Tag Archives: Behind The Title

Behind the Title: Legwork director of production Chris Grey

NAME: Chris Grey

COMPANY: Denver-based Legwork

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Legwork is an independent creative studio combining animation and technology to create memorable stories and experiences for advertising, entertainment and education.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Director of Production

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I touch almost all parts of the business, including business development, client relationships, scoping, resourcing, strategy, producer mentorship and making sure every project that goes out the door is up to our high standards. Oh, and I still produce several projects myself.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
It might be cliché, but you still need to get your hands dirty producing things. You just can’t escape it, nor should you want to. It sets the example for your team.

Dominos

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
The problem-solving aspect of it. No matter how tight your project plan is, it’s a given that curveballs are going to happen. Planning for those and being able to react with smart solutions is what makes every day different.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Anxiety isn’t fun, but it comes with the job. Just know how to deal with it and don’t let it rub off on others.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
First hour of the day for emails. I do my best to keep my afternoons meeting-free, unless it’s a client meeting, My last job put a lot of emphasis on “flow” and staying in it, so I do my best to keep all internals in the morning so the whole team can work in the afternoon, including myself.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’ve always wanted to own a cool bodega/deli type of place. We’d specialize in proper sandwiches, hard to find condiments, cheap beer. Keeping this dream alive…

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I knew in college. Crispin Porter + Bogusky was moving to Boulder during my junior or senior year at Colorado University. I read up on them and thought to myself “That’s it. That’s what I want to do.” I was lucky enough to get an internship there after graduation and I haven’t really looked back.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
Can I take credit for the team on these two? Cool, because we’re super-proud of these, but I didn’t “produce” them:
Rise: Hope-a-monics
Pandora: Smokepurpp

Yeti

Some stuff I worked on recently that we are equally proud of:
https://www.yeticycles.com/
https://ifthisthendominos.com/
L.L.Bean: Find Your Park

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
More than a project, our relationship with YouTube has been super rewarding. The View in 2 series is now on its fifth season and it was one of the first things I worked on when I got to Legwork. Watching the show and our relationship with the client evolve is something I am proud of. In the coming months, there will be a new show that we’re releasing with them that pushes the style even further.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
1. This is a cheat because it covers music, my calendar, email, etc., but one is my iCloud and Google accounts — because 75 percent of my life on there now.
2. My Nest camera gives me peace of mind when I’m out of town and lets me know my dog isn’t too lonely.
3. Phonograph records — old tech that I love to collect.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Besides friends and family? Lots of food-related ones (current favorites are @wdurney and @turkeyandthewolf), sports/sneakers (@houseofhighlights, @jordansdaily), history (@ww2nowandthen) and a good random one is @celebsonsandwhiches.

I also like every @theonion post.

That was all for Instagram. I save Twitter for political rants and Liverpool F.C.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
We have a Sonos at the office and more often than not it forces me to put on my headphones. Sorry, Legworkers. So it might be a podcast, Howard Stern, KEXP or something British.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I’m a new dad, so that helps keep everything in perspective. That and some brewery visits on the weekend, which are totally socially acceptable to bring infants to!

Behind the Title: FuseFX VFX supervisor Marshall Krasser

Over the years, this visual effects veteran has worked with both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, whose films helped inspire his career path.

NAME: Marshall Krasser

COMPANY: FuseFX 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
FuseFX offers visual effects services for episodic television, feature films, commercials and VR productions. Founded in 2006, the company employs over 300 people across three studio locations in LA, NYC and Vancouver

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Visual Effects Supervisor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
In general, a VFX supervisor is responsible for leading the creative team that brings the director’s vision to life. The role does vary from show to show depending on whether or not there is an on-set or studio-side VFX supervisor.

