Tag Archives: Avid

EIPMA: Focusing on industry mentoring

By Barry Goch

As an instructor, I try to bridge the gap between the technology of yesterday, today and tomorrow. So much of what I do as an industry pro depends on knowing and respecting the past while keeping an eye on the future. I see a digital divide as I guide my students into the world of contemporary post production. For example, it helps them to know the origins of terms like bin, trim and splice.

So when I had the opportunity to learn more about the Entertainment Industry Professionals Mentoring Alliance (EIPMA), I was intrigued. It’s an organization that wants to pay it forward by providing mentors to students and educational institutions. I’m proud to say that I am one of the first beneficiaries. When I was looking for a guest speaker for my UCLA post production class, EIPMA came through in a heartbeat.

I’m happy this organization exists and I want to spread the word to other educators, institutions and facilities. Let’s find out more from EIPMA president Bernard Weiser, who is also VP of the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE).

Bernard Weiser

What inspired you to start the Entertainment Industry Professionals Mentoring Alliance?
The beginning idea for EIPMA started with the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE). The MPSE is a craft society for sound editors and I am vice president. Its main purpose is to bring attention to the craft of sound editing and what sound editors do — both technically and creatively.

A longtime board member and treasurer of the MPSE, Paul Rodriguez, passed away about a year and half ago. We very much looked upon him as a sound ambassador — he went to many events, including NAB, each year, speaking about sound editorial. (You can see him chatting with us and sharing his wisdom during NAB 2017) The MPSE wanted to honor him and came up with the idea of a mentoring program in his name, since he had given so many editors their start in our industry. MPSE President Tom McCarthy began talking about it, and a lot of other organizations started to hear about the idea and said, “You know, we’ve been trying to put a mentorship program together. We’d like to be involved in this.”

How long did it take to get it going?
Literally, in two or three days, this had grown far bigger than the MPSE, far bigger than anything that was imagined. After a month or two of discussion about this, and given my background as an instructor at the UCLA Film School, I was voted president of what is now called EIPMA. In addition to the MPSE, we have many industry organizations involved as members — American Cinema Editors (ACE), Audio Engineering Society, Cinema Audio Society (CAS), Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE), The Recording Academy (Grammy’s), SMPTE and SoundGirls.org (a group of women that does field reporting). All are founding members with more industry organizations poised to come aboard.

It sounds like you have a lot of momentum already for a brand-new organization, and there’s definitely a need for it. There’s definitely a lack of hand-off from the old-school ways to the new-school ways.
We realized that many top industry and veteran professionals have a feeling of wanting to give back. But also, what all of us would see are changes in the industry that create a gap. New people coming in are basically fresh out of school or from some other background, and there’s no real apprenticeship program anymore. So they come in and start working and they really don’t have a background for professional workflows, protocols, and just the way that industry professional life works. Professors and educators see the need for this as well, and that is the core of what we are doing as an organization, to be a conduit between those two points.

How do you envision the rollout of mentoring programs?
We start out with Q&As, setting up a panel especially for high schools that will show the different crafts that are out there. Around the high school level, you have a lot of kids that might be talented and looking toward the craft of storytelling through videos and such, but they just don’t know all of the different fields that are out there. They know there’s writing and there’s directing, but they really don’t know the depths of the different crafts. A Q&A can start to show that, and they can ask professionals how they got started and learn a more detailed perspective of those crafts.

Then, we move to the college level, where these are people who probably are majoring in cinema studies, film studies, television or broadcast, and they have more of a commitment toward what’s going on. So we will do Q&As in the different crafts for them too, but start to proceed a little bit further — and that’s where group mentoring can happen. Also, we can send individual professionals in as a guest lecturers to help cross that divide within the classroom. We look upon it as an aid to the educators, and the way we see this working, in fact, is having educators invite us in so we can help support education from a “real-world” perspective.

Then the third part is graduate and post-graduate students, or what we call “pre-industry individuals,” such as people coming out of the military, which I am very familiar with. One of my first jobs was doing films for the military for three years. There’s great talent in the military. They come out and have no idea where to go or how to pursue a career in entertainment; I really feel we have a role to fill in that area as well. In this third category, we’d start with many of the events I mentioned earlier, but also include one-on-one mentoring, helping people with their own projects, getting them seen, helping them with areas of filmmaking that could be their strength to help them keep going. That’s where job fairs and new contacts leading them toward internships and a much higher level of advice can come into play.

We also want to offer shadowing possibilities for late-college-level, close-to-graduation, college-level and the graduate students. They could come for a couple of days and follow someone skilled in a craft to see what goes on during the day.

L-R, front: At Notre Dame High School are EIPMA board members MPSE/music editor Steven A. Saltzman, MPSE/sound supervisor Christopher B. Reeves, ACE/picture editor Molly Shock and Sound Girls/mastering engineer Jett Galindo.

I have my own experience with the organization. Having Mark Lanza, MPSE, from EIPMA as a guest speaker in my UCLA Extension post production class was magical.
Yeah, by the way, Mark, who is also on the EIPMA board, is one of our first mentors/lecturers. It’s a perfect example. In fact, on May 3, we had a Q&A at Notre Dame High School in the San Fernando Valley, with panelists representing picture editing, sound design/editing, music editing and live field recording.

How is the EIPMA addressing the diversity issue in the industry?
EIPMA recognizes that diversity is an important step in fixing serious issues that have existed for so long in our business. When one sees what diversity has to offer the entertainment industry creatively, I for one fall in love with filmmaking all over again. I see it directly in the students at UCLA who come from around the world, bringing their different cultures, varying social, economic and ethnic backgrounds all into their stories and into their films. And, at the end of the day, this is what it’s all about — storytelling. Diversity opens a huge door to a wide world of fresh stories and with it, the next generation of incredibly talented filmmakers

Where are you in terms of rolling this out, and how can the readers of postPerspective connect with the organization?
What we’re doing this summer is building our database. We have our website, which is EIPMA.org. We invite educators, potential mentors, volunteers, interested businesses, students and individuals interested in the program to come and register their information, and especially their emails, so we can contact them as the program goes forward. In late September, we will have an introductory event at Sony Picture Studios in Culver City. Sound Girls is putting together an event that will happen in a few weeks as well.

Bernard Weiser mingling with educators and Avid folks during Avid’s Learning Program reception during NAB.

Tell us about the connection with Avid.
Avid is the only manufacturer involved with us as a member organization and has representatives on our board. At NAB, during Avid Connect weekend, there was a meet and greet with educators from around the world. I gave a talk about what we’re doing. Avid CEO Jeff Rosica fell in love with what we were doing. The next day I met with Avid executives from back east, and we had 100% of their support.

