Tag Archives: Behind The Title

Behind the Title: C&I Studios founder Joshua Miller

While he might run the company, founder/CEO Joshua Miller is happiest creating. He also says there is no job too small: “Nothing is beneath you.”

NAME: Joshua Otis Miller

COMPANY: C&I Studios

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
C&I Studios is a production company and advertising agency. We are located in New York City, Los Angeles, and Fort Lauderdale.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Founder and CEO

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Well, my job is a little weird. While I own and run the company, my passion has always been filmmaking… since I was four years old. I also run the video and film team at the studio, so my job means a lot of things. One day, I can be shooting on a mountain and the next day writing scripts and concepts, or editing, creating feature films or TV shows or managing post production. Since I’m the CEO, I spend a ton of time bringing in new business and adding technology to the company. Every day feels brand new to me, and that is the best part.

Black Violin

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think the thing that surprises most people is that when I’m on set working, I’m not sitting back drinking a mojito. I’m carrying the tripods and the sandbags and setting up the shots. I’m also the one signing everyone’s checks. One of our core beliefs at our company is “nothing is beneath you,” and that means you can do anything — including cleaning toilets —that helps the company grow, and it requires you to drop your ego. In the creative industry that’s a big deal.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is working with my team. I got so sick of the freelance game — it’s so individualized, and everyone is out for themselves. I wanted to start C&I to work with people consistently, dream together, build together and create together. That is by far better than anything else.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of the job is firing people. That just sucks.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Between 4am and 5am. If you aren’t waking up earlier than everyone else, you aren’t doing it right.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be doing the exact same thing. I could be working at McDonald’s, but I’d be filming with my iPhone or Razer phone and editing. It’s not about the money; you can’t take this thing from me. It’s a part of me, and something I certainly didn’t choose. So, no matter where you put me, this is what will come out. And since Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve is free, this is something I could actually do… I could be working at McDonald’s and shooting for fun on my phone and editing in Resolve’s new cut page, which is magic. That actually sounds awesome. Well, except the McDonald’s part (laughs).

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Again, I don’t feel like I chose it. It’s something that I always felt drawn to. I was interested in cameras since I was very young… tearing apart my parents VHS tapes to see how they worked. I was completely perplexed by the idea that a camera does something and then it goes on this tape, and I see what’s on that tape in this VHS player and on TV. That was something I had to learn and figure out. But the main reason I wanted to really dig into this field is because I remember being in my grandmother’s house watching those VHS tapes with my brothers and my family and everyone is just sitting around, laughing watching old memories. I can’t shake that feeling. People feel warm, vulnerable, close… that is the power you have with a camera and the ability to tell a story. It’s absolutely incredible.

Black Violin

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Right now, I’m working on an incredible music video with Black Violin. We are shooting it in Los Angeles and Miami, and I’m really excited about it.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Probably something I’m most proud of is our latest film Christmas Eve. We just poured everything into that film. It’s just magic. We have done a lot of amazing stuff, but that one is really close to me right now.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Camera, computer, speakers (for music — I can’t live without music). Those three things are a must for me to breathe.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m not really into social media, not a big fan of what it has turned us into (off of my soapbox now), but I do follow a ton of film companies and directors. I love following Shane Hurlbut, Blackmagic Design, SmallHD, Red Digital Cinema and Panavision, to name a view.

YOU MENTIONED LOVING MUSIC. DO YOU LISTEN WHILE YOU WORK?
Music is everything. It’s the oil to my car. Without that, I’m toast. Of course, I don’t listen to music when I’m editing, but when I’m on set I love to listen to music. Love the new Chance record. When I’m writing, it’s always either Bon Iver or Michael Giacchino. I love scores and composers.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
To distress, I love the moments in the studio when the staff and I just sit around and get to laugh and just hang out. I have a beautiful family and two wonderful kids, so when I’m not stressing about work I’m giving horsey-back rides to my son, while my daughter tries to explain TikTok to me.

Behind the Title: Live Nation Entertainment Editor Hillary Lewis

This Indiana-based editor uses Avid Media Composer at work, Adobe Premiere for personal projects and After Effects for both.

NAME: Indianapolis-based Hillary Lewis

COMPANY: TourDesign Creative/Live Nation Entertainment

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are the post house for all Live Nation artists creating their broadcast, online, print, radio and advertising for concert tours, nationally and internationally.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Using the approved ad materials from our art department and approved radio materials from our audio department, we create TV and online commercials using concert footage and/or music videos, adding motion graphics, transitions, color grading, etc. With the approved commercial, we localize and deliver for each market (city) where the tour will perform.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The editors here are jacks-of-all-trades. We don’t have colorists, assistant editors or other post positions that you’d normally find in TV/film post houses. We truly do it all from start to finish.

One of the things that still surprises me is working with artist management teams that give you unusable footage. Whether it be terrible camera work, aspect ratio differences, low resolution, baked-in logos, etc.

A good majority of artist management teams don’t keep a sufficient archive of raw, uncompressed footage of their artist performances. This inevitably backs us into a corner and we’re tasked with finding and ripping usable footage off of YouTube. The humanity!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When I have the most possible time to be creative on a new spot. When I can work on one of my favorite artists or bands. And when I can learn new things and put them in my bag of tricks.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Having to put my name on something I’ve created that I’m not proud of, but that was completely out of my control. For example, a commercial spot that I artistically and creatively didn’t call the shots on.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
For me, there’s a difference between when I’m most productive and when I’m the busiest. We tend to be busiest in the afternoons — from 3pm to 6pm — because we cater to our smaller office on the West Coast. This means the majority of my work is done right before I leave for the day, which often means staying late. But I’m truly more productive in the mornings when the office is less chaotic and when there’s time to be most creative, rather than sacrificing creativity to push a product out in the late afternoon.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Two things. I’m obsessed with Vox’s explainer videos and would be making similar highly designed, motion-graphics-based content on broad topics such as film/TV, music, FAQs, food, travel, etc.

Or, I’d be a phenomenal post production coordinator/supervisor in film/TV.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I entered college as a business major and knew pretty early on it wasn’t going to be a fulfilling career path for me. I happened to take a new media course to fill elective requirements, and it resonated with me so much I switched my major to new media arts and sciences and have been on the post production path ever since. It hasn’t been easy making a name in this industry, but I’ve never once looked back or had any regrets.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The most recent artist tours created by TourDesign: Cardi B, Madonna, Khalid, Live Nation $20 National Concert Week, Lewis Black, MasterChef Junior Live!, Mary J. Blige/NAS, Dave Matthews Band, The Head and the Heart… I could go on.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Not a specific work project, but several accomplishments through my side hustles. I’ve also been a panelist at recent conferences speaking on topics like the gender pay gap, post workflow and new trends in AI and machine learning.

Being an integral part of the media production industry and building a vast network of pros through my travels is something I’m extremely proud of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Our Avid Nexis server at work, my stand-up desk and my AirPods.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
The Blue Collar Post Collective on Facebook. I’m also a member and volunteer. BCPC is a nonprofit supporting emerging talent in post by providing mentorships, networking and funding to attend major industry events for pros who make less than the median income of the state they live in. I was one of the recipients of that funding and it was life-changing for me.

Hillary Lewis on panel at NAB for Gals N Gear.

If anyone reading this has questions about the program, reach out to me on Facebook
or Instagram @hillary.dillary. I follow other Facebook pages like I Am a Female Editor!, Avid Editors of Facebook, Post Chat, I Need an Editor, Austin Digital Jobs (I’ll be moving there soon).

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
If I listen to anything at work it’s either keeping up with current events from talk shows like The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, The Daily Show With Trevor Noah, Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, etc. or Vice News. Or strictly entertaining things like GoT recaps/fan theory videos, SNL, Vox, Funny or Die.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It is extremely high stress! I have to keep my body active during the day, using my stand-up desk in intervals and stretching. I can’t be in the right state of mind if my body feels stiff or sore.

Going to the gym at least two to three nights every week also helps me sleep better, which makes me fresher mentally the next day.

Cooking is a great stress reliever for me as well as a creative outlet. I can try new things and be risky with it. Even if I make a meal that tastes horrible, I know I’ll eventually improve that meal and make something that tastes good. It reminds of something a wise man on Queer Eye once said “Failure is not the opposite of success, it’s a part of it.”

I also love a good beer at the end of the day.

Behind the Title: Ntropic Flame artist Amanda Amalfi

NAME: Amanda Amalfi

COMPANY: Ntropic (@ntropic)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Ntropic is a content creator producing work for commercials, music videos and feature films as well as crafting experiential and interactive VR and AR media. We have offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City and London. Some of the services we provide include design, VFX, animation, color, editing, color grading and finishing.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Flame Artist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being a senior Flame artist involves a variety of tasks that really span the duration of a project. From communicating with directors, agencies and production teams to helping plan out any visual effects that might be in a project (also being a VFX supervisor on set) to the actual post process of the job.

Amanda worked on this lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

It involves client and team management (as you are often also the 2D lead on a project) and calls for a thorough working knowledge of the Flame itself, both in timeline management and that little thing called compositing. The compositing could cross multiple disciplines — greenscreen keying, 3D compositing, set extension and beauty cleanup to name a few. And it helps greatly to have a good eye for color and to be extremely detail-oriented.

WHAT MIGHT SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT YOUR ROLE?
How much it entails. Since this is usually a position that exists in a commercial house, we don’t have as many specialties as there would be in the film world.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
First is the artwork. I like that we get to work intimately with the client in the room to set looks. It’s often a very challenging position to be in — having to create something immediately — but the challenge is something that can be very fun and rewarding. Second, I enjoy being the overarching VFX eye on the project; being involved from the outset and seeing the project through to delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’re often meeting tight deadlines, so the hours can be unpredictable. But the best work happens when the project team and clients are all in it together until the last minute.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
The evening. I’ve never been a morning person so I generally like the time right before we leave for the day, when most of the office is wrapping up and it gets a bit quieter.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably a tactile art form. Sometimes I have the urge to create something that is tangible, not viewed through an electronic device — a painting or a ceramic vase, something like that.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved films that were animated and/or used 3D elements growing up and wanted to know how they were made. So I decided to go to a college that had a computer art program with connections in the industry and was able to get my first job as a Flame assistant in between my junior and senior years of college.

ANA Airlines

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Most recently I worked on a campaign for ANA Airlines. It was a fun, creative challenge on set and in post production. Before that I worked on a very interesting project for Facebook’s F8 conference featuring its AR functionality and helped create a lipstick branding video for the makeup brand Morphe.

IS THERE A PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked on a spot for Vaseline that was a “through the ages” concept and we had to create looks that would read as from 1880s, 1900, 1940s, 1970s and present day, in locations that varied from the Arctic to the building of the Brooklyn Bridge to a boxing ring. To start we sent the digitally shot footage with our 3D and comps to a printing house and had it printed and re-digitized. This worked perfectly for the ’70s-era look. Then we did additional work to age it further to the other eras — though my favorite was the Arctic turn-of-the-century look.

NAME SOME TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Flame… first and foremost. It really is the most inclusive software — I can grade, track, comp, paint and deliver all in one program. My monitors — the 4K Eizo and color-calibrated broadcast monitor, are also essential.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mostly Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? 
I generally have music on with clients, so I will put on some relaxing music. If I’m not with clients, I listen to podcasts. I love How Did This Get Made and Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Hiking and cooking are two great de-stressors for me. I love being in nature and working out and then going home and making a delicious meal.

Behind the Title: Editor and colorist Grace Novak

One of her favorite parts of the job is when she encounters a hard edit and it finally clicks and falls into place.

