Tag Archives: Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve

Review: Lenovo Yoga A940 all-in-one workstation

By Brady Betzel

While more and more creators are looking for alternatives to the iMac, iMac Pro and Mac Pro, there are few options with high-quality, built-in monitors: Microsoft Surface Studio, HP Envy, and Dell 7000 are a few. There are even fewer choices if you want touch and pen capabilities. It’s with that need in mind that I decided to review the Lenovo Yoga A940, a 27-inch, UHD, pen- and touch-capable Intel Core i7 computer with an AMD Radeon RX 560 GPU.

While I haven’t done a lot of all-in-one system reviews like the Yoga A940, I have had my eyes on the Microsoft Surface Studio 2 for a long time. The only problem is the hefty price tag of around $3,500. The Lenovo’s most appealing feature — in addition to the tech specs I will go over — is its price point: It’s available from $2,200 and up. (I saw Best Buy selling a similar system to the one I reviewed for around $2,299. The insides of the Yoga and the Surface Studio 2 aren’t that far off from each other either, at least not enough to make up for the $1,300 disparity.)

Here are the parts inside the Lenovo Yoga A940: Intel Core i7-8700 3.2GHz processor (up to 4.6GHz with Turbo Boost), six cores (12 threads) and 12MB cache; 27-inch 4K UHD IPS multitouch 100% Adobe RGB display; 16GB DDR4 2666MHz (SODIMM) memory; 1TB 5400 RPM drive plus 256GB PCIe SSD; AMD Radeon RX 560 4GB graphics processor; 25-degree monitor tilt angle; Dolby Atmos speakers; Dimensions: 25 inches by 18.3 inches by 9.6 inches; Weight: 32.2 pounds; 802.11AC and Bluetooth 4.2 connectivity; side panel inputs: Intel Thunderbolt, USB 3.1, 3-in-1 card reader and audio jack; rear panel inputs: AC-in, RJ45, HDMI and four USB 3.0; Bluetooth active pen (appears to be the Lenovo Active Pen 2); and QI wireless charging technology platform.

Digging In
Right off the bat, I just happened to put my Android Galaxy phone on the odd little flat platform located on the right side of the all-in-one workstation, just under the monitor, and I saw my phone begin to charge wirelessly. QI wireless charging is an amazing little addition to the Yoga; it really comes through in a pinch when I need my phone charged and don’t have the cable or charging dock around.

Other than that nifty feature, why would you choose a Lenovo Yoga A940 over any other all-in-one system? Well, as mentioned, the price point is very attractive, but you are also getting a near-professional-level system in a very tiny footprint — including Thunderbolt 3 and USB connections, HDMI port, network port and SD card reader. While it would be incredible to have an Intel i9 processor inside of the Yoga, the i7 clocks in at 3.2GHz with six cores. Not a beast, but enough to get the job done inside of Adobe Premiere and Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve, but maybe with transcoded files instead of Red raw or the like.

The Lenovo Yoga A940 is outfitted with a front-facing Dolby Atmos audio speaker as well as Dolby Vision technology in the IPS display. The audio could use a little more low end, but it is good. The monitor is surprisingly great — the whites are white and the blacks are black; something not everyone can get right. It has 100% Adobe RGB color coverage and is Pantone-validated. The HDR is technically Dolby Vision and looks great at about 350 nits (not the brightest, but it won’t burn your eyes out either). The Lenovo BT active pen works well. I use Wacom tablets and laptop tablets daily, so this pen had a lot to live up to. While I still prefer the Wacom pen, the Lenovo pen, with 4,096 levels of sensitivity, will do just fine. I actually found myself using the touchscreen with my fingers way more than the pen.

One feature that sets the A940 apart from the other all-in-one machines is the USB Content Creation dial. With the little time I had with the system, I only used it to adjust speaker volume when playing Spotify, but in time I can see myself customizing the dials to work in Premiere and Resolve. The dial has good action and resistance. To customize the dial, you can jump into the Lenovo Dial Customization Assistant.

Besides the Intel i7, there is an AMD Radeon RX 560 with 4GB of memory, two 3W and two 5W speakers, 32 GB of DDR4 2666 MHz memory, a 1 TB 5400 RPM hard drive for storage, and a 256GB PCIe SSD. I wish the 1TB drive was also an SSD, but obviously Lenovo has to keep that price point somehow.