Avid talks about its connection with education. It’s not just making sales. They really want to support the educators and help develop the next generation of filmmakers. They know what that means business-wise but also, they’re also very supportive in doing the right thing. We are thrilled by Avid’s support and commitment.

Main Image: Mark Lanza, MPSE, is on the EIPMA board talking to Barry Goch’s UCLA Extension class.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya

Apple intros long-awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR

By Barry Goch

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC19) kicked off on Monday with a keynote from Apple CEO Tim Cook, where he announced the eagerly awaited new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR.

Tim Cook’s keynote

In recent years, many working in M&E felt as if Apple had moved away from supporting creative pros in this industry. There was the fumbled rollout of FCPX and then the “trash can” MacPro with its limited upgrade path. Well, our patience has finally paid off and our faith in Apple restored. This week Apple delivered products beyond expectation.

This post pro, for one, is very happy that Apple is back making serious hardware for creative professionals. The tight integration of hardware and software, along with Apple’s build quality, makes its products unique in the market. There is confidence and freedom using Macs that creatives love, and the tower footprint is back!

The computer itself is a more than worthy successor to the original Mac Pro tower design. It’s the complete opposite concept of the current trash-can-shaped Mac Pro, with its closed design and limited upgradeability. The new Mac Pro’s motherboard is connected to a stainless steel space frame offering 360-degree access to the internals, which include 12 memory slots with up to 1.5TB of RAM capacity and eight PCI slots, which is the most ever in a Mac — more than the venerable 9600 Power Mac. The innovative graphics architecture in the new Mac Pro is an expansion module, or MPX module, which allows the installation of two graphic cards tied together through the Infinity Fabric link. This allows for data transfers up to five times faster between the GPUs on the PCIe bus.

Also new is the Apple Afterburner hardware accelerator card, which is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware card for accelerating ProRes and ProRes RAW workflows. Afterburner supports playback of up to three streams of 8K ProRes RAW or up to 12 streams of 4K ProRes RAW. The FPGA allows new instruction to be installed on the chipset, giving the MacPro Afterburner card a wealth of possibilities for future updates.

Plays Well With Others
Across the street from the San Jose Convention Center, where the keynote was held, Apple set up “The Studio” in the historic San Jose Civic. The venue was divided into areas of creative specialization: video, photography, music production, 3D and AR. It was really great to see complete workflows and to be able to interface with Apple creative pros. Oh, and Apple has announced support from third-party developers, such as Blackmagic, Avid, Adobe, Maxon’s Cinema 4D, Foundry, Red, Epic Games, Unity, Pixar and more.

Metal is Apple’s replacement for OpenCL/GL. It’s a low level language for interfacing with GPUs. Working closely with AMD, the new Mac Pro will use native Metal rendering for Resolve, OToy Octane, Maxon Cinema 4D and Red.

Blackmagic’s Grant Perry and Barry Goch at The Studio.

DaVinci Resolve is a color correction and online editing software for high-end film and television work. “It was the first professional software to adopt Metal and now, with the new Mac Pro and Afterburner, we’re seeing full-quality 8K performance in realtime with color correction and effects, something we could never dream of doing before,” explains Blackmagic CEO Grant Petty. “DaVinci Resolve running on the new Mac Pro is the fastest way to edit, grade and finish movies and TV shows.”

According to Avid’s director of product management for audio, Francois Quereuil, “Avid’s Pro Tools team is blown away by the unprecedented processing power of the new Mac Pro, and thanks to its internal expansion capabilities, up to six Pro Tools HDX cards can be installed within the system — a first for Avid’s flagship audio workstation. We’re now able to deliver never-before-seen performance and capabilities for audio production in a single system and deliver a platform that professional users in music and post have been eagerly awaiting.”

“Apple continues to innovate for video professionals,” reports Adobe’s VP of digital video and audio, Steven Warner. “With the power offered by the new Mac Pro, editors will be able to work with 8K without the need for any proxy workflows in a future release of Premiere Pro.”

And from Apple? Expect versions of FCPX and Logic to be available with release of the new MacPro and rest assured they will fully use the new hardware.

The Cost
The price for a Mac Pro with an eight-core Xeon W processor, 32GB of RAM, an AMD Radeon Pro 580X GPU and a 256GB SSD is $5999. The price for the fully loaded version with the 28-core Xeon processor, Afterburner, two MDX modules with four AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics cards and 4TB of SSD internal storage will come in around $20,000, give or take. It will be available this fall.

Pro Display XDR
The new Pro Display XDR is amazing. I was invited into a calibrated viewing environment that also housed Dell, Eizo, Sony BVM-X300 and Sony-X310 HDR monitors. We were shown the typical extreme bright and colorful animal footage for monitor demos. Personally, I would have preferred to have seen more shots of people from a TV show or feature and not the usual extreme footage used to show off how bright the monitor could get.

For example, it would have been cool to see the Jony Ive video — which plays on the Apple site and describes the offerings of the MacPro and the monitor — talking about the design of the product on the monitor.

Anyway, the big hang-up with the monitor is the stand. The price tag of $1,000 for a monitor stand is a lot compared to the price of the monitor itself. When the price of the stand was announced during the keynote, there was a loud gasp, which unfortunately dampened the excitement and momentum of the new releases. It too will be available in the fall.

Display Specs
This Retina 6K 32-inch (diagonal) display offers 6016×3384 pixels (20.4 million pixels) at 218 pixels per inch. The sustained brightness is 1000-nits sustained (full screen) with 1600 nits peak and a contrast ratio of one million to one. It works in P3 wide color gamut with 10-bit depth for 1.073 billion colors. Available reference modes include HDR video (P3-ST 2084), Digital Cinema (P3-DCI), Digital Cinema (P3-D65) and HDTV video (BT.709-BT.1886). Supported HDR formats are HLG, HDR 10 and Dolby Vision.

Portrait mode

The Cost
The standard glass version is $4,999. The nano-texture anti-glare glass version is $5,999. As mentioned, the Pro Stand is $999 and VESA mount adapter is $199. Both are sold separately and have a Thunderbolt 3 connection only.

Pros and Cons
MacPro Pros: innovative design, expandability
Cons: Lack of Nvidia support, no Afterburner support for other formats beyond ProRes and no optical audio output.

Pro Display XDR Pros: Ability to sustain 1,000 nits, beautiful design and execution.
Cons: Lack of Rec 2020 color space and ACES profile, plus the high cost of the display stand.

Summing Up
The Pro is back for Apple and third-party apps like Avid and Resolve. I really can’t wait to get my hands on the new MacPro and Pro Display XDR and put them through their paces.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation as well as a UCLA Extension Instructor, Post Production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya

Avid adds to Nexis product line with Nexis|E5

The Nexis|E5 NL nearline storage solution from Avid is now available. The addition of this high-density on-premises solution to the Avid Nexis family allows Avid users to manage media across all their online, nearline and archive storage resources.