NAME: New York-based Grace Novak

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor and Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with directors/clients to make their project come to life using an editing program. Then during the color process, I bring it even closer to their aesthetic vision.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It can include a lot of not-so-creative work like troubleshooting and solving technical problems, especially when doing assistant color/edit work either for myself or for someone else.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love the great moment when you push through a hard edit and it finally clicks. I also love getting to collaborate with other great creators and filmmakers and working one-on-one in the editing room. I find it to be a great learning experience.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When nothing works and I don’t know why. But, luckily, once I figure it out (eventually, hours later sometimes) I’ve learned to solve a new issue.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Definitely the mornings once I’ve had some coffee. I’m a morning person who is most active around the hours of 8-11. Once lunch hits, it can be hard not to want to take a good midday nap.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
When I was younger, for some reason, I told everyone I wanted to be a barber. I think that’s because I liked using scissors. Seriously, though, I’d probably be working with kids in some way or as an educator. I still hope to teach down the road.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I knew I wanted a job where I could be creative, and with editing I can also be technically proficient. I love the combination of the two.

Dissonance

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I always knew I wanted to be involved with film, probably since I was 12. I remember starting to edit on Windows Movie Maker and being enamored with the effects. I especially liked the really awful and gaudy one that went through a gradient of colors. Don’t worry, I would never use something like that now.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m working on a lot of short indie films right now including Dissonance, Bogalusa and Siren. I’m also an assistant editor on the feature film The Outside Story.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Dissonance, a short experimental film that is currently in color right now (with me), is probably the most proud I am of a project purely because of how far it pushed me as an artist, editor and collaborator.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I follow a lot, but in the post world that includes postPerspective, BCPC and Jonny Elwyn.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
If I can, I like to listen to podcasts. That’s probably my primary podcast listening time besides at the gym. Obviously, I can only do this during my color work. For music, I like tunes that aren’t too upbeat and more relaxing. For podcasts I like to listen to either comedians or Reply All, Blank Check and Reveal.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I like to read and play video games. I also started to do cross-stitch recently and it’s nice to find a way to use my hands that doesn’t involve a computer or a controller. I make sure to exercise a lot as well because I find that helps my stress levels like nothing else can.

Behind the Title: Light Sail VR MD/EP Robert Watts

This creative knew as early as middle school that he wanted to tell stories. Now he gets to immerse people in those stories.

NAME: Robert Watts

COMPANY: LA-based Light Sail VR (@lightsailvr)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We’re an immersive media production company. We craft projects end-to-end in the VR360, VR180 and interactive content space, which starts from bespoke creative development all the way through post and distribution. We produce both commercial work and our own original IP — our first of which is called Speak of the Devil VR, which is an interactive, live-action horror experience where you’re a main character in your own horror movie.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Managing Partner and Executive Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
A ton. As a startup, we wear many hats. I oversee all production elements, acting as producer. I run operations, business development and the financials for the company. Then Matt Celia, my business partner and creative director, collaborates on the overall creative for each project to ensure the quality of the experience, as well as making sure it works natively (i.e.: is the best in) the immersive medium.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m very hands-on on set, almost to a fault. So I’ve ended up with some weird (fake) credits, such as fog team, stand-in, underwater videographer, sometimes even assistant director. I do whatever it takes to get the job done — that’s a producer’s job.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Excluding all the VR headsets and tech, on the producing side Google Drive and Dropbox are a producer’s lifeblood, as well as Showbiz Budgeting from Media Services.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love being on set watching the days and weeks of pre-production and development coalesce. There’s an energy on set that’s both fun and professional, and that truly shows the crew’s dedication and focus to get the job done. As the exec producer, it’s nice being able to strike a balance between being on set and being in the office.

Light Sail VR partners (L-R): Matt Celia and Robert Watts

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Tech hurdles. They always seem to pop up. We’re a production company working on the edge of the latest technology, so something always breaks, and there’s not always a YouTube tutorial on how to fix it. It can really set back one’s day.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
We do “Light Sail Sandwich Club” at lunch and cater a smorgasbord of sandwich fixings and crafty services for our teams, contractors and interns. It’s great to take a break from the day and sit down and connect with our colleagues in a personal way. It’s relaxed and fun, and I really enjoy it.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I love what I do, but I also like giving back. I think I’d be using my project management skills in a way that would be a force for good, perhaps at an NGO or entity working on tackling climate change.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
Middle school. My family watched a lot of television and films. I wanted to be an archaeologist after watching Indiana Jones, a paleontologist after Jurassic Park, a submarine commander after Crimson Tide and I fancied being a doctor after watching ER. I got into theater and video productions in high school, and I realized I could be in entertainment and make all those stories I loved as a kid.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
At the tail end of 2018, we produced 10 360-degree episodes for Refinery29 (Sweet Digs 360), 10 VR180 episodes (Get Glam, Hauliday) and VR180 spots for Bon Appetit and Glamour. We also wrapped on a music video that’s releasing this year.

On top of it all, we’ve been hard at work developing our next original, which we will reveal more details about soon. We’ve been busy! I’m extremely thankful for the wonderful teams that helped us make it all happen.

Now Your Turn

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am very proud of the diversity project we did with Google, Google: Immerse, as well as our first original, Speak of the Devil. But I think our first original series Now Your Turn is the one I’m going to pick. It’s a five-episode VR180 series that features Geek & Sundry talent showcasing some amazing board games. It’s silly and fun, and we put in a number of easter eggs that make it even better when you’re watching in a headset. I’m proud of it because it’s an example of where the VR medium is going — series that folks tune into week to week.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My Mac for work and music — I’m constantly listening to music while I work. My Xbox One is where I watch all my content and, lastly, my VIVE set up at home. I like to check out all the latest in VR, from experiences to gaming, and I even work out with it playing BoxVR or Beat Saber.

WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU LISTEN TO AT WORK?
My taste spans from classic rock to techno/EDM to Spanish guitar.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I try to have a work-life balance. I don’t set my email notifications to “push.” Instead, I make the choice of when I check my emails. I do it frequently enough I don’t ever feel I’m out of the loop, but that small choice helps me feel in control of all the hundreds of things that happen on a day-to-day basis.

I make time every night and on the weekends to spend time with my lovely wife, Jessica. When we’re not watching stuff, we’re seeing friends and playing board games — we’re big nerds. It’s important to have fun!

Behind the Title: Legwork director of production Chris Grey

NAME: Chris Grey

COMPANY: Denver-based Legwork

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Legwork is an independent creative studio combining animation and technology to create memorable stories and experiences for advertising, entertainment and education.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Production

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I touch almost all parts of the business, including business development, client relationships, scoping, resourcing, strategy, producer mentorship and making sure every project that goes out the door is up to our high standards. Oh, and I still produce several projects myself.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It might be cliché, but you still need to get your hands dirty producing things. You just can’t escape it, nor should you want to. It sets the example for your team.

Dominos

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The problem-solving aspect of it. No matter how tight your project plan is, it’s a given that curveballs are going to happen. Planning for those and being able to react with smart solutions is what makes every day different.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Anxiety isn’t fun, but it comes with the job. Just know how to deal with it and don’t let it rub off on others.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
First hour of the day for emails. I do my best to keep my afternoons meeting-free, unless it’s a client meeting, My last job put a lot of emphasis on “flow” and staying in it, so I do my best to keep all internals in the morning so the whole team can work in the afternoon, including myself.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve always wanted to own a cool bodega/deli type of place. We’d specialize in proper sandwiches, hard to find condiments, cheap beer. Keeping this dream alive…

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew in college. Crispin Porter + Bogusky was moving to Boulder during my junior or senior year at Colorado University. I read up on them and thought to myself “That’s it. That’s what I want to do.” I was lucky enough to get an internship there after graduation and I haven’t really looked back.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Can I take credit for the team on these two? Cool, because we’re super-proud of these, but I didn’t “produce” them:
Rise: Hope-a-monics
Pandora: Smokepurpp

Yeti

Some stuff I worked on recently that we are equally proud of:
https://www.yeticycles.com/
https://ifthisthendominos.com/
L.L.Bean: Find Your Park

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
More than a project, our relationship with YouTube has been super rewarding. The View in 2 series is now on its fifth season and it was one of the first things I worked on when I got to Legwork. Watching the show and our relationship with the client evolve is something I am proud of. In the coming months, there will be a new show that we’re releasing with them that pushes the style even further.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
1. This is a cheat because it covers music, my calendar, email, etc., but one is my iCloud and Google accounts — because 75 percent of my life on there now.
2. My Nest camera gives me peace of mind when I’m out of town and lets me know my dog isn’t too lonely.
3. Phonograph records — old tech that I love to collect.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Besides friends and family? Lots of food-related ones (current favorites are @wdurney and @turkeyandthewolf), sports/sneakers (@houseofhighlights, @jordansdaily), history (@ww2nowandthen) and a good random one is @celebsonsandwhiches.

I also like every @theonion post.

That was all for Instagram. I save Twitter for political rants and Liverpool F.C.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
We have a Sonos at the office and more often than not it forces me to put on my headphones. Sorry, Legworkers. So it might be a podcast, Howard Stern, KEXP or something British.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’m a new dad, so that helps keep everything in perspective. That and some brewery visits on the weekend, which are totally socially acceptable to bring infants to!

Behind the Title: FuseFX VFX supervisor Marshall Krasser

Over the years, this visual effects veteran has worked with both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, whose films helped inspire his career path.

NAME: Marshall Krasser

COMPANY: FuseFX 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
FuseFX offers visual effects services for episodic television, feature films, commercials and VR productions. Founded in 2006, the company employs over 300 people across three studio locations in LA, NYC and Vancouver

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Visual Effects Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In general, a VFX supervisor is responsible for leading the creative team that brings the director’s vision to life. The role does vary from show to show depending on whether or not there is an on-set or studio-side VFX supervisor.

Here is a list of responsibilities across the board:
– Read and flag the required VFX shots in the script.
– Work with the producer and team to bid the VFX work.
– Attend the creative meetings and location scouts.
– Work with the studio creative team to determine what they want and what we need to achieve it.
– Be the on-set presence for VFX work — making sure the required data and information we need is shot, gathered and catalogued.
– Work with our in-house team to start developing assets and any pre-production concept art that will be needed.
– Once the VFX work is in post production, the VFX supervisor guides the team of in-house artists and technicians through the shot creation/completion phase, while working with the producer to keep the show within the budgets constraints.
– Keep the client happy!

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
That the job is much more than pointing at the computer screen and making pretty images. Team management is critical. Since you are working with very talented and creative people, it takes a special skill set and understanding. Having worked up through the VFX ranks, it helps you understand the mind set since you have been in their shoes.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN VFX?
My first job was creating computer graphic images for speaker support presentations on a Genigraphics workstation in 1984. I then transitioned into feature film in 1994.

HOW HAS THE VFX INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE TIME YOU’VE BEEN WORKING? WHAT’S BEEN GOOD, WHAT’S BEEN BAD?
It’s changed a lot. In the early days at ILM, we were breaking ground by being asked to create imagery that had never been seen before. This involved creating new tools and approaches that had not been previously possible.

Today, VFX has less of the “man behind the curtain” mystique and has become more mainstream and familiar to most. The tools and computer power have evolved so there is less of the “heavy lifting” that was required in the past. This is all good, but the “bad” part is the fact that “tricking” people’s eyes is more difficult these days.

DID A PARTICULAR FILM INSPIRE YOU ALONG THIS PATH IN ENTERTAINMENT?
A couple really focused my attention toward VFX. There is a whole generation that was enthralled with the first Star Wars movie. I will never forget the feeling I had upon first viewing it — it was magical.

The other was E.T., since it was more grounded on Earth and more plausible. I was blessed to be able to work directly with both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg [and the artisans who created the VFX for these films] during the course of my career.

DID YOU GO TO FILM SCHOOL?
I did not. At the time, there was virtually no opportunity to attend a film school, or any school, that taught VFX. I took the route that made the most sense for me at the time — art major. I am a classically trained artist who focused on graphic design and illustration, but I also took computer programming.