Real-World Testing
I use Premiere Pro, After Effects and Resolve all the time and can understand the horsepower of a machine through these apps. Whether editing and/or color correcting, the Lenovo A940 is a good medium ground — it won’t be running much more than 4K Red raw footage in real time without cutting the debayering quality down to half if not one-eighth. This system would make a good “offline” edit system, where you transcode your high-res media to a mezzanine codec like DNxHR or ProRes for your editing and then up-res your footage back to the highest resolution you have. Or, if you are in Resolve, maybe you could use optimized media for 80% of the workflow until you color. You will really want a system with a higher-end GPU if you want to fluidly cut and color in Premiere and Resolve. That being said, you can make it work with some debayer tweaking and/or transcoding.

In my testing I downloaded some footage from Red’s sample library, which you can find here. I also used some BRAW clips to test inside of Resolve, which can be downloaded here. I grabbed 4K, 6K, and 8K Red raw R3D files and the UHD-sized Blackmagic raw (BRAW) files to test with.

Adobe Premiere
Using the same Red clips as above, I created two one-minute-long UHD (3840×2160) sequences. I also clicked “Set to Frame Size” for all the clips. Sequence 1 contained these clips with a simple contrast, brightness and color cast applied. Sequence 2 contained these same clips with the same color correction applied, but also a 110% resize, 100 sharpen and 20 Gaussian Blur. I then exported them to various codecs via Adobe Media Encoder using the OpenCL for processing. Here are my results:

QuickTime (.mov) H.264, No Audio, UHD, 23.98 Maximum Render Quality, 10 Mb/s:
Color Correction Only: 24:07
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 26:11
DNxHR HQX 10 bit UHD
Color Correction Only: 25:42
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 27:03

ProRes HQ
Color Correction Only: 24:48
Color Correction w/ 110% Resize, 100 Sharpen, 20 Gaussian Blur: 25:34

As you can see, the export time is pretty long. And let me tell you, once the sequence with the Gaussian Blur and Resize kicked in, so did the fans. While it wasn’t like a jet was taking off, the sound of the fans definitely made me and my wife take a glance at the system. It was also throwing some heat out the back. Because of the way Premiere works, it relies heavily on the CPU over GPU. Not that it doesn’t embrace the GPU, but, as you will see later, Resolve takes more advantage of the GPUs. Either way, Premiere really taxed the Lenovo A940 when using 4K, 6K and 8K Red raw files. Playback in real time wasn’t possible except for the 4K files. I probably wouldn’t recommend this system for someone working with lots of higher-than-4K raw files; it seems to be simply too much for it to handle. But if you transcode the files down to ProRes, you will be in business.

Blackmagic Resolve 16 Studio
Resolve seemed to take better advantage of the AMD Radeon RX 560 GPU in combination with the CPU, as well as the onboard Intel GPU. In this test I added in Resolve’s amazing built-in spatial noise reduction, so other than the Red R3D footage, this test and the Premiere test weren’t exactly comparing apples to apples. Overall the export times will be significantly higher (or, in theory, they should be). I also added in some BRAW footage to test for fun, and that footage was way easier to work and color with. Both sequences were UHD (3840×2160) 23.98. I will definitely be looking into working with more BRAW footage. Here are my results:

Playback: 4K realtime playback at half-premium, 6K no realtime playback, 8K no realtime playback

H.264 no audio, UHD, 23.98fps, force sizing and debayering to highest quality
Export 1 (Native Renderer)
Export 2 (AMD Renderer)
Export 3 (Intel QuickSync)

Color Only
Export 1: 3:46
Export 2: 4:35
Export 3: 4:01

Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur
Export 1: 36:51
Export 2: 37:21
Export 3: 37:13

BRAW 4K (4608×2592) Playback and Export Tests

Playback: Full-res would play at about 22fps; half-res plays at realtime

H.264 No Audio, UHD, 23.98 fps, Force Sizing and Debayering to highest quality
Color Only
Export 1: 1:26
Export 2: 1:31
Export 3: 1:29
Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur
Export 1: 36:30
Export 2: 36:24
Export 3: 36:22

DNxHR 10 bit:
Color Correction Only: 3:42
Color, 110% Resize, Spatial NR: Enhanced, Medium, 25; Sharpening, Gaussian Blur: 39:03

One takeaway from the Resolve exports is that the color-only export was much more efficient than in Premiere, taking just over three or four times realtime for the intensive Red R3D files, and just over one and a half times real time for BRAW.