Avid Nexis|E5 NL includes a new web-based Nexis management console for managing, controlling and monitoring Nexis installations. NexislE5 NL can be easily accessed through MediaCentral | Cloud UX or Media Composer and also integrates with MediaCentral|Production Management, MediaCentral|Asset Management and MediaCentral|Editorial Management to help collaboration, with advanced features such as project and bin sharing. Extending the Nexis|FS (file system) to a secondary storage tier makes it easy to search for, find and import media, enabling users to locate content distributed throughout their operations more quickly.

Build for project parking, staging workflows and proxy archive, Avid reports that Nexis | E5 NL streamlines the workflow between active and non-active assets, allowing media organizations to park assets as well as completed projects on high-density nearline storage, and keep them within easy reach for rediscovery and reuse.

Up to eight Nexis|E5 NL engines can be integrated as one virtualizable pool of storage, making content and associated projects and bins more accessible. In addition, other Avid Nexis Enterprise engines can be integrated into a single storage system that is partitioned for better archival organization.

Additional Nexis|E5 NL features include:
• It’s scalable from 480TB of storage to more than 7PB by connecting multiple Nexis|E5 NL engines together as a single nearline system for a highly scalable, lower-cost secondary tier of storage.
• It offers flexible storage infrastructure that can be provisioned with required capacity and fault-tolerance characteristics.
• Users can configure, control and monitor Nexis using the updated management console that looks and feels like a MediaCentral|Cloud UX application. Its dashboard provides an overview of the system’s performance, bandwidth and status, as well as access to quickly configure and manage workspaces, storage groups, user access, notifications and other functions. It offers the flexibility and security of HTML5 along with an interface design that enables mobile device support.

AJA and Avid intro Avid Artist | DNxIP hardware interface

AJA has collaborated with Avid to develop Avid Artist | DNxIP, a new hardware interface option for Avid Media Composer users that supports high frame rate, deep color and HDR IP workflows. It is a Thunderbolt 3-equipped I/O device that enables the transfer of SMPTE standard HD video over 10 GigE IP networks, with high-quality local monitoring over 3G-SDI and HDMI 2.0.

Based on the new AJA Io IP, Avid Artist | DNxIP is custom engineered to Avid’s specifications and includes an XLR audio input on the front of the device for microphone or line-level sources. Avid Artist | DNxIP uses Thunderbolt 3 to enable simple, fast HD/SD video and audio ingest/output from/to IP networks. It features dual Thunderbolt 3 ports for daisy chaining and two SFP+ cages for video and audio routing over 10 GigE IP networks. The portable, aluminum encased device also supports SMPTE 2022-6 uncompressed video, audio and VANC data over IP, as well as SMPTE 2022-7 for redundancy protection.

“The increased agility and efficiency of IP workflows is a must-have for content creators and broadcasters in today’s competitive climate,” says Alan Hoff, VP of market solutions for Avid. “We’ve collaborated with AJA on the newest addition to our Avid Artist product line, Avid Artist DNxIP, which offers broadcasters and post production facilities a portable, yet powerful, video interface for IP workflows.”

Avid Artist | DNxIP feature highlights include:
– Laptop or desktop HD/SD capture and playback over IP across Thunderbolt 3
– Audio input for analog microphone to record single-channel 16-bit D/A analog audio, 48 kHz sample rate, balanced, using industry standard XLR
– Backwards compatibility with existing Thunderbolt hosts
– SMPTE 2022-6 and 2022-7 I/O
– Dual 10 GigE connectivity via two SFP+ cages compatible with 10 GigE SFP transceiver modules from leading third-party providers
– Two Thunderbolt 3 ports for daisy chaining of up to six Thunderbolt devices
– 3G-SDI and HDMI 2.0 video monitoring
– Audio I/O: 16-channel embedded SDI; 8-channel embedded HDMI; 4-channel analog audio In and 4-channel audio out via XLR breakout
– Small, rugged design suited for a variety o production environments
– Downstream keyer
– Standard 12v 4-pin XLR for AC or battery power

SMPTE ST 2110 enables IP workflows

By Tom Coughlin

At IBC2017 and this year’s SMPTE Conference there were significant demonstrations of IP-based workflows with interoperability demonstrations and conference sessions. Clearly proprietary media networking will be supplanted by IP-based workflows. This will enable new equipment economies and open up new opportunities for using and repurposing media. IP workflows will also impact the way we store and use digital content and thus the storage systems where they live.

SMPTE has just ratified ST 2110 standards for IP transport in media workflows. The standard puts video, audio and ancillary data into separate routable streams as shown in the figure below. PCM Audio streams are covered by SMPTE ST 2110-30, uncompressed video streams are covered by ST 2110-20 and ancillary data is covered by ST 2110-40. Some other parts of the standards cover traffic shaping of uncompressed video (ST 2110-21), AES3 transparent transport (ST 2110-31) and ST 2110-50 allows integration with older specification ST 2022-6 that covers legacy SDI over IP.

The separate streams have timestamps that allow proper alignment of the different streams when they are combined together — this timestamp is provided by ST 2059. Each stream contains metadata that tells the receiver how to interpret what is inside of the stream. The uncompressed video stream supports up to 32k X 32k images, HDR and all common color systems and formats.

The important thing about these IP standards is that they allow using conventional Ethernet cabling rather than special proprietary cables. This saves a lot of money on hardware. In addition, having an IP-based workflow allows easy ingest into a core IP network and distribution of content using IP-based broadcast, telco, cable and broadband technologies as well as satellite channels. As most consumers have IP content access, these IP networks connect directly to consumer equipment. The image below from an Avid presentation by Shailendra Mathur at SMPTE 2017 illustrates the workflow below.

At IBC and the SMPTE 2017 Conference there were interoperability demonstrations. Although the IBC interop demo had many more participants the SMPTE demo was pretty extensive. The photo below shows the SMPTE interoperability demonstration setup.

As many modern network storage systems, whether file or object based, use Ethernet connectivity, having the rest of the workflow using an IP network makes movement of data through the workflow to and from digital storage easier. Since access to cloud-based assets is also though IP-based networks and these can feed CDNs and other distribution networks, on-premise and cloud storage interact through IP networks and can be used to support working storage, archives as well as content distribution libraries.

IP workflows combined with IP-based digital storage provide end-to-end processing and storage of data. This provides hardware economics and access to a lot of software built to manage and monitor IP flows to help optimize a media production and distribution system. By avoiding the overhead of converting from one type of network to another the overall system complexity and efficiency will be improved, resulting in faster projects and easier repair of problems when they arise.


Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates. He is the founder and organizer of the annual Storage Visions Conference as well as the Creative Storage Conference. He has also been the general chairman of the annual Flash Memory Summit.

Avid at IBC with new post workflows based on MediaCentral 

At IBC2017, Avid introduced new MediaCentral solutions for post production. Dubbed MediaCentral for Post, the solutions integrate Media Composer video editing software with a new collaborative asset management module, new video I/O hardware and Avid Nexis software-defined storage.

MediaCentral for Post is a scalable solution for small and mid-sized creative teams to enhance collaboration and so teams can work more efficiently with 4K and other demanding formats, delivering their best work faster. Avid collected feedback from working editors while developing a collaborative workflow that goes beyond bin-locking and project-sharing to include integrated storage, editing, I/O acceleration and media management.

Besides Media Composer, MediaCentral solutions for post integrate Avid’s products in a single, open platform that includes:

• MediaCentral Editorial Management: This new media asset management tool enables everyone in a creative organization to collaborate in secure, reliable and simply-configured media workflows from a web browser. MediaCentral Editorial Management gives a view into an entire organization’s media assets. Without needing an NLE, assistants and producers can ingest files, create bins, add locators and metadata, create subclips and perform other asset management tasks — all from a simple browser interface. Users can collaborate using the new MediaCentral Panel for Media Composer, which provides direct access to MediaCentral content right in the Media Composer interface.

• MediaCentral Cloud UX: An easy-to-use and task-oriented graphical user interface, MediaCentral Cloud UX runs on any OS or mobile device, and is available to everyone connected to the platform. Creative team members can easily collaborate with each other from wherever they are.

• Artist DNxIVvideo: This interface offers a wide range of analog and digital I/O to plug into diverse media productions. It works with a broad spectrum of Avid and third-party video editing, audio, visual effects and graphics software.

• MediaCentral Panel for Media Composer: Within the Media Composer user interface, MediaCentral Panel allows users to see media outside of their active project as well as drag and drop assets from MediaCentral directly into any Media Composer project, bin or sequence.

• More Storage: Avid Nexis Pro now scales to 160 terabytes — twice its previous capacity – to give small post facilities the ease-of-use, security and performance advantages that larger Avid Nexis customers have access to. Avid Nexis E2 now supports SSD drives to deliver the extreme performance required when working with multiple streams of ultra-high-resolution media in real time. Additionally, Avid Nexis Enterprise now leverages 100 terabyte media packs to scale up to 4.8 petabytes.

Assistant Editor’s Bootcamp coming to Burbank in June

The new Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp, founded by assistant/lead editors Noah Chamow (The Voice) and Conor Burke (America’s Got Talent), is a place for a assistant editors and aspiring assistants to learn and collaborate with one another in a low-stakes environment. The next Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp classes will be held on June 10-11, along with a Lead Assistant Editors’ class geared toward understanding troubleshooting and system performance on June 24-25. All classes, sponsored by AlphaDogs’ Editor’s Lounge, will be held at Skye Rentals in Burbank.

The classes will cover such topics as The Fundamentals of Video, Media Management, Understanding I/O and Drive Speed, Prepping Footage for Edit, What’s New in Media Composer, Understanding System Performance Bottlenecks and more. Cost is $199 for two days for the Assistant Editor class, and $299 for two days for the Lead Assistant Editor class. Space is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited to 25 participants per course. You can register here.

A system with Media Composer 8.6 or later and an external hard drive is required to take the class (30-day Avid trial available) 8GB of system memory and Windows 7/OS X 10.9 or later are needed to run Media Composer 8.6. Computer rentals are available for as little as $54 a week from Hi-Tech Computer Rental in Burbank.

Chamow and Burke came up with the idea for Assistant Editors’ Bootcamp when they realized how challenging it is to gain any real on-the-job experience in today’s workplace. With today’s focus being primarily on doing things faster and more efficiently, it’s almost impossible to find the time to figure out why one method of doing something is faster than another. Having worked extensively in reality television and creating the “The Super Grouper,” a multi-grouping macro for Avid that is now widely used in reality post workflows, Chamow understands first-hand the landscape of the assistant editor’s world. “One of the most difficult things about working in the entertainment industry, especially in a technical position, is that there is never time to learn,” he says. “I’m very passionate about education and hope by hosting these classes, I can help other assistants hone their skills as well as helping those who are new to the business get the experience they need.”

Having worked as both an assistant editor and lead assistant editor, Burke has created workflows and overseen post for up to 10 projects at a time, before moving into his current position at NBC’s America’s Got Talent. “In my years of experience and working on grueling deadlines, I completely understand how difficult the job of an assistant editor can be, having little or no time to learn anything other than what’s right in front of you,” he says. “In teaching this class, I hope to make peers feel more confident and have a better understanding in their work, taking them to the next level in their careers.”

Main Image (L-R): Noah Chamow and Conor Burke.

postPerspective Impact Award winners from NAB 2017

In early April, postPerspective announced the debut of our Impact Awards, celebrating innovative products and technologies for the post production and production industries that will influence the way people work. Our inaugural awards honor the best new or upgraded gear shown at NAB 2017.

Now that the show is over, and our panel of post pro judges has had time to decompress, dig out and think about what impressed them, we are happy to announce our honorees.

And the winners of the postPerspective Impact Award from NAB 2017 are:

• Adobe — Creative Cloud Suite
• Avid — Media Composer | Cloud Remote
• Blackmagic Design — DaVinci Resolve 14
• Dell — UltraSharp 27 4K HDR Monitor
• HP — DreamColor Z31x Studio Display

“The postPerspective Impact Award celebrates companies that have listened to users’ wants and needs and then produced tools designed to make their working lives easier and projects better,” said Randi Altman, postPerspective’s founder and editor-in-chief. “And all of our winners certainly fall into that category.

“Our awards are special because they are voted on by people who will be potentially using these tools in their day-to-day workflows. It’s real-world users who have determined our winners, and that is the way it should be. We feel awards for products targeting pros should be voted on by pros.”

Obviously, there were many new technologies and products at NAB this year, and while only five won an Impact Award, our judges felt there were other tools that it was important to let people know about as well.

Displays for high-resolution workflows were of special interest to many of our judges. In addition to our winners, they pointed to Sony’s CLEDIS, Bravia and XBR displays; SmallHD’s Focus monitor; Eizo’s Color Edge monitors; and Flanders Scientific’s OLED 55-inch HDR display.

