Tag Archives: Barry Goch

Review: G-Tech’s G-Speed Shuttle using a Windows PC

By Barry Goch

When I was asked to review the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle SSD drive, I was very excited. I’ve always had great experiences with G-Tech and was eager to try out this product with my MSI 17.3-inch GT73VR Titan PC laptop… and this is where the story gets interesting.

I’ve been a Mac fan for years. I’ve owned Macs going back to the Mac Classic in the ‘90s. But a couple of years ago I reached a tipping point. My 17-inch MacBook Pro didn’t have the horsepower to support VR video, and I was looking to upgrade to a new Mac. But when I started looking deeper, comparing specifications and performance, specifically looking to harness the power of industry-leading GPUs for Adobe Premiere with its VR capabilities, I bought the MSI Titan VR because it shipped with the Nvidia GTX1070 graphics card.

The laptop is a beast and has all the power and portability I needed but couldn’t find in a Mac laptop at the time. I wanted to give you my Mac-to-PC background before we jump in, because to be clear: The G-Speed Shuttle SSD will provide the best performance when used with Thunderbolt 3 Macs. That doesn’t mean it won’t be great on a PC; it just won’t be as good as when used on a Mac.

G-Tech makes the PC configuration software easy to find on their website… and easy to use. I did find, though, that I could only configure the drive NTFS with RAID-5 on the PC. But, I was also able to speed test the G-Speed Shuttle SSD as a Mac-formatted drive on the PC, as well as using MacDrive that enables Mac drive formatting and mounting.

We actually reached out to G-Tech, which is a Western Digital brand, about the Mac vs. PC equation. This is what Matthew Bennion, director of product line management at G-Technology said: “Western Digital is committed to providing high-speed, reliable storage solutions to both PC and Mac power users. G Utilities, formatted for Windows computers, is constantly being added to more of our products, including most recently our G-Speed Shuttle products. The addition of G Utilities makes our full portfolio Windows-friendly.”

Digging In
The packaging of the G-Speed Shuttle SSD is very clean and well laid out. There is a parts box that has the Thunderbolt cable, power cable and instructions. Underneath the perfectly formed plastic box insert, wrapped in a plastic bag, was the drive itself. The drive has a lightweight polycarbonate chassis. I was surprised how light it was when I pulled it out of the box.

There are four drive bays, each with an SSD drive. The first things I noticed was the drive’s weight and sound — it’s very lightweight for so much storage, and it’s very quiet with no spinning disks. SSDs run quieter, cooler and uses less power than traditional spinning disks. I think this would be a perfect companion for a DIT looking for a fast, lightweight and low-power-consumption RAID for doing dailies.

I used the drive with Red RAW files inside of Resolve and RedCine-X. I set up a transcode project to make Avid offline files that the G-Speed Shuttle SSD handled muscularly. I left the laptop running overnight working on the files on more than one occasion and didn’t have any issues with the drive at all.

The main shortcoming of using a PC setup using the G-Shuttle is the lack of ability to create Apple ProRes codec QuickTime files. I’ve become accustomed to working with ProRes files created with my Blackmagic Ursa Mini camera, and PCs read those files fine. If you’re delivering to YouTube or Vimeo, it’s not a big deal. It is a bit of an obstacle if you need to deliver ProRes. For this review, I worked around this by rendering out a DPX sequence to the Mac-formatted G-Speed Shuttle SSD drive in Resolve (I also used Premiere) and made ProRes files using Autodesk Flame on my venerable 17-inch MacBook Pro. The Flame is the clear winner in quality of file delivery. So, yes, not being able to write ProRes is a pain, but there are ways around it. And, again, if you’re delivering just for the Web, it’s no big deal.

The Speed
My main finding involves the speed of the drive on a PC. In their marketing material for the drive, G-Tech advertises a speed of 2880 MB/sec with Thunderbolt 3. Using the AJA speed test, I was able to get 1590MB/sec — a speed more comparable with Thunderbolt 2. Perhaps it had something to do with the fact that using the G-Tech PC drive configuration program? I could only set up the drive as RAID-5, and not the faster RAID-0 or RAID-1. I did also run speed tests on the Mac-formatted G-Speed Shuttle SSD and I found similar speeds. I am certain that if I had a newer Thunderbolt 3 Mac, I would have gotten speeds closer to their advertised Mac speed specifications.

Summing Up
Overall, I really liked the G-Speed Shuttle SSD. It looks cool on the desk, it’s lightweight and very quiet. I wish I didn’t have to give it back!

And the cost? It’s 16TB for $7499.95, and 8TB for $4999.95.


Barry Goch is a Finishing Artist at The Foundation and a Post Production Instructor at UCLA Extension. You can follow him on Twitter at @gochya.

Behind the Title: UCLA Extension Instructor Barry Goch

NAME: Barry Goch (@gochya)

COMPANY: UCLA Extension Entertainment Studies

WHAT IS UCLA EXTENSION?
UCLA Extension is the continuing education division of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). UCLA Extension offers over 5,000 open-enrollment courses and 180+ certificate programs with online and on-campus learning

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Review: Mettle VR plug-ins for Adobe Premiere

By Barry Goch

I was very frustrated. I took a VR production class, I bought a LG 360 camera, but I felt like I was missing something. Then it dawned on me — I wanted to have more control. I started editing 360 videos using the VR video viewing tools in Adobe Premiere Pro, but I still was lacking the control I desired. I wanted my audience to have a guided, immersive experience without having to be in a swivel chair to get the most out of my work. Then, like a bolt of lightning, it came to me — I needed to rotate the 360 video sphere. I needed to be able to reorient it to accomplish my vision, but how would I do that?