Here is a list of responsibilities across the board:
– Read and flag the required VFX shots in the script.
– Work with the producer and team to bid the VFX work.
– Attend the creative meetings and location scouts.
– Work with the studio creative team to determine what they want and what we need to achieve it.
– Be the on-set presence for VFX work — making sure the required data and information we need is shot, gathered and catalogued.
– Work with our in-house team to start developing assets and any pre-production concept art that will be needed.
– Once the VFX work is in post production, the VFX supervisor guides the team of in-house artists and technicians through the shot creation/completion phase, while working with the producer to keep the show within the budgets constraints.
– Keep the client happy!

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
That the job is much more than pointing at the computer screen and making pretty images. Team management is critical. Since you are working with very talented and creative people, it takes a special skill set and understanding. Having worked up through the VFX ranks, it helps you understand the mind set since you have been in their shoes.

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING IN VFX?
My first job was creating computer graphic images for speaker support presentations on a Genigraphics workstation in 1984. I then transitioned into feature film in 1994.

HOW HAS THE VFX INDUSTRY CHANGED IN THE TIME YOU’VE BEEN WORKING? WHAT’S BEEN GOOD, WHAT’S BEEN BAD?
It’s changed a lot. In the early days at ILM, we were breaking ground by being asked to create imagery that had never been seen before. This involved creating new tools and approaches that had not been previously possible.

Today, VFX has less of the “man behind the curtain” mystique and has become more mainstream and familiar to most. The tools and computer power have evolved so there is less of the “heavy lifting” that was required in the past. This is all good, but the “bad” part is the fact that “tricking” people’s eyes is more difficult these days.

DID A PARTICULAR FILM INSPIRE YOU ALONG THIS PATH IN ENTERTAINMENT?
A couple really focused my attention toward VFX. There is a whole generation that was enthralled with the first Star Wars movie. I will never forget the feeling I had upon first viewing it — it was magical.

The other was E.T., since it was more grounded on Earth and more plausible. I was blessed to be able to work directly with both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg [and the artisans who created the VFX for these films] during the course of my career.

DID YOU GO TO FILM SCHOOL?
I did not. At the time, there was virtually no opportunity to attend a film school, or any school, that taught VFX. I took the route that made the most sense for me at the time — art major. I am a classically trained artist who focused on graphic design and illustration, but I also took computer programming.

On a typical Saturday, I would spend the morning in the computer lab programming and the afternoon on the potter’s wheel throwing pots. Always found that ironic – primitive to modern in the same day!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Working with the team and bringing the creative to life.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Numbers, no one told me there would be math! Re: bidding.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Maybe a fishing or outdoor adventure guide. Something far away from computers and an office.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
– the Vice movie
– the Waco miniseries
–  the Life Sentence TV series
– the Needle in a Timestack film
The 100 TV series

WHAT IS THE PROJECT/S THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
A few stand out, in no particular order. Pearl Harbor, Harry Potter, Galaxy Quest, Titanic, War of the Worlds and the last Indiana Jones movie.

WHAT TOOLS DO YOU USE DAY TO DAY?
I would have to say Nuke. I use it for shot and concept work when needed.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION NOW?
Everything around me. I am heavily into photography these days, and am always looking at putting a new spin on ordinary things and capturing the unique.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Head into the great British Columbian outdoors for camping and other outdoor activities.

Behind the Title: Picture Shop workflow specialist Alex Martin

NAME: Alex Martin

COMPANY: Picture Shop Post

TITLE: Workflow Specialist

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
While Picture Shop is two years old, our team has decades of experience. A majority of our employees here know each other through some previous career venture. We are a hand-picked team that meshes really well together.

We’re led by four individuals who live and breathe post production and have for decades: president Bill Romeo, EVP of sales and marketing Robert Glass, EVP of VFX Tom Kendall and EVP and CTO Jay Bodnar.

Our projects — from superhero shows to Netflix and Hulu’s top HDR projects (oh yeah, and zombies) — we’re constantly expanding.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT A WORKFLOW SPECIALIST DOES?
Technology is always advancing, and so are our shows and their workflows. Keeping up to speed with the new gear and new specs is a large majority of what makes up my day-to-day.