Other gear that caught our judges attention — AJA’s FS HDR with ColorFront; Telestream Wirecast with Cloud-Assist captioning; Avid Pro Tools with Dolby Atmos integration; IBM Watson for post production; Mettle’s 360 Degree/VR Depth plug-ins and Skybox Studio v2; G-Tech’s Thunderbolt 3 Shuttle XL; AJA’s KiPro Ultra Plus; and The Foundry’s Nuke 11 and Elara.

Stay tuned for future Impact Award winners in the coming months — voted on by users for users — from SIGGRAPH and IBC.

Steve Holyhead

AJA brings on Steve Holyhead from Fox Broadcasting

Steve Holyhead has joined AJA as senior product manager for desktop products. He joins AJA from Fox Broadcasting Company where he was director of technical operations.

Holyhead recently moved to Grass Valley, where AJA is headquartered, from Los Angeles. In addition to working at Fox, his 20-plus years of industry experience includes developing professional digital video workflows with BloomCast, managing post operations at Discovery Communications and working as a technology evangelist, producer and technical marketing manager for both Discreet (now Autodesk) and Avid. He has also developed Avid and Adobe training courses for multiple partners, including Lynda.com.

“Steve brings a blend of real-world production and technology developer experience to AJA. His understanding of production, broadcast and post, together with his experience both designing enterprise scale workflows and as a master trainer for Adobe, Apple and Avid products, will make powerful contributions to the success of our customers,” says Nick Rashby, president of AJA.

AES Paris: A look into immersive audio, cinematic sound design

By Mel Lambert

The Audio Engineering Society (AES) came to the City of Light in early June with a technical program and companion exhibition that attracted close to 2,600 pre-registrants, including some 700 full-pass attendees. “The Paris International Convention surpassed all of our expectations,” AES executive director Bob Moses told postPerspective. “The research community continues to thrive — there was great interest in spatial sound and networked audio — while the business community once again embraced the show, with a 30 percent increase in exhibitors over last year’s show in Warsaw.” Moses confirmed that next year’s European convention will be held in Berlin, “probably in May.”

Tom Downes

Getting Immersed
There were plenty of new techniques and technologies targeting the post community. One presentation, in particular, caught my eye, since it posed some relevant questions about how we perceive immersive sound. In the session, “Immersive Audio Techniques in Cinematic Sound Design: Context and Spatialization,” co-authors Tom Downes and Malachy Ronan — both of who are AES student members currently studying at the University of Limerick’s Digital Media and Arts Research Center, Ireland — questioned the role of increased spatial resolution in cinematic sound design. “Our paper considered the context that prompted the use of elevated loudspeakers, and examined the relevance of electro-acoustic spatialization techniques to 3D cinematic formats,” offered Downes. The duo brought with them a scene from writer/director Wolfgang Petersen’s submarine classic, Das Boot, to illustrate their thesis.

Using the university’s Spatialization and Auditory Display Environment (SpADE) linked to an Apple Logic Pro 9 digital audio workstations and a 7.1.4 playback configuration — with four overhead speakers — the researchers correlated visual stimuli with audio playback. (A 7.1-channel horizontal playback format was determined by the DAW’s I/O capabilities.) Different dynamic and static timbre spatializations were achieved by using separate EQ plug-ins assigned to horizontal and elevated loudspeaker channels.

“Sources were band-passed and a 3dB boost applied at 7kHz to enhance the perception of elevation,” Downes continued. “A static approach was used on atmospheric sounds to layer the soundscape using their dominant frequencies, whereas bubble sounds were also subjected to static timbre spatialization; the dynamic approach was applied when attempting to bridge the gap between elevated and horizontal loudspeakers. Sound sources were split, with high frequencies applied to the elevated layer, and low frequencies to the horizontal layer. By automating the parameters within both sets of equalization, a top-to-bottom trajectory was perceived. However, although the movement was evident, it was not perceived as immersive.”

The paper concluded that although multi-channel electro-acoustic spatialization techniques are seen as a rich source of ideas for sound designers, without sufficient visual context they are limited in the types of techniques that can be applied. “Screenwriters and movie directors must begin to conceptualize new ways of utilizing this enhanced spatial resolution,” said Downes.

Rich Nevens

Rich Nevens

Tools
Merging Technologies demonstrated immersive-sound applications for the v.10 release of Pyramix DAW software, with up to 30.2-channel routing and panning, including compatibly for Barco Auro, Dolby Atmos and other surround formats, without the need for additional plug-ins or apps, while Avid showcased additions for the modular S6 Assignable Digital Console, including a Joystick Panning Module and a new Master Film Module with PEC/DIR switching.

“The S6 offers improved ergonomics,” explained Avid’s Rich Nevens, director of worldwide pro audio solutions, “including enhanced visibility across the control surface, and full Ethernet connectivity between eight-fader channel modules and the Pro Tools DSP engines.” Reportedly, more than 1,000 S6 systems have been sold worldwide since its introduction in December 2013, including two recent installations at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, California.

Finally, Eventide came to the Paris AES Convention with a remarkable new multichannel/multi-element processing system that was demonstrated by invitation only to selected customers and distributors; it will be formally introduced during the upcoming AES Convention in Los Angeles in October. Targeted at film/TV post production, the rackmount device features 32 inputs and 32 discrete outputs per DSP module, thereby allowing four multichannel effects paths to be implemented simultaneously. A quartet of high-speed ARM processors mounted on plug-in boards can be swapped out when more powerful DSP chips became available.

Joe Bamberg and Ray Maxwell

Joe Bamberg and Ray Maxwell

“Initially, effects will be drawn from our current H8000 and H9 processors — with other EQ, dynamics plus reverb effects in development — and can be run in parallel or in series, to effectively create a fully-programmable, four-element channel strip per processing engine,” explained Eventide software engineer Joe Bamberg.

“Remote control plug-ins for Avid Pro Tools and other DAWs are in development,” said Eventide’s VP of sales and marketing, Ray Maxwell. The device can also be used via a stand-alone application for Apple iPad tablets or Windows/Macintosh PCs.

Multi-channel I/O and processing options will enable object-based EQ, dynamic and ambience processing for immersive-sound production. End user price for the codenamed product, which will also feature Audinate Dante, Thunderbolt, Ravenna/AES67 and AVB networking, has yet to be announced.

Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators, an LA-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Company 3’s Heydar Adel: The role of today’s online editor

Workflows for episodic TV have changed a lot over the last several years, sometimes daily. A role that has gone largely underappreciated in the process is online editor. Senior online editor Heydar Adel is no stranger to the process, having served in that role for over 17 years. While he has only been with Deluxe’s Company 3 in Santa Monica since last year, he is no stranger to Deluxe itself — he held a similar role at the company’s Encore facility for seven years prior to this recent move.