On a typical Saturday, I would spend the morning in the computer lab programming and the afternoon on the potter’s wheel throwing pots. Always found that ironic – primitive to modern in the same day!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with the team and bringing the creative to life.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Numbers, no one told me there would be math! Re: bidding.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Maybe a fishing or outdoor adventure guide. Something far away from computers and an office.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
– the Vice movie
– the Waco miniseries
–  the Life Sentence TV series
– the Needle in a Timestack film
The 100 TV series

WHAT IS THE PROJECT/S THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
A few stand out, in no particular order. Pearl Harbor, Harry Potter, Galaxy Quest, Titanic, War of the Worlds and the last Indiana Jones movie.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
I would have to say Nuke. I use it for shot and concept work when needed.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION NOW?
Everything around me. I am heavily into photography these days, and am always looking at putting a new spin on ordinary things and capturing the unique.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Head into the great British Columbian outdoors for camping and other outdoor activities.

Behind the Title: Picture Shop workflow specialist Alex Martin

NAME: Alex Martin

COMPANY: Picture Shop Post

TITLE: Workflow Specialist

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
While Picture Shop is two years old, our team has decades of experience. A majority of our employees here know each other through some previous career venture. We are a hand-picked team that meshes really well together.

We’re led by four individuals who live and breathe post production and have for decades: president Bill Romeo, EVP of sales and marketing Robert Glass, EVP of VFX Tom Kendall and EVP and CTO Jay Bodnar.

Our projects — from superhero shows to Netflix and Hulu’s top HDR projects (oh yeah, and zombies) — we’re constantly expanding.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT A WORKFLOW SPECIALIST DOES?
Technology is always advancing, and so are our shows and their workflows. Keeping up to speed with the new gear and new specs is a large majority of what makes up my day-to-day.

You have to be quick on your feet and one step ahead of the industry at all times in order to grasp success. The biggest challenge for me is always having to think outside the box; looking for new and improved ways to make what already works even better. We are often stumbling upon new advancements, constantly producing and testing new ideas into fruition.

WHAT SYSTEMS DOES PICTURE SHOP HAVE FOR COLOR?
We’re fortunate enough to have three major color correctors: Digital Vision’s Nucoda, Filmlight’s Baselight and Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. We also use Colorfront’s software, Express Dailies and Transkoder.

For our online systems we use Avid Media Composer, Autodesk Flame and, recently, Resolve.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST SET UP PROJECTS/ DESIGN WORKFLOWS?
All the time. One moment, I’m figuring out why the text over picture is more transparent than it should be, and the next, I’m creating LUTs for a new show on-set. My day-to-day job is always about workflow, but my minute-to-minute lies in the fine details. The main focus is to help get the show out the door on time and ensure that our clients keep coming back for more.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Probably that no two days are the same. I have a great mentor, senior systems workflow engineer Todd Korody, who we consider the brains of the building. Working alongside him for the past two years has been the most rewarding. Most of the conversations that we have are about a show’s color pipeline, and how we can get to the final delivery stage seamlessly while keeping in mind that each new show brings a different element to the table.

Whether we’re designing the workflow on a regular HD finish for a network show or evolving the HDR processes for Netflix and Hulu, figuring out the pass off from one platform to the next (dailies to online, online to color, or VFX to color) makes each day unique.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite is probably my own tendency to be a perfectionist. I always want to make sure that everything goes according to plan — as most of us do. I’m then reminded of the brilliant team that I am surrounded by, and though seeking a more collaborative effort, the “best way” to fix any issue makes itself known.

It’s amazing to know that I’m surrounded by people that care about our company to the same degree, and we all work together to ensure the best possible success.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a sound engineer for live concerts. What’s better than being behind the controls, mixing for a great band?

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I kind of fell into it. I wanted to go to recording school for music. Not that I couldn’t have, but a four-year university was needed. I ended up finding film schools had classes in mixing for movies. This turned into an editing and VFX emphasis so I could take mixing classes.

One of the classes offered in the area I was studying was color correction. I loved that class, which opened a very wide door for me to pursue in post. I knew I would end up in the entertainment business in some way around 17. My friends and I would cut together videos on Windows Movie Maker. Always enjoyed the art and still do today.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON OR PLAN TO WORK ON?
On the technology side, we’ve been working a lot with Resolve and Baselight in terms of HDR. Also making sure we are familiar with the Dolby Vision toolsets, color management workflows and making sure our pipeline is smooth for everyone.

We have a few projects coming out which I’m exciting to be a part of, The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Unbelievable and Huge in France, all for Netflix. There is also Future Man for Hulu. There’s a lot more HDR work on the horizon, but these are a few currently underway.

WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF WORK WISE?
Our HDR pipeline. We’ve developed some great tools and strategies along the way to handle very large camera files, ways we bring media in and out of the color correctors, and tools to help us with final delivery.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
Camera tests through to final picture. Before each show starts filming, the DP usually directs a camera test. When they do the camera and lens-package comparisons, I love seeing the subtle differences. Once the show’s colorist has a chance to collaborate with the DP’s vision, the best part is seeing the final colored image through their eyes. In my opinion, this finishing touch is what brings the picture to life.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT?
My phone, my laptop and Resolve… I also have to mention my car.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I use LinkedIn – I follow all the studios, production companies, software companies, different operators and artists; really anything that keeps me up to speed with the post production world.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I guess I always go back to what brought me to this business in the first place, and that’s music. I play the drums, and that helps me decompress and have a good time.

Behind the Title: Carbon senior colorist Julien Biard

NAME: Julien Biard

COMPANY: Carbon in Chicago

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Carbon is a full-service creative studio specializing in design, color, visual effects and motion graphics, with offices in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for grading the work to get the most out of the material. Color has a lot of potential to assist the storytelling in conveying the emotion of a film. I also oversee the running of the Chicago color department.

National Trust

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Most of the time people are surprised this job actually exists, or they think I’m a hair colorist. After many years this still makes me smile every time!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There are many aspects of the job I enjoy. The main part of the job is the creative side, giving my input and taste to a piece makes the job personally and emotionally involving. I get a lot of satisfaction from this process, working with the team and using color to set the mood and tone of the spot or film.

Finally, by far the best part of the job is to educate and train the next generation of colorists. Having been part of the same process at the beginning of my career, I feel very proud to be able to pass on my knowledge, what I have learned from peers and worked out for myself, and to help as many youngsters to get into color grading as possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I miss 35mm…

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning type of guy, so getting on my bike nice and early, taking photographs or getting straight to work. Mornings are always productive for me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be an art buyer! Realistically, I’d probably be a mountain guide back home in the French Alps where I grew up.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In all honesty, this was very unexpected as I originally trained to become a professional football player until quite an advanced age — which I’m now glad wasn’t meant to be my path. It was only when I moved to London after graduating that I fell into the post world where I started as a tea boy. I met the colorist there, and within the first day I knew this would be something I’d enjoy doing and could be good at. I trained hard and worked alongside some of the best colorists in the industry, learning from them while finding my own tune and it worked out pretty well.

Ted Baker

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
National Trust
Run the Jewels
Royal Blood
Rapha
Ted Baker

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
There are many projects I’m proud of, and picking only one is probably not possible. I think what I’m the most proud of is the relationship I have built with some of the industry’s most creative talents — people like Crowns and Owls, David Wilson, Thomas Bryant, Andrew Telling and Ninian Doff, to name a few. Also, being able to bring my contribution to the edifice in this stimulating world is what I’m the proudest of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My sound system, my camera, a corkscrew and my bike, of course!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mainly Instagram; it’s all about the visuals.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Is there such thing as grading without music?! I need my music when I work. It helps me get in the zone and also helps me with timings. An album is around the hour mark, so I know where I am.

Taste wise? Oh dear, the list could be long. If the beat is good and there are instruments, I’m in. I do struggle with pop music a lot. But I’m open to anything else.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I ride my bike, anywhere I can. I climb. I enjoy photography very much too. Since I’m in a dark room most of the time at work, I spend as much of my spare time outside as possible

Behind the Title: Trollbäck+Company’s David Edelstein

NAME: David Edelstein

COMPANY: Trollbäck+Company (@trollback)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a creative agency that believes in the power of communication, craft and collaboration.
Our mission is to promote innovation, create beauty and foster a lasting partnership. We believe that the brands of the future will thrive on the constant spirit of invention. We apply the same principle to our work, always evolving our practice and reaching across disciplines to produce unexpected, original results.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Director of Client Partnerships

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for building on current client relationships and bringing in new ones. I work closely with the team on our strategic approach to presenting us to a wide array of clients.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think you need to be in a position of doing business development to really understand that question. The goal is to land work that the company wants to do and balance that with the needs of running a business. It is not an easy task to juggle.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with a talented team, and being in a position to present a company with such a strong legacy.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Even after all these years, rejection still isn’t easy, but it’s something you deal with on a daily, sometimes hourly, basis.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning person, so I find it’s the perfect time to reach out to people when they’re fresh — and before their day gets chaotic.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Are you trying to tell me something? (laughs) I actually think I’d be doing the same thing, but perhaps for a different industry. I truly enjoy the experience of developing relationships and the challenge of solving creative problems with others. I think it’s a valuable skill set that can be applied to other types of jobs.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
This career came about pretty organically for me. I had a traditional production background and grew up in LA. When I moved to New York, I wound up at Showtime as a producer and discovered motion graphics. When I left there, I was fortunate enough to launch a few small studios. Being an owner makes you the head of business development from the start. These experiences have certainly prepared me for where I’ve been and where I am today.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m only a few months in, but we are currently spearheading branding for a Fortune 500 company. Trollbäck is also coming off a fantastic title sequence and package for the final episode of the Motion Conference, which just took place in June.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s tough to call out one particular project, but some career highlights have been a long relationship with Microsoft, as well as traveling the world with Marriott and Hilton.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Cell phone, computer/email and iPad.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I try to give different types of music a go, so Spotify works well for me. But, honestly, I’m still a Springsteen guy.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go home to relax and then come back the next day and try to be positive and grateful. Repeat!

Behind the Title: Steelhead MD Ted Markovic

NAME: Ted Markovic

COMPANY: LA-based Steelhead

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a content studio and cross-platform production company. You can walk through our front door with a script and out the back with a piece of content. We produce everything from social to Super Bowl.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Managing Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I am responsible for driving the overall culture and financial health of the organization. That includes building strong client relationships, new business development, operational oversight, marketing, recruiting and retaining talent and managing the profits and losses of all departments.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We all have a wide range of responsibilities and wear many hats. I occasionally find myself replacing the paper towels in the bathrooms because some days that’s what it takes.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
We are a very productive group that produces great work. I get a sense of accomplishment almost every day.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Replacing the paper towels in the bathrooms.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I get a lot more done while everyone else is busy eating their lunch or driving home.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Solving the traffic problem in Los Angeles. I see a lot of opportunities there.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I am a third-generation post production executive, and essentially grew up in a film lab in New York. I suspect the profession chose me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I am currently working on a Volkswagen Tier 2 project where we are shooting six cars over seven days on our stage at Steelhead. We’re incorporating dynamic camera shots of cars on a cyc with kinetic typography, motion graphics and VFX. It’s a great example of how we can do it all under one roof.

We recently worked with Nintendo and Interogate to bring the new Switch games to life in a campaign called Close Call. On set with rams, air mortars, lighting effects and lots of sawed-in-half furniture, we were able create real weight in-camera to layer with our VFX. We augmented the practical effects with HDR light maps, fire and debris simulations, as well as procedurally generated energy beams, 3D models, and 2D compositing to create a synergy between the practical and visual effects that really sells the proximity and sense of danger we were looking to create.

While the coordination of practical and post was no small chore, another interesting challenge we had to overcome was creating the CG weapons to mesh with the live-action plates. We started with low-resolution models directly from the games themselves, converted them and scrubbed in a good layer of detail and refined them to make them photoreal. We also had to conceptualize how some of the more abstract weapons would play with real-world physics.