You have to be quick on your feet and one step ahead of the industry at all times in order to grasp success. The biggest challenge for me is always having to think outside the box; looking for new and improved ways to make what already works even better. We are often stumbling upon new advancements, constantly producing and testing new ideas into fruition.

WHAT SYSTEMS DOES PICTURE SHOP HAVE FOR COLOR?
We’re fortunate enough to have three major color correctors: Digital Vision’s Nucoda, Filmlight’s Baselight and Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. We also use Colorfront’s software, Express Dailies and Transkoder.

For our online systems we use Avid Media Composer, Autodesk Flame and, recently, Resolve.

ARE YOU SOMETIMES ASKED TO DO MORE THAN JUST SET UP PROJECTS/ DESIGN WORKFLOWS?
All the time. One moment, I’m figuring out why the text over picture is more transparent than it should be, and the next, I’m creating LUTs for a new show on-set. My day-to-day job is always about workflow, but my minute-to-minute lies in the fine details. The main focus is to help get the show out the door on time and ensure that our clients keep coming back for more.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Probably that no two days are the same. I have a great mentor, senior systems workflow engineer Todd Korody, who we consider the brains of the building. Working alongside him for the past two years has been the most rewarding. Most of the conversations that we have are about a show’s color pipeline, and how we can get to the final delivery stage seamlessly while keeping in mind that each new show brings a different element to the table.

Whether we’re designing the workflow on a regular HD finish for a network show or evolving the HDR processes for Netflix and Hulu, figuring out the pass off from one platform to the next (dailies to online, online to color, or VFX to color) makes each day unique.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
My least favorite is probably my own tendency to be a perfectionist. I always want to make sure that everything goes according to plan — as most of us do. I’m then reminded of the brilliant team that I am surrounded by, and though seeking a more collaborative effort, the “best way” to fix any issue makes itself known.

It’s amazing to know that I’m surrounded by people that care about our company to the same degree, and we all work together to ensure the best possible success.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I would be a sound engineer for live concerts. What’s better than being behind the controls, mixing for a great band?

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I kind of fell into it. I wanted to go to recording school for music. Not that I couldn’t have, but a four-year university was needed. I ended up finding film schools had classes in mixing for movies. This turned into an editing and VFX emphasis so I could take mixing classes.

One of the classes offered in the area I was studying was color correction. I loved that class, which opened a very wide door for me to pursue in post. I knew I would end up in the entertainment business in some way around 17. My friends and I would cut together videos on Windows Movie Maker. Always enjoyed the art and still do today.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON OR PLAN TO WORK ON?
On the technology side, we’ve been working a lot with Resolve and Baselight in terms of HDR. Also making sure we are familiar with the Dolby Vision toolsets, color management workflows and making sure our pipeline is smooth for everyone.

We have a few projects coming out which I’m exciting to be a part of, The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Unbelievable and Huge in France, all for Netflix. There is also Future Man for Hulu. There’s a lot more HDR work on the horizon, but these are a few currently underway.

WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF WORK WISE?
Our HDR pipeline. We’ve developed some great tools and strategies along the way to handle very large camera files, ways we bring media in and out of the color correctors, and tools to help us with final delivery.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? ART? PHOTOGRAPHY?
Camera tests through to final picture. Before each show starts filming, the DP usually directs a camera test. When they do the camera and lens-package comparisons, I love seeing the subtle differences. Once the show’s colorist has a chance to collaborate with the DP’s vision, the best part is seeing the final colored image through their eyes. In my opinion, this finishing touch is what brings the picture to life.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT?
My phone, my laptop and Resolve… I also have to mention my car.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I use LinkedIn – I follow all the studios, production companies, software companies, different operators and artists; really anything that keeps me up to speed with the post production world.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I guess I always go back to what brought me to this business in the first place, and that’s music. I play the drums, and that helps me decompress and have a good time.