In describing his current role at Company 3, which provides high-end post services to feature film, commercial, music video and television clients, he says, “I primarily do conforming, which is essentially recreating what the picture editors are doing using smaller, more user-friendly files like Avid DNX-36, but with the larger and more robust files that our colorists works with. That could be a camera-original file format like r3d or ArriRaw, or it could be DPX or EXR, depending on the client’s requirements.”

In addition to the actual conforming of the files, he says, the process almost always involves creating some visual effects. “Elaborate effects and CGI work will go to an effects facility, but I do quite a lot of wire and mic removal, reframing, compositing and those kinds of effects. So that can be clean-up, stabilizations, laptop comps, cell phone comps, gunplay — like sparks and smoke — and those types of things.”

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia is just one of the shows that Adel lends his talents to.

Adel makes it clear that he’s not changing the story or making creative decisions, “but the level of polish on a show is quite different when I’m done with it than when it first get it.”

Let’s dig in a bit deeper with Adel to find out more about his role and his workflow…

What tools do you use?
I can work in any of the “online” tools, such as Autodesk Flame, which used to be Smoke. We’ve also started doing some work in Blackmagic Resolve, but I’ve worked most often in Avid since it became possible last year to use Avid Symphony for 4K finishing.

Picture editors mostly work in Avid, so that helps with efficiency. We’re finishing a lot of shows for Netflix and Amazon and other companies who want 4K, and now HDR. I’ve found that working in Avid requires a bit less guesswork in recreating some of the effects the picture editor created so I can focus on bigger issues like compositing.

Can you walk us through an average session?
We get the offline edit in whatever format they use — often DNX36 — and all the raw camera footage. Company 3’s data department handles any transcoding that might be required and then we archive everything. My assistant editor puts the entire project online and I watch a split, with the offline version playing back in one monitor and the larger files assembled on a timeline chasing that version. First I check and make sure that there are no discrepancies between the versions and then I start on the bells and whistles.

What determines what effects you do and what gets sent out to a VFX vendor?
Their editorial department prepares lists of work that needs to be done. I’m part of that conversation and I’ll bid specific effects. So I’ll determine it might take two hours to do the shot and they generally pay a certain hourly rate. Some effects shots require many hours. Then they determine whether they want to do it here or send it out based on any number of factors. For the last pilot I worked on, I did 1,200 Avid visual effects shots for one 80-minute piece.

What tools do you use for the effects work, or is it just Avid?
You can do some of the work in the actual online tool — Avid or one of the others. Beyond that I use Adobe After Effects for a lot of compositing and Mocha for tracking. Mocha (now a Boris FX product) is very effective, and the tracking information translates well into the editing tools. I’ve also done some work in Blackmagic Fusion when I’m using Resolve to conform because they talk well to each other.

What monitors do you use?
I use a big 4K UHD monitor (sometimes Sony, sometimes LG) as the primary display, an HD LCD HP DreamColor as a close-up monitor and an HD plasma for comparisons. I use a nice curved Dell monitor for UI, which has a super wide — 21:9 — aspect ratio. Avid and Resolve interfaces are dual monitor set-ups but you can fit the whole thing on this one screen, and I love it.

What are some industry trends you’ve noticed recently?
The speed at which things need to get done — it used to be 8-12 hours to conform and output a show, now maybe four or five and with a lot more visual effects. Of course, the machines are faster but then as the resolution of the files goes up things naturally slow down again. We’re also working with 16-bit files and HDR and that also slows things down. At Company 3 we’re always maneuvering through these technological changes.

What’s the most satisfying part of your job?
Working on shows I like! Recently, because I’m doing more and more, I have a sense of ownership. My job has changed; I’m not just a conform editor. I’ve contributed to it on an artistic level and I’m embracing the shift. So I watch them again and I’m proud of it. I’ve worked on shows I love and have gotten friends to start watching.

Black Sails Season 3

Black Sails

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Cutnotes is an iPad app I love. When we play out a show with a client, you sync up timecode in the form of a text file. You can input parameters, like that it’s a 23.976 project, and it’s very effective. I really do love Mocha. It lets me do planar tracking in 3D space. It’s the core of most effects I do. And I use After Effects all the time.

Can you name some of those shows you’ve worked on?
It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, The Last Ship, Narcos, Black Sails, and a lot of other shows and pilots.

What social media channels do you follow?
Mostly Instagram. I follow photographers and DPs.

If you listen to music while you work, care to share some of your favorites?
I listen to EDM; ‘90s electronica, like Massive Attack and Chemical Brothers; and Jazz. It’s the best music for VFX comps!

What do you do to de-stress?
I spend a lot of time outdoors with my two little boys!

Ncam hires industry vet Vincent Maza to head up LA office

Ncam, makers of camera tracking for augmented reality production and previs, has opened a new office in Los Angeles, and they have brought on Vincent Maza to run the operation.

Maza spent much of his career at Avid and as an HD engineer at Fletcher Chicago. More recently he has been working with the professional imaging division of Dolby and with data transfer specialist Aspera. He is also a member of the board of directors of the HPA (Hollywood Post Alliance), now part of SMPTE. He will be in Indian Wells, California next week representing Ncam at the HPA Tech Retreat.

“2016 is going to be a great year for augmented reality and we believe we will see a huge uptake in people using it to make television more engaging, more exciting and more challenging,” commented Maza. “Ncam’s camera tracking technology makes augmented reality a practical proposition, and I am very excited to be at the heart of it and supporting our US presence.”

Ncam’s tracking system is able to achieve all six degrees of movement in camera location: XYZ position in 3D space, pan, tilt and roll, so even handheld cameras can be precisely tracked with minimal latency.

Broadcasters have embraced augmented reality with Ncam, including CNN, ESPN, Fox Sports and the NFL. This same technology is used to provide directors and cinematographers with realtime visualization of effects shots. Recent movies using the technology include, Avengers Age of Ultron, Edge of Tomorrow and White House Down.

Bandito Brothers: picking tools that fit their workflow

Los Angeles-based post, production and distribution company Bandito Brothers is known for its work on feature films such as Need for Speed, Act of Valor and Dust to Glory. They provide a variety of services — from shooting to post to visual effects — for spots, TV, films and other types of projects.

Lance Holte in the company’s broadcast color by working on DaVinci Resolve 12.

They are also known in our world for their Adobe-based workflows, using Premiere and After Effects in particular. But that’s not all they are. Recently, Bandito invested in Avid’s new Avid ISIS|1000 shared storage system to help them work more collaboratively with very large and difficult-to-play files across all editing applications. The system — part of the Avid MediaCentral Platform— allows Bandito’s creative teams to collaborate efficiently regardless of which editing application they use.