Rotate Sphere plug-in showing keyframing.

Mettle’s Skybox 360/VR Tools are exactly what I was looking for. The Rotate Sphere plug-in alone is worth the price of the entire plug-in package. With this one plug-in, you’re able to re-orient your 360 video without worrying about any technical issues — it gives you complete creative control to re-frame your 360 video — and it’s completely keyframable too! For example, I mounted my 360 camera on my ski helmet this winter and went down a ski run at Heavenly in Lake Tahoe. There are amazing views of the lake from this run, but I also needed to follow the skiers ahead of me. Plus, the angle of the slope changed and the angle to the subjects I was following changed as well. Since the camera was fixed, how could I guide the viewer? By using the Rotate Sphere plug-in from Mettle and keyframing the orientation of the shot as the slope/subject relationship changed relative to my position.

My second favorite plug-in is Project 2D. Without the Project 2D plug-in, when you add titles to your 360 videos they become warped and you have very little control over their appearance. In Project 2D, you create your title using the built-in titler in Premiere Pro, add it to the timeline, then apply the Project 2D Mettle Skybox plug-in. Now you have complete control over the scale, rotation of the titling element and the placement of the title within the 360 video sphere. You can also use the Project 2D plug-in to composite graphics or video into your 360 video environment.

Mobius Zoom transition in action.

Rounding out the Skybox plug-in set are 360 video-aware plug-ins that every content creator needs. What do I mean but 360 video-aware? For example, when you apply a blur that is not 360 video-content-aware, it crosses the seam where the equi-rectangular video’s edges join together and makes the seam unseemly. With the Skybox Blur, Denoise, Glow and Sharpen plug-ins, you don’t have this problem. Just as the Rotate Sphere plug-in does the crazy math to rotate your 360 video without distortion or introducing artifacts, these plug-ins do the same.

Transitioning between cuts in 360 video is an evolving art form. There is really no right or wrong way. Longer cuts, shorter cuts, dissolves and dips to black are some of the basic options. Now, Mettle is adding to our creative toolkit by applying their crazy math skills on transitions in 360 videos. Mettle started with their first pack of four transitions: Mobius Zoom, Random Blocks, Gradient Wipe and Iris Wipe. I used the Mobius Zoom to transition from the header card to the video and then the Iris Wipe with a soft edge to transition from one shot to the next in the linked video.

Check out this video, which uses Rotate Sphere, Project 2D, Mobius Zoom and Iris wipe effects.

New Plug-Ins
I’m pleased to be among the first to show you their second set of plug-ins specifically designed for 360 / VR video! Chroma Leaks, Light Leaks, Spherical Blurs and everyone’s favorite, Light Rays!

Mettle plug-ins work on both Mac and Windows platforms — on qualified systems — and in realtime. The Mettle plug-ins are also both mono- and stereo-aware.

The Skybox plug-in set for Adobe Premiere Pro is truly the answer I’ve been looking for since I started exploring 360 video. It’s changed the way I work and opened up a world of control that I had been wishing for. Try it for yourself by downloading a demo at www.mettle.com.


Barry Goch is currently a digital intermediate editor for Deluxe in Culver City, working on Autodesk Flame. He started his career as a camera tech for Panavision Hollywood. He then transitioned to an offline Avid/FCP editor. His resume includes Passengers, Money Monster, Eye in the Sky and Game of Thrones. His latest endeavor is VR video.

NAB 2015: Love and hate, plus blogs and videos

By Randi Altman

I have been to more NABs than I would like to admit, and I loved them all… I’ve also hated them all, but that is my love/hate relationship with the show. I love seeing the new technology, trends and friends I’ve made from my many years in the business.

I hate the way my feet feel at the end of the day. I hate the way that there is not enough lotion on the planet to keep my skin from falling off.  I extra-hate the cab lines, but mostly I hate not being able to see everything that needs to be seen.

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My Top 5 favorite keyboard shortcuts for Smoke

This Modern VideoFilm online editor shares some hot-key tips that make the job a bit easier.

By Barry Goch

I’ve been using Autodesk Smoke on Linux and Mac for many years… on features like Stretch and Tell to high-profile TV shows like Madam Secretary. In my experience, and when training new users to Smoke, I’ve found that using “hot-keys” or keyboard short-cuts really improves your speed on the system.

Every time you can reduce a multi-step process to a simple keyboard combination, you get your work done faster. Also, since your hands are on the keyboard, you save time mousing Continue reading

Modern Video colorist talks color grading ‘Madam Secretary’

By Randi Altman

Madam Secretary, which is in the middle of its first season on CBS, has been using LA-based Modern Videofilm for post services, specifically conform and color.

Barry Goch performs the conform via Autodesk Flame 2015, recreating the creative edit with the highest resolution footage while ensuring the program meets all broadcast specs. He also does some paint fixes, titling and final video layback.

Todd Bochner provides the color grading, working out of the company’s Santa Monica DI suite using Blackmagic’s DaVinci Resolve. The New York City-shot show stars Tea Leoni as Secretary of State Elizabeth McCord and takes place in different settings around Washington, DC. This gives Continue reading