, Uber, Adidas and Zara, among numerous others.

Bulashenko’s resume includes work across commercials, music videos, fashion, and feature films. Notable projects include Sia and Diplo’s (LSD) music video for “Audio,” “Sound and Vision” a tribute to the late singer David Bowie directed by Canada for whom she has been a colorist of choice for the past five years; and feature films The Girl From The Song and Gold.

Toronto-based Bulashenko is available immediately and also available remotely via Nice Shoes’s New York, Boston, Chicago, and Minneapolis spaces.

Bulashenko began her career as a fashion photographer before transitioning into creating fashion films. Through handling all of the post on her own film projects, she discovered a love for color grading. After building relationships with a number of collaborators, she began taking on projects as a freelancer, working with clients in Spain and the UK working on a wide range of projects throughout Europe, Mexico, Qatar and India.

Managing director Justin Pandolfino notes, “We’re excited to announce Yulia as the first of a number of new signings as we enter our fourth year in the Toronto market. Bringing her onboard is part of our ongoing efforts to unite the best talent from around the world to deliver stunning design, animation, VFX, VR/AR, editorial, color grading and finishing for our clients.”

Colorist Chat: Scott Ostrowsky on Amazon’s Sneaky Pete

By Randi Altman

Scott Ostrowsky, senior colorist at Deluxe’s Level 3 in Los Angeles has worked on all three seasons of Amazon’s Sneaky Pete, produced by Bryan Cranston and David Shore and starring Giovanni Ribisi. Season 3 is the show’s last.

For those of you unfamiliar with the series, it follows a con man named Marius (Ribisi), who takes the place of his former cell-mate Pete and endears himself to Pete’s seemingly idyllic family while continuing to con his way through life. Over time he comes to love the family, which is nowhere as innocent as they seem.

Scott Ostrowsky

We reached out to this veteran colorist to learn more about how the look of the series developed over the seasons and how he worked with the showrunners and DPs.

You’ve been on Sneaky Pete since the start. Can you describe how the look has changed over the years?
I worked on Seasons 1 through Season 3. The DP for Season 1 was Rene Ohashi and it had somewhat of a softer feel. It was shot on a Sony F55. It mostly centered around the relationship of Bryan Cranston’s character and Giovanni Ribisi’s newly adopted fake family and his brother.

Season 2 was shot by DPs Frank DeMarco and William Rexer on a Red Dragon, and it was a more stylized and harsher look in some ways. The looks were different because the storylines and the locations had changed. So, even though we had some beautiful, resplendent looks in Season 2, we also created some harsher environments, and we did that through color correction. Going into Season 2, the storyline changed, and it became more defined in the sense that we used the environments to create an atmosphere that matched the storyline and the performances.

An example of this would be the warehouse where they all came together to create the scam/ heist that they were going to pull off. Another example of this would be the beautiful environment in the casino that was filled with rich lighting and ornate colors. But there are many examples of this through the show — both DPs used shadow and light to create a very emotional mood or a very stark mood and everything in between.

Season 3 shot by Arthur Albert and his son, Nick Albert on a Red Gemini, and it had a beautiful, resplendent, rich look that matched the different environments when it moved from the cooler look of New York to the more warm, colorful look in California.

So you gave different looks based on locale? 
Yes, we did. Many times, the looks would depend on time of day and the environment that they were in. An example of this might be the harsh fluorescent green in the gas station bathroom where Giovanni’s character is trying to figure out a way to help his brother and avoid his captures.

How did you work with the Alberts on the most recent season?
I work at Level 3 Post, which is a Deluxe company. I did Season 1 and 2 at the facility on the Sony lot. Season 3 was posted at Level 3. Arthur and Nick Albert came in to my color suite with the camera tests shot on the Red Gemini and also the Helium. We set up a workflow based on the Red cameras and proceeded to grade the various setups.

Once Arthur and Nick decided to use the Gemini, we set up our game plan for the season. When I received my first conform, I proceeded to grade it based on our conversations. I was very sensitive to the way they used their setups, lighting and exposures. Once I finished my first primary grade, Arthur would come in and sit with me to watch the show and make any changes. After Arthur approved the grade, The producers and showrunner would come in for their viewing. They could make any additional changes at that time. (Read our interview with Arthur Albert here.)

How do you prefer to work with directors/DPs?
The first thing is have conversation with them on their approach and how they view color as being part of the story they want to tell. I always like to get a feel for how the cinematographer will shoot the show and what, if any, LUTs they’re using so I can emulate that look as a starting point for my color grading.

It is really important to me to find out how a director envisions the image he or she would like to portray on the screen. An example of this would be facial expressions. Do we want to see everything or do they mind if the shadow side remains dark and the light falls off.

A lot of times, it’s about how the actors emote and how they work in tandem with each other to create tension, comedy or other emotions — and what the director is looking for in these scenes.

Any tips for getting the most out of a project from a color perspective?
Communication. Communication. Communication. Having an open dialogue with the cinematographer, showrunners and directors is extremely important. If the colorist is able to get the first pass very close, you spend more time on the nuisances rather than balancing or trying to find a look. That is why it is so important to have an understanding of the essence of what a director, cinematographer and showrunner is looking for.

How do you prefer the DP or director to describe their desired look?
However they’re comfortable in enlightening me to their styles or needs for the show is fine. Usually, we can discuss this when we have a camera test before principal photography starts. There’s no one way that you can work with everybody — you just adapt to how they work. And as a colorist, it’s your job to make that image sing or shine the way that they intended it to.

You used Resolve on this. Is there a particular tool that came in handy for this show?
All tools on the Resolve are useful for a drama series. You would not buy the large crayon box and throw out colors you didn’t like because, at some point, you might need them. I use all tools — from keys, windows, log corrections and custom curves to create the looks that were needed.

You have been working in TV for many years. How has color grading changed during that time?
Color correction has become way more sophisticated over the years, and is continually growing and expanding into a blend of not only color grading but helping to create environments that are needed to express the look of a show. We no longer just have simple color correctors with simple secondaries; the toolbox continues to grow with added filters, added grain and sometimes even helping to create visual effects, which most color correctors are able to do today.

Where do you find inspiration? Art? Photography?
I’ve always loved photography and B&W movies. There’s a certain charm or subtlety that you find in B&W, whether it’s a film noir, the harshness of film grain, or just the use of shadow and light. I’ve always enjoyed going to museums and looking at different artists and how they view the world and what inspires them.

To me, it’s trying to portray an image and have that image make a statement. In daily life, you can see multiple examples as you go through your day, and I try and keep the most interesting ones that I can remember in my lexicon of images.


Randi Altman is the founder and editor-in-chief of postPerspective. She has been covering production and post production for more than 20 years. 

Colorist Joanne Rourke grades Netflix horror film In the Tall Grass

Colorists are often called on to help enhance a particular mood or item for a film, show or spot. For Netflix’s In the Tall Grass — based on a story from horror writers Stephen King and Joe Hill — director Vincenzo Natali and DP Craig Wrobleski called on Deluxe Toronto’s Joanne Rourke to finesse the film’s final look using color to give the grass, which plays such a large part in the film, personality.

In fact, most of the film takes place in a dense Kansas field. It all begins when a brother and his pregnant sister hear a boy’s cries coming from a field of tall grass and go to find him. Soon they realize they can’t escape.

Joanne Rourke

“I worked with Vincenzo more than 20 years ago when I did the video mastering for his film Cube, so it was wonderful to reconnect with him and a privilege to work with Craig. The color process on this project was highly collaborative and we experimented a lot. It was decided to keep the day exteriors natural and sunny with subtle chromatic variations between. While this approach is atypical for horror flicks, it really lends itself to a more unsettling and ominous feeling when things begin to go awry,” explains Rourke.

In the Tall Grass was principally shot using the ARRI Alexa LF camera system, which helped give the footage a more immersive feeling when the characters are trapped in the grass. The grass itself comprised a mix of practical and CG grass that Rourke adjusted the color of depending on the time of day and where the story was taking place in the field. For the night scenes, she focused on giving the footage a silvery look while keeping the overall look as dark as possible with enough details visible. She was also mindful to keep the mysterious rock dark and shadowed.

Rourke completed the film’s first color pass in HDR, then used that version to create an SDR trim pass. She found the biggest challenge of working in HDR on this film to be reining in unwanted specular highlights in night scenes. To adjust for this, she would often window specific areas of the shot, an approach that leveraged the benefits of HDR without pushing the look to the extreme. She used Blackmagic Resolve 15 along with the occasional Boris FX Sapphire plugins.

“Everyone involved on this project had a keen attention to detail and was so invested in the final look of the project, which made for such great experience,” says Rourke. “I have many favorite shots, but I love how the visual of the dead crow on the ground perfectly captures the silver feel. Craig and Vincenzo created such stunning imagery, and I was just happy to be along for the ride. Also, I had no idea that head squishing could be so gleeful and fun.”

In the Tall Grass is now streaming on Netflix.

NAB NY Panel: Working in 4K HDR for Netflix’s Russian Doll

Goldcrest Post senior colorist Nat Jencks will take part in a discussion about the technology and creativity behind the Netflix series Russian Doll at NAB Show New York. Joining Jencks will be post supervisor Lisa Melodia in a session moderated by our own postPerspective editor-in-chief Randi Altman.

Nat Jencks

The session will take place on Thursday, October 17 at 3:30pm at the Javits Convention Center. Those wishing to attend this event may do so for free by entering the code EP06 when registering for NAB Show New York.

Nominated for 13 Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Comedy Series, Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series and Outstanding Single-Camera Picture Editing for a Comedy Series, Russian Doll has won critical acclaim and popular embrace for its story of a young New York City woman, Nadia Vulvokov (Natasha Lyonne), who, after being killed in a traffic accident, finds herself continuously reliving a birthday party held in her honor the same night. Think of Groundhog’s Day, but darker.

In this session, Jencks and Melodia will discuss how they balance art and tech, taking advantage of the latest technologies in depicting a highly cinematic version of New York’s East Village while still prioritizing creativity in storytelling. They will also discuss the intricacies of working in 4K HDR.

Goldcrest’s Jencks collaborated once again with cinematographer Chris Teague to finalize the look of Russian Doll. A colorist with 10 years of experience in this aspect of the job, Jencks’ work ranges from studio features to indies and includes episodic series, commercials and music videos. Jencks has worked in post for two decades total, including in the fields of VFX, title design and editorial. 

Melodia is a post supervisor working in New York City. Prior to Russian Doll, she worked on comedies such as The Jim Gaffigan Show for TV Land and The Detour for TBS, as well as movies for HBO. Currently, she is the post supervisor on Darren Star’s new show, Emily in Paris.

 

Colorist Chat: Lucky Post’s Neil Anderson

After joining Lucky Post in Dallas in 2013 right out of film school, Neil Anderson was officially promoted to colorist in 2017. He has worked on a variety of projects during his time at the studio, including projects for Canada Dry, Costa, TGI Fridays, The Salvation Army and YETI. He also contributed to Augustine Frizzell’s feature comedy, Never Goin’ Back, which premiered at Sundance and was distributed by A24.

YETI

We checked in with Anderson to find out how he works, some favorite projects and what inspires him.

What do you enjoy most about your work?
That’s a really hard question because there are a lot of things I really enjoy about color grading. If I had to choose, I think it comes back to the fact that it’s rewarding to both left- and right-brained people. It truly is both an art and a science.