Summing UpIn the end, the Lenovo A940 is a sleek looking all-in-one touchscreen- and pen-compatible system. While it isn’t jam-packed with the latest high-end AMD GPUs or Intel i9 processors, the A940 is a mid-level system with an incredibly good-looking IPS Dolby Vision monitor with Dolby Atmos speakers. It has some other features — like IR camera, QI wireless charger and USB Dial — that you might not necessarily be looking for but love to find.

The power adapter is like a large laptop power brick, so you will need somewhere to stash that, but overall the monitor has a really nice 25-degree tilt that is comfortable when using just the touchscreen or pen, or when using the wireless keyboard and mouse.

Because the Lenovo A940 starts at just around $2,299 I think it really deserves a look when searching for a new system. If you are working in primarily HD video and/or graphics this is the all-in-one system for you. Check out more at their website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: PixelTools V.1 PowerGrade presets for Resolve

By Brady Betzel

Color correction and color grading can be tricky (especially for those of us who don’t work as a dedicated colorist). And to be good at one doesn’t necessarily mean you will be good at the other. After watching hundreds of hours of tutorials, the only answer to getting better at color correction and color grading is to practice. As trite and cliche as it sounds, it’s the truth. There is also the problem of a creative block. I can sometimes get around a creative block when color correcting or general editing by trying out of the box ideas, like adding a solid color on top of footage and changing blend modes to spark some ideas.

An easier way to get a bunch of quick looks on your footage is with LUTs (Look Up Tables) and preset color grades. LUTs can sometimes work at getting your footage into an acceptable spot color correction-wise or technically, in the correct color space (the old technical vs. creative LUTs discussion). They often need (or should) be tweaked to fit the footage you are using.

Dawn

This is where PixelTool’s PowerGrade presets for Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve come in to play. PixelTool’s presets give you that instant wow of a color grade, sharpening and even grain, but with the flexibility to tweak and adjust to your own taste.

PixelTool’s PowerGrade V.1 are a set of Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve PowerGrades (essentially pre-built color grades sometimes containing noise reduction, glows or film grain) that retail for $79.99. Once purchased, the PowerGrade presets can be downloaded immediately. If you aren’t sure about the full commitment to purchase for $79.99, you can download eight sample PowerGrade presets to play with by signing up for PixelTools’ newsletter.

While it doesn’t typically matter what version of Resolve you are using with the PixelTool PowerGrade, you will probably want to make sure you are using Resolve Studio 15 (or higher) or you may miss out on some of the noise reduction or film. I’m running Resolve 16 Studio.

What are PowerGrades? In Resolve, you can save and access pre-built color correction node trees across all projects in a single database. This way if you have an amazing orange and teal, bleach bypass, or maybe a desaturated look with a vignette and noise reduction that you don’t want to rebuild inside every project you can them in the PowerGrades folder in the color correction tab. Easy! Just go into the Color Correction Tab > Gallery (in the upper left corner) > click the little split window icon > right click and “Add PowerGrade Album.”

Golden

Installing the PixelTools presets is pretty easy, but there are a few steps you are going to want to follow if you’ve never made a PowerGrades folder before. Luckily, there is a video just for that. Once you’ve added the presets into your database you can access over 110 grades in both Log and Rec 709 color spaces. In addition, there is a folder of “Utilities,” which offers some helpful tools like Scanlines (Mild-Intense), various Vignettes, Sky Debanding, preset Noise Reductions, two-and three-way Grain Nodes and much more. Some of the color grading presets can fit on one node but some have five or six nodes like the “2-Strip Holiday.” They will sometimes be applied as a Compound Node for organization-sake but can be decomposed to see all the goodness inside.

The best part of PixelTools, other than the great looks, is the ability to decompose or view the Compound Node structure and see what’s under the hood. Not only does it make you appreciate all of the painstaking work that is already done for you, but you can study it, tweak it and learn from it. I know a lot of companies that don’t like to reveal how things are done, but with PixelTools you can break the grades. Follows my favorite motto: “A rising tide lifts all boats” mindset.

From the understated “2-Strip Holiday” look to the crunchy “Bleach Duotone 2” with the handy “Saturation Adjust” node on the end of the tree, PixelTools is the prime example of pre-built looks that can be as easy as drag-and-dropping onto a clip or as intricate as adjusting each node to the way you like it. One of my favorite looks is a good-old Bleach Bypass — use two layer nodes (one desaturated and one colored), layer mix with a composite mode set to Overlay and adjust saturation to taste. The Bleach Bypass setup is not a tightly guarded secret, but PixelTools gets you right to the Bleach Bypass look with the Bleach Duotone 2 and also adds a nice orange and teal treatment on top.