“We’ve been using Media Composer since 2009, although our workflows and infrastructure have always been built around Premiere,” explains Lance Holte, senior director of post production, Bandito Brothers. “We tend to use Media Composer for offline editorial on projects that require more than a few editors/assistants to be working in the same project since Avid bin-locking in one project is a lot simpler than breaking a feature into 200 different scene-based Premiere projects.

“That said, almost every project we cut in Avid is conformed and finished in Premiere, and many projects — that only require two or three editors/assistants, or require a really quick turnaround time, or have a lot of After Effects-specific VFX work — are cut in Premiere. The major reason that we’ve partnered with Avid on their new shared storage is because it works really well with the Adobe suite and can handle a number of different editorial workflows.”

MixStage             
Bandito’s Mix Stage                                                         Bandito’s Edit 4.

He says the ISIS | 1000 gives them the collaborative power to share projects across a wide range of tools and staff, and to complete projects in less time. “The fact that it’s software-agnostic means everyone can use the right tools for the job, and we don’t need to have several different servers with different projects and workflows,” says Holte.

Bandito Brothers’ ISIS|1000 system is accessible from three separate buildings at its Los Angeles campus — for music, post production and finishing. Editors can access plates being worked on by its on-site visual effects company, or copy over an AAF or OMF file for the sound team to open in Avid Pro Tools in their shared workspace.

“Bandito uses Pro Tools for mixing, which also makes the ISIS|1000 handy, since we can quickly movie media between mix and editorial anywhere across the campus,” concludes Holte.

Currently, Bandito Brothers is working on a documentary called EDM, as well as commercial campaigns for Audi, Budweiser and Red Bull.

Mocha now plug-in for NLEs, BCC 10 integrates Mocha 5

The big news from Boris FX/Imagineer at IBC this year was that the soon-to-be-released Mocha Pro planar tracking and roto masking technology will be available as a plug-in for Avid, Adobe and OFX. This brings all of the tools from Mocha Pro to these NLEs — no more workarounds needed. This Mocha Pro 5 plug-in, which will be available in a month, incorporates a new effects panel for integrated keying, grain, sharpening and skin smoothing as well as new Python scripting support and more.

“Avid editors have always asked us for the Mocha planar tracking tools on their timeline. Now with the Imagineer/Boris FX collaboration, we are bringing the full Mocha Pro to Avid,” explains Ross Shain, CMO at BorisFX/Imagineer. “Media Composer and Symphony users will be able to handle more complex effects and finishing tasks, without importing/exporting footage. Just drop the Mocha Pro plug-in on your clip and you immediately have access to the same powerful tracking, stabilization and object removal tools used in high-end feature film visual effects.”

The availability of this plugin coincides with the Mocha Pro 5 release.

In other company news, Boris FX’s upcoming Boris Continuum Complete (BCC) 10 will have Mocha planar tracking and masking embedded. This is inside every BCC 10 plug-in and can be used for isolating areas of the effect with Mocha masks. The first version to ship will be BCC 10 for Avid in a few weeks.

Besides integrating Mocha Pro 5, BCC 10 will also offer a new Beauty Studio skin-retouching filter, new 3D titling and animation tools, import of Maxon Cinema 4D models, new image restoration filters, new transitions and more host support.

Avid Artist|DNxIO box for high frame rate, 4K workflows now shipping

Avid has started shipping its Avid Artist|DNxIO, a hardware I/O interface designed to simplify and accelerate HD, Ultra HD, 2K and 4K workflows. Available as standalone hardware or bundled with Media Composer software, Artist|DNxIO allows users to capture, monitor and output media quickly — in the highest quality possible. And because the interface, which includes hardware by Blackmagic Design, is designed to be open and flexible, you can use it with Avid and other creative tools too. More on that in a bit.

Currently the company is offering users a path to upgrade: between now and September 30, customers can save more than 20 percent on Avid Artist | DNxIO when they trade in Avid Nitris DX or Avid Mojo DX, or selected Open IO hardware from AJA, Blackmagic Design, Matrox and MOTU.

Built on the Avid MediaCentral Platform, Avid Artist|DNxIO is compatible with Avid Artist Suite solutions and many third-party tools, including Blackmagic Resolve, Apple Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe After Effects and others. It includes hardware by Blackmagic, which is a new I/O Connectivity Partner for the MediaCentral Platform.

Artist-DNxIO_Back_Enlarged

Avid Artist|DNxIO enables video pros to capture, monitor and output Ultra HD, 2K and 4K media, as well as HD and SD formats. Its fits in standard 19-inch equipment racks for easy integration in equipment rooms, and it’s quiet enough to place on the desk of an edit bay. The HD display allows editors to monitor media that is being ingested into and outputted from the system, even when the software is not running. A host of connections delivers fast switching among a range of input devices and sources for capture, as well as a range of monitors and output devices. Hands-on controls allow users to easily select video, audio, and timecode inputs as well as deck control.

Avid Artist|DNxIO is bundled with Blackmagic’s Fusion Connect plug-in for Media Composer. This gives users access to this node-based effects compositing tool from within the Media Composer user interface. Onboard DNxHR encoding for capture workflows will be enabled on DNxIO via a future no-cost firmware update. Updated software for supported creative editorial applications will be required to take advantage of this capability.

Here are some details of the release:
• Capture and playback up to 60 frames per second in HD format.
• Work faster and more efficiently with realtime or accelerated encode, decode, colorspace conversion, upconversion, down conversion and cross conversion with onboard hardware processing.
• Operation reliably with a redundant power supply
• Connect to a variety of computers using PCIe or Thunderbolt connections (cables sold separately)
• Easily integrate with existing workflows using multiple connections
• Timecode in/out is available on board
• Control the system from external devices using remote control ports
• Monitor media with confidence using a bright front-panel full 1080 HD LCD display.
• Get hands-on control over sources of video, audio, timecode, and remote control signaling
• Video inputs and outputs:
– Four SDI in, four SDI loop, four SDI out and four SDI repeated out, providing 12Gb/s in/out with support for single link, dual link and quad link (quad link in coming soon)
– Dual Optical SDI in/out which support 3Gb/s and 6Gb/s SDI – 12Gb/s support coming soon (modules not included)
– HDMI in and out
– Analog video in and out—component and composite
• Audio inputs and outputs:
– Balanced analog audio — four channels in, four channels out
– AES/EBU— two channels in, two channels out
– Consumer Hi-Fi inputs for MP3 players and other devices
– Front panel features mic input with 48V phantom power, mic level control, headphone connection, and headphone level control

Avid touts resolution independence with Media Composer 8.4

Avid Media Composer 8.4 is now available. It offers accelerated high-resolution workflows and faster realtime collaboration while freeing editors of some time-consuming background tasks.