Behind the Title: Carbon senior colorist Julien Biard

NAME: Julien Biard

COMPANY: Carbon in Chicago

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
Carbon is a full-service creative studio specializing in design, color, visual effects and motion graphics, with offices in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Senior Colorist

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for grading the work to get the most out of the material. Color has a lot of potential to assist the storytelling in conveying the emotion of a film. I also oversee the running of the Chicago color department.

National Trust

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
Most of the time people are surprised this job actually exists, or they think I’m a hair colorist. After many years this still makes me smile every time!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
There are many aspects of the job I enjoy. The main part of the job is the creative side, giving my input and taste to a piece makes the job personally and emotionally involving. I get a lot of satisfaction from this process, working with the team and using color to set the mood and tone of the spot or film.

Finally, by far the best part of the job is to educate and train the next generation of colorists. Having been part of the same process at the beginning of my career, I feel very proud to be able to pass on my knowledge, what I have learned from peers and worked out for myself, and to help as many youngsters to get into color grading as possible.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
I miss 35mm…

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning type of guy, so getting on my bike nice and early, taking photographs or getting straight to work. Mornings are always productive for me.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be an art buyer! Realistically, I’d probably be a mountain guide back home in the French Alps where I grew up.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
In all honesty, this was very unexpected as I originally trained to become a professional football player until quite an advanced age — which I’m now glad wasn’t meant to be my path. It was only when I moved to London after graduating that I fell into the post world where I started as a tea boy. I met the colorist there, and within the first day I knew this would be something I’d enjoy doing and could be good at. I trained hard and worked alongside some of the best colorists in the industry, learning from them while finding my own tune and it worked out pretty well.

Ted Baker

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
National Trust
Run the Jewels
Royal Blood
Rapha
Ted Baker

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
There are many projects I’m proud of, and picking only one is probably not possible. I think what I’m the most proud of is the relationship I have built with some of the industry’s most creative talents — people like Crowns and Owls, David Wilson, Thomas Bryant, Andrew Telling and Ninian Doff, to name a few. Also, being able to bring my contribution to the edifice in this stimulating world is what I’m the proudest of.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My sound system, my camera, a corkscrew and my bike, of course!

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Mainly Instagram; it’s all about the visuals.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
Is there such thing as grading without music?! I need my music when I work. It helps me get in the zone and also helps me with timings. An album is around the hour mark, so I know where I am.

Taste wise? Oh dear, the list could be long. If the beat is good and there are instruments, I’m in. I do struggle with pop music a lot. But I’m open to anything else.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I ride my bike, anywhere I can. I climb. I enjoy photography very much too. Since I’m in a dark room most of the time at work, I spend as much of my spare time outside as possible

Behind the Title: Trollbäck+Company’s David Edelstein

NAME: David Edelstein

COMPANY: Trollbäck+Company (@trollback)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a creative agency that believes in the power of communication, craft and collaboration.
Our mission is to promote innovation, create beauty and foster a lasting partnership. We believe that the brands of the future will thrive on the constant spirit of invention. We apply the same principle to our work, always evolving our practice and reaching across disciplines to produce unexpected, original results.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Executive Director of Client Partnerships

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’m responsible for building on current client relationships and bringing in new ones. I work closely with the team on our strategic approach to presenting us to a wide array of clients.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
I think you need to be in a position of doing business development to really understand that question. The goal is to land work that the company wants to do and balance that with the needs of running a business. It is not an easy task to juggle.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
I love working with a talented team, and being in a position to present a company with such a strong legacy.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Even after all these years, rejection still isn’t easy, but it’s something you deal with on a daily, sometimes hourly, basis.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I’m a morning person, so I find it’s the perfect time to reach out to people when they’re fresh — and before their day gets chaotic.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Are you trying to tell me something? (laughs) I actually think I’d be doing the same thing, but perhaps for a different industry. I truly enjoy the experience of developing relationships and the challenge of solving creative problems with others. I think it’s a valuable skill set that can be applied to other types of jobs.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
This career came about pretty organically for me. I had a traditional production background and grew up in LA. When I moved to New York, I wound up at Showtime as a producer and discovered motion graphics. When I left there, I was fortunate enough to launch a few small studios. Being an owner makes you the head of business development from the start. These experiences have certainly prepared me for where I’ve been and where I am today.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I’m only a few months in, but we are currently spearheading branding for a Fortune 500 company. Trollbäck is also coming off a fantastic title sequence and package for the final episode of the Motion Conference, which just took place in June.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It’s tough to call out one particular project, but some career highlights have been a long relationship with Microsoft, as well as traveling the world with Marriott and Hilton.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
Cell phone, computer/email and iPad.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I try to give different types of music a go, so Spotify works well for me. But, honestly, I’m still a Springsteen guy.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
I go home to relax and then come back the next day and try to be positive and grateful. Repeat!