Another project worth mentioning was a piece we created for Volkswagen called Strange Terrains. The challenge was to create 360-degree timelapse video from day-to-night. Something that’s never been done before. And in order to get this unique footage, we had to build an equally unique rigging system. We partnered with Supply Frame to design and build a custom-milled aluminum head to support four 50.6 megapixel Canon EOS 5DS cameras.

The “holy grail” of timelapse photography is getting the cameras to ramp the exposure over broad light changes. This was especially challenging to capture due to the massive exposure changes in the sky and the harshness of the white salt. After capturing around approximately 2,000 frames per camera — 9TB of working storage — we spent countless hours stitching, compositing, computing and rendering to get a fluid final product.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
About eight years ago, I created a video for my parents’ 40th wedding anniversary. My mother still cries when she watches it.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The wheel is a pretty essential piece of technology that I’m not sure I could live without. My smartphone is as expected as well as my Sleepwell device for apnea. That device changed my life.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I can work listening to anything but reggae.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Exercise.

Behind the Title: UCLA Extension Instructor Barry Goch

NAME: Barry Goch (@gochya)

COMPANY: UCLA Extension Entertainment Studies

WHAT IS UCLA EXTENSION?
UCLA Extension is the continuing education division of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). UCLA Extension offers over 5,000 open-enrollment courses and 180+ certificate programs with online and on-campus learning

Continue reading

Behind the Title: Spacewalk Sound’s Matthew Bobb

NAME: Matthew Bobb

COMPANY: Pasadena, California’s SpaceWalk Sound 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service audio post facility specializing in commercials, trailers and spatial sound for virtual reality (VR). We have a heavy focus on branded content with clients such as Panda Express and Biore and studios like Warner Bros., Universal and Netflix.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner/Sound Supervisor/Composer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’ve transitioned more into the sound supervisor role. We have a fantastic group of sound designers and mixers that work here, plus a support staff to keep us on track and on budget. Putting my faith in them has allowed me to step away from the small details and look at the bigger picture on every project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We’re still a small company, so while I mix and compose a little less than before, I find my days being filled with keeping the team moving forward. Most of what falls under my role is approving mixes, prepping for in-house clients the next day, sending out proposals and following up on new leads. A lot of our work is short form, so projects are in and out the door pretty fast — sometimes it’s all in one day. That means I always have to keep one eye on what’s coming around the corner.

The Greatest Showman 360

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Lately, it has been showing VR to people who have never tried it or have had a bad first experience, which is very unfortunate since it is a great medium. However, that all changes when you see someone come out of a headset exclaiming,”Wow, that is a game changer!”

We have been very fortunate to work on some well-known and loved properties and to have people get a whole new experience out of something familiar is exciting.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Dealing with sloppy edits. We have been pushing our clients to bring us into the fold as early as v1 to make suggestions on the flow of each project. I’ll keep my eye tuned to the timing of the dialog in relation to the music and effects, while making sure attention has been paid to the pacing of the edit to the music. I understand that the editor and director will have their attention elsewhere, so I’m trying to bring up potential issues they may miss early enough that they can be addressed.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I would say 3pm is pretty great most days. I should have accomplished something major by this point, and I’m moments away from that afternoon iced coffee.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be crafting the ultimate sandwich, trying different combinations of meats, cheeses, spreads and veggies. I’d have a small shop, preferably somewhere tropical. We’d be open for breakfast and lunch, close around 4pm, and then I’d head to the beach to sip on Russell’s Reserve Small Batch Bourbon as the sun sets. Yes, I’ve given this some thought.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I came from music but quickly burned out on the road. Studio life suited me much more, except all the music studios I worked at seemed to lack focus, or at least the clientele lacked focus. I fell into a few sound design gigs on the side and really enjoyed the creativity and reward of seeing my work out in the world.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We had a great year working alongside SunnyBoy Entertainment on VR content for the Hollywood studios including IT: Float, The Greatest Showman 360, Annabelle Creation: Bee’s Room and Pacific Rim: Inside the Uprising 360. We also released our first piece of interactive content, IT: Escape from Pennywise, for Gear VR and iOS.

Most recently, I worked on Star Wars: The Last Jedi in Scoring The Last Jedi: A 360 VR Experience. This takes Star Wars fans on a VIP behind-the-scenes intergalactic expedition, giving them on a virtual tour of the The Last Jedi’s production and soundstages and dropping them face-to-face with Academy Award-winning film composer John Williams and film director Rian Johnson.

Personally, I got to compose two Panda Express commercials, which was a real treat considering I sustained myself through college on a healthy diet of orange chicken.

It: Float

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It: Float was very special. It was exciting to take an existing property that was not only created by Stephen King but was also already loved by millions of people, and expand on it. The experience brought the viewer under the streets and into the sewers with Pennywise the clown. We were able to get very creative with spatial sound, using his voice to guide you through the experience without being able to see him. You never knew where he was lurking. The 360 audio really ramped up the terror! Plus, we had a great live activation at San Diego Comic Con where thousands of people came through and left pumped to see a glimpse of the film’s remake.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
It’s hard to imagine my life without these three: Spotify Premium, no ads! Philips Hue lights for those vibes. Lastly, Slack keeps our office running. It’s our not-so-secret weapon.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I treat social media as an escape. I’ll follow The Onion for a good laugh, or Anthony Bourdain to see some far flung corner of earth I didn’t know about.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHEN NOT MIXING OR EDITING?
If I’m doing busy work, I prefer something instrumental like Eric Prydz, Tycho, Bonobo — something with a melody and a groove that won’t make me fall asleep, but isn’t too distracting either.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
The best part about Los Angeles is how easy it is to escape Los Angeles. My family will hit the road for long weekends to Palm Springs, Big Bear or San Diego. We find a good mix of active (hiking) and inactive (2pm naps) things to do to recharge.

Behind the Title: Sim’s supervising sound editor David McCallum

Name: David McCallum

Company: Sim International — Sim Post (Sound) in Toronto

Can you describe your company?
Sim provides equipment and creative services for projects in film and television. We have offices in Toronto, Los Angeles, New York City, Atlanta and Vancouver. I work as part of our Sim Post team in Toronto’s King St. East post facility where our emphasis is post sound and picture. We’re a small division, but we’ve been together as a team for nearly 15 years, the last three of which have been as part of Sim.

What’s your job title?
Supervising Sound Editor

What does that entail? 
My work is 90% project and client focused. I work directly on the sound design and sound edit for television and film projects, collaborating with directors and producers to shape the sound for their show. I also manage a team of people at Sim Post (Sound) Toronto that make up our sound crew(s). Part of my job also involves studio time, working closely with actors and directors to help shape the final performances that end up on the screen.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I don’t work extreme hours. The screen industry, and post production in particular, has a well-deserved reputation for working its people hard, with long hours and tight demands as the norm rather than the exception. I don’t believe in overworking either my crew or myself. I strongly believe that people work best under predictable conditions.

Individuals need to be placed in positions to succeed, not merely survive. So, I put a lot of effort into managing my workload, getting on top of things well in advance of deadlines. I try to keep my days and weeks structured and organized so that I’m at my best as much as possible.

Sim’s ADR room.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Finding a unique way to solve a sound problem. I love discovering a new trick, like using parts of two different words to make a character say a new word. You never know when or where you can find these kinds of solutions — hearing the possibilities requires patience and a keen ear. Sometimes the things I put together sound ridiculous, but because I mostly work alone nobody gets to hear my mistakes. Every now and then something unexpected works, and it’s golden.

What’s your least favorite?
There can be a lot of politics that permeate the film and television world. I prefer direct communication and collaboration, even if what you hear from someone isn’t what you want to hear.

What is your favorite time of the day?
The start. I like getting in a bit early, relaxing with a good coffee while I map out my goals for the day. Every day something good needs to be accomplished, and if the day gets off to a positive start then there is a better chance that all my objectives for that day will be met.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would probably still be working in audio, but perhaps on the consumer side, selling high-end tube audio electronics and turntables. Either that, or I would be a tennis instructor.

Why did you choose this profession? 
That is actually a long story. I didn’t find this profession or career path on my own. I was put on it by a very thoughtful university professor named Clarke Mackay at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, who saw a skill set in me that I did not recognize in myself. The path started with Clarke, went through the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television and on to Jane Tattersall, who is senior VP of Sim Toronto.

Jane’s been the strongest influence in my career by far, teaching and steering me along the way. Not all lessons were intended, and sometimes we found ourselves on the same path. Sim Post (Sound) went through so many changes, and we managed a lot of them together. I don’t know if I would have found or stayed in this profession without Clarke or Jane, so in a way they have helped choose it for me.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
The Handmaid’s Tale, Vikings, Alias Grace, Cardinal, Molly’s Game, Kin and The Man Who Invented Christmas.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
The one I’m working on now! More seriously, that does feel like an impossible question to answer, as I’ve felt pride at numerous times in my career. But most recently I would say our work on The Handmaid’s Tale has been tremendously rewarding.

I’d also mention a small Canadian documentary I was a part of in 2016 called Unarmed Verses. It’s a National Film Board of Canada documentary by director Charles Officer and producer Lea Marin. It touched my heart.

I’m also very proud of some of my colleagues that I’ve been overseeing for a few years now, in particular Claire Dobson and Krystin Hunter. Claire and Krystin are two young editors who are both doing extremely impressive work with me. I’m very proud of them.

Name three pieces of technology that you can’t live without.
Avid Pro Tools, Izotope RX and NOS Amperex 6922 vacuum tubes.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’ve only ever participated in Facebook, but the global political climate has me off of social media right now. I do my best to stay away from the “comments section of life.”

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I try to reduce stress within the workplace. I have a few rituals that help… and good coffee. Nothing beats stress in the morning like a delicious coffee. But more practically, I try my best to stay on top of my work and make sure I thoroughly understanding my client’s expectations. I then actively manage my work so I’m not pushed up against deadlines.

But really the best tool is my team. I have an amazing team of people around me and I would be nothing without them.

Behind the Title: Versus Partner/CD Justin Barnes

NAME: Justin Barnes

COMPANY: Versus (@vs_nyc)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are “versus” the traditional model of a creative studio. Our approach is design driven and full service. We handle everything from live action to post production, animation and VFX. We often see projects from concept through delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner and Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I handle the creative side of Versus. From pitching to ideation, thought leadership and working closely with our editors, animators, artists and clients to make our creative — and our clients’ creative vision — the best it can be.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
There’s a lot of business and politics that you have to deal with being a creative.

Adidas

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Every day is different, full of new challenges and the opportunity to come up with new ideas and make really great work.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When I have to deal with the business side of things more than the creative side.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
For me, it’s very late at night; the only time I can work with no distractions.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Anything in the creative world.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
It’s been a natural progression for me to be where I am. Working with creative and talented people in an industry with unlimited possibilities has always seemed like a perfect fit.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
– Re-brand of The Washington Post
– Animated content series for the NCAA
– CG campaign for Zyrtec
– Live-action content for Adidas and Alltimers collaboration

Zyrtec

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am proud of all the projects we do, but the ones that stick out the most are the projects with the biggest challenges that we have pulled together and made look amazing. That seems like every project these days.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My laptop, my phone and Uber.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I can’t live without Pinterest. It’s a place to capture the huge streams of inspiration that come at us each day.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
We have music playing in the office 24/7, everything from hip-hop to classical. We love it all. When I am writing for a pitch, I need a little more concentration. I’ll throw on my headphones and put on something that I can get lost in.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Working on personal projects is big in helping de-stress. Also time at my weekend house in Connecticut.

