Tag Archives: Butcher Post

Quick Chat: ATK PLN’s David Bates on alliance with Butcher Post

By Randi Altman

Creative group ATK PLN, which focuses on design, animation and live action, has partnered with LA-based editorial and post shop Butcher Post. ATK PLN will represent Butcher’s editors in the Texas market, and Butcher will represent ATK PLN’s editors in their markets. While ATK PLN is headquartered in Dallas, they have offices in LA and Montreal as well.

We reached out to ATK PLN managing director David Bates to find out more about the partnership.

ATK PLN has multiple offices. Is this partnership only with the Dallas facility? If so, why only Dallas and not across the board?
This is a strategic first step. Butcher hasn’t had representation in the Texas market, and this gave us a way to begin Phase 1 in a manageable way, while still making a big impact by bringing national talent into our Texas market.

The flip side is that we do have multiple brick and mortar offices that allow Butcher to have locations to work at as the need arises. ATK PLN is specifically representing Butcher in the Texas market, but operationally, our relationship goes much deeper than that.

Are the editors going to work in Texas or from where they are based? If remotely, what will that review and approval process look like?
One of the things we love the most about Butcher is their flexibility. We love that they can work on set, in a hotel suite or at a client’s office. They have already honed the skill of doing very high-quality work in whatever location they are called upon to do it. So much of the work that both Butcher and ATK PLN does is reviewed remotely.

The days of clients having the time to sit in a suite for hours or days on end to review work in progress are long gone. The key becomes setting clear expectations for both calendars and the content to be reviewed. We’re basically bringing the work to the client instead of asking them to come to us. We understand that agencies are continually asked to run leaner and meaner, and our aim is to be as supportive and as beneficial to them as possible. We’re mapping our workflow to their needs.

What systems does Butcher use?
They work on Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere, depending on the specific needs of the project. Both are easily portable.

Why was now the right time to partner, and why Butcher? There are many editorial houses out there.
So much of harnessing opportunity is just keeping your eyes open and being bold enough to leap when the opportunities present themselves. Our EP Jim Riche has had a long relationship with the team at Butcher and said, “David, you need to meet these guys.”

Our partnership began with a simple conversation… a discussion of how we think, and of what we do and how we do it. We discovered that our philosophies overlap, yet our skills are different enough to significantly extend the reach of the other. We had actually brought up the idea to other editorial houses in the past, but it was almost as if they couldn’t grasp the idea of being stronger together, while still retaining individuality. Butcher immediately understood the idea because they’re already in that mindset, and have been thinking in new strategic ways.

And conversely for Butcher, why partner with ATL PLN?
This partnership allows both companies to offer complete solutions without the long arduous process of building it from scratch. We allow Butcher to have three additional bases to operate from, as well as access to our young editorial talent. We provide them with representation in a significant market, and offer a level of design, animation, and general finishing that allows us to tackle potential work together and in a more strategic and efficient way.

What have they partnered on so far? Any projects to date? If so, what and how was the workflow on that?
We are at the very beginning of our relationship, and we’ve just begun the process of letting the marketplace know about it. Step one was to create awareness, letting the marketplace know that we are bringing something different to the table.

We have been approached by a Dallas agency for a project, but it never materialized. Butcher has successfully worked in two other markets with local agencies there. In one city, they had the editor set up in a hotel suite close to the client, in another they four-walled at a local edit company. In most cases the finishing, conform and color are all done at a facility local to the client. Here in Dallas, we offer all of the finishing needed, conform, Flame VFX, color and audio.

Tips: From editing to directing

By Dave Henegar

Recently, I was asked by a client of mine to direct a national commercial. At first I thought, “What a fantastic opportunity!” Then reality set in. I realized that for the last 23 years I’ve been editing for some of the greatest commercial directors in the industry, but I had no idea how they did what they did.

So, naturally, I felt a mix of excitement and anxiety. After picking myself up off the floor, I thought about the many years I was lucky enough to work with such beautiful pieces, and my confidence grew as I recounted the varied and ingenious ways those directors told their stories. From the way they composed their images to the art direction of every meticulous detail. The great effort they put into connecting one shot to the next.

As their editor, I realized my life was much easier when all of those details were worked out well in advance. In fact, the worst projects I’ve worked on were the ones where directors set up many cameras and simply “captured” the action and said to themselves “we’ll figure it out in the edit.”

With that in mind, I set out on day one to craft a 30 second story that had a structure similar to the great directors I had worked with in the past. Thankfully, the commercial turned out to be a success, and I was proud of the final product.  In fact, there was very little I would change if I had to do it over.

So in light of the fact that I’ve only directed one commercial, I was asked to give my thoughts on making the leap into directing from editorial. Perhaps the best way to do that is to offer up the top five lessons I learned that may help other editors who dream of becoming directors.

1.  Pre-pro is more than half the battle
The day after I got the call from the agency I began drawing my own storyboards. I needed to understand quickly if I could pull off the grand concept the agency had presented. I must have drawn a hundred images. Like editing, I was rearranging shots in my head, but now I had to draw each one of those images and decide if they would work or not. Then came the process of the director’s treatment. Because I was a first-timer, I had to design and write the treatment myself. I took the treatment very seriously because I knew that it would be my one chance to prove that I understood what the client’s needs were and how to execute what the agency had carefully constructed. My words had to be clear and compelling — the images and layout had to be crafted and polished. Everything you present in your treatment is a reflection of your taste level. And lastly, location scouting is incredibly important. Design the perfect environment in your head before you begin your search, it will help you narrow down the vast number of images that will start pouring in from the location scouts.

2. Choose the Best Help You Can Afford
I would not have been able to achieve the look I wanted without the best cinematographer. Once I had secured best DP, I knew that he would bring with him his best keys. It’s a trickle down effect: choose the best and they’ll choose the best. The shoot day goes infinitely smoother and faster when the right people are in place.

3. Pay Close Attention to the Client
The client knows their audience far better than you will. You will be tempted to take their money and make the film of your dreams, but in my opinion that’s not what makes a good director. A good director is someone who can take the limitations and opportunities they’ve been handed and make an outstanding product.

4. Try Not to Edit Your Own Work
I believe that teamwork is better than a one-man-band. Talented teams can elevate a project. A talented editor will show you different ways in which your story could be told. As a director, it’s easy to get your storyboards firmly embedded in your head and simply edit what you had storyboarded. Let someone else you trust take your film in ways you didn’t expect.

5. Learn How to Present
Often times as editors we are required to say a few words before we press “play” for the first time. We may caveat the edit before showing it, saying something like “the sound is still rough” or “VFX aren’t in place yet.” Apart from that, we’re not required to go into great detail about deeper concepts. As a director, I learned that I was accountable for several hundreds of thousands of dollars earmarked for the vision I was trying to sell.  I have never spent so much time on the phone in my life!

Being a director is mostly about being a great communicator. You need to be able to effectively explain your concept and execution to the agency and the client — several times over! People who are prepared to plop down a six-figure check want to have everything explained to them in great detail. As well they should! If they’re paying the bill, they deserve to know what they’re getting for their money. Also being able to communicate with your crew is tremendously important. The more you communicate, the more respect you’ll get from those who are trying to help you bring your vision to life.  Respect everyone in your crew — period.

So that’s the top five, of what could easily be 25, things to think about when moving from editorial to directing.

To all my friends in editorial, I highly recommend trying it if you’ve not yet had the opportunity. It’s a challenging task but exciting. Take advantage of your many years of storytelling experience and put them behind the camera. It’s a humbling and exhilarating experience!

Dave Henegar is co-founder and editor at Butcher Post in Santa Monica.