Behind the Title: Steelhead MD Ted Markovic

NAME: Ted Markovic

COMPANY: LA-based Steelhead

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a content studio and cross-platform production company. You can walk through our front door with a script and out the back with a piece of content. We produce everything from social to Super Bowl.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Managing Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I am responsible for driving the overall culture and financial health of the organization. That includes building strong client relationships, new business development, operational oversight, marketing, recruiting and retaining talent and managing the profits and losses of all departments.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We all have a wide range of responsibilities and wear many hats. I occasionally find myself replacing the paper towels in the bathrooms because some days that’s what it takes.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
We are a very productive group that produces great work. I get a sense of accomplishment almost every day.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Replacing the paper towels in the bathrooms.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
I get a lot more done while everyone else is busy eating their lunch or driving home.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Solving the traffic problem in Los Angeles. I see a lot of opportunities there.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
I am a third-generation post production executive, and essentially grew up in a film lab in New York. I suspect the profession chose me.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
I am currently working on a Volkswagen Tier 2 project where we are shooting six cars over seven days on our stage at Steelhead. We’re incorporating dynamic camera shots of cars on a cyc with kinetic typography, motion graphics and VFX. It’s a great example of how we can do it all under one roof.

We recently worked with Nintendo and Interogate to bring the new Switch games to life in a campaign called Close Call. On set with rams, air mortars, lighting effects and lots of sawed-in-half furniture, we were able create real weight in-camera to layer with our VFX. We augmented the practical effects with HDR light maps, fire and debris simulations, as well as procedurally generated energy beams, 3D models, and 2D compositing to create a synergy between the practical and visual effects that really sells the proximity and sense of danger we were looking to create.

While the coordination of practical and post was no small chore, another interesting challenge we had to overcome was creating the CG weapons to mesh with the live-action plates. We started with low-resolution models directly from the games themselves, converted them and scrubbed in a good layer of detail and refined them to make them photoreal. We also had to conceptualize how some of the more abstract weapons would play with real-world physics.

Another project worth mentioning was a piece we created for Volkswagen called Strange Terrains. The challenge was to create 360-degree timelapse video from day-to-night. Something that’s never been done before. And in order to get this unique footage, we had to build an equally unique rigging system. We partnered with Supply Frame to design and build a custom-milled aluminum head to support four 50.6 megapixel Canon EOS 5DS cameras.

The “holy grail” of timelapse photography is getting the cameras to ramp the exposure over broad light changes. This was especially challenging to capture due to the massive exposure changes in the sky and the harshness of the white salt. After capturing around approximately 2,000 frames per camera — 9TB of working storage — we spent countless hours stitching, compositing, computing and rendering to get a fluid final product.

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
About eight years ago, I created a video for my parents’ 40th wedding anniversary. My mother still cries when she watches it.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
The wheel is a pretty essential piece of technology that I’m not sure I could live without. My smartphone is as expected as well as my Sleepwell device for apnea. That device changed my life.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK? CARE TO SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC TO WORK TO?
I can work listening to anything but reggae.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Exercise.