The satisfaction I get when I first watch a newly graded spot is also very special. A cohesive and mindful color grade absolutely transforms the piece into something greater, and it’s a great feeling to be able to make such a powerful impact.

What’s the most misunderstood aspect of color artistry?
I’m not sure many people stop and think about how amazing it is that we can fine tune our engineering to something as wild as our eye sight. Our vision is very fluid and organic, constantly changing under different constraints and environments, filled with optical illusions and imperfect guesses. There are immensely strange phenomena that drastically change our perception of what we see. Yet we need to make camera systems and displays work with this deeply non-uniform perception. It’s an absolutely massive area of study that we take for granted; I’m thankful for those color scientists out there.

Where do you find your creative inspiration?
I definitely like to glean new ideas and ways of approaching new projects from seeing other great colorists. Sometimes certain commercials come on TV that catch my eye and I’ll excitedly say to my partner Odelie, “That is damn good color!” Depending on the situation, I might get an eye-roll or two from her.

Tell us about some recent projects, and what made them stand out to you creatively?
Baylor Scott & White Health: I just loved how moody we took these in the end. They are very inspiring stories that we wanted to make feel even more impactful. I think the contrast and color really turned out beautiful.

Is This All There Is?

Is This All There Is? by Welcome Center: This is a recent music video that we filmed in a stunningly dilapidated house. The grit and grain we added in color really brings out the “worst” of it.

Hurdle: This was a documentary feature I worked on that I really enjoyed. The film was shot over a six-month window in the West Bank in Israel, so wrangling it in while also giving it a distinctly unique look was both difficult and fun.

Light From Light: Also a feature film that I finished a few months ago. I really enjoyed the process of developing the look with its wonderful DP Greta Zozula. We specifically wanted to capture the feeling of paintings by Andrew Wyeth, Thomas Eakins and Johannes Vermeer.

Current bingeable episodics and must see films?
Exhibit A, Mindhunter, Midsommar and The Cold Blue.

When you are not at Lucky Post, where do you like to spend time?
I’m an avid moviegoer so definitely a lot of my time (and money) is spent at the theater. I’m also a huge sports fan; you’ll find me anywhere that carries my team’s games! (Go Pack Go)

Favorite podcast?
The Daily (“The New York Times”)

Current Book?
“Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-1963”

Dumbest thing you laughed at today?
https://bit.ly/2MYs0V1

Song you can’t stop listening to?
John Frusciante — 909 Day

Color grading IT Chapter Two’s terrifying return

In IT Chapter Two, the kids of the Losers’ Club are all grown up and find themselves lured back to their hometown of Derry. Still haunted both by the trauma that monstrous clown Pennywise let loose on the community and by each one’s own unique insecurities, the group (James McAvoy, Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader) find themselves up against even more terrifying forces than they faced in the first film, IT.

Stephen Nakamura

IT Chapter Two director Andy Muschietti called on cinematographer Checco Varese and colorist Stephen Nakamura of Company 3. Nakamura returned to the franchise, performing the final color grade at Efilm in Hollywood. “I felt the first one was going to be a big hit when we were working on it, because these kids’ stories were so compelling and the performances were so strong. It was more than just a regular horror movie. This second one, in my opinion, is just as powerful in terms of telling these characters’ stories. And, not surprisingly, it also takes the scary parts even further.”

According to Nakamura, Muschietti “is a very visually oriented director. When we were coloring both of the films, he was very aware of the kinds of things we can do in the DI to enhance the imagery and make things even more scary. He pushed me to take some scenes in Chapter Two in directions I’ve never gone with color. I think it’s always important, whether you’re a colorist or a chef or a doctor, to always push yourself and explore new aspects of your work. Andy’s enthusiasm encouraged me to try new approaches to working in DaVinci Resolve. I think the results are very effective.”

For one thing, the technique he used to bring up just the light level in the eyes of the shapeshifting clown Pennywise got even more use here because there were more frightening characters to use it on. In many cases, the companies that created the visual effects also provided mattes that let Nakamura easily isolate and adjust the luminance of each individual eye in Resolve. When such mattes weren’t available, he used Resolve to track each eyeball a frame at a time.

“Resolve has excellent tracking capabilities, but we were looking to isolate just the tiny whites of the characters’ eyes,” Nakamura explains, “and there just wasn’t enough information to track.” It was meticulous work, he recalls, “but it’s very effective. The audience doesn’t consciously know we’re doing anything, but it makes the eyes brighter in a very strange way, kind of like a cat’s eyes when they catch the light. It really enhances the eerie feeling.”

In addition, Nakamura and the filmmakers made use of Resolve’s Flicker tool in the OpenFX panel to enhance the flickering effect in a scene involving flashing lights, taking the throbbing light effects further than they did on set. Not long ago, this type of enhancement would have been a more involved process in which the shots would likely be sent to a visual effects house. “We were able to do it as part of the grading, and we all thought it looked completely realistic. They definitely appreciated the ability to make little enhancements like that in the final grade, when everyone can see the scenes with the grade in context and on a big screen.”

Portions of the film involve scenes of the Losers’ Club as children, which were comprised of newly shot material (not cut in from the production of the first It). Nakamura applied a very subtle amount of Resolve’s mid-tone detail tool over them primarily to help immediately and subliminally orient the audience in time.

But the most elaborate use of the color corrector involved one short sequence in which Hader’s character, walking in a local park on a pleasant, sunny day, has a sudden, terrifying interaction with a very frightening character. The shots involved a significant amount of CGI and compositing work, which was completed at several effects houses. Muschietti was pleased with the effects work, but he wanted Nakamura to bring in an overall quality to the look of the scene that made it feel a bit more otherworldly.

Says Nakamura, “Andy described something that reminded me of the old-school, two-strip color process, where essentially anything red would get pushed into being a kind of magenta, and something blue or green would become a kind of cyan.”

Nakamura, who colored Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (shot by Robert Richardson, ASC), had designed something at that point to create more of a three-strip look, but this process was more challenging, as it involved constraining the color palette to an even greater degree — without, of course, losing definition in the imagery.

With a bit of trial and error, Nakamura came up with the notion of using the splitter/combiner node and recombined some nodes in the output, forcing the information from the green channel into the red and blue channels. He then used a second splitter/combiner node to control the output. “It’s almost like painting a scene with just two colors,” he explains. “Green grass and blue sky both become shades of cyan, while skin and anything with red in it goes into the magenta area.”

The work became even more complex because the red-haired Pennywise also makes an appearance; it was important for him to retain his color, despite the rest of the scene going two-tone. Nakamura treated this element as a complex chroma key, using a second splitter/combiner node and significantly boosting the saturation just to isolate Pennywise while preventing the two-tone correction from affecting him.

When it came time to complete the pass for HDR Dolby Cinema — designed for specialty projectors capable essentially of displaying brighter whites and darker blacks than normal cinema projectors — Muschietti was particularly interested in the format’s treatment of dark areas of the frame.

“Just like in the first one,” Nakamura explains, “we were able to make use of Dolby Cinema to enhance suspense. People usually talk about how bright the highlights can be in HDR. But, when you push more light through the picture than you do for the P3 version, we also have the ability to make shadowy areas of the image appear even darker while keeping the details in those really dark areas very clear. This can be very effective in a movie like this, where you have scary characters lurking in the shadows.

“The color grade always plays some kind of role in a movie’s storytelling,” Nakamura sums up, “but this was a fun example of how work we did in the color grade really helped scare the audience.”

You can check out our Q&A with Nakamura about his work on the original IT.

HPA Awards name 2019 creative nominees

The HPA Awards Committee has announced the nominees for the creative categories for the 2019 HPA Awards. The HPA Awards honor outstanding achievement and artistic excellence by the individuals and teams who help bring stories to life. Launched in 2006, the HPA Awards recognize outstanding achievement in color grading, editing, sound and visual effects for work in episodic, spots and feature films.

The winners of the 14th Annual HPA Awards will be announced at a gala ceremony on November 21 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles.

The 2019 HPA Awards Creative Category nominees are:

Outstanding Color Grading – Theatrical Feature

-“First Man”

Natasha Leonnet // Efilm

-“Roma”

Steven J. Scott // Technicolor

-“Green Book”

Walter Volpatto // FotoKem

-“The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”

Tom Poole // Company 3

-“Us”

Michael Hatzer // Technicolor

-“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Natasha Leonnet // Efilm

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature

-“The Handmaid’s Tale – Liars”

Bill Ferwerda // Deluxe Toronto

-“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – Vote for Kennedy, Vote for Kennedy”

Steven Bodner // Light Iron

-“Game of Thrones – Winterfell”

Joe Finley // Sim, Los Angeles

-“I am the Night – Pilot”

Stefan Sonnenfeld // Company 3

-“Gotham – Legend of the Dark Knight: The Trial of Jim Gordon”

Paul Westerbeck // Picture Shop

-“The Man in the High Castle – Jahr Null”

Roy Vasich // Technicolor

 

Outstanding Color Grading – Commercial  

-Zara – “Woman Campaign Spring Summer 2019”

Tim Masick // Company 3

-Tiffany & Co. – “Believe in Dreams: A Tiffany Holiday”

James Tillett // Moving Picture Company

-Hennessy X.O. – “The Seven Worlds”

Stephen Nakamura // Company 3

-Palms Casino – “Unstatus Quo”

Ricky Gausis // Moving Picture Company

-Audi – “Cashew”

Tom Poole // Company 3

 

Outstanding Editing – Theatrical Feature

-“Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood”

Fred Raskin, ACE

-“Green Book”

Patrick J. Don Vito, ACE

-“Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese”

David Tedeschi, Damian Rodriguez

-“The Other Side of the Wind”

Orson Welles, Bob Murawski, ACE

-“A Star Is Born”

Jay Cassidy, ACE

 

Outstanding Editing – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature (30 Minutes and Under)

“Russian Doll – The Way Out”

Todd Downing

-“Homecoming – Redwood”

Rosanne Tan, ACE

-“Veep – Pledge”

Roger Nygard, ACE

-“Withorwithout”

Jake Shaver, Shannon Albrink // Therapy Studios

-“Russian Doll – Ariadne”

Laura Weinberg

 

Outstanding Editing – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature (Over 30 Minutes)

-“Stranger Things – Chapter Eight: The Battle of Starcourt”

Dean Zimmerman, ACE, Katheryn Naranjo

-“Chernobyl – Vichnaya Pamyat”

Simon Smith, Jinx Godfrey // Sister Pictures

-“Game of Thrones – The Iron Throne”

Katie Weiland, ACE

-“Game of Thrones – The Long Night”

Tim Porter, ACE

-“The Bodyguard – Episode One”

Steve Singleton

 

Outstanding Sound – Theatrical Feature

-“Godzilla: King of Monsters”

Tim LeBlanc, Tom Ozanich, MPSE // Warner Bros.

Erik Aadahl, MPSE, Nancy Nugent, MPSE, Jason W. Jennings // E Squared

-“Shazam!”

Michael Keller, Kevin O’Connell // Warner Bros.

Bill R. Dean, MPSE, Erick Ocampo, Kelly Oxford, MPSE // Technicolor

-“Smallfoot”

Michael Babcock, David E. Fluhr, CAS, Jeff Sawyer, Chris Diebold, Harrison Meyle // Warner Bros.

-“Roma”

Skip Lievsay, Sergio Diaz, Craig Henighan, Carlos Honc, Ruy Garcia, MPSE, Caleb Townsend

-“Aquaman”

Tim LeBlanc // Warner Bros.