2-Strip Holiday

Now I know what you are thinking — “Orange and Teal! Come on, what are we Michael Bay making Transformers 30?!” Well, the answer is, obviously, yes. But to really dial the look to taste on my test footage I brought down the Saturation node at the end of the node tree to around 13%, and it looks fantastic! Moral of the story is: always dial in your looks, especially with presets. Just a little customization can take your preset-look to a personalized look quickly. Plus, you won’t be the person who just throws on a preset and walks away.

Will these looks work with my footage? If you shot in a Log-ish style like SLog or BMD Film, Red Log Film or even GoPro Flat you can use the Log presets and dial them to taste. If you shot footage in Rec. 709 with your Canon 5D Mark II, you can just use the standard looks. And if you want to create your own basegrade on Log footage just add the PixelTool PowerGrade Nodes after!

Much like my favorite drag-and-drop tools from Rampant Design, PixelTools will give you a jump on your color grading quickly and if nothing else can maybe shake loose some of that colorist creative block that creeps in. Throw on that “Fuji 1” or “Fuji 2” look, add a serial node in the beginning and crank up the red highlights…who knows it may give you some creative jumpstart that you are looking for. Know the rules to break the rules, but also break the rules to get those creative juices flowing.

Saturate-Glow-Shadows

Summing Up
In the end, PixelTools is not just a set of PowerGrades for DaVinci Resolve, they can also be creative jumpstarts. If you think your footage is mediocre, you will be surprised at what a good color grade will do. It can save your shoot. But don’t forget about the rendering when you are finished. Rendering speed will still be dependent on your CPU and GPU setup. In fact, using an Asus ConceptD 7 laptop with an Nvidia RTX 2080 GPU, I exported a one-minute long Blackmagic Raw sequence with only color correction (containing six clips) to 10-bit DPX files in :46 seconds, with a random PixelTools PowerGrade applied to each clip it took :40 seconds! In this case the Nvidia RTX 2080 really aided in the fast export but your mileage may vary.

Check out pixeltoolspost.com and make sure to at least download their sample pack. From the one of five Kodak looks, two Fuji Looks, Tobacco Newspaper to Old Worn VHS 2 with a hint of chromatic aberration you are sure to find something that fits your footage.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on shows like Life Below Zero and The Shop. He is also a member of the Producer’s Guild of America. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

Review: Puget Systems Genesis I custom workstation

By Brady Betzel

With so many companies building custom Windows-based PCs these days, what really makes for a great build? What would make me want to pay someone to build me a PC versus building it myself? In this review, I will be going through a custom-built PC sent to me to review by Puget Systems. In my opinion, besides the physical components, Puget Systems is the cream of the crop of custom -built PCs. Over the next few paragraphs I will focus on how Puget Systems identified the right custom-built PC solution for me (specifically for post), how my experience was before, during and after receiving the system and, finally, specs and benchmarks of the system itself.

While quality components are definitely a high priority when building a new workstation, the big thing that sets Puget Systems’ apart from the rest of the custom-built PC pack is the personal and highly thorough support. I usually don’t get the full customer experience when reviewing custom builds. Typically, I am sent a workstation and maybe a one-sheet to accompany the system. To Puget System’s credit they went from top to tail when helping me put together the system I would test. Not only did I receive a completely newly built and tested system, but I talked to a customer service rep, Jeff Stubbers, who followed up with me along the way.

First, I spoke with Jeff over the phone. We talked about my price range and what I was looking to do with the system. I usually get told what I should buy — by the way, I am not a person that likes to be told what I want. I have a lot of experience not only working on high-end workstations but have been building and supporting them essentially my entire life. I actively research the latest and greatest technology. Jeff from Puget Systems definitely took the correct approach; he started by asking which apps I use and how I use them. When using After Effects, am I doing more 3D work or simple lower thirds and titles. Do I use and do I plan to continue using Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere Pro or Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve the most?

Essentially, my answers were that I use After Effects sparingly, but I do use it. I use Avid Media Composer professionally more than Premiere, but I see more and more Premiere projects coming my way. However, I think Resolve is the future, so I would love to tailor my system toward that. Oh and I dabble in Maxon Cinema 4D as well. So in theory, I need a system that does everything, which is kind of a tall order.