Behind the Title: UCLA Extension Instructor Barry Goch

NAME: Barry Goch (@gochya)

COMPANY: UCLA Extension Entertainment Studies

WHAT IS UCLA EXTENSION?
UCLA Extension is the continuing education division of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). UCLA Extension offers over 5,000 open-enrollment courses and 180+ certificate programs with online and on-campus learning

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Behind the Title: Spacewalk Sound’s Matthew Bobb

NAME: Matthew Bobb

COMPANY: Pasadena, California’s SpaceWalk Sound 

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are a full-service audio post facility specializing in commercials, trailers and spatial sound for virtual reality (VR). We have a heavy focus on branded content with clients such as Panda Express and Biore and studios like Warner Bros., Universal and Netflix.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner/Sound Supervisor/Composer

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I’ve transitioned more into the sound supervisor role. We have a fantastic group of sound designers and mixers that work here, plus a support staff to keep us on track and on budget. Putting my faith in them has allowed me to step away from the small details and look at the bigger picture on every project.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
We’re still a small company, so while I mix and compose a little less than before, I find my days being filled with keeping the team moving forward. Most of what falls under my role is approving mixes, prepping for in-house clients the next day, sending out proposals and following up on new leads. A lot of our work is short form, so projects are in and out the door pretty fast — sometimes it’s all in one day. That means I always have to keep one eye on what’s coming around the corner.

The Greatest Showman 360

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Lately, it has been showing VR to people who have never tried it or have had a bad first experience, which is very unfortunate since it is a great medium. However, that all changes when you see someone come out of a headset exclaiming,”Wow, that is a game changer!”

We have been very fortunate to work on some well-known and loved properties and to have people get a whole new experience out of something familiar is exciting.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
Dealing with sloppy edits. We have been pushing our clients to bring us into the fold as early as v1 to make suggestions on the flow of each project. I’ll keep my eye tuned to the timing of the dialog in relation to the music and effects, while making sure attention has been paid to the pacing of the edit to the music. I understand that the editor and director will have their attention elsewhere, so I’m trying to bring up potential issues they may miss early enough that they can be addressed.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF THE DAY?
I would say 3pm is pretty great most days. I should have accomplished something major by this point, and I’m moments away from that afternoon iced coffee.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
I’d be crafting the ultimate sandwich, trying different combinations of meats, cheeses, spreads and veggies. I’d have a small shop, preferably somewhere tropical. We’d be open for breakfast and lunch, close around 4pm, and then I’d head to the beach to sip on Russell’s Reserve Small Batch Bourbon as the sun sets. Yes, I’ve given this some thought.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS PROFESSION?
I came from music but quickly burned out on the road. Studio life suited me much more, except all the music studios I worked at seemed to lack focus, or at least the clientele lacked focus. I fell into a few sound design gigs on the side and really enjoyed the creativity and reward of seeing my work out in the world.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
We had a great year working alongside SunnyBoy Entertainment on VR content for the Hollywood studios including IT: Float, The Greatest Showman 360, Annabelle Creation: Bee’s Room and Pacific Rim: Inside the Uprising 360. We also released our first piece of interactive content, IT: Escape from Pennywise, for Gear VR and iOS.

Most recently, I worked on Star Wars: The Last Jedi in Scoring The Last Jedi: A 360 VR Experience. This takes Star Wars fans on a VIP behind-the-scenes intergalactic expedition, giving them on a virtual tour of the The Last Jedi’s production and soundstages and dropping them face-to-face with Academy Award-winning film composer John Williams and film director Rian Johnson.

Personally, I got to compose two Panda Express commercials, which was a real treat considering I sustained myself through college on a healthy diet of orange chicken.