Peter Brown, Joe Dzuban, Stephen P. Robinson, MPSE, Eliot Connors, MPSE // Formosa Group

 

Outstanding Sound – Episodic or Non-theatrical Feature

-“Chernobyl – 1:23:45”

Stefan Henrix, Stuart Hilliker, Joe Beal, Michael Maroussas, Harry Barnes // Boom Post

-“Deadwood: The Movie”

John W. Cook II, Bill Freesh, Mandell Winter, MPSE, Daniel Coleman, MPSE, Ben Cook, MPSE, Micha Liberman // NBC Universal

-“Game of Thrones – The Bells”

Tim Kimmel, MPSE, Onnalee Blank, CAS, Mathew Waters, CAS, Paula Fairfield, David Klotz

-“The Haunting of Hill House – Two Storms”

Trevor Gates, MPSE, Jason Dotts, Jonathan Wales, Paul Knox, Walter Spencer // Formosa Group

-“Homecoming – Protocol”

John W. Cook II, Bill Freesh, Kevin Buchholz, Jeff A. Pitts, Ben Zales, Polly McKinnon // NBC Universal

 

Outstanding Sound – Commercial 

-John Lewis & Partners – “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Mark Hills, Anthony Moore // Factory

Audi – “Life”

Doobie White // Therapy Studios

-Leonard Cheshire Disability – “Together Unstoppable”

Mark Hills // Factory

-New York Times – “The Truth Is Worth It: Fearlessness”

Aaron Reynolds // Wave Studios NY

-John Lewis & Partners – “The Boy and the Piano”

Anthony Moore // Factory

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Theatrical Feature

-“Avengers: Endgame”

Matt Aitken, Marvyn Young, Sidney Kombo-Kintombo, Sean Walker, David Conley // Weta Digital

-“Spider-Man: Far From Home”

Alexis Wajsbrot, Sylvain Degrotte, Nathan McConnel, Stephen Kennedy, Jonathan Opgenhaffen // Framestore

-“The Lion King”

Robert Legato

Andrew R. Jones

Adam Valdez, Elliot Newman, Audrey Ferrara // MPC Film

Tom Peitzman // T&C Productions

-“Alita: Battle Angel”

Eric Saindon, Michael Cozens, Dejan Momcilovic, Mark Haenga, Kevin Sherwood // Weta Digital

-“Pokemon Detective Pikachu”

Jonathan Fawkner, Carlos Monzon, Gavin Mckenzie, Fabio Zangla, Dale Newton // Framestore

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Episodic (Under 13 Episodes) or Non-theatrical Feature

-“Game of Thrones – The Long Night”

Martin Hill, Nicky Muir, Mike Perry, Mark Richardson, Darren Christie // Weta Digital

-“The Umbrella Academy – The White Violin”

Everett Burrell, Misato Shinohara, Chris White, Jeff Campbell, Sebastien Bergeron

-“The Man in the High Castle – Jahr Null”

Lawson Deming, Cory Jamieson, Casi Blume, Nick Chamberlain, William Parker, Saber Jlassi, Chris Parks // Barnstorm VFX

-“Chernobyl – 1:23:45”

Lindsay McFarlane

Max Dennison, Clare Cheetham, Steven Godfrey, Luke Letkey // DNEG

-“Game of Thrones – The Bells”

Steve Kullback, Joe Bauer, Ted Rae

Mohsen Mousavi // Scanline

Thomas Schelesny // Image Engine

 

Outstanding Visual Effects – Episodic (Over 13 Episodes)

-“Hawaii Five-O – Ke iho mai nei ko luna”

Thomas Connors, Anthony Davis, Chad Schott, Gary Lopez, Adam Avitabile // Picture Shop

-“9-1-1 – 7.1”

Jon Massey, Tony Pizadeh, Brigitte Bourque, Gavin Whelan, Kwon Choi // FuseFX

-“Star Trek: Discovery – Such Sweet Sorrow Part 2”

Jason Zimmerman, Ante Dekovic, Aleksandra Kochoska, Charles Collyer, Alexander Wood // CBS Television Studios

-“The Flash – King Shark vs. Gorilla Grodd”

Armen V. Kevorkian, Joshua Spivack, Andranik Taranyan, Shirak Agresta, Jason Shulman // Encore VFX

-“The Orville – Identity: Part II”

Tommy Tran, Kevin Lingenfelser, Joseph Vincent Pike // FuseFX

Brandon Fayette, Brooke Noska // Twentieth Century Fox TV

 

In addition to the nominations announced today, the HPA Awards will present a small number of special awards. Visual effects supervisor and creative Robert Legato (The Lion King, The Aviator, Hugo, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Titanic, Avatar) will receive the HPA Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Winners of the Engineering Excellence Award include Adobe, Epic Games, Pixelworks, Portrait Displays Inc. and LG Electronics. The recipient of the Judges Award for Creativity and Engineering, a juried honor, will be announced in the coming weeks. All awards will be bestowed at the HPA Awards gala.

For more information or to buy tickets to the 2019 HPA Awards, click here.

 

 

Flavor adds Joshua Studebaker as CG supervisor

Creative production house Flavor has added CG supervisor Joshua Studebaker to its Los Angeles studio. For more than eight years, Studebaker has been a freelance CG artist in LA, specializing in design, animation, dynamics, lighting/shading and compositing via Maya, Cinema 4D, Vray/Octane, Nuke and After Effects.

A frequent collaborator with Flavor and its brand and agency partners, Studebaker has also worked with Alma Mater, Arsenal FX, Brand New School, Buck, Greenhaus GFX, Imaginary Forces and We Are Royale in the past five years alone. In his new role with Flavor, Studebaker oversees visual effects and 3D services across the company’s global operations. Flavor’s Chicago, Los Angeles and Detroit studios offer color grading, VFX and picture finishing using tools like Autodesk Lustre and Flame Premium.

Flavor creative director Jason Cook also has a long history of working with Studebaker and deep respect for his talent. “What I love most about Josh is that he is both technical and a really amazing artist and designer. Adding him is a huge boon to the Flavor family, instantly elevating our production capabilities tenfold.”

Flavor has always emphasized creativity as a key ingredient, and according to Studebaker, that’s what attracted him. “I see Flavor as a place to grow my creative and design skills, as well as help bring more standardization to our process in house,” he explained. “My vision is to help Flavor become more agile and more efficient and to do our best work together.”

FotoKem expands post services to Santa Monica

FotoKem is now offering its video post services in Santa Monica. This provides an accessible location for those working on the west side of LA, as well as access to the talent from its Burbank and Hollywood studios.

Designed to support an entire pipeline of services, the FotoKem Santa Monica facility is housed just off the 10 freeway, above FotoKem’s mixing and recording studio Margarita Mix. For many projects, color grading, sound mixing and visual effects reviews often take place in multiple locations around town. This facility offers showrunners and filmmakers a new west side post production option. Additionally, the secure fiber network connecting all FotoKem-owned locations ensures feature film and episodic finishing work can take place in realtime among sites.

FotoKem Santa Monica features a DI color grading theater, episodic and commercial color suite, editorial conform bay and a visual effects team — all tied to the comprehensive offerings at FotoKem’s main Burbank campus, Keep Me Posted’s episodic finishing facility and Margarita Mix Hollywood’s episodic grading suites. FotoKem’s entire roster of colorists are available to collaborate with filmmakers to ensure their vision is supported throughout the process. Recent projects include Shazam!, Vice, Aquaman, The Dirt, Little and Good Trouble.

Colorist Jimmy Hsu joins Encore Vancouver

Seasoned colorist Jimmy Hsu has joined Encore Vancouver, bringing with him experience in content creation and color science. He comes to Encore Vancouver from Side Street Post Production, where he began as an online editor in 2012 before focusing on color grading.

Hsu’s work spans live action and animated projects across genres, including features, video game cinematics and commercials for clients such as Universal Studios, Disney and Lifetime.

Upon graduating from British Columbia’s Simon Fraser University with a bachelor’s in interactive arts and film production, Hsu held various roles in production and post production, including as a creative editor and motion graphics artist. Having edited more than a hundred movie trailers, Hsu is well-versed in project deliverables and specs, which helps inform his color process. He also draws from his artistic background, leveraging the latest capabilities of Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve to incorporate significant compositing and visual effects work into his projects.


Senior colorist Maria Carretero joins Nice Shoes

NYC-based post studio Nice Shoes has hired senior colorist Maria Carretero, who comes to Nice Shoes with nearly two decades of global experience in color grading under her belt. Her portfolio includes a wide range of feature films, short films, music videos and commercials for brands like Apple, Jeep, Porsche, Michael Kors, Disney and Marriott, among many others. She will be based at Nice Shoes’ NYC studio, also working across Nice Shoes’s Boston, Chicago, Toronto and Minneapolis spaces and through its network of remote partnerships globally.

She comes to Nice Shoes from Framestore in Chicago, where she spent nearly two years establishing relationships with agencies such as BBDO, FCB, DDB, Leo Burnett Chicago and Media Arts Lab LA.

Carretero is originally from Spain, where she received an education in fine arts. She soon discovered the creative possibilities in digital color grading, quickly establishing a career for herself as an international artist. Her background in painting, coupled with her natural eye for nuanced visuals, are the tools that help her maximize her clients’ creative visions. Carretero’s ability to convey a brand story through her work has earned her a long list of awards, including Cannes Lions and a Clio.

Carretero’s recent work includes Jeep’s Recalculating, Disney’s You Can Fly and Bella Notte, Porsche’s The Fix and Avocados From Mexico’s Top Dog spot for Super Bowl 2019.

“Nice Shoes brings together the expertise backed by 20 years of experience with a personal approach that really celebrates female talent and collaboration,” adds Carretero. “I’m thrilled to be joining a team that truly supports the creative exploration process that color takes in storytelling. I’ve always wanted to live in New York. Throughout my whole life, I visited this city again and again and was fascinated by the diversity, the culture, and incredible energy that you breathe in as you walk the city’s streets.”

AJA adds HDR Image Analyzer 12G and more at IBC

AJA will soon offer the new HDR Image Analyzer 12G, bringing 12G-SDI connectivity to its realtime HDR monitoring and analysis platform developed in partnership with Colorfront. The new product streamlines 4K/Ultra HD HDR monitoring and analysis workflows by supporting the latest high-bandwidth 12G-SDI connectivity. The HDR Image Analyzer 12G will be available this fall for $19,995.

HDR Image Analyzer 12G offers waveform, histogram and vectorscope monitoring and analysis of 4K/Ultra HD/2K/HD, HDR and WCG content for broadcast and OTT production, post, QC and mastering. It also features HDR-capable monitor outputs that not only go beyond HD resolutions and offer color accuracy but make it possible to configure layouts to place the preferred tool where needed.