Behind the Title: Lucky Post editor Elizabeth V. Moore

NAME: Elizabeth V. Moore

COMPANY: Lucky Post

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
The studio combines creative editorial, graphic design, sound design, mixing, color, compositing,VFX and finish

I feel very lucky to call Lucky my home for the past five and a half years. It’s a collection of driven co-workers who truly interact like a team. Together, we infuse art and care into the projects that come through our office.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
I am one of the four editors here.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I work with clients to take their concept and make it a reality. With the footage I’m provided, I get to be a storyteller. I add my creative perspective and collaborate with clients to craft a story or message that is hopefully even better than what they had envisioned possible.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
A big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a cut we’re all happy with. It’s not just me in a room by myself, editing. There’s a responsibility to your clients not just to edit something for them, but also to help facilitate a space where they feel comfortable and are happy to come to every day. My goal is to have them leave Lucky Post at the end of the day confident in the cut and feeling good in general… with smiles on their faces.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is seeing the edit take shape… to get to the end of a project and see the final resul, and reflect on what it took for that to manifest. That is a very satisfying feeling.

This CostaDelMar Slam spot is a recent project edited by Moore.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I try not to focus too much on my least favorite aspects of anything, but if pressed I’d have to say going through footage and making selects. I feel anxious to start my favorite part of the job — seeing the edit take shape — but in order to get the best result you have to focus and find the best pieces amidst all the content.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I wouldn’t consider myself a morning person, so I’d have to say early afternoon. When I have a deadline to hit, however, late at night is when I can really surprise myself with the amount and quality of work I can produce under pressure.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve asked myself that question, and I honestly can’t think of a better answer than what I’m doing now. Even though I had no idea when I was younger that this is where I’d end up, in retrospect, it makes the most sense.

My personal set of talents and interests throughout my development have helped give me the arsenal of skills it takes to enjoy editing and do it well.

SO YOU DIDN’T KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I didn’t have any idea I would end up in this career until college. I was originally a business major with a minor in film, because I always loved movies. Quickly into my first semester it dawned on me that I could actually pursue a career in something I was passionate about, not just what I thought was expected of me. I switched to film and, as I learned more about all the different departments, I knew editing was where my talents and skills could thrive. And the more I did it, the more I fell in love with the art.

AS A WOMAN EDITOR, WHO DID YOU LOOK UP TO WHEN STARTING OUT?
I didn’t think too much about who I looked up to based on being a woman. I had my films and editors that inspired me and I aspired to emulate editorially. However, I would say that my biggest female inspiration was editor Sally Menke (who died in an accident in 2010). Pulp Fiction was one of my favorite movies at the time, and the way the story was edited and structured was a large part of that.

Once I looked deeper into her career, I realized she was the editor for all of Quentin Tarantino’s films. It inspired me greatly that she was able to not only be an editor during a time that was very much a male-dominated field, but also maintain an ongoing, collaborative relationship that shaped both of their careers. I wanted to be the kind of editor that was not only worth working with, but worth working with again and again.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE MEDIA CHAMPIONING MORE FEMALE CREATIVES AND LEADERS IN OUR INDUSTRY?
I think it’s extremely important. To continue to push our industry to greater heights, new and different perspectives are needed to keep things evolving and growing. Media plays a big role in our society and culture, and women need to be well represented and their voices heard. Similar to my own story, a lot of opportunities are missed if they’re unknown or seem impossible. More women in leadership and creative positions will help young women see themselves in these roles.

WHAT SHOULD OR CAN WE DO TO ENCOURAGE MORE WOMEN TO BECOME EDITORS?
To be an editor, you have to be passionate about it and love the process. We can’t make women be interested in the art, but we can reinforce the confidence in the ones who are. We have to be the ones to say, “There’s no reason to be intimidated by pursuing this career path. This industry is always looking for fresh, original perspectives and we, as women, have a unique voice to offer. The quality of your craft will speak for itself and that is what will draw clients to work with you.”

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Within the past year I’ve worked on campaigns for Crate & Barrel, Charles Schwab, AT&T and Soraa.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I wouldn’t say that I wear a different hat when working on different genres, because at the end of the day the goal is the same: to tell a good story in as creative a way as the content allows.

However, what I’m looking for out of the footage will change depending on the type of project. So much of my select-making process is based on feelings that arise while viewing a scene. I select the pieces that give me the reaction I want the audience to feel based on the genre of the piece.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I have a different sense of pride for all the projects I work on. Sometimes it’s because of the level of quality of the work, and sometimes it’s because of the challenges that had to be overcome. But I’d say that I’m still most proud of one of my first pieces I did at Lucky Post. It was back when I was an assistant editor; I was given access to footage for a music video for a musician named Jesse Woods and was told to just have fun with it and use it as an opportunity to practice.

Even though I wasn’t the official editor on it, I took the challenge seriously and spent hours exploring possibilities, pushing my craft farther than I ever had to that point. The director was impressed enough that it became the final cut he and the artist used. I still look back on that as one of the most beautiful pieces I’ve produced. It was the turning point in my career, where not only did others see and recognize my talent, but I saw what I was capable of and this gave me the confidence that led me to where I am now.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
I’ve used a few different editing software programs throughout my career and my favorite, and what I currently use, is Adobe Premiere Pro.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Even though I’m only asked to edit, a big part of my job includes spending a lot of time with my clients as we work toward a final cut. Sometimes that means being a good listener or a positive force for them when things get stressful.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
A computer is number one, since I can’t edit without it. I’d like to believe I’d still be interested in the art of editing if I had to do it via the cut and splice method, but it would be a very different process and experience for me. Second would be my television. I love watching great movies, shows and well-done commercials, so it’s both a leisure activity and it inspires me as an editor. Lastly, my cell phone because we now live in a society where it’s becoming hard to work and stay connected without it.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Besides my passion for the visual arts, like movies, my favorite escape is music. I love to go to shows to see live bands or get lost in music being played by DJs and dance. When I’m in those moments, all the stress from the week is forgotten and I’m living in the present.

Behind the Title: PlushNYC partner/mixer Mike Levesque, Jr.

NAME: Michael Levesque, Jr.

COMPANY: PlushNYC

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We provide audio post production

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner/Mixer/Sound Designer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The foundation of it all for me is that I’m a mixer and a sound designer. I became a studio owner/partner organically because I didn’t want to work for someone else. The core of my role is giving my clients what they want from an audio post perspective. The other parts of my job entail managing the staff, working through technical issues, empowering senior employees to excel in their careers and coach junior staff when given the opportunity.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Everyday I find myself being the janitor in many ways! I’m a huge advocate of leading by example and I feel that no task is too mundane for any team member to take on. So I don’t cast shade on picking up a mop or broom, and also handle everything else above that. I’m a part of a team, and everyone on the team participates.

During our latest facility remodel, I took a very hands-on approach. As a bit of a weekend carpenter, I naturally gravitate toward building things, and that was no different in the studio!

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE?
Avid Pro Tools. I’ve been operating on Pro Tools since 1997 and was one of the early adopters. Initially, I started out on analog ¼-inch tape and later moved to the digital editing system SSL ScreenSound. I’ve been using Pro Tools since its humble beginnings, and that is my tool of choice.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
For me, my favorite part about the job is definitely working with the clients. That’s where I feel I am able to put my best self forward. In those shoes, I have the most experience. I enjoy the conversation that happens in the room, the challenges that I get from the variety of projects and working with the creatives to bring their sonic vision to life. Because of the amount of time i spend in the studio with my clients one of the great results besides the work is wonderful, long-term friendships. You get to meet a lot of different people and experience a lot of different walks of life, and that’s incredibly rewarding for me.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
We’ve been really lucky to have regular growth over the years, but the logistics of that can be challenging at times. Expansion in NYC is a constant uphill battle!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
The train ride in. With no distractions, I’m able to get the most work done. It’s quiet and allows me to be able to plan my day out strategically while my clarity is at its peak. That way I can maximize my day and analyze and prioritize what I want to get done before the hustle and bustle of the day begins.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
If I weren’t a mixer/sound designer, I would likely be a general contractor or in a role where I was dealing with building and remodeling houses.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I started when I was 19 and I knew pretty quickly that this was the path for me. When I first got into it, I wanted to be a music producer. Being a novice musician, it was very natural for me.

Borgata

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I recently worked on a large-scale project for Frito-Lay, a project for ProFlowers and Shari’s Berries for Valentine’s Day, a spot for Massage Envy and a campaign for the Broadway show Rocktopia. I’ve also worked on a number of projects for Vevo, including pieces for The World According To… series for artists — that includes a recent one with Jaden Smith. I also recently worked on a spot with SapientRazorfish New York for Borgata Casino that goes on a colorful, dreamlike tour of the casino’s app.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Back in early 2000s, I mixed a DVD box set called Journey Into the Blues, a PBS film series from Martin Scorsese that won a Grammy for Best Historical Album and Best Album Notes.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
– My cell phone to keep me connected to every aspect of life.
– My Garmin GPS Watch to help me analytically look at where I’m performing in fitness.
– Pro Tools to keep the audio work running!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’m an avid triathlete, so personal wellness is a very big part of my life. Training daily is a really good stress reliever, and it allows me to focus both at work and at home with the kids. It’s my meditation time.

Behind the Title: Arcade Edit’s Ali Mao

NAME: Ali Mao

COMPANY: Arcade Edit in New York City

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Arcade is a film and television editorial house with offices located in Los Angeles and New York City.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being an editor is all about storytelling. Whether that means following the script and boards as designed or playing outside the parameters of those guidelines, we set the pace and tone of a piece in hopes that our audience reacts to it. Sometimes it’s super easy and everything just falls into place. Other times it requires a bit more problem solving on my end, but I’m always striving to tell the story the best I can.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
For a lot of people who don’t work in the industry, they think editors just sit in a dark room alone all the time, and we do sometimes! But what I love most about editing is how collaborative a process it is. So much of what we do is working with the director and the creatives to find just the right pieces that help tell their story the most effectively.

Aflac

Once in awhile the best cuts are not even what was originally boarded or conceived, but what was found through the exploration of editing. When you fall in love with a character, laugh at a joke, or cry at an emotional moment it’s a result of the directing, the acting and the editing all working perfectly in sync with one another.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love going through dailies for the first time and seeing how the director and the cinematographer compose a particular scene or how an actor interprets lines, especially when you pick up on something in a take that you as an editor love – a subtle twitching of an eye or the way the light captures some element of the image – that everyone forgot about until they see it in your edit.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Not having enough time to really sit with the footage before I start working with the director or agency.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early in the morning even though I’m not really a morning person…but in our industry, that’s probably the quietest time of the day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Bumming it at the beach back home in Hawaii.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
During the summer before my junior year of high school, I stumbled upon Vivacious Lady (with Jimmy Stewart and Ginger Rogers) on AMC. I don’t know what it was about that movie, but I stayed up until 2am watching the whole thing.

For the next two years, every Sunday I’d grab the TV guide from the morning newspaper and review the AMC and TCM lineups for the week. Then I’d set my VCR to record every movie I wanted to see, which at the time were mostly musicals and rom-coms. When my dad asked me what I wanted to study in college I said film because at 5’4” getting paid to play basketball probably wasn’t going to happen, and those old AMC and TMC movies were my next favorite thing.

When I got to college, I was taught the basics of FCP in a digital filmmaking class and fell in love with editing instantly. I liked how there was a structure to the process of it, while simultaneously having a ton of creative freedom in how to tell the story.

Tide

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
In January I worked with Saatchi on their Tide Super Bowl Campaign, editing the television teasers and 15s. This was the second year in a row that I got to work with them for the Super Bowl, and it’s one of my favorite jobs every year. They do some really fun and creative work for their teasers, and there’s so much opportunity to experiment and get a little weird

There was the Aflac Ski Patrol spot, and I also just finished a Fage Campaign with Leo Burnett, which went incredibly well. Matt Lenski from Arts & Science did such an incredible job with the shoot and provided me with so many options of how to tell the story for each spot.

DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I think you put on a different hat whenever you start any project, regardless of genre. Every comedy piece or visual piece is unique in its story, rhythm, etc. I definitely try to put myself in the right head space for editing a specific genre, whether that be from chatting with the director/agency or doing a deep dive on the Internet looking for inspiration from films, ads, music videos — anything really.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I worked as an editor on a documentary called Undroppable. It was about the school dropout rate across the US and followed students from different parts of the country, focusing on the challenges of graduating high school.