I told Jeff that I would love to stay below $10,000, but need the system to last a few years. Essentially, I was taking the angle of a freelance editor/colorist buying an above mid-range system. After we configured the system, Jeff continued to detail benchmarks that Puget Systems performs on a continuing basis and why two GTX 1080ti cards are going to benefit me instead of just one, as well as why an Intel i9 processor would specifically benefit my work in Resolve.

After we finished on the phone I received an email from Jeff that contained a link to webpage that continually would update me on the details and how my workstation was being built — complete with pictures of my actual system. There are also some links to very interesting articles and benchmarks on the Puget System’s website. They perform more pertinent benchmarks for post production pros than I have seen from any other company. Usually you see a few generic Premiere or Resolve benchmarks, but nothing like Puget System’s, even if you don’t buy a system from them you should read their benchmarks.

While my system went through the build and ship process, I saw pictures and comments about who did what in the process over at Puget Systems. Beth was my installer. She finished and sent the system to Kyle who ran benchmarks. Kyle then sent it to Josh for quality control. Josh discovered the second GTX 1080ti was installed in a reduced bandwidth PCIe slot and would be sent back to Beth for correction. I love seeing this transparency! It not only gives me the feeling that Puget Systems is telling me the truth, but that they have nothing to hide. This really goes a long way with me. Once my system was run through a second quality control pass, it was shipped to me in four days. From start to finish, I received my system in 12 days. Not a short amount of time, but for what Puget Systems put the system through, it was worth it.

Opening the Box
I received the Genesis I workstation in a double box. A nice large box with sturdy foam corners encasing the Fractal Design case box. There was also an accessories box. Within the accessories box were a few cables and an awesome three-ring binder filled with details of my system, the same pictures of my system, including thermal imaging pictures from the website, all of the benchmarks performed on my system (real-world benchmarks like Cinebench and even processing in Adobe Premiere) and a recovery USB 3.0 drive. Something I really appreciated was that I wasn’t given all of the third-party manuals and cables I didn’t need, only what I needed. I’ve received other custom-built PCs where the company just threw all of the manuals and cables into a Ziploc and called it a day.

I immediately hooked the system up and turned it on… it was silent. Incredibly silent. The Fractal Design Define R5 Titanium case was lined with a sound-deadening material that took whatever little sound was there and made it zero.

Here are the specs of the Puget System’s Genesis I I was sent:
– Gigabyte X299 Designare EX motherboard
– Intel Core i9 7940X 3.1GHz 14 Core 19.25MB 165W CPU
– Eight Crucial DDR4-2666 16GB RAM
– EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI 11GB gaming video card
– Onboard sound card
– Integrated WiFi+Bluetooth networking
– Samsung 860 Pro 512GB SATA3 2.5-inch SSD hard drive — primary drive
– Samsung 970 Pro 1TB M.2 SSD hard drive — secondary drive.
– Asus 24x DVD-RW SATA (Black) CD / DVD-ROM
– Fractal Design Define R5 titanium case
– EVGA SuperNova 1200W P2 power supply
– Noctua NH-U12DX i4 CPU cooling
– Arctic Cooling MX-2 thermal compound
– Windows 10 Pro 64-bit operating system
– Warranty: Lifetime labor and tech support, one-year parts warranty
– LibreOffice software: courtesy install
– Chrome software: courtesy install
– Adobe Creative Cloud Desktop App software: courtesy Install
– Resolve 1-3 GPU

System subtotal: $8,358.38. The price is right in my opinion, and mixed with the support and build detail it’s a bargain.

System Performance
I ran some system benchmarks and tests that I find helpful as a video editor and colorist who uses plugins and other tools on a daily basis. I am becoming a big fan of Resolve, so I knew I needed to test this system inside of Blackmagic’s Resolve 15. I used a similar sequence between Adobe Premiere and Resolve 15: a 10-minute, 23.98fps, UHD/3840×2160 sequence with mixed format footage from 4K and 8K Red, ARRI Raw UHD and ProRes4444. I added some Temporal Noise Reduction to half of the clips, including the 8K Red footage, resizes to all clips, all on top of a simple base grade.

First, I did a simple Smart User cache test by enabling the User Cache at DNxHR HQX 10-bit to the secondary Samsung 1TB drive. It took about four minutes and 34 seconds. From there I tried to playback the media un-cached, and I was able to playback everything except the 8K media in realtime. I was able to playback the 8K Red media at Quarter Res Good (Half Res would go between 18-20fps playback). The sequence played back well. I also wanted to test the export speeds. The first test was an H.264 export without cache on the same sequence. I set the H.264 output in Resolve to 23.98fps, UHD, auto-quality, no frame reordering, force highest quality debayer/resizes and encoding profile: main. The file took 11 minutes and 57 seconds. The second test was a DNxHR HQX 10-bit QuickTime with the same sequence, it took seven minutes and 44 seconds.