“Since its release, HDR Image Analyzer has powered HDR monitoring and analysis for a number of feature and episodic projects around the world. In listening to our customers and the industry, it became clear that a 12G version would streamline that work, so we developed the HDR Image Analyzer 12G,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

AJA’s video I/O technology integrates with HDR analysis tools from Colorfront in a compact 1-RU chassis to bring HDR Image Analyzer 12G users a comprehensive toolset to monitor and analyze HDR formats, including PQ (Perceptual Quantizer) and hybrid log gamma (HLG). Additional feature highlights include:

● Up to 4K/Ultra HD 60p over 12G-SDI inputs, with loop-through outputs
● Ultra HD UI for native resolution picture display over DisplayPort
● Remote configuration, updates, logging and screenshot transfers via an integrated web UI
● Remote Desktop support
● Support for display referred SDR (Rec.709), HDR ST 2084/PQ and HLG analysis
● Support for scene referred ARRI, Canon, Panasonic, Red and Sony camera color spaces
● Display and color processing lookup table (LUT) support
● Nit levels and phase metering
● False color mode to easily spot pixels out of gamut or brightness
● Advanced out-of-gamut and out-of-brightness detection with error intolerance
● Data analyzer with pixel picker
● Line mode to focus a region of interest onto a single horizontal or vertical line
● File-based error logging with timecode
● Reference still store

At IBC 2019, AJA also showed new products and updates designed to advance broadcast, production, post and pro AV workflows. On the stand were the Kumo 6464-12G for routing and the newly shipping Corvid 44 12G developer I/O models. AJA has also introduced the FS-Mini utility frame sync Mini-Converter and three new OpenGear-compatible cards: OG-FS-Mini, OG-ROI-DVI and OG-ROI-HDMI. Additionally, the company previewed Desktop Software updates for Kona, Io and T-Tap; Ultra HD support for IPR Mini-Converter receivers; and FS4 frame synchronizer enhancements.

SGO Mistika Boutique at IBC with Dolby Vision, color workflows

At IBC, SGO will be showing enhancements and upgrades of its subscription-based finishing solution, Mistika Boutique. The company will demo color management solutions as well as HDR content delivery workflows with recently integrated Dolby Vision support.

This professional color grading toolset combined with the finishing functionality of Mistika Boutique will be showcased running on a Mac Pro workstation with Tangent Arc control panels and output to a Canon 4K HDR reference display through Blackmagic Design DeckLink I/O.

Mistika Boutique is hardware-agnostic and runns on both Windows and MacOS.

SGO is offering a variety of sessions highlighting the trending topics for the content creation industry that feature Mistika Boutique as well as Mistika Workflows and Mistika VR at their stand.

While at the show, SGO is offering a special IBC promotion for Mistika Boutique. Anyone who subscribes by September 30, 2019 will get the Professional Immersive Edition for €99/month or €990/year (or whatever your bank’s conversion rate is), which represents a saving of over 65% from the normal price. The special IBC promotional price will be maintained as long as the subscription is not canceled and remains active.

Company 3 buys Sixteen19, offering full-service post in NYC

Company 3 has acquired Sixteen19, a creative editorial, production and post company based in New York City. The deal includes Sixteen19’s visual effects wing, PowerHouse VFX, and a mobile dailies operation with international reach.

The acquisition helps Company 3 further serve NYC’s booming post market for feature film and episodic TV. As part of the acquisition, industry veterans and Sixteen19 co-founders Jonathan Hoffman and Pete Conlin, along with their longtime collaborator, EVP of business development and strategy Alastair Binks, will join Company 3’s leadership team.

“With Sixteen19 under the Company 3 umbrella, we significantly expand what we bring to the production community, addressing a real unmet need in the industry,” says Company 3 president Stefan Sonnenfeld. “This infusion of talent and infrastructure will allow us to provide a complete suite of services for clients, from the start of production through the creative editing process to visual effects, final color, finishing and mastering. We’ve worked in tandem with Sixteen19 many times over the years, so we know that they have always provided strong client relationships, a best-in-class team and a deeply creative environment. We’re excited to bring that company’s vision into the fold at Company 3.”

Sonnenfeld will continue to serve as president of Company 3, and oversee operations of Sixteen19. As a subsidiary of Deluxe, Company 3 is part of a broad portfolio of post services. Bringing together the complementary services and geographic reach of Company3, Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX, will expand Company 3’s overall portfolio of post offerings and reach new markets in the US and internationally.

Sixteen19’s New York location includes 60 large editorial suites; two 4K digital cinema grading theaters; and a number of comfortable spaces, open environments and many common areas. Sixteen19’s mobile dailies services will add a perfect companion to Company 3’s existing offerings in that arena. PowerHouse VFX includes dedicated teams of experienced supervisors, producers and artists in 2D and 3D visual effects and compositing.

“The New York film community initially recognized the potential for a Company 3 and Sixteen19 partnership,” says Sixteen19’s Hoffman. “It’s not just the fact that a significant majority of the projects we work on are finished at Company 3, it’s more that our fundamental vision about post has always been aligned with Stefan’s. We value innovation; we’ve built terrific creative teams; and above all else, we both put clients first, always.”

Sixteen19 and Powerhouse VFX will retain their company names.

Behind the Title: Mission’s head of digital imaging, Pablo Garcia Soriano

NAME: Pablo Garcia Soriano (@pablo.garcia.soriano)

COMPANY: UK-based Mission (@missiondigital)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Mission is a provider of DIT and digital lab services based in London, with additional offices in Cardiff, Rome, Prague and Madrid. We process and manage media and metadata, producing rich deliverables with as much captured metadata as possible — delivering consistency and creating efficiencies in VFX and post production.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Head of Digital Imaging

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with cinematographers to preserve their vision from the point of capture until the final deliverable. This means supporting productions through camera tests, pre-production and look design. I also work with manufacturers, which often means I get an early look at new products.

Mission

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It sounds like a very technical job, but it’s so much more than engineering — it’s creative engineering. It’s problem solving and making technical complexities seem easy to a creative person.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with cinematographers to help them achieve their vision and make sure it is preserved through post. I also enjoy being able to experiment with the latest technology and have an influence on products. Recently, I’ve been involved with growing Mission’s international presence with our Madrid office, which is particularly close to my heart.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sometimes I get to spend hours in a dark room with a probe calibrating monitors. It’s dull but necessary!

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
In the early to mid-morning after two coffees. Also at the end of the day when the office is quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Gardening… or motor racing.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I feel like it chose me. I’m an architect by training, but was a working musician until around the age of 28 when I stepped down from the stage and started as a freelancer doing music promos. I was doing a bit of everything on those, director, editor, finishing, etc. Then I was asked to be the assistant editor on two films by a colleague whom I was sharing and office with.

After this experience (and due to the changes the music industry was going through), I decided to focus fully on editing several documentaries, short films. I then ended up on a weekly TV show where I was in charge of the final assembly. This is where I started paying attention to continuity and the overall look. I was using Apple Final Cut and Apple Color, which I loved. All of this happened in a very organic way and I was always self-taught.

I didn’t take studying seriously until I met the DP Rafa Roche, AEC, on our first film together around the age of 31. Rafa mentored me, teaching me all about cameras, lenses, filters and filled my brain with curiosity about all the technical stuff (signal, codecs, workflows). From there to now it all has been a bit of a rollercoaster with some moments of real vertigo caused by how fast it all has developed.

Downton Abby

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We work on a lot of features and television in the UK and Europe — recent projects include Cats, Downton Abbey, Cursed and Criminal.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
In 2018, I was the HDR image supervisor for the World Cup in Moscow. Knowing the popularity of football and working on a project that would be seen by so many people around the world was truly an honor, despite the pressure!

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A good reference monitor, a good set of speakers and Spotify.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, music is a huge part of my life. I have very varied taste. For example, I enjoy Wilco, REM and Black Sabbath.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to walk by the River Thames in Hammersmith, London, near where I live.

FilmLight sets speakers for free Color On Stage seminar at IBC

At this year’s IBC, FilmLight will host a free two-day seminar series, Color On Stage, on September 14 and 15. The event features live presentations and discussions with colorists and other creative professionals. The event will cover topics ranging from the colorist today to understanding color management and next-generation grading tools.

“Color on Stage offers a good platform to hear about real-world interaction between colorists, directors and cinematographers,” explains Alex Gascoigne, colorist at Technicolor and one of this year’s presenters. “Particularly when it comes to large studio productions, a project can take place over several months and involve a large creative team and complex collaborative workflows. This is a chance to find out about the challenges involved with big shows and demystify some of the more mysterious areas in the post process.”

This year’s IBC program includes colorists from broadcast, film and commercials, as well as DITs, editors, VFX artists and post supervisors.

Program highlights include:
•    Creating the unique look for Mindhunter Season 2
Colorist Eric Weidt will talk about his collaboration with director David Fincher — from defining the workflow to creating the look and feel of Mindhunter. He will break down scenes and run through color grading details of the masterful crime thriller.

•    Realtime collaboration on the world’s longest running continuing drama, ITV Studios’ Coronation Street
The session will address improving production processes and enhancing pictures with efficient renderless workflows, with colorist Stephen Edwards, finishing editor Tom Chittenden and head of post David Williams.

•    Looking to the future: Creating color for the TV series Black Mirror
Colorist Alex Gascoigne of Technicolor will explain the process behind grading Black Mirror, including the interactive episode Bandersnatch and the latest Season 5.

•    Bollywood: A World of Color
This session will delve into the Indian film industry with CV Rao, technical general manager at Annapurna Studios in Hyderabad. In this talk, CV will discuss grading and color as exemplified by the hit film Baahubali 2: The Conclusion.

•    Joining forces: Strengthening VFX and finishing with the BLG workflow
Mathieu Leclercq, head of post at Mikros Image in Paris, will be joined by colorist Sebastian Mingam and VFX supervisor Franck Lambertz to showcase their collaboration on recent projects.

•    Maintaining the DP’s creative looks from set to post
Meet with French DIT Karine Feuillard, ADIT — who worked on the latest Luc Besson film Anna as well as the TV series The Marvelous Mrs Maisel — and FilmLight workflow specialist Matthieu Straub.

•    New color management and creative tools to make multi-delivery easier
The latest and upcoming Baselight developments, including a host of features aimed to simplify delivery for emerging technologies such as HDR. With FilmLight’s Martin Tlaskal, Daniele Siragusano and Andy Minuth.

Color On Stage will take place in Room D201 on the second floor of the Elicium Centre (Entrance D), close to Hall 13. The event is free to attend but spaces are limited. Registion is available here.

Harbor expands to LA and London, grows in NY

New York-based Harbor has expanded into Los Angeles and London and has added staff and locations in New York. Industry veteran Russ Robertson joins Harbor’s new Los Angeles operation as EVP of sales, features and episodic after a 20-year career with Deluxe and Panavision. Commercial director James Corless and operations director Thom Berryman will spearhead Harbor’s new UK presence following careers with Pinewood Studios, where they supported clients such as Disney, Netflix, Paramount, Sony, Marvel and Lucasfilm.

Harbor’s LA-based talent pool includes color grading from Yvan Lucas, Elodie Ichter, Katie Jordan and Billy Hobson. Some of the team’s projects include Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood, The Irishman, The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner, Maleficent, The Wolf of Wall Street, Snow White and the Huntsman and Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Paul O’Shea, formerly of MPC Los Angeles, heads the visual effects teams, tapping lead CG artist Yuichiro Yamashita for 3D out of Harbor’s Santa Monica facility and 2D creative director Q Choi out of Harbor’s New York office. The VFX artists have worked with brands such as Nike, McDonald’s, Coke, Adidas and Samsung.

Harbor’s Los Angeles studio supports five grading theaters for feature film, episodic and commercial productions, offering private connectivity to Harbor NY and Harbor UK, with realtime color-grading sessions, VFX reviews and options to conform and final-deliver in any location.

The new UK operation, based out of London and Windsor, will offer in-lab and near-set dailies services along with automated VFX pulls and delivery through Harbor’s Anchor system. The UK locations will draw from Harbor’s US talent pool.