The film had already been edited by the time I got involved, but the producer felt it needed fresh eyes. I loved a lot of what the previous editors had done, and felt like the one thing I could bring to the film was focus. There were so many compelling stories that it sometimes felt like you never had a chance to really take any of it in. I wanted the audience to not just fall in love with these students and root for them, but to also leave the theater in active pursuit of ways they could be involved in our country’s education system.

As someone who was cutting mostly commercials and short films in Final Cut Pro at the time, doing a feature length documentary on Avid Media Composer was daunting, but so very, very exciting and gratifying.

WHAT DO YOU EDIT ON THESE DAYS?
Avid Media Composer.

ARE YOU EVER ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT?
Every once in awhile I get a job where I’m asked to create an edit that is not in line with the footage that was shot. In those instances, I’ll have to comp takes together in order to get a desired set of performances or a desired shot. I try not to make the comps too clean because I don’t want to put our Flame artist out of a job.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
iPhone, computer, Roomba

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I just had a baby, so coming home to my son and my baby daddy is a great way to end the day. I also play on an all-women’s flag football team in a co-ed league on the weekends. The first game we ever won I QB’d while I was eight weeks pregnant; it was my Serena Williams moment!

Behind the Title: Whitehouse editor David Cea

NAME: David Cea

COMPANY: Whitehouse Post in New York

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Originally, we were an editorial shop that has grown into a one-stop shop for all things post production.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Being the one responsible for expressing the creative vision in filmmaking. The film editor takes all of the hard work and ideas and gives it shape and form for the world to see.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The human component. I find a large part of what I do is making my clients feel comfortable. Filmmaking is a tough and sometimes exhausting process. Just shy of the finish line is where I come in. I want to be the one that helps relieve some of the stress from the process. As a former bartender, I learned how to be a pseudo-therapist. Keeping everyone positive and showing them that all of their work will lead to a great end-product is important.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Creative problem solving. Inevitably there will be a missed shot or last-minute client ask that seems impossible. Finding a way to fix it with what I have in front of me keeps things interesting.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Second guessing. When anyone on the creative team, myself included, begins to doubt their instincts, I feel the end product starts to suffer.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
5:30pm… much to my wife’s chagrin.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
In an ideal world, a surf instructor in Costa Rica.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In college I knew I wanted to work in the film industry in some capacity. I took an editing class and was sold from there. Editing also seemed to be the sanest leg of the process.

Target

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Target’s fashion forward rebranding campaign
– A short film for Mercedes featuring Mariel Hemingway and her daughter Langley Fox
– A skate film for the Loke app launching soon

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
I certainly have to place myself in the right mood when cutting each specific genre. It may be a certain type of music during the selection process or watching the works of the masters of the field to gain inspiration. I try to put myself in the director’s shoes: “Why was this shot done this way? What is the broad feeling he or she is trying to achieve?”

While I do get into a different headspace when cutting different genres, I definitely borrow from each style no matter the project. Not being married to a specific genre is key to keeping me engaged and making for a more well rounded end product.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The Jeep 4×4 Ever Super Bowl spot. This a spot that went through a several evolutions until it was the final piece that won the big game spot for FCA Chrysler that year.

Ford

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
Avid Media Composer

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUGIN?
Waves Pitch Shift. It will make even the dullest scratch VO talent sound like Sam Elliot.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? IF SO, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU ASKED TO DO?
Yes. Many projects you see coming through the door nowadays are comprised of found footage. Sometimes all we get is a script. This is sometimes fun because we are then in essence put in more of a directorial role.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
– Wireless silent mouse — Since I don’t use Wacom tablets to edit, this is key to not drive the people in the room nuts with constant clicking
– Noise-cancelling headphones — the streets of NYC become downright pleasant when wearing them, smells aside
– Swell bottle — that’s technology, right?

DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Plenty of screen-free time with the family.

Behind the Title: Senior compositing artist Marcel Lemme

We recently reached out to Marcel Lemme to find out more about how he works, his background and how he relaxes.

What is your job title and where are you based?
I’m a senior compositing artist based out of Hamburg, Germany.

What does your job entail?
I spend about 90 percent of my time working on commercial jobs for local and international companies like BMW, Audi and Nestle, but also dabble in feature films, corporate videos and music videos. On a regular day, I’m handling everything from job breakdowns to set supervision to conform. I’m also doing shot management for the team, interacting with clients, showing clients work and some compositing. Client review sessions and final approvals are regular occurrences for me too.

What would surprise people the most about the responsibilities that fall under that title?
When it comes to client attended sessions, you have to be part clown, part mind-reader. Half the job is being a good artist; the other half is keeping clients happy. You have to anticipate what the client will want and balance that with what you know looks best. I not only have to create and keep a good mood in the room, but also problem-solve with a smile.

What’s your favorite part of your job?
I love solving problems when compositing solo. There’s nothing better than tackling a tough project and getting results you’re proud of.

What’s your least favorite?
Sometimes the client isn’t sure what they want, which can make the job harder.

What’s your most productive time of day?
I’m definitely not a morning guy, so the evening — I’m more productive at night.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I’ve asked myself this question a lot, but honestly, I’ve never come up with a good answer.

How’d you get your first job, and did you know this was your path early on?
I fell into it. I was young and thought I’d give computer graphics a try, so I reached out to someonewho knew someone, and before I knew it I was interning at a company in Hamburg, which is how I came to know online editing. At the time, Quantel mostly dominated the industry with Editbox and Henry, and Autodesk Flame and Flint were just emerging. I dove in and started using all the technology I could get my hands on, and gradually started securing jobs based on recommendations.

Which tools are you using today, and why?
I use whatever the client and/or the project demands, whether it’s Flame or Foundry’s Nuke and for tracking I often use The Pixel Farm PFTrack and Boris FX Mocha. For commercial spots, I’ll do a lot of the conform and shot management on Flame and then hand off the shots to other team members. Or, if I do it myself, I’ll finish in Flame because I know I can do it fast.

I use Flame because it gives me different ways to achieve a certain look or find a solution to a problem. I can also play a clip at any resolution with just two clicks in Flame, which is important when you’re in a room with clients who want to see different versions on the fly. The recent open clip updates and python integration have also saved me time. I can import and review shots, with automatic versions coming in, and build new tools or automate tedious processes in the post chain that have typically slowed me down.

Tell us about some recent project work.
I recently worked on a project for BMW as a compositing supervisor and collaborated with eight other compositors to finish number of versions in a short amount of time. We did shot management, compositing, reviewing, versioning and such in Flame. Also individual shot compositing in Nuke and some tracking in Mocha Pro.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
There’s no one project that stands out in particular, but overall, I’m proud of jobs like the BMW spots, where I’ve led a team of artists and everything just works and flows. It’s rewarding when the client doesn’t know what you did or how you did it, but loves the end result.

Where do you find inspiration for your projects?
The obvious answer here is other commercials, but I also watch a lot of movies and, of course, spend time on the Internet.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
The off button on the telephone (they should really make that bigger), anything related to cinematography or digital cinema, and streaming technology.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’ve managed to avoid Facebook, but I do peek at Twitter and Instagram from time to time. Twitter can be a great quick reference for regional news or finding out about new technology and/or industry trends.

Do you listen to music while you work?
Less now than I did when I was younger. Most of the time, I can’t as I’m juggling too much and it’s distracting. When I listen to music, I appreciate techno, classical and singer/song writer stuff; whatever sets the mood for the shots I’m working on. Right now, I’m into Iron and Wine and Trentemøller, a Danish electronic music producer.

How do you de-stress from the job?
My drive home. It can take anywhere from a half an hour to an hour, depending on the traffic, and that’s my alone time. Sometimes I listen to music, other times I sit in silence. I cool down and prepare to switch gears before heading home to be with my family.

Behind the Title: Start VR Producer Ela Topcuoglu

NAME: Ela Topcuoglu

COMPANY: Start VR (@Start_VR)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Start VR is a full-service production studio (with offices in Sydney, Australia and Marina Del Rey, California) specializing in immersive and interactive cinematic entertainment. The studio brings expertise in entertainment and technology together with feature film quality visuals with interactive content, creating original and branded narrative experiences in VR.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Development Executive and Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I am in charge of expanding Start VR’s business in North America. That entails developing strategic partnerships and increasing business development in the entertainment, film and technology sectors.

I am also responsible for finding partners for our original content slate as well as seeking existing IP that would fit perfectly in VR. I also develop relationships with brands and advertising agencies to create branded content. Beyond business development, I also help produce the projects that we move forward with.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
The title comes with the responsibility of convincing people to invest in something that is constantly evolving, which is the biggest challenge. My job also requires me to be very creative in coming up with a native language to this new medium. I have to wear many hats to ensure that we create the best experiences out there.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of the job is that I get to wear lots of different hats. Being in the emerging field of VR, everyday is different. I don’t have a traditional 9-to-5 office job and I am constantly moving and hustling to set up business meetings and stay updated on the latest industry trends.

Also, being in the ever-evolving technology field, I learn something new almost everyday, which is extremely essential to my professional growth.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Convincing people to invest in virtual reality and seeing its incredible potential. That usually changes once they experience truly immersive VR, but regardless, selling the future is difficult.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
My favorite part of the day is the morning. I start my day with a much-needed shot of Nespresso, get caught up on emails, take a look at my schedule and take a quick breather before I jump right into the madness.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
If I wasn’t working in VR, I would be investing my time in learning more about artificial intelligence (AI) and use that to advance medicine/health and education.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I loved entertaining people from a very young age, and I was always looking for an outlet to do that, so the entertainment business was the perfect fit. There is nothing like watching someone’s reaction to a great piece of content. Virtual reality is the ultimate entertainment outlet and I knew that I wanted to create experiences that left people with the same awe reaction that I had the moment I experienced it.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I worked and assisted in the business and legal affairs department at Media Rights Capital and had the opportunity to work on amazing TV projects, including House of Cards, Baby Driver and Ozark.

Awake: First Contact

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
The project that I am most proud of to date is the project that I am currently producing at Start VR. It’s called Awake: First Contact. It was a project I read about and said, “I want to work on that.”

I am in incredibly proud that I get to work on a virtual reality project that is pushing the boundaries of the medium both technically and creatively.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, laptop and speakers.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes, especially if I’m working on a pitch deck. It really keeps me in the moment. I usually listen to my favorite DJ mixes on Soundcloud. It really depends on my vibe that day.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have recently started surfing, so that is my outlet at the moment. I also meditate regularly. It’s also important for me to make sure that I am always learning something new and unrelated to my industry.

Behind the Title: Weta Workshop’s Jason Aldous

NAME: Jason Aldous

COMPANY: Wellington, New Zealand’s Weta Workshop

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
A weird and wonderful (emphasis on wonderful) collection of artists, craftspeople and some of the most creative minds I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting. Any one day can have leading costume designers, sword-smiths and game creators working under a single roof.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Project manager for communications & media production.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
On the surface it sounds pretty straightforward: product marketing and product packaging. But like a lot of things at Weta Workshop, once you jump aboard the train it turns out to be more like a roller coaster.