To compare these numbers I recently ran a similar test on an Intel i9-based MacBook Pro and with the Blackmagic eGPU with Radeon Pro 580 attached, the H.264 export took 16 minutes and 21 seconds, while a ProRes4444 took 22 minutes and 57 seconds. While not comparing apples to apples, this is still a good comparison in terms of a speed increase you can have with a desktop system and a pair of Nvidia GTX 1080ti graphics cards. With the impending release of the Nvidia GTX 2080 cards, you may want to consider getting those instead.

While in Premiere I ran similar tests with a very similar sequence. To export an H.264 (23.98fps, UHD, no cache used during export, VBR 10Mb/s target rate, no frame reordering) it took nine minutes and 15 seconds. Going a step further it took 47 minutes to export an H.265. Similarly, doing a DNxHR HQX 10-bit QuickTime export took 24 minutes.

I also ran the AJA System test on the 1TB spare drive (UHD, 16GB test file size, ProRes HQ). The read speed was 2951MB/sec and the write speed was 2569MB/sec. Those are some very respectable drive speeds, especially for a cache or project drive. If possible you would probably want to add another drive for exports or to have your RAW media stored on in order to maximize input/output speeds.

Up next was Cinebench R15: OpenGL — 153.02fps, Ref. Match 99.6%, CPU — 2905 cb, CPU (single core) — 193cb and MP Ratio 15.03x. Lastly, I ran a test that I recently stumbled upon: the Superposition Benchmark from Unigine. While it is more of a gaming benchmark, I think a lot of people use this and might glean some useful information from it. The overall score was 7653 (fps: min 45.58, avg 57.24, max 72.11, GPU degrees Celsius: min 36, max 85, GPU use: max 98%.

Summing Up
In the end, I am very skeptical of custom-build PC shops. Typically, I don’t see the value in the premium they set when you can probably build it yourself with parts you choose from PCpartpicker.com. However, Puget Systems is the exception — their support and build-quality are top notch. From the initial phone conversation to the up-to-the minute images and custom-build updates online, to the final delivery, and even follow-up conversations, Puget Systems is by far the most thorough and worthwhile custom-build PC maker I have encountered.

Check out their high-end custom build PCs and tons of benchmark testing and recommendations on their website.


Brady Betzel is an Emmy-nominated online editor at Margarita Mix in Hollywood, working on Life Below Zero and Cutthroat Kitchen. You can email Brady at bradybetzel@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @allbetzroff.

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space optimized for Resolve workflows

DigitalGlue’s Creative.Space, an on-premise managed storage (OPMS) service, has been optimized for Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve workflows, meeting the technical requirements for inclusion in Blackmagic’s Configuration Guide. DigitalGlue is an equipment, integration and software development provider, that also designs and implements solutions for complete turnkey content creation, post production and distribution.

According to DigitalGlue CEO/CTO Tim Anderson, each Creative.Space system is pre-loaded with a Resolve optimized PostreSQL database server enabling users to simply create databases in Resolve using the same address they use to connect to their storage. In addition, users can schedule database backups with snapshots, ensuring that work is preserved timely and securely. Creative.Space also uses media intelligent caching to move project data and assets into a “fast lane” allowing all collaborators to experience seamless performance.

“We brought a Creative.Space entry-level Auteur unit optimized with a DaVinci Resolve database to the Blackmagic training facility in Burbank,” explains Nick Anderson, Creative.Space product manager. “The Auteur was put through a series of rigorous testing processes and passed each with flying colors. Our Media Intelligent caching allowed the unit to provide full performance to 12 systems at a level that would normally require a much larger and more expensive system.”

Auteur was the first service in the Creative.Space platform to launch. Creative.Space targets collaborative workflows by optimizing the latest hardware and software for efficiency and increased productivity. Auteur starts at 120TB RAW capacity across 12 drives in a 24-bay 4RU chassis with open bays for rapid growth. Every system is custom-built to address each client’s unique needs. Entry level systems are designed for small to medium workgroups using compressed 4K, 6K and 8K workflows and can scale for 4K uncompressed workflows (including 4K OpenEXR) and large multi-user environments.