Meanwhile, the New York operation has grown its talent roster and Soho footprint to six locations, with a recently expanded offering for creative advertising. Veteran artists on the commercial team include editors Bruce Ashley and Paul Kelly, VFX supervisor Andrew Granelli, colorist Adrian Seery, and sound mixers Mark Turrigiano and Steve Perski.

Harbor’s feature and episodic offering continues to expand, with NYC-based artists available in Los Angeles and London.

GLOW’s DP and colorist adapt look of new season for Vegas setting

By Adrian Pennington

Netflix’s Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (GLOW) are back in the ring for a third round of the dramatic comedy, but this time the girls are in Las Vegas. The glitz and glamour of Sin City seems tailor-made for the 1980s-set GLOW and provided the main creative challenge for Season 3 cinematographer Chris Teague (Russian Doll, Broad City).

DP Chris Teague

“Early on, I met with Christian Sprenger, who shot the first season and designed the initial look,” says Teague, who was recently nominated for an Emmy for his work on Russian Doll. “We still want GLOW to feel like GLOW, but the story and character arc of Season 3 and the new setting led us to build on the look and evolve elements like lighting and dynamic range.”

The GLOW team is headlining the Fan-Tan Hotel & Casino, one of two main sets along with a hotel built for the series and featuring the distinctive Vegas skyline as a backdrop.

“We discussed compositing actors against greenscreen, but that would have turned every shot into a VFX shot and would have been too costly, not to mention time-intensive on a TV schedule like ours,” he says. “Plus, working with a backdrop just felt aesthetically right.”

In that vein, production designer Todd Fjelsted built a skyline using miniatures, a creative decision in keeping with the handcrafted look of the show. That decision, though, required extensive testing of lenses, lighting and look prior to shooting. This testing was done in partnership with post house Light Iron.

“There was no overall shift in the look of the show, but together with Light Iron, we felt the baseline LUT needed to be built on, particularly in terms of how we lit the sets,” explains Teague.

“Chris was clear early on that he wanted to build upon the look of the first two seasons,” says Light Iron colorist Ian Vertovec. “We adjusted the LUT to hold a little more color in the highlights than in past seasons. Originally, the LUT was based on a film emulation and adjusted for HDR. In Season 1, we created a period film look and transformed it for HDR to get a hybrid film emulation LUT. For Season 3, for HDR and standard viewing, we made tweaks to the LUT so that some of the colors would pop more.”

The show was also finished in Dolby Vision HDR. “There was some initial concern about working with backdrops and stages in HDR,” Teague says. “We are used to the way film treats color over its exposure range — it tends to desaturate as it gets more overexposed — whereas HDR holds a lot more color information in overexposure. However, Ian showed how it can be a creative tool.”

Colorist Ian Vertovec

“The goal was to get the 1980s buildings in the background and out the hotel windows to look real — emulating marquees with flashing lights,” adds Vertovec. “We also needed it to be a believable Nevada sky and skyline. Skies and clouds look different in HDR. So, when dialing this in, we discussed how they wanted it to look. Did it feel real? Is the sky in this scene too blue? Information from testing informed production, so everything was geared toward these looks.”

“Ian has been on the first two seasons, so he knows the look inside and out and has a great eye,” Teague continues. “It’s nice to come into a room and have his point of view. Sometimes when you are staring at images all day, it’s easy to lose your objectivity, so I relied on Ian’s insight.” Vertovec grades the show on FilmLight’s Baselight.

As with Season 2, GLOW Season 3 was a Red Helium shoot using Red’s IPP2 color pipeline in conjunction with Vertovec’s custom LUTs all the way to post. Teague shot full 8K resolution to accommodate his choice of Cooke anamorphic lenses, desqueezed and finished in a 2:1 ratio.

“For dailies I used an iPad with Moxion, which is perhaps the best dailies viewing platform I’ve ever worked with. I feel like the color is more accurate than other platforms, which is extremely useful for checking out contrast and shadow level. Too many times with dailies you get blacks washed out and highlights blown and you can’t judge anything critical.”

Teague sat in on the grade of the first three of the 10 episodes and then used the app to pull stills and make notes remotely. “With Ian I felt like we were both on the same page. We also had a great DIT [Peter Brunet] who was doing on-set grading for reference and was able to dial in things at a much higher level than I’ve been able to do in the past.”

The most challenging but also rewarding work was shooting the wrestling performances. “We wanted to do something that felt a little bigger, more polished, more theatrical,” Teague says. “The performance space had tiered seating, which gave us challenges and options in terms of moving the cameras. For example, we could use telescoping crane work to reach across the room and draw characters in as they enter the wrestling ring.”

He commends gaffer Eric Sagot for inspiring lighting cues and building them into the performance. “The wrestling scenes were the hardest to shoot but they’re exciting to watch — dynamic, cinematic and deliberately a little hokey in true ‘80s Vegas style.”


Adrian Pennington is a UK-based journalist, editor and commentator in the film and TV production space. He has co-written a book on stereoscopic 3D and edited several publications.

Digital Arts expands team, adds Nutmeg Creative talent

Digital Arts, an independently owned New York-based post house, has added several former Nutmeg Creative talent and production staff members to its roster — senior producer Lauren Boyle, sound designer/mixers Brian Beatrice and Frank Verderosa, colorist Gary Scarpulla, finishing editor/technical engineer Mark Spano and director of production Brian Donnelly.

“Growth of talent, technology, and services has always been part of the long-term strategy for Digital Arts, and we’re fortunate to welcome some extraordinary new talent to our staff,” says Digital Arts owner Axel Ericson. “Whether it’s long-form content for film and television, or working with today’s leading agencies and brands creating dynamic content, we have the talent and technology to make all of our clients’ work engaging, and our enhanced services bring their creative vision to fruition.”

Brian Donnelly, Lauren Boyle and Mark Spano.

As part of this expansion, Digital Arts will unveil additional infrastructure featuring an ADR stage/mix room. The current facility boasts several state-of-the-art audio suites, a 4K finishing theater/mixing dubstage, four color/finishing suites and expansive editorial and production space, which is spread over four floors.

The former Nutmeg team has hit the ground running working their long-time ad agency, network, animation and film studio clients. Gary Scarpulla worked on color for HBO’s Veep and Los Espookys, while Frank Verderosa has been working with agency Ogilvy on several Ikea campaigns. Beatrice mixed spots for Tom Ford’s cosmetics line.

In addition, Digital Arts’ in-house theater/mixing stage has proven to be a valuable resource for some of the most popular TV productions, including recording recent commentary sessions for the legendary HBO series, Game of Thrones and the final season of Veep.

Especially noteworthy is colorist Ericson’s and finishing editor Mark Spano’s collaboration with Oscar-winning directors Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim to bring to fruition the Netflix documentary The Great Hack.

Digital Arts also recently expanded its offerings to include production services. The company has already delivered projects for agencies Area 23, FCB Health and TCA.

“Digital Arts’ existing infrastructure was ideally suited to leverage itself into end-to-end production,” Donnelly says. “Now we can deliver from shoot to post.”

Tools employed across post are Avid Pro Tools, D Control ES, S3 for audio post and Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere and Blackmagic Resolve for editing. Color grading is via Resolve.

Main Image: (L-R) Frank Verderosa, Brian Beatrice and Gary Scarpulla

 

Blackmagic: Resolve 16.1 in public beta, updates Pocket Cinema Camera

Blackmagic Design has announced DaVinci Resolve 16.1, an updated version of its edit, color, visual effects and audio post software that features updates to the new cut page, further speeding up the editing process.

With Resolve 16, introduced at NAB 2019, now in final release, the Resolve 16.1 public beta is now available for download from the Blackmagic Design website. This new public beta will help Blackmagic continue to develop new ideas while collaborating with users to ensure those ideas are refined for real-world workflows.

The Resolve 16.1 public beta features changes to the bin that now make it possible to place media in various folders and isolate clips from being used when viewing them in the source tape, sync bin or sync window. Clips will appear in all folders below the current level, and as users navigate around the levels in the bin, the source tape will reconfigure in real time. There’s even a menu for directly selecting folders in a user’s project.

Also new in this public beta is the smart indicator. The new cut page in DaVinci Resolve 16 introduced multiple new smart features, which work by estimating where the editor wants to add an edit or transition and then applying it without the editor having to waste time placing exact in and out points. The software guesses what the editor wants to do and just does it — it adds the inset edit or transition to the edit closest to where the editor has placed the CTI.

But a problem can arise in complex edits, where it is hard to know what the software would do and which edit it would place the effect or clip into. That’s the reason for the beta version’s new smart indicator. The smart indicator provides a small marker in the timeline so users get constant feedback and always know where DaVinci Resolve 16.1 will place edits and transitions. The new smart indicator constantly live-updates as the editor moves around the timeline.

One of the most common items requested by users was a faster way to cut clips in the timeline, so now DaVinci Resolve 16.1 includes a “cut clip” icon in the user interface. Clicking on it will slice the clips in the timeline at the CTI point.

Multiple changes have also been made to the new DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, including a new adaptive scroll feature on the search dial, which will automatically slow down a job when editors are hunting for an in point. The live trimming buttons have been renamed to the same labels as the functions in the edit page, and they have been changed to trim in, trim out, transition duration, slip in and slip out. The function keys along the top of the keyboard are now being used for various editing functions.

There are additional edit models on the function keys, allowing users to access more types of editing directly from dedicated keys on the keyboard. There’s also a new transition window that uses the F4 key, and pressing and rotating the search dial allows instant selection from all the transition types in DaVinci Resolve. Users who need quick picture picture-in in-picture effects can use F5 and apply them instantly.

Sometimes when editing projects with tight deadlines, there is little time to keep replaying the edit to see where it drags. DaVinci Resolve 16.1 features something called a Boring Detector that highlights the timeline where any shot is too long and might be boring for viewers. The Boring Detector can also show jump cuts, where shots are too short. This tool allows editors to reconsider their edits and make changes. The Boring Detector is helpful when using the source tape. In that case, editors can perform many edits without playing the timeline, so the Boring Detector serves as an alternative live source of feedback.

Another one of the most requested features of DaVinci Resolve 16.1 is the new sync bin. The sync bin is a digital assistant editor that constantly sorts through thousands of clips to find only what the editor needs and then displays them synced to the point in the timeline the editor is on. The sync bin will show the clips from all cameras on a shoot stacked by camera number. Also, the viewer transforms into a multi-viewer so users can see their options for clips that sync to the shot in the timeline. The sync bin uses date and timecode to find and sync clips, and by using metadata and locking cameras to time of day, users can save time in the edit.

According to Blackmagic, the sync bin changes how multi-camera editing can be completed. Editors can scroll off the end of the timeline and keep adding shots. When using the DaVinci Resolve Editor Keyboard, editors can hold the camera number and rotate the search dial to “live overwrite” the clip into the timeline, making editing faster.

The closeup edit feature has been enhanced in DaVinci Resolve 16.1. It now does face detection and analysis and will zoom the shot based on face positioning to ensure the person is nicely framed.

If pros are using shots from cameras without timecode, the new sync window lets them sort and sync clips from multiple cameras. The sync window supports sync by timecode and can also detect audio and sync clips by sound. These clips will display a sync icon in the media pool so editors can tell which clips are synced and ready for use. Manually syncing clips using the new sync window allows workflows such as multiple action cameras to use new features such as source overwrite editing and the new sync bin.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera
Besides releasing the DaVinci Resolve 16.1 public beta, Blackmagic also updated the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera. Blackmagic not only upgraded the camera from 4K to 6K resolution, but it changed the mount to the much used Canon EF style. Previous iterations of the Pocket Cinema Camera used a Micro 4/3s mount, but many users chose to purchase a Micro 4/3s-to-Canon EF adapter, which easily runs over $500 new. Because of the mount change in the Pocket Cinema Camera 6K, users can avoid buying the adapter and — if they shoot with Canon EF — can use the same lenses.