On a daily basis this role could involve product design, presentations, photo shoots, brainstorm sessions, client visits and modeling. But the heart of the role is making sure we’ve got everything we need (information, planning, resources and inspiration) to make sure every project meets the Weta Workshop standard.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
This is the type of role that can scale up or down in responsibility depending on the size of the project and the size of the team. In a smaller team on a small project, you could spend time being involved in planning, creative, copyediting and graphic design. In a larger team on a big project you keep it to the basics while the team cover their bases.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
When the schedules fall into alignment, everything is perfectly balanced, and the team is creatively challenged.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When we’ve made way for an urgent request and everything is looking steady and then… a second urgent request rolls in. With such a wide and varied company with clients, fans, employees and projects from all over the world, the surprises are unavoidable, but it’s pretty rewarding to deliver on too!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Afternoon walk. There’s always someone thoughtful enough to round up a few people at a time for a walk. It’s a good time to get fresh air, talk about work, not talk about work and generally give your head a bit of a refresh before truckin’ on to the end of the day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be getting back to planning some short films. Ideally ones that involve food.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I wasn’t initially looking to re-enter the field of graphic design, but I saw a compelling role that I fit the bill perfectly for. The appeal of working at Weta Workshop helped push me out of my comfort zone in editorial to keep developing in another field.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
The Art & Craft of Weta Workshop exhibition in Wuhan — sharing the work we do with people who might not have the chance to visit us in Wellington. Also brand development for the Mini Epics line of collectibles. I really love the product packaging we’ve come up with and I can’t wait to see it on shelves.

GKR: Heavy Hitters was my first time working on a board game. Plus, it’s an IP of our own, created by three artists who I had admired from afar for a really long time!

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Recently, Middle-earth: From Script to Screen. I can’t claim a great deal of ownership over this project, but to have been involved with a team of experts detailing how the world of Middle-earth was built for screen has been an absolute privilege and an adventure.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Fujifilm x100 (taking photos)
iPhone (viewing photos)
Printing press (properly viewing photos)

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I stay tuned to Twitter personally and professionally. But my favorite place for social media content is Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Daft Punk’s Tron: Legacy has been my go-to night shift and focus-inducing music for years. There’s always a place for The Commodores on the late-night playlist too!

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I used get out for a run on my lunch break, if I could. I think I’ve taken a change of pace and moved onto dog walks. But nothing can beat a multi-day hike in the New Zealand bush!

Behind the Title: Union VFX supervisor James Roberts

NAME: James Roberts

COMPANY: London-based Union (@unionvfx)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Union is an independent VFX company founded on a culture of originality, innovation and collaboration.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
VFX Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Overseeing the VFX for feature films from concept to delivery. This includes concept development, on-set photography and supervision of artists.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I sometimes get to be an actor.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with creative artists both on set and in the studio to develop original artwork.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Answering emails.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
1am

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Professional dog walker

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
My mother was an artist and my father was a computer programmer… I didn’t have many other options.

My Cousin Rachel

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS?
T2 Trainspotting and My Cousin Rachel.

WHAT PROJECT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
’71 and The Theory of Everything.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Headphones, Side Effects Houdini and light bulbs.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Instagram — I’m @jjjjjjames

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Yes…… anything and everything.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I spend time away from work with nice people.

Behind the Title: Alma Mater EP/producer Ben Apley

NAME: Ben Apley

COMPANY: Alma Mater

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Alma Mater is a visual studio dedicated to design, live action and animation. Our work has a strong foundation in design, and includes projects in traditional commercial advertising, as well as entertainment, and often includes digital extensions, branding and experiential executions.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Producer/Producer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As executive producer, I target new opportunities, work with sales reps to strategically figure out how to pursue new business and manage the overall flow of the office from a business and resource standpoint. As producer, I manage production workflow and communicate project goals, needs, etc. to our clients.

My primary responsibility is putting the creative team in the best possible place to succeed. If you do that, then everything else kind of falls into place.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
There isn’t an established “right way” to try to do this job. The role really does shift around a lot based on where you are in the sales and production cycle, and you have to be comfortable adapting to immediate needs while still planning for longer-term business strategies.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Closing on new business.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Turning down new opportunities when we’re too busy. That kills me.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
After my children go to sleep.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Pursuing a career as a professional basketball player.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
When I was in college, I had a journalism internship at a news agency based in Washington, DC, one spring, and then a production internship in Chicago later that summer. I realized during the production internship that everyone on the crew appeared to be pretty happy while the journalists I followed always seemed kind of angry. So I decided to pursue production.

Rough Night

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We just finished a campaign for Lennox, the title sequence for the movie Rough Night and a series of commercials launching the 2018 Ford F-150.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
Early on in my career, I produced the original Marvel theatrical logo animation. I remember being so excited to see something I had worked on in the movie theater.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My phone, my computer, and my car.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Sometimes I like to play “Everyday I’m Hustlin’” by Rick Ross while I work on bids.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I have three children who bring me back to reality on a regular basis.

Behind the Title: PS260 editor Matt Posey

NAME: Matt Posey

COMPANY: PS260 (@ps260nyc)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
PS260 is a boutique editorial house (with offices in Venice, California and New York City) specializing in commercials, music videos and features. We also have a motion graphics and visual effects department. We’re a small team that fosters real creativity and experimentation in the work that we do.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Editing is essentially taking video, audio and images and crafting them into the most effective telling of a story. It is an extremely collaborative process that involves many components — understanding the technology, working with directors/writers/creatives, coordinating sound and effects — but at its heart, editing is telling a compelling visual story over time.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I suppose for people who aren’t a part of the post process the most surprising thing might be how drastically a story can change in the edit. There’s that saying that a film (or short, or commercial, or whatever) is written three times: first as a script, then as it ends up being shot and finally as it’s edited. Very rarely does a final product end up as “boarded,” and I still find it amazing how such small changes can completely change the viewer’s idea of what’s happening on the screen — what if we held this shot so the character blinks weirdly one more time? Or how about we add a sound effect of his keys rustling? What if we open with the other character so now we’re in their POV for the rest of the scene?

Depeche Mode

Editors can frequently act as fixers — with the stress and unpredictability of productions, things don’t often go the way they’re planned and the editors are then tasked with making sense of a puzzle with missing pieces. I love being challenged to find some outrageous way to tell the story, and we want to tell it with the material that’s in front of us.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Sometimes these creative solutions to production problems work really well and sometimes they feel a bit lacking. It’s at these times you know these problems could have been solved if editorial was involved earlier in the process. I’ve been lucky to be involved in some projects through pre and post production and, along with minimizing prep in post and allowing for more time to be spent on creative editorial, potential issues were caught and ironed out before they became bigger concerns.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Lunchtime is always a pretty great thing. PS260 makes sure we’re all well fed.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Probably desperately trying to garner YouTube hits for my speculative fiction essay videos.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I’ve been editing since I was a kid, re-editing Star Wars audio books on cassette tape to tell new stories. Later, I began capturing analog video that I shot or recorded from the TV with a Dazzle Movie Star box and editing in Adobe Premiere 5.0 (I never thought I’d go back to Premiere almost 20 years later, but I did). I always knew I wanted to work with video and loved to experiment with new effects and ways to craft a story, so I went to art school and got a degree in video art. After that I found I needed to make rent, so getting paid to do what I love was the easiest decision I’ve ever made.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Recently, I’ve done a lot of video work for Depeche Mode. The director Tim Saccenti and I created the live visuals for their current tour, along with two performance music videos and three 360 music videos, which should be out very soon!

I’ve also just finished a wonderful feature documentary, Illustrated Man (left), about tattooed men and the history of tattooing in NYC, with director Sophy Holland. Currently, I’m working on some videos for Elizabeth Arden, starring Reese Witherspoon.

YOU HAVE WORKED ON ALL SORTS OF PROJECTS. DO YOU PUT ON A DIFFERENT HAT WHEN CUTTING FOR A SPECIFIC GENRE?
The goal of every project is the same: to make the audience feel what you want them to feel, whether it’s laughter or sadness, or that rush of adrenaline as they’re making their way home from the theater. But each project comes with its own set of limitations.

With TV spots, you’re confined to 30 or 60 seconds and you have to temper your grand ideas of how best to tell the story with the economy of time, not to mention the sometimes limiting concerns of the brand or product you’re representing. Long form and features can allow you all the time you may need, but you have to be mindful of the audience’s attention span.

The best thing you can do is continually learn, and have at-the-ready techniques to help you with a specific form or genre, like knowing when to be in a wide or a close-up shot, using the camera’s distance to create tension or reveal emotion. Or in a comedy, for example, knowing not to reveal new information right after a big joke because the audience will miss it while they’re laughing (thanks Ren & Stimpy).

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
My first feature, We’ve Forgotten More Than We Ever Knew, was an incredible learning experience for me. It taught me so much about how to cut dialogue, build out a scene and carry a character’s emotional arc across 90 minutes. Plus, it’s just a really cool film.

WHAT DO YOU USE TO EDIT?
Right now I’m using Adobe Premiere CC 2017. The recent updates have finally stolen me away from Avid and Final Cut.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLUG-IN?
This is like asking someone what their favorite book or movie is, so it’ll probably change depending on the day of week. Right now I’m into using stock reverb plug-ins, or things like iZotope Vinyl to mix in sound elements in interesting ways. Tomorrow it could be star wipes.

ARE YOU OFTEN ASKED TO DO MORE THAN EDIT? IF SO, WHAT ELSE ARE YOU ASKED TO DO?
Definitely. Because of the progression of technology, clients are expecting more and more, and the divide between offline and online is narrowing. I do a lot of the online effects in the edit, whether it’s motion graphics, correcting eye lines when the actors stray, or comping split screens.

In the features and music videos I work on, I have a lot of freedom to work on bigger CG shots and effects set pieces, which is always a lot of fun.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Of course, no one can live without their phone nowadays. It does help a lot for my job as well, allowing me to remote in to my workstation to check on a render or reference an EDL at a session.

The other two would be my corded Apple full-size keyboard and Logitech M500 mouse. They’re amazingly simple tools, but they make things so much easier.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
It’s all about having a good work-life balance, which is an issue most editors have to grapple with. Fortunately, I have some amazing people in my life who make sure to occasionally pull me away from all the screens.

Behind the Title: Broadcast Management Group’s Todd Mason

NAME: Todd Mason

COMPANY: Broadcast Management Group (BMG) with offices in DC, NYC and LA.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Broadcast Management Group (BMG) is a video production company that focuses on music, news and entertainment events. We work with networks, event companies and digital media companies on multi-camera productions live to air or live to the web. We handle all of the technical design, engineering and management for each production as well as all the crewing, transmissions and overall logistics.

Additionally, we provide creative and editorial solutions as well as broadcast consulting services. We like to think of ourselves as a one-stop-shop for live production.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
CEO and Executive in Charge of Production.

Live streaming for Mashable during SXSW was one recent job for BMG.

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
As CEO, I’m involved in all of the day-to-day activity for the company as well as long-term strategic planning and client development. During our live productions, I serve as the executive in charge of production, in which I’m responsible for all aspects of the production. My job is to ensure that everything is running smoothly – from a technical, editorial and personnel perspective – and deal with any last-minute changes.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Like most CEOs, I’m involved in all facets of the company — business development, accounting, marketing, etc. I think people would be surprised by how much of the hands-on work I participate in.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
It’s hard to explain to people outside of the industry, but there’s an adrenaline rush that you get during a live production. That’s my favorite part of the job. At BMG, we like to say that we’re adrenaline junkies.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Being on the road constantly is a challenge for me and my family.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
Early morning before everyone else is in the office and there aren’t any distractions.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Growing up I wanted to be a truck driver. I don’t know what it was that drew me to that, but I always told my parents it was something I wanted to do. Luckily, I found television production instead.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
When I was growing up, the church I attended started to televise their weekly church services. I was fascinated by all of the technology and the live production aspect. I was able to negotiate my way into being on the production crew — even though I was younger than the required age limit — and I was immediately hooked.

The Oscars party for IMDb.


CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?

In February, Broadcast Management Group produced a live Oscars Watch Party for IMDb. The program consisted of a 30-minute pre-show, 30-minute post show and a three-hour second screen show that ran concurrent to the Oscars broadcast. The show streamed live on Twitter and Twitch and drew 13 million viewers. After that, we produced live programming for Mashable during SXSW in Austin. Our program streamed live on Twitter and featured interviews with actors, celebrities and musicians. Currently, we’re in the middle of two large consulting projects for TD Ameritrade and Verizon and will be producing some additional live programming at San Diego Comic-Con in July.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
About a year ago, we completed a consulting project for the International Center for Journalists. We built out a full production operation in Karachi, Pakistan at a local university. It was designed to train aspiring journalists and newsroom crews and allow them to hone their craft. It was great to be part of such an ambitious project, especially one that has a positive impact on people’s lives and contributes to the broadcast community as a whole.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My iPhone (since I’m always on it), my laptop and Google Drive (which I’ve just learned to love).

