Tag Archives: Baselight

FilmLight at NAB with Baselight 5.0

FilmLight, which makes management and grading technologies, is at NAB 2016 with Baselight 5.0, a new version of the company’s flagship color finishing system. Baselight 5.0 includes a new set of tools to optimize both high dynamic range (HDR) grading and extended color gamut, and offers more than 50 new features designed to help colorists and other creative artists.

The new Base Grade tool improves color grading techniques by giving colorists access to subtle grading. Moving away from the traditional lift/gamma/gain approach, it offers controls that accurately mimic the way the eye appreciates color — via exposure, temperature and balance — to yield a more natural feel and smooth, consistent changes. Because Base Grade works in a perceptually linear space, it is ideal for grading RAW formats, OpenEXRs, and other scene-referred data for both HDR and standard range displays

Baselight 5.0 also features added HDR capabilities through color space “families” that simplify the deliverables process for distinct viewing environments such as television, 4K projection and handheld devices. Gamut optimization provides natural gamut mapping deliverables and prevents clipping when captured colors can’t be displayed on a cinema or television screen.

A new gamut optimization feature in Baselight 5.0 provides simple-to-implement gamut mapping for wide dynamic range images, which form part of the new generation of HDR displays. As new high-end cameras capture colors that could never be displayed on current television screens, this feature offers an easy fix, providing natural gamut mapping for deliverables. Where an HDR image results in colors outside a standard color gamut, the new gamut compression feature sensitively brings it back in, compressing the outer volume of the gamut without affecting the inner volume. Bright, saturated colors won’t clip or destroy the image.

Additional Baselight 5.0 tools tailored to improve colorists’ creative control and efficiency include a perspective operator that makes screen replacement and re-projection easy; perspective tracking of images, shapes, paint strokes and grid warps using either four 1-point trackers or new perspective-capable area tracker; a grid warper; a dedicated keyer for production-quality blue and green screen keying; a paint tool for retouching, such as logo removal; a relight tool to add virtual lights to a scene; and a matchbox shader including support for Flame Matchbox shaders.

Building on the concept of metadata-driven grading, in which the raw footage remains untouched and realtime viewing uses color metadata to render the grade, Baselight 5.0 allows facilities and freelancers in remote sites to browse any scene independently or lock into the master suite and follow a grading session live. The remote colorist can take over and suggest changes, instantly reflected on the other systems.

Baselight 5.0 will be available for all BLG-enabled products from FilmLight, including the Daylight dailies and media management platform, as well as Baselight for Avid and Baselight for Nuke in the Baselight Editions range.

Quick Chat: FilmLight co-founder Wolfgang Lempp

In what has become a semi-regular column here at postPerspective, we have taken to doing short Q&As with the people behind the products you use. The questions, submitted by pros, are meant to illicit responses that allow users to understand how a company goes about creating, updating and servicing gear for our industry.

This time we spoke to Wolfgang Lempp, who co-founded UK-based FilmLight with Peter Stothart and Steve Chapman in 2002. He and the other co-founders oversee the management of the company, including business and product development, product management and strategic development.

Lempp’s tech credentials are pretty impressive. He has a degree in theoretical physics from Munich University and has been working in the motion picture industry since 1983. Continue reading

Encore gives ‘House of Cards’ moody feel in 4K Ultra HD

The second season of Netflix’s House of Cards was made available to subscribers in 4K Ultra HD. LA’s Encore handled the show’s post production, with lead colorist Laura Jans-Fazio grading in uncompressed 4K.

The show was shot on Red cameras, some using the HDR functionality for extended contrast and color dynamic range. The floating-point processing in Baselight, Jans-Fazio’s tool of choice, offered her new creative options. Windows that appeared blown out, for example, could be graded to show detail then composited into the rest of the scene. She was able to achieve the color and composite in realtime so the clients could see the final results immediately.

Laura Jans-Fazio, lead colourist, Encore

Laura Jans-Fazio

Co-producer Peter Mavromates and post supervisor Hameed Shaukat worked directly with Jans-Fazio on the grade, with director David Fincher and DP Igor Martinovic providing feedback via using the PIX digital collaboration tool.