London’s Cheat expands with color and finishing suites

London-based color and finishing house Cheat has expanded, adding three new grading and finishing suites, a production studio and a client lounge/bar space. Cheat now has four large broadcast color suites and services two other color suites at Jam VFX and No.8 in Fitzrovia and Soho, respectively. Cheat has a creative partnership with these studios.

Located in the Arthaus building in Hackney, all four of Cheat’s color suites have calibrated projection or broadcast monitoring and are equipped with cutting-edge hardware for HDR and working with 8K. Cheat was the first color company to complete a TV series in 8K on Netflix’s The End of The F***ing World in 2017. Having invested in improved storage and network infrastructure during this period, the facility is well-equipped to take on 8K and HDR projects.

Cheat uses Autodesk Flame for finishing and Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve for color grading.

The new HDR grading suite offers HDR mastering above 2,000 nits with a Flanders Scientific XM310K reference monitor that can master up to 3,000 nits. Cheat is also now a full-fledged Dolby Vision-certified mastering facility.

“Improving client experience was, of course, a key consideration in shaping the design of the renovation,” says Toby Tomkins, founder of Cheat. “The new color suite is our largest yet and comfortably seats up to 10 people. We designed it from the ground up with a raised client platform and a custom-built bias wall. This allows everyone to look at the same single monitor while grading and maintaining the spacious and relaxed feel of our other suites. The new lounge and bar area also offer a relaxing area for clients to feel at home.”

Point.360 adds senior colorist Patrick Woodard

Senior colorist Patrick Woodard has joined the creative team at Point.360 in Burbank. He was most recently at Hollywood’s DigitalFilm Tree, where he colored dozens of television shows, including ABC’s American Housewife, CBS’ NCIS: Los Angeles, NBC’s Great News and TBS’ Angie Tribeca. Over the years, he also worked on Weeds, Everybody Hates Chris, Cougar Town and Sarah Silverman: We Are Miracles.

Woodard joins Point.360 senior colorist Charlie Tucker, whose recent credits include the final season of the Netflix’s Orange Is the New Black, CW’s Legacies and Roswell, New Mexico, YouTube’s Cobra Kai, as well as the Netflix comedy Medical Police.

“Patrick is an exceptional artist with an extensive background in photography,” says Point.360’s SVP of episodic Jason Kavner. “His ability to combine his vast depth of technical expertise and his creative vision to quickly create a highly-developed aesthetic has the won the loyalty of many DPs and creatives alike.”

Point360 has four color suites at its Burbank facility. “Although we have the feel of a boutique episodic facility, we are able to offer a robust end to end pipeline thanks to our long history as a premier mastering company,” reports Kavner. “We are currently servicing 4K Dolby Vision projects for Netflix such as the upcoming Jenji Kohan series currently being called Untitled Vigilante Project, as well as the UHD SDR Sony produced YouTube series Cobra Kai. We also continue to offer the same end-to-end service to our traditional studio and network clients on series such as Legacies for the CW, Fresh Off The Boat, Family Guy and American Dad for 20th Century Fox, and Drunk History and Robbie for Comedy Central.

Woodard, who will be working on Resolve at Point360, was also a recent subject of our Behind the Title series. You can read that here.

Brittany Howard music video sets mood with color and VFX

The latest collaboration between Framestore and director Kim Gehrig is for Brittany Howard’s debut solo music video for Stay High, which features a color grade and subtle VFX by the studio. A tribute to the Alabama Shakes’ lead singer’s late father, the stylized music video stars actor Terry Crews (Brooklyn Nine-Nine, The Expendables) as a man finishing a day’s work and returning home to his family.

Produced by production company Somesuch, the aim of Stay High is to present a natural and emotionally driven story that honors the singer’s father, K.J. Howard. Shot in her hometown of Nashville, the music video features Howard’s family and friends while the singer pops up in several scenes throughout the video as different characters.

The video begins with Howard’s father getting off of work at his factory job. The camera follows him on his drive home, all the while he’s singing “Stay High.” As he drives home, we see images people and locations where Howard grew up. The video ends when her dad pulls into his driveway and is met by his daughters and wife.

“Kim wanted to really highlight the innocence of the video’s story, something I kept in mind while grading the film,” says Simon Bourne, Framestore’s head of creative color, who’s graded several films for the director. “The focus needed to always be on Terry with nothing in his surroundings distracting from that and the grade needed to reflect that idea.”

Framestore’s creative director Ben Cronin, who was also a compositor on the project along with Nuke compositor Christian Baker, adds, “From a VFX point of view, our job was all about invisible effects that highlighted the beautiful job that Ryley Brown, the film’s DP, did and to complement Kim’s unique vision.”

“We’ve worked with Kim on several commercials and music video projects, and we love collaborating because her films are always visually-interesting and she knows we’ll always help achieve the ground-breaking and effortlessly cool work that she does.”

a52 Color adds colorist Gregory Reese

Colorist Gregory Reese has joined LA-based grading and finishing studio a52 Color, which is led by executive producer Thatcher Peterson and includes colorists Paul Yacono and Daniel de Vue.

Reese comes to a52 Color after eight years at The Mill. While there he colored a spectrum of commercials for athletic brands, including Nike and Reebok, as well as campaigns for Audi, Apple, Covergirl, GMC, Progressive and Samsung. He worked with such directors as AG Rojas, Matt Lambert and Harold Einstein while developing the ability to grade for any style.

Reese contributed to several projects for Apple, including the History of Sound spot, which sonically chronicles the decades from the late 1800s to 2015. The spot earned Reese an HPA Award nomination for Outstanding Color Grading in a Commercial.

“Color is at the center of how audiences engage with a picture in motion,” explains Reese. “Some of its technical components may not always be instantly recognized by the audience, but when it’s done right, it can make for an emotional experience.”

Merging his love for music with the passion for his craft, Reese has collaborated with artists like Jack Ü, Major Lazer, Arctic Monkeys, Run The Jewels, Jack White, Pharrell Williams and many more. Peterson and Reese previously worked together at The Mill in LA. “Having had the fortunate experience of working with Gregory at The Mill, I knew he was the real deal when it came to a seasoned colorist,” says Peterson.

The all-new facility was yet another perk that sealed the deal for Reese, as he explains: “One of the biggest barriers for entry to color is not having access to theaters. a52 Color solves that problem with having the ability to grade both broadcast and theatrical formats as well as giving us a high level of creative freedom. It left me immediately impressed by how invested they are in making it the absolute best place to go for color grading.”

He will be working on FilmLight Baselight.

Colorist Chat: Refinery’s Kyle Stroebel

This Cape Town, South Africa-based artist says that “working creatively with a director and DP to create art is a privilege.”

NAME: Colorist Kyle Stroebel

COMPANY: Refinery in Cape Town, South Africa

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service post company in the heart of Cape Town. We specialize in front-end dailies and data solutions, and have a full finishing department with a VFX arm and audio division.

Our work varies from long-form feature and television programming to commercials and music video content. We are a relatively young team that loves what we do.

AS A COLORIST, WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We are by far the most important members of the team and the creative success of a movie is largely based around our skills! Okay, honestly? I have a shot on my timeline that is currently on version 54, and my client still needs an additional eyelash painted out.

I think the surprising thing to the uninformed is the minute elements that we focus on in detail. It’s not all large brush strokes and emotional gesturing; the images you see have more often than not gone through painstaking hours of crafting and creative processing. For us the beauty is in the detail.

Flatland

WHAT SYSTEM DO YOU WORK ON?
FilmLight’s Baselight

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST COLOR ON PROJECTS?
We are a small team handling multiple projects simultaneously, and our Baselight suites perform multiple functions as a result. My fellow colorist David Grant and I will get involved in our respective projects early on. We handle conform, VFX pulls and versioning and follow the pipe through until the film or project has cleared QC.

With Baselight’s enhanced toolset and paint functionality, we are now saving our clients both time and money by handling a variety of cleanups and corrections without farming the shots out to VFX or Flame.

Plus, the DI is pretty much the last element in the production process. We’re counselors, confidants and financial advisors. People skills come in really handy. (And a Spotify playlist for most tastes and moods is a prerequisite.)

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Making something amazing happen with a client’s footage. When they didn’t realize that their own footage could look like what the final product looks like… and sharing in that excitement when it happens.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Insane deadlines. As our tools have improved, the expectation for lightning-fast turnarounds has increased. I’m a perfectionist with my work and would love to spend days molding certain shots and trying new things. Walking away from a grade and coming back to it is often very fruitful because looking at a complex shot with fresh eyes frequently produces new outlooks and better results. But with hard delivery dates this is becoming seldom-afforded.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Scuba diving with manta rays in Bali; it’s a testament to how much I love what I do that I’m not doing that every day of my life.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I sometimes wonder that myself when it’s 3am and I’m in a room with no windows for the 17th consecutive hour. Truthfully, I chose it because changing something from the banal to the magnificent gives me joy. Working creatively with a director and DP to create art is a privilege, and the fact that they must sweat and literally bleed to capture the images while I fiddle with the aircon in my catered suite doesn’t hurt.

I was in my third year of film school and brought one of my 16mm projects in to grade with a colorist in telecine. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. I knew I wanted to do that.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
There have been a load of amazing projects recently. Our local industry has been very busy, and we have benefited greatly from that. I recently finished a remake of the cult classic Critters for Warner Bros.

Flatland

Before that I completed a movie called Flatland that premiered at Berlinale and then went to Cannes. There are a few other movies that I can’t chat too much about right now. I also did a short piece by one of South Africa’s biggest directors, Kim Geldenhuys, for the largest blue diamond found in recent history.

Changing of the seasons has also meant a couple of amazing fashion pieces for different fashion houses’ new collections.

HOW DO YOU PREFER TO WORK WITH THE DP/DIRECTOR?
Depends on the project. Depends on the director and DP too, actually. With long-form work,  I love to spend a day or two together with them in the beginning, and then I take a day or two to go over and play with a couple of scenes on my own. From there we should have reached a pretty cohesive vision as to what the directors wants and how I see the footage. Once that vision is aligned, I like to work on my own while listening to loud music and giving everything a more concrete look. Then, ideally, the director returns for a few days at the end, and we get stuck into the minutia.

With commercials, I like working with the director from early in the morning so that we know where we want to go before the agency has input and makes alterations! It’s a fine balancing act.

ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF A PROJECT FROM A COLOR PERSPECTIVE?
Have the colorist involved early on. When you begin shooting, have the colorist and DP develop a relationship so that the common vision develops during principal photography. That way, when the edit is locked, you have already experimented with ideas and the DP is shooting for a more precise look.

CAN YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR WORK ON THE WARNER BROS. FILM? EXPLAIN YOUR PROCESS ON THAT? ANY PARTICULARLY CHALLENGING SCENES?
Critters is a cult horror franchise from the late ’80 and early ‘90s. The challenge was to be really dark and moody but still stay true to the original and fit in with modern viewing devices without losing drastic detail. It centers on a lot of practical on-set special effects, something in increasing decline with advancements in CGI. Giving the puppets a lifelike appearance while still making them believable came with quite a few challenges.