It: Float

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
It: Float was very special. It was exciting to take an existing property that was not only created by Stephen King but was also already loved by millions of people, and expand on it. The experience brought the viewer under the streets and into the sewers with Pennywise the clown. We were able to get very creative with spatial sound, using his voice to guide you through the experience without being able to see him. You never knew where he was lurking. The 360 audio really ramped up the terror! Plus, we had a great live activation at San Diego Comic Con where thousands of people came through and left pumped to see a glimpse of the film’s remake.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
It’s hard to imagine my life without these three: Spotify Premium, no ads! Philips Hue lights for those vibes. Lastly, Slack keeps our office running. It’s our not-so-secret weapon.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I treat social media as an escape. I’ll follow The Onion for a good laugh, or Anthony Bourdain to see some far flung corner of earth I didn’t know about.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHEN NOT MIXING OR EDITING?
If I’m doing busy work, I prefer something instrumental like Eric Prydz, Tycho, Bonobo — something with a melody and a groove that won’t make me fall asleep, but isn’t too distracting either.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
The best part about Los Angeles is how easy it is to escape Los Angeles. My family will hit the road for long weekends to Palm Springs, Big Bear or San Diego. We find a good mix of active (hiking) and inactive (2pm naps) things to do to recharge.

Behind the Title: Sim’s supervising sound editor David McCallum

Name: David McCallum

Company: Sim International — Sim Post (Sound) in Toronto

Can you describe your company?
Sim provides equipment and creative services for projects in film and television. We have offices in Toronto, Los Angeles, New York City, Atlanta and Vancouver. I work as part of our Sim Post team in Toronto’s King St. East post facility where our emphasis is post sound and picture. We’re a small division, but we’ve been together as a team for nearly 15 years, the last three of which have been as part of Sim.

What’s your job title?
Supervising Sound Editor

What does that entail? 
My work is 90% project and client focused. I work directly on the sound design and sound edit for television and film projects, collaborating with directors and producers to shape the sound for their show. I also manage a team of people at Sim Post (Sound) Toronto that make up our sound crew(s). Part of my job also involves studio time, working closely with actors and directors to help shape the final performances that end up on the screen.

What would surprise people the most about what falls under that title?
I don’t work extreme hours. The screen industry, and post production in particular, has a well-deserved reputation for working its people hard, with long hours and tight demands as the norm rather than the exception. I don’t believe in overworking either my crew or myself. I strongly believe that people work best under predictable conditions.

Individuals need to be placed in positions to succeed, not merely survive. So, I put a lot of effort into managing my workload, getting on top of things well in advance of deadlines. I try to keep my days and weeks structured and organized so that I’m at my best as much as possible.

Sim’s ADR room.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
Finding a unique way to solve a sound problem. I love discovering a new trick, like using parts of two different words to make a character say a new word. You never know when or where you can find these kinds of solutions — hearing the possibilities requires patience and a keen ear. Sometimes the things I put together sound ridiculous, but because I mostly work alone nobody gets to hear my mistakes. Every now and then something unexpected works, and it’s golden.

What’s your least favorite?
There can be a lot of politics that permeate the film and television world. I prefer direct communication and collaboration, even if what you hear from someone isn’t what you want to hear.

What is your favorite time of the day?
The start. I like getting in a bit early, relaxing with a good coffee while I map out my goals for the day. Every day something good needs to be accomplished, and if the day gets off to a positive start then there is a better chance that all my objectives for that day will be met.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I would probably still be working in audio, but perhaps on the consumer side, selling high-end tube audio electronics and turntables. Either that, or I would be a tennis instructor.

Why did you choose this profession? 
That is actually a long story. I didn’t find this profession or career path on my own. I was put on it by a very thoughtful university professor named Clarke Mackay at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, who saw a skill set in me that I did not recognize in myself. The path started with Clarke, went through the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television and on to Jane Tattersall, who is senior VP of Sim Toronto.

Jane’s been the strongest influence in my career by far, teaching and steering me along the way. Not all lessons were intended, and sometimes we found ourselves on the same path. Sim Post (Sound) went through so many changes, and we managed a lot of them together. I don’t know if I would have found or stayed in this profession without Clarke or Jane, so in a way they have helped choose it for me.