“As episodes were completed, they were uploaded to PIX, which allowed the producer, director and DP to view content on calibrated Sony OLED monitors,” explained Morgan Strauss, Encore SVP, operations. “They returned their feedback, which we could extract directly into Baselight, and Jans-Fazio finalized the look and delivered the files to Netflix. It was essential to maximize this asynchronous collaborative process and, along with Baselight’s sophisticated toolset, it meant we could fully realize the creative needs of the producers and DP.”

Screen Shot 2014-06-24 at 10.17.17

The overall look of the series has a slightly moody feel, reflecting the tense, internal political intrigues of the story. The grade avoids over-saturated colors, maintaining the palette throughout — which was Fincher’s vision for the show.

“Baselight has so many features, and the fact that it works in floating-point processing gives me image quality for a pristine picture every time,” said Jans-Fazio. “We often used multiple shapes in a single shot, and being able to do that in one layer in Baselight was a real time-saver. We could also composite through VFX mattes, and do monitor replacements, in realtime.”

 

Capra’s classic ‘It Happened One Night’ restored in 4K

hpn_v1.0019556

CULVER CITY— Frank Capra’s 1934 comedy It Happened One Night has undergone painstaking 4K restoration by Sony Pictures Entertainment in advance of its release on Sony’s newly-launched Video Unlimited 4K download service. It Happened One Night, which starred Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, is the first of five Capra films slated for re-release in 4K over the next few years. Those are Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Lost Horizon, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and You Can’t Take it With You.

The original 35mm negative that served as the basis for the restoration was in poor condition. Rita Belda, Sony Pictures Entertainment’s executive director of asset management, digital mastering and film restoration notes that in the 1930s it was common practice to use original negative to produce film prints for distribution. As a result, the negative suffered from damage due to overuse. Furthermore, a number of damaged scenes had been replaced by poor quality duplicate elements.

Continue reading

FilmLight offers Windows version of Baselight for Avid

 

LONDON — FilmLight has launched its Windows version of Baselight for Avid. This is part of the Baselight Editions range, which delivers the key elements the Baselight color grading software as a plug-in for existing post tools.

Baselight Editions puts the Baselight user interface, along with its color processing, into a standard AVX plug-in. It provides unlimited primary and secondary grades in a single layer, including mattes, automatic object tracking and full keyframe animation.

Baselight for Avid supports AAF-based round-tripping with full Baselight systems, meaning that no rendering time is needed to export grade metadata back into Media Composer. That includes carrying over sophisticated grading data including secondary color correction, shapes and tracked objects. Since the exported grades are fully modifiable, workflow efficiency is improved, as corrections and last-minute changes can be made directly in Media Composer, with no need to return to the full Baselight suite.

Color information can also be exported in the FilmLight BLG file format, for seamless exchange with any other FilmLight (http://www.filmlight.ltd.uk) system including other Baselight Editions.

The software includes FilmLight’s Truelight color management system so that editors know that what they see on their monitor is what they will get.
To complement Baselight Editions, FilmLight offers the Slate control panel. This offers the same configurability, precision, ergonomic convenience and reliability as the full-sized panel, but in a smaller form factor.

“We know that the production and post industry is moving away from the idea of color grading as a single step in the process towards collaborative workflows, where a number of people contribute to the look of a project,” said Wolfgang Lempp, co-founder of FilmLight. “To meet the trend, we now offer ‘Baselight everywhere,’ with the appropriate tools – and the same uncompromised color precision – on devices from on-set ingest to the final deliverables.

“We have had Baselight for Avid on Mac for some time,” FilmLight’s Lempp added. “What our customers told us was that they also needed to access it in their Media Composer and Symphony suites, with full render-free grading and a simple workflow. The new Baselight for Windows delivers this.”

 

IBC: Day Two

Simon-Ray-4

By Simon Ray
Head of Operations and Engineering
Goldcrest Post, London
www.goldcrestfilms.com

Today is picture day, and I definitely earned my expenses. A day full of meetings and demos that were all interesting and enlightening in their own ways. Quantel was first. They were showing us the new features in the Pablo Rio, which is their top of the range picture finishing system which now runs on readily available hardware. This differs from their previous systems which ran on their own proprietary hardware. Pablo Rio has some great features (and a lousy name) and performs well at 4k and beyond.  Continue reading