HOW DO YOU PREFER THE DP OR DIRECTOR TO DESCRIBE THE LOOK THEY WANT? PHYSICAL EXAMPLES, FILMS TO EMULATE, ETC.?
Practical examples or references are very helpful. Matching something is easy, developing beyond that to give it a unique quality is what keeps it interesting. Certain directors find it easier to work with non-specifics and let me interpret the vibe and mood from more emotional explanations rather than technical jargon. While sometimes harder to initially interpret, that approach has benefits because it’s a bit more open-ended.

Red Bull

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I love and hate most of the things I work on for a variety of reasons. It’s hard to pick one. Gun to my head? Probably a short film for Red Bull Music by Petite Noir. It was shot by Deon Van Zyl in the Namib desert and had just the most exquisite visuals from the outset. I still watch it when I’m feeling down.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
At the risk of sounding like a typical millennial, I use Instagram a heck of a lot. I get to see what the biggest and best colorists are doing around the world. Before Instagram, you would only see pieces of critical acclaim. Now, through Instagram and Vimeo, I get to see so many passion projects in which people are trying new things and pushing boundaries beyond what clients, brands and studios want. I can spend days in galleries and bask in the glory of Caravaggio and Vermeer, but I can also scroll quickly through very contemporary looks, innovations and trends.

Red Bull

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone. I hate it, but my life happens largely through that porthole. My NutriBullet. My Baselight. I’ve never loved an inanimate object like I love my Baselight.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram as mentioned. I love the work of Joseph Bicknell, Kath Raisch, Sofie Borup, Craig Simonetti, Matt Osborne and then anything that comes from The Mill channel. Also, a wide range of directors and the associated Vimeo links. I can honestly get lost on an obscure Korean channel with magnificent images and languages I don’t understand.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I run. Even If I’m breaking 90-hour weeks, I always make sure I run three or four times a week. And I love cooking. It’s expressive. I get to make meals for my partner Katherine, who tends to be very receptive.

Review: The Loupedeck+ editing console for stills and video

By Brady Betzel

As an online editor I am often tasked with wearing multiple job hats, including VFX artist, compositor, offline editor, audio editor and colorist, which requires me to use special color correction panel hardware. I really love photography and cinematography but have never been able to use the color correction hardware I’m used to in  Adobe’s Photoshop or Lightroom, so for the most part I’ve only done basic photo color correction.

You could call it a hobby, although this knowledge definitely helps many aspects of my job. I’ve known Photoshop for years and use it for things like building clean plates to use in apps like Boris FX Mocha Pro and After Effects, but I had never really mastered Lightroom. However, that changed when I saw the Loupedeck. I was really intrigued with its unique layout but soon dismissed it since it didn’t work on video… until now. I’m happy to say the new Loupedeck+ works with both photo and video apps.

Much like the Tangent Element and Wave or Blackmagic Micro and Mini panels, the Loupedeck+ is made to adjust parameters like contrast, exposure, saturation, highlights, shadows and individual colors. But, unlike Tangent or Blackmagic products, the Loupedeck+ functions not only in Adobe Premiere and Apple Final Cut Pro X but in image editing apps like Lightroom 6, Photoshop CC, and Skylum Aurora HDR; the audio editing app Adobe Audition and the VFX app Adobe After Effects. There’s also beta integration with Capture One.

It works via USB 2.0 connection on Windows 10 and Mac OS 10.12 or later. In order to use the panel and adjust its keys, you must also download the Loupedeck software, which you can find here. The Loupedeck+ costs just $249 dollars, which is significantly less than many of the other color correction panels on the market offering so many functions.

Digging In
In this review, I am going to focus on Loupedeck+’s functionality with Premiere, but keep in mind that half of what makes this panel interesting is that you can jump into Lightroom Classic or Photoshop and have the same, if not more, functionality. Once you install the Loupedeck software, you should restart your system. When I installed the software I had some weird issues until I restarted.

When inside of Premiere, you will need to tell the app that you are using this specific control panel by going to the Edit menu > Preferences > Control Surface > click “Add” and select Loupedeck 2. This is for a PC, but Mac OS works in a similar way. From there you are ready to use the Loupedeck+. If you have any customized keyboard shortcuts (like I do) I would suggest putting your keyboard shortcuts to default for the time being, since they might cause the Loupedeck+ to use different keypresses than you originally intended.

Once I got inside of Premiere, I immediately opened up the Lumetri color panels and began adjusting contrast, exposure and saturation, which are all clearly labeled on the Loupedeck+. Easy enough, but what if you want to use the Loupedeck+ as an editing panel as well as a basic color correction console? That’s when you will want to print out pages six through nine of the Premiere Pro Loupedeck+ manual, which you can find here. (If you like to read on a tablet you could pull that up there, but I like paper for some reason… sorry trees.) In these pages, you will see that there are four layers of controls built into the Loupedeck+.

Shortcuts
Not only can you advance frames using the arrow keypad, jump to different edit points with the jog dial, change LUTs, add keyframes and extend edits, you also have three more layers of shortcuts. To get to the second layer of shortcuts, press the “Fn” button located toward the lower left, and the Fn layer will appear. Here you can do things like adjust the shadows and midtones on the X and Y axes, access the Type Tool or add edits to all tracks. To go even further, you can access the “Custom” mode, which has defaults but can be customized to whichever keypress and functions the Loupedeck+ app allows.

Finally, while in the Custom mode, you can press the Fn button again and enter “Custom Fn” mode — the fourth and final layer of shortcuts. Man, that is a lot of customizable buttons. Do I need all those buttons? Probably not, but still, they are there —and it’s better to have too much than not enough, right?

Beyond the hundreds of shortcuts in the Loupedeck+ console you have eight color-specific scroll wheels for adjusting. In Lightroom Classic, these tools are self-explanatory as they adjust each color’s intensity.

In Premiere they work a little differently. To the left of the color scroll wheels are three buttons: hue, saturation and luminance (Hue, Sat and Lum, respectively). In the standard mode, they each equate to a different color wheel: Hue = highlights, Sat = midtones and Lum = shadows. The scroll wheel above red will adjust the up/down movement in the selected color wheel’s x-axis, orange will adjust the left/right movement in the selected color wheel’s y-axis, and yellow will adjust the intensity (or luminance) of the color wheel.

Controlling the Panel
In traditional color correction panels, color correction is controlled by roller balls surrounded by a literal wheel to control intensity. It’s another way to skin a cat. I personally love the feel of the Tangent Element Tk panel, which simply has three roller balls and rings to adjust the hue, but some people might like the ability to precisely control the color wheels in x- and y-axis.

To solve my issue, I used both. In the preferences, I enabled both Tangent and Loupedeck options. It worked perfectly (once I restarted)! I just couldn’t get past the lack of hue balls and rings in the Loupedeck, but I really love the rest of the knobs and buttons. So in a weird hodge-podge, you can combine a couple of panels to get a more “affordable” set of correction panels. I say affordable in quotes because, as of this review, the Tangent Element Tk panels are over $1,100 for one panel, while the entire set is over $3,000.

So if you already have the Tangent Element Tk panel, but want a more natural button and knob layout, the Loupedeck+ is a phenomenal addition as long as you are staying within the Adobe or FCP X world. And while I clearly like the Tangent Elements panels, I think the overall layout and design of the Loupedeck+ is more efficient and overall more modern.

Summing Up
In the end, I really like the Loupedeck+. I love being able to jump back and forth between photo and video apps seamlessly with one panel. What I think I love the most is the “Export” button in the upper right corner of the Loupedeck+. I wish that button existed on all panels.

When using the Loupedeck+, you can really get your creative juices flowing by hitting the “Full Screen” button and color correcting away, even using multiple adjustments at once to achieve your desired look — similar to how a lot of people use other color correction panels. And at $249, the Loupedeck+ might be the overall best value for the functionality of any editing/color correction panel currently out there.

Can I see using it when editing? I can, but I am such a diehard keyboard and Wacom tablet user that I have a hard time using a panel for editing functions like trimming and three-point edits. I did try the trimming functionality and it was great, not only on a higher-end Intel Xeon-based system but on an even older Windows laptop. The responsiveness was pretty impressive and I am a sucker for adjustments using dials, sliders and roller balls.

If you want to color correct using panels, I think the Loupedeck+ is going to fit the bill for you if you work in Adobe Creative Suite or FCP X. If you are a seasoned colorist, you will probably start to freak out at the lack of rollerballs to adjust hues of shadows, midtones and highlights. But if you are a power user who stays inside the Adobe Creative Cloud ecosystem, there really isn’t a better panel for you. Just print up the shortcut pages of the manual and tape them to the wall by your monitor for constant reference.

As with anything, you will only get faster with repetition. Not only did I test out color correcting footage for this review, I also used the Loupedeck+ in Adobe Lightroom Classic to correct my images!


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Perpetual Grace’s DPs, colorist weigh in on show’s gritty look

You don’t have to get very far into watching the Epix series Perpetual Grace LTD to realize just how ominous this show feels. It begins with the opening shots, and by the time you’ve spent a few minutes with the dark, mysterious characters who populate this world — and gathered hints of the many schemes within schemes that perpetuate the story — the show’s tone is clear. With its black-and-white flashbacks and the occasional, gritty flash-forwards, Perpetual Grace gets pretty dark, and the action goes in directions you won’t see coming.

This bizarre show revolves around James (Westworld’s Jimmi Simpson), who gets caught up in what initially seems like a simple con that quickly gets out of control. Sir Ben Kingsley, Jacki Weaver, Chris Conrad and Luis Guzmán also star as an assortment of strange and volatile characters.

The series comes from the minds of executive producer Steve Conrad, who also served in that role on Amazon’s quirky drama Patriot, and Bruce Terris, who was both a writer and a first AD on that show.

These showrunners developed the look with other Patriot veterans: cinematographers James Whitaker and Nicole Hirsch Whitaker, who incorporated colorist Sean Coleman’s input before commencing principal photography.

Coleman left his grading suite at Company 3 in Santa Monica to spend several days at the series’ New Mexico location. While there he worked with the DPs to build customized LUTs for them to use during production. This meant that everyone on set could get a strong sense of how lighting, costumes, sets and locations would read with the show’s signature looks applied.

The Whitakers on set

“I’ve never been able to work with the final colorist this way,” says Whitaker, who also alternated directing duties with Conrad. “It was great having him there on set where we could talk about the subtleties of color. What should the sky look like? What should blood look like? Faces? Clothes? Using Resolve, he made two LUTs — “the main one for the color portions and a different one specifically for the black-and-white parts.”

The main look of the show is inspired by film noir and western movie tropes, and all with a tip of the hat to Roger Deakins’ outstanding work on The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. “For me,” says Whitaker, “it’s about strong contrast, deep blacks and desert colors … the moodier the better. I don’t love very blue skies, but we wanted to keep some tonality there.”

“It’s real sweaty, gritty, warm, nicotine-stained kind of thing,” Coleman elaborates.

“When we showed up in New Mexico,” Whitaker recalls, “all these colors did exist at various times of the day, and we just leaned into them. When you have landscapes with big, blue skies, strong greens and browns, you can lean in the other way and make it overly saturated. We leaned into it the other way, holding the brown earth tones but pulling out some of the color, which is always better for skin tones.”