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
LinkedIn and Facebook mostly.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
I do. Mostly whatever comes up in my iTunes playlist.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Excersing and keeping up with my landscaping at home.

Behind the Title: Audiomotion managing director Brian Mitchell

NAME: Brian Mitchell

COMPANY: Oxford, UK-based Audiomotion

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Audiomotion has been around nearly 20 years, providing motion-captured character animation to video games, film, TV and a whole host of other applications.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Managing Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The job consists of many disciplines. All the usual forecasting and planning requirements, working closely with the management team to ensure we maintain the quality of service. I also get involved with the day-to-day running of the studio itself when time allows. I enjoy being part of the team especially on location shoots. We have a wide range of regular clients who are based all over the UK, Europe and beyond. I also like to get out and pay them a visit from time to time to maintain the relationship and make sure we’re aware of any new workflows and of any new opportunities for evolving our collaboration.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I’m not sure if it’s a surprise but as a small company we all get to wear several hats, which means there might be an odd occasion when I can sneak off to the workshop and help build some crazy props. Last time it was a full-size “mocap-friendly” helicopter.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The thing that gives me the most pleasure is the wide variety of characters, creatives, sports celebrities and actors that we work with. Whilst on screen the workflow appears very similar, the final results are pretty amazing. I have to say that on most occasions no two shoots are the same.

We have worked with the likes of Liam Neeson, Brian Cox and Andy Sirkis. Sport stars such as Lionel Messi, Gareth Bale and Harry Kane, as well as Robbie Williams, Take That and Will.i.am to name a few, and I have to say that every one of them has been a pleasure to work with. We make it our business to ensure every client, actor and crew are supported and looked after from pre-production through the whole process to delivery and beyond if necessary.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I would say the admin. Now don’t get me wrong, I love a good spreadsheet, I’m just not a fan of spending lots of time wading through a flood of emails or coming up with answers to this type thing!

From a shoot perspective, packing up from a horse capture location shoot. There’s a lot to do even though the party is over and you never know what you might step in!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I think for me it has to be first thing in the morning because I can get in early and get the jump on the day. I achieve far more that way.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I constantly have a list of alternative ventures floating around that occasionally get discussed over a beer with friends. I’m sure I would pick one of these to develop into something. There’s no shortage of ideas and opportunity, just a lack of time.

Liam Neeson, on set.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I had no idea until the opportunity presented itself some time back. I had shared the running of the company with one Mr. Michael Morris since 2003. Now I’m flying solo.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
A Monster Calls, which opened in the US in October, 2016, was a great production to be a part of. We had Liam Neeson in the studio for two weeks and he was great to work with. There’s a real buzz when everything is in full swing: streaming realtime characters on screen and having the director, JA Bayona, exploring the virtual world with the virtual camera.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT?
Our in-house tracking software is very cool, my damn phone is a love-hate relationship, although I’d be lost without it, and the Bluetooth in the car makes life easy.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
The “usual suspects” — LinkedIn, Twitter and a little bit of Facebook

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
The tunes get cranked up during studio set-ups and location shoots, and my dancin’ trousers get pulled on for an after party. Other than that, I resort to an audio book in the car, which has become commonplace.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I enjoy a spot of golf now and again, and heading off to the coast as much as possible. I play FIFA with my 11-year-old son who beats me every time! I’m quite fond of a charity run followed by a charity beer. Happy days.

Behind the Title: audio post pro Stephen Harrison

NAME: Stephen Harrison (@theaudiosuite)

COMPANY: Phoenix-based  The Audio Suite — Creative Sound Services

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service digital audio post facility. We provide sound editorial, design, recording and mixing services to film, television and video production companies, trailer houses and more.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Owner/Sound Editor/Designer/Mixer/Juggler

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Just about everything. Mainly I oversee the daily operations and engineer most of the sessions myself.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Aside from handling all the non-engineering related duties involved with running a business, probably the amount of detail that goes into every aspect of the different services required on any given project.

Mark Skalny Photography

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The endless learning and creative stretching. Hearing all the pieces of the sonic puzzle come together in the end. Capturing the client’s vision.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Accounting and sales.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
In the studio…. it’s whenever I’m sitting behind the board and can smell the coffee brewing. Otherwise, it’s when I’m home with my family.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve often thought about that, but I really don’t know. Probably something outside that involved lots of traveling. Yeah, that sounds good.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I think it chose me actually. As a kid I loved music and wanted to know how to make records. So I answered the call and never looked back. After 18 years in music production, I jumped tracks into audio post and here we are keeping the dream alive.

3 Mark Skalny Photography

YOU ARE AN INDUSTRY VETERAN. HOW HAVE YOU SEEN THE INDUSTRY CHANGE OVER THE YEARS?
Outside of the technological advancements, which have just been stunning, it’s the way these tools have enabled the creative process and workflow to surpass all previous limitations.

As well, you can now collaborate with virtually anyone, anywhere around the world, which is quite amazing. It’s also afforded many others to jump into the arena to design, produce, mix and compete directly for work that was usually reserved for established companies and seasoned technicians. This might be the biggest change and we all know the mixed results it’s had over the last 10 years or so.

PowersWar

Marketing and sales are now necessary again. Production companies, networks and agencies have more options than ever when contracting services. They also want more for less. In-house finishing operations have become the norm. So it’s been a tough ride for many in our industry lately, something I certainly haven’t been immune to. So if you want to stay current, vital & in the game, I think adapting to market trends and diversifying is the only way to go. Of course, endless passion, determination and perseverance certainly helps.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Power’s War – a feature length documentary. We provided sound editorial, design and mixing services.
– Hewlett Packard – corporate marketing campaigns. We provided sound design and mixing.
– Lego, Marvel, Netflix, WB – TV spots and trailers.
Sharknado 3 – film for SyFy. ADR recording with Frankie Muniz.

Sharknado 3

Sharknado 3

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s hard to name just one. Other than some of the music projects I worked on long ago, I’d have to say the variety of indie films and docs I’ve done over the last nine years. I generally provided all editorial, design and mixing services, which was very challenging, but rewarding as well.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Pro Tools rig, iZotope RX4 and my laptop.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
FB, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Vimeo

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Get outdoors and not look at screens! A cold beer never hurts either.

Behind the Title: Roger’s Dane Macbeth

NAME: Dane Macbeth

COMPANY: LA-based Roger (@RogerTVLA)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Roger is a multimedia company that brings a unique and creative vision to a wide landscape of projects. We offer design, animation, original content, branding ID, live-action and post services.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
The best part of being a creative director at Roger is the wide range of work that entails. For every project that comes through our doors, we aim to give a unique and personal feel, from concept through delivery. As a creative director, I am in charge of all creative decisions from pre- through post. Depending on the size and scope of the project, my specific role can change drastically.

On smaller projects, I may do the design and storyboards myself alongside other artists. On larger projects, I will oversee a large design team and make creative decisions along the way. It also depends on how many projects I am overseeing at one time. I can be overseeing up to 15 or more projects at once, which makes it virtually impossible to make any time to get behind the box. The job also requires a lot of time on sets working as a live-action director. It’s the constant blend of working with different mediums and wearing multiple hats that makes the creative direction position so appealing to me.

The set for

The set for the KPMG project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think because the word creative is in the job title itself an outsider may think it’s only creative decisions that are made. While making creative decisions makes up the bulk of my position, there is a lot of management that comes along with the title. Putting together teams of artists that are the perfect fit for an individual project can go a long way. Working with producers to oversee schedules, calendars and budgets also plays a major role in my position.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
My favorite part of my job is getting a new project in. I love starting from little to nothing and thinking about all the amazing possible directions that it can be taken. Writing treatments is the best way to show off and sell an idea, and I love the creative and competitive edge it brings out.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite part of my job is making creative sacrifices. It’s very rare that a project comes along and your total and complete vision comes to be. At the end of the day, as a creative director, it’s your aim to create something interesting, compelling and unique that pleases both your internal team and the client. Often, a great concept and idea can be watered down through the process. Over time, you learn to pick and choose your battles — what is worth sacrificing versus what you feel is important to fight for. On the flip side, I’ve been surprised by what seemed like a sacrifice at first that turned out to make a project better in the long run.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
It’s hard to pinpoint my favorite time of day — creative breakthroughs and inspiration can come at any point in time from anywhere. When I solve or help solve a problem with a creative solution, that’s my favorite time of day.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I have several other areas of interest that I could see myself doing professionally if I were not in this position. I am an avid scuba diver and could see myself travelling the world as a dive master and underwater photographer. I also love creating original comedic content and writing.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I tend to think that I didn’t choose this position it chose me. I always knew I would be working in some form of a creative position, I just didn’t know what field. Growing up, I was always creating something. From drawing, writing, filming, and playing sports, I was always looking from one creative outlet to another.

I was very drawn to the video game industry at a young age. I surprised myself when I pivoted more towards production as I began my professional career. Working in the game industry you can work on one project for years. If you’re not in love with the creative direction of that project, it can become very tiresome very fast. I was drawn to the fast-paced and diverse work that goes along with motion-graphics and production. It was a great fit and a decision I am very happy I made.

15_fung_logo USE
Stills from FYI’s What the Fung?!

WHAT ARE SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
My most recent delivery was a television commercial for a financial firm KPMG. The work came through the agency JWT. It was KPMG’s first television commercial and a fun and exciting project from start to finish. We’ve done several projects for Disney, which includes Disney Junior, Disney XD and Disney. We recently worked on the marketing campaign for the launch of “Miles from Tomorrowland” on Disney Junior. This was a fun project that had us filming scientists and astronauts. I was also CD on promos for the show What the Fung?! on FYI  network.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I had a lot of fun on a recent project that came in from TBS. It was completely open with no direction from the client. We had very little time to execute but always want to create compelling content. The only restriction was to use the new TBS logo. Our idea was to 3D print the new logo and stuff it with explosives, confetti and paint. We used a Phantom camera to capture the explosion and were very happy with the results.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
That’s a tough question, as I often ask myself if I have an unhealthy addiction to tech. From when I first wake up to when I go to bed, I’m interacting with tech on all levels. If I had to name three it would have to be my phone, laptop and camera.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I’m an avid user of Instagram and Facebook. I never got into the Twitter craze. I also use LinkedIn on a regular basis when looking for new talent.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
Depending on my workload and what type of project I’m working on, listening to music while working can be very difficult. We always have music playing in the background at work, which is a must for me. I spend a lot of day talking to clients and artists, so it’s hard to completely zone out with headphones and music.

Later in the day and when working from home, I will put on some headphones and music to help inspire creativity. I have a very wide range and eclectic taste of music. I pretty much listen to everything. I enjoy working to a wide range of music and often find myself shuffling through genres to find inspiration.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I love playing sports. I think it’s my greatest stress relief. I can fully focus on the sport I’m playing and not think about any stress that work may have. Basketball, football and scuba diving truly take me away from the real world and its stress.

Meet The Artist: Meetal Gokul

Behind the Title….

image

Dark rooms, polorized glasses and making 3D visions a reality

NAME: Meetal Gokul

COMPANY: Park Road Post Production (www.parkroadpost.co.nz) in Wellington, New Zealand

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY:

Park Road Post Production is a post production facility located five minutes from Stone Street Studios. Park Road was established as a one-stop shop and offers all post services for a feature from digital rushes, stereoscopic alignment, digital intermediate, Foley, ADR and sound mixing through to the final completion of all film and digital deliverables for distribution. Continue reading