Can you name some recent projects you have worked on?
The Handmaid’s Tale, Vikings, Alias Grace, Cardinal, Molly’s Game, Kin and The Man Who Invented Christmas.

What is the project that you are most proud of?
The one I’m working on now! More seriously, that does feel like an impossible question to answer, as I’ve felt pride at numerous times in my career. But most recently I would say our work on The Handmaid’s Tale has been tremendously rewarding.

I’d also mention a small Canadian documentary I was a part of in 2016 called Unarmed Verses. It’s a National Film Board of Canada documentary by director Charles Officer and producer Lea Marin. It touched my heart.

I’m also very proud of some of my colleagues that I’ve been overseeing for a few years now, in particular Claire Dobson and Krystin Hunter. Claire and Krystin are two young editors who are both doing extremely impressive work with me. I’m very proud of them.

Name three pieces of technology that you can’t live without.
Avid Pro Tools, Izotope RX and NOS Amperex 6922 vacuum tubes.

What social media channels do you follow?
I’ve only ever participated in Facebook, but the global political climate has me off of social media right now. I do my best to stay away from the “comments section of life.”

This is a high stress job with deadlines and client expectations. What do you do to de-stress from it all?
I try to reduce stress within the workplace. I have a few rituals that help… and good coffee. Nothing beats stress in the morning like a delicious coffee. But more practically, I try my best to stay on top of my work and make sure I thoroughly understanding my client’s expectations. I then actively manage my work so I’m not pushed up against deadlines.

But really the best tool is my team. I have an amazing team of people around me and I would be nothing without them.

Behind the Title: Versus Partner/CD Justin Barnes

NAME: Justin Barnes

COMPANY: Versus (@vs_nyc)

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
We are “versus” the traditional model of a creative studio. Our approach is design driven and full service. We handle everything from live action to post production, animation and VFX. We often see projects from concept through delivery.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Partner and Creative Director

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
I handle the creative side of Versus. From pitching to ideation, thought leadership and working closely with our editors, animators, artists and clients to make our creative — and our clients’ creative vision — the best it can be.

WHAT WOULD SURPRISE PEOPLE THE MOST ABOUT WHAT FALLS UNDER THAT TITLE?
There’s a lot of business and politics that you have to deal with being a creative.

Adidas

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB?
Every day is different, full of new challenges and the opportunity to come up with new ideas and make really great work.

WHAT’S YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
When I have to deal with the business side of things more than the creative side.

WHAT IS YOUR MOST PRODUCTIVE TIME OF THE DAY?
For me, it’s very late at night; the only time I can work with no distractions.

IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE THIS JOB, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING INSTEAD?
Anything in the creative world.

HOW EARLY ON DID YOU KNOW THIS WOULD BE YOUR PATH?
It’s been a natural progression for me to be where I am. Working with creative and talented people in an industry with unlimited possibilities has always seemed like a perfect fit.

CAN YOU NAME SOME RECENT PROJECTS YOU HAVE WORKED ON?
– Re-brand of The Washington Post
– Animated content series for the NCAA
– CG campaign for Zyrtec
– Live-action content for Adidas and Alltimers collaboration

Zyrtec

WHAT IS THE PROJECT THAT YOU ARE MOST PROUD OF?
I am proud of all the projects we do, but the ones that stick out the most are the projects with the biggest challenges that we have pulled together and made look amazing. That seems like every project these days.

NAME THREE PIECES OF TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT.
My laptop, my phone and Uber.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS DO YOU FOLLOW?
I can’t live without Pinterest. It’s a place to capture the huge streams of inspiration that come at us each day.

DO YOU LISTEN TO MUSIC WHILE YOU WORK?
We have music playing in the office 24/7, everything from hip-hop to classical. We love it all. When I am writing for a pitch, I need a little more concentration. I’ll throw on my headphones and put on something that I can get lost in.

WHAT DO YOU DO TO DE-STRESS FROM IT ALL?
Working on personal projects is big in helping de-stress. Also time at my weekend house in Connecticut.