The LUTs, Whitaker notes, offer a lot more flexibility than the DPs would have if they used optical filters. Beyond the nondestructive aspect of a LUT, it also allows for a lot more complexity. “If you think about a ‘sepia’ or ‘tobacco’ filter or something like that, you think of an overall wash that goes across the entire frame, and I get immediately bored by that. It’s tricky to do something that feels like it’s from a film a long time ago without dating the project you’re working on now; you want a lot of flexibility to get [the imagery] where you want it to go.”

The series was shot in November through February, often in brutally cold environments. Almost the entire series (the present-day scenes and black-and-white flashbacks) was shot on ARRI Alexa cameras in a 2.0:1 aspect ratio. A frequent Whitaker/Hirsch Whitaker collaborator, DIT Ryan Kunkleman applied and controlled the LUTs so the set monitors reflected their effect on the look.

The flash forwards, which usually occur in very quick spurts, were shot on a 16mm Bolex camera using Kodak’s 7203 (50D) and 7207 (250D) color negative film, which was pushed two stops in processing to enhance grain in post by Coleman.

Final color was done at Company 3’s Santa Monica facility, working primarily alongside the Whitakers. “We enhanced the noir look with the strong, detailed blacks,” says Coleman. Even though a lot of the show exudes the dry desert heat, it was actually shot over a particularly cold winter in New Mexico. “Things were sometimes kind of cold-looking, so sometimes we’d twist things a bit. We also added some digital ‘grain’ to sort of muck it up a little.”

For the black and white, Coleman took the color material in Resolve and isolated just the blue channel in order to manipulate it independent of the red and green, “to make it more inky,” he says. “Normally, you might just drain the color out, but you can really go further than that if you want a strong black-and-white look. When you adjust the individual channel, you affect the image in a way that’s similar to the effect of shooting black-and-white film through a yellow filter. It helps us make darker skies and richer blacks.”

Sean Coleman

“We’ve booked a whole lot of hours together, and that provides a level of comfort,” says Hirsch Whitaker about her and Whitaker’s work with Coleman. “He does some wonderful painting [in Resolve] that helps make a character pop in the frame or direct the viewer’s eye to a specific part of the frame. He really enjoys the collaborative element of color grading.”

Whitaker seconds that emotion: “As a cinematographer, I look at color grading a bit like working on set. It’s not a one-person job. It takes a lot of people to make these images.”

Assimilate Scratch 9.1: productivity updates, updated VFX workflow

Assimilate’s Scratch 9.1, a dailies and finishing software, now includes new and extensive performance and productivity features, including integration with Foundry Nuke and Adobe After Effects. It’s available now.

“A primary goal for us is to quickly respond to the needs of DITs and post artists, whether it’s for more advanced features, new format support, or realtime bug-fixes,” said Mazze Aderhold, Scratch product manager at Assimilate. “Every feature introduced in Scratch 9.1 is based on feedback we received from our users before and during the beta cycle.”

The software now features native touch controls for grading by clicking and dragging directly on the image. Thanks to this intuitive way to color and manipulate images, an artist can grade the overall image or even control curves and secondaries — all without a panel and directly where the cursor is dragging.

There is also a redesigned color management system, enabling deep control over how camera-specific gamut and gamma spaces are handled and converted. Additionally, there is a new color-space conversion plugin (any color space to any other) that can be applied at any stage of the color/mastering process.

Also new is integration with After Effects and Nuke. Within Scratch, users can now seamlessly send shots to and from Nuke and After Effects, including transparencies and alphas. This opens up Scratch to high-end tracking, compositing, 3D models, advanced stabilization, motion graphics and more.

Within the VFX pipeline, Scratch can act as a central hub for all finishing needs. It provides realtime tools for any format, data management, playback and all color management in a timeline with audio, including to and from After Effects and Nuke.

Other new features include:

• Integration with Avid, including all metadata in the Avid MXF. Additionally, Scratch includes all the source-shot metadata, such as the genuine Sound TC in Avid MXF, which is important later on in post for something like a Pro Tools roundtrip
• Per-frame metadata on ARRIRAW files, allowing camera departments to pass through camera roll and tilt, lens focus distance metadata items, and more. Editorial and VFX teams can benefit from per-frame info later in the post process.
• Faster playback and rendering
• Realtime, full-res Red 8K DeBayer on GPU
• A deep set of options to load media, including sizing options, LUTs and automatic audio-sync, speeding up the organizational process when dealing with large amounts of disparate media
• A LUT cycler that allows for quick preview and testing of large numbers of looks on footage
• Preset outputs for Pix, Dax, MediaSilo and Copra, simplifying the delivery of industry-standard web dailies


• Vector tool for advanced color remapping using a color grid
• Automatic installation of free Matchbox Shaders, opening Scratch up to a wealth of realtime VFX effects, including glows, lens effects, grain add/remove, as well as more advanced creative FX
• Built-in highlight glow, diffusion, de-noise and time-warp FX
• Added support for AJA’s Io 4K Plus and Kona 5 SDI output devices using the latest SDKs.
• Support for Apple’s new ProRes RAW compressed-acquisition format and Blackmagic RAW support on both OS X and Windows

Scratch 9.1 starts at $89 monthly and $695 annually.

Yoomin Lee joins MPC London as senior colorist

Yoomin Lee has joined Moving Picture Company’s color team in London. Lee got her start working for some of Australia’s top post houses including Frame Set & Match, The Lab and Cutting Edge, before joining Jogger Studios London in 2016.

While at Jogger, she worked on many campaigns, including those for Google, Valentino, FIFA and Samsung. A collaboration with director Anton Corbijn has seen her grade projects for Depeche Mode and U2, including the visuals for the latter’s The Joshua Tree Tour in 2017, which played across the world’s largest concert screen.

When asked what brings her inspiration, Lee says, “I get inspired by any visual art form, and often from nature, especially for light. I become more observant of how things are lit. Color grading is such a unique art form and technology, and it’s all about details and finesse. I find it very inspiring when I collaborate with creative people who are always eager to push the boundaries to achieve their craft.”

Lee will be working on FilmLight’s Baselight.

You can check out her work here.

Behind the Title: Editor and colorist Grace Novak

One of her favorite parts of the job is when she encounters a hard edit and it finally clicks and falls into place.

NAME: New York-based Grace Novak

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor and Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with directors/clients to make their project come to life using an editing program. Then during the color process, I bring it even closer to their aesthetic vision.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It can include a lot of not-so-creative work like troubleshooting and solving technical problems, especially when doing assistant color/edit work either for myself or for someone else.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love the great moment when you push through a hard edit and it finally clicks. I also love getting to collaborate with other great creators and filmmakers and working one-on-one in the editing room. I find it to be a great learning experience.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When nothing works and I don’t know why. But, luckily, once I figure it out (eventually, hours later sometimes) I’ve learned to solve a new issue.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Definitely the mornings once I’ve had some coffee. I’m a morning person who is most active around the hours of 8-11. Once lunch hits, it can be hard not to want to take a good midday nap.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
When I was younger, for some reason, I told everyone I wanted to be a barber. I think that’s because I liked using scissors. Seriously, though, I’d probably be working with kids in some way or as an educator. I still hope to teach down the road.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I knew I wanted a job where I could be creative, and with editing I can also be technically proficient. I love the combination of the two.

Dissonance

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always knew I wanted to be involved with film, probably since I was 12. I remember starting to edit on Windows Movie Maker and being enamored with the effects. I especially liked the really awful and gaudy one that went through a gradient of colors. Don’t worry, I would never use something like that now.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m working on a lot of short indie films right now including Dissonance, Bogalusa and Siren. I’m also an assistant editor on the feature film The Outside Story.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Dissonance, a short experimental film that is currently in color right now (with me), is probably the most proud I am of a project purely because of how far it pushed me as an artist, editor and collaborator.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I follow a lot, but in the post world that includes postPerspective, BCPC and Jonny Elwyn.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
If I can, I like to listen to podcasts. That’s probably my primary podcast listening time besides at the gym. Obviously, I can only do this during my color work. For music, I like tunes that aren’t too upbeat and more relaxing. For podcasts I like to listen to either comedians or Reply All, Blank Check and Reveal.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to read and play video games. I also started to do cross-stitch recently and it’s nice to find a way to use my hands that doesn’t involve a computer or a controller. I make sure to exercise a lot as well because I find that helps my stress levels like nothing else can.

VFX house a52 launches a52 Color

Santa Monica-based visual effects studio a52 has launched a new custom-built space called a52 Color. It focuses on color grading and finishing. a52 Color is now home to a52 colorist Paul Yacono and new hire Daniel de Vue, who joins from London where he was head of color at Glassworks. a52 Color is able to offer clients access to combined or end-to-end services from its network of affiliated companies, which include Rock Paper Scissors, a52 VFX and Elastic.

“Color has been an offering within a52 with Paul Yacono for over half a decade, so it’s already an established part of the culture here,” explains executive producer Thatcher Peterson, who now runs with a52 after coming over from a four-year stint as EP at The Mill. “And with Daniel joining us from London, the distinction of a52 Color to become a separate entity thrusts our services and talent into its own spotlight.”

Yacono’s first major color project of out a52, was the Netflix series House of Cards, which proved that this boutique facility had the bandwidth to service high-volume 4K projects. Since that time, Yacono has established a body of work that ranges from ads for Target, Nike and BMW to the iconic title sequence for Game of Thrones. Yacono’s latest work includes the feature documentaries Struggle: The Life and Art of Szukalski, 13th, Amanda Knox, the TV miniseries Five Came Back and spots for Toyota, Prada, Samsung and Lexus.

Danish colorist de Vue has worked for directors such as Martin Werner, Martin de Thurah, Andreas Nilsson and Wally Pfister, and crafted the mood for brands such as Nike, Principal Financial, Vans, Mercedes, Toyota, Adidas, H&M and Xbox. Recently he graded an Elliot Rausch-directed TUMI spot featuring Lenny Kravitz and Zoë Kravitz on a journey to their family’s Bahamian roots.

Equipped for theatrical and broadcast color grading, the studio boasts two suites outfitted with FilmLight Baselight grading systems and is equipped for HDR with Dolby Vision certification. Additionally, remote grading services are also available throughout the US and internationally.

EP Peterson was at Company 3 for over 15 years, where he helped grow their core business from commercials to features and television.

As company founder Angus Wall, also an Oscar-winning editor for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, explains, “In adding high-end color and DI to our suite of companies, a52 Color completes our offerings for end-to-end, best of breed creative services.”

Tony Dustin joins Efilm as senior colorist

Tony Dustin has joined the Deluxe Creative Services team as senior colorist at Hollywood’s  Efilm. He will also be doing some work for sister company Encore. With more than 20 years of experience in color grading, Dustin’s work spans styles and genres, with a talent for revealing details in the darker palettes of many of his projects. He will be using Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve.

Dustin’s credits include the Netflix dramatic series Sense8, for which he was nominated for an HPA Award; Hulu horror series Castle Rock; Best Picture Academy Award-nominee Silver Linings Playbook, directed by David O. Russell; and Gran Torino, directed by Clint Eastwood.

Dustin’s first project for Efilm is the biographical drama Harriet, working with Oscar-winning cinematographer John Toll, with whom Dustin previously collaborated with on Sense8.

He comes to Efilm from Technicolor, where he spent nearly 17 years. He’s also held various color-centric roles at Westwind Media and Efilm sister company Encore. Dustin got his start in post by discovering the color grading process through his work in the vault at Editel while attending college. Having spent many hours developing negatives in a photo lab as a youth, Dustin has a well-honed eye and deep appreciation for cinematic visuals.