The biggest news is this version no longer ties users into standard, higher-resolution frame sizes. Editors can now easily work in whatever size they need, from big-screen features films — including 8K — to billboards to ads running on kiosks in stores, and everything in between. Also new is the ability to preview closed captions, search timelines and work in native ProRes and Sony XAVC formats.

“Today’s video professionals need to be able to handle whatever media walks in the door, ingest that media, edit it, and deliver a master for distribution,” says Charlie Russell, Avid’s senior segment marketing manager. “Increasingly, the media they need to work with is greater than HD: 2K, 4K or Ultra HD. With the latest version of Media Composer, editors and assistants will be able to handle this high-resolution media, while leveraging their existing HD infrastructure.”

Here is a list of offerings from their press release:

• Custom raster support —  Editors can work with any raster up to 8K, in any format.

• AVC-I, ProRes, XAVC-I and XF-AVC native high-resolution playback — Optimized performance for Apple ProRes, Canon XF-AVC, Panasonic AVC-I and Sony XAVC-I allows users the flexibility to mix and match high-resolution media in the timeline, from DNxHR to other popular formats, and edit with smooth realtime playback.

• AAX factory presets — With Media Composer 8.4, users have access to the same AAX presets as with Pro Tools.

• Enhanced closed captioning — Users can see closed caption timing in the timeline to avoid breaking captions, and can view captions on external monitors as well as in the interface.

• Alpha channel support for QuickTime-wrapped Avid DNxHR — Users can enhance their graphics, effects and compositing workflows when working with QuickTime apps.

• Media Composer|Cloud —  Editors can use Media Composer software and Media Composer|Cloud workflows on a single system, including remote cloud-based editing while simultaneously performing background uploading, rendering, consolidating or transcoding.

Look for a review of the new version coming soon to postPerspective.

 

Avid buys Orad, a good fit for its Avid MediaCentral Platform

Avid has completed its acquisition of Orad Hi-Tec Systems, a provider of 3D realtime graphics, video servers and related workflow management solutions. The Orad product lines complement the Avid MediaCentral Platform, and many of Avid’s and Orad’s solutions are already integrated and widely used together.

More than 600 customers worldwide rely on Orad’s technology to produce graphics, live events and sports broadcasts. Avid plans to expand its portfolio and distribution network with Orad’s comprehensive line of news, channel branding, sports production and enhancement, elections and special events, virtual studios, video walls and virtual advertisement products. With this expanded capability, media organizations on the Avid MediaCentral Platform should be able to reduce the burden of piecing together disparate fragmented workflows in their production environments, resulting in less complexity, fewer interoperability challenges and greater efficiency and productivity.

The combination of Avid and Orad is expected to deliver a number of benefits for customers of both companies, including enhanced integration between more Avid and Orad solutions, more comprehensive workflows, improved efficiency and more options for workflow management.

What it means to be free

Free versions of software help develop a stronger entry-level talent pool

By The Unknown Artist

One of the biggest buzzes at the NAB Show this year was the announcement of free versions of software from Avid and The Foundry: Avid First and Nuke Non-Commercial. This is a pretty big deal… for those companies and for the industry as a whole because I have seen how free versions, not just short-term trial versions of software, have a significant, positive impact.

Avid had a stranglehold on the professional market during the 1990s and the early 2000s. During this period, their range of products included a free version — Avid Free DV. This was discontinued in 2007, just as Final Cut Pro matured as a serious competitor in the professional market.

Suddenly, learning Avid independently wasn’t an option. But Apple didn’t make Final Cut Pro difficult to rip, so many young people did with FCP what they had previously, legitimately, done with Avid: they acquired free and accessible software to learn on and started making content. And as they stepped up the ladder and into the professional world, so did their preferred NLE. Emerging talent did what they had to do, and the NLE market changed as a result.

As the industry has moved away from on-the-job mentorship and training this has become the new way to break in. You don’t get to start out with nothing and learn on the job, you have to start out with basic skills and familiarity with specific software before you get in the door.

A by-product of people learning these tools at home was it created new entry-level talent for the industry. What happened when Avid discontinued DV was that the industry lost a lot of low-paid entry-level talent. There were stories of productions that literally couldn’t find anyone at entry-level who knew Avid. This likely had some influence on the shift away from Avid over the past few years: cash-strapped productions shifted to a platform that they could find freelancers to operate.

At NAB, The Foundry introduced the free Nuke Non-Commercial.

That’s why free versions are important for the overall strength of the brand, as well as for the industry in general. We live in a digital age where we are accustomed to being able to “try before we buy.” Not every working professional learned how to use the many tools of their trade by taking a training course.

A large portion learned, or at least honed their skills, by getting a free version, taking it for a spin over a few months and creating some personal projects at home. Film schools may teach the fundamentals of post, but it takes tinkering, exploration and months of practice to become comfortable enough to put in on your resume. Whether it’s aspiring editors familiarizing themselves with Avid, compositors with Nuke or colorists with Resolve Lite, free and accessible versions of professional software open up our industry for a more diverse, more skilled talent pool.

Bluefish444 intros Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo cards, bundles with Scratch

Bluefish444 is offering its Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo high-bandwidth SDI video I/O card, which brings video formats to the Epoch 4K Neutron range that accommodate 4K/2K high-bandwidth workflows. Introduced at the 2015 NAB Show, Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo features Quad Link 3G SDI, 3G/1.5G/SD SDI input or output, 4K/2K/HD/SD HDMI preview, 4K/UHD high-frame-rate 50/59/60 fps SDI, tri/bilevel genlock, eight channels of AES/EBU audio input and output, two channels of analog audio monitoring output, RS422 machine control and auxiliary genlock connection.

The company has created an upgrade path for existing Epoch 4K Neutron customers who do not initially need the Turbo’s advanced 4K/2K video mode support. Those customers can buy the Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo upgrade board anytime within two years of purchasing their Epoch 4K Neutron video cards. Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo and the Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo upgrade boards are compatible with both the Bluefish444 cross-platform SDK and the Bluefish444 retail installer, which supports popular Bluefish444 and third-party software.

In related news, Bluefish444 announced the immediate availability of an Epoch 4K Neutron and Assimilate Scratch v8 software bundle.

For the bundle, Bluefish444 has redesigned the Epoch 4K Neutron card with a low-profile, half-height form factor to integrate into a wide range of chassis, from low-profile servers to small-form-factor computers to low-profile Thunderbolt expansion chassis. The full-height shield option allows for integration in more traditional workstation computers and provides additional I/O requirements, such as AES/EBU, RS422 machine control, and domestic analog audio monitoring. Epoch 4K Neutron supports 3G SDI I/O configurations for 4K SDI workflows. An HDMI mini connector provides a lower cost 4K/2K/HD/SD HDMI monitoring preview and allows for color-critical monitoring on consumer HDMI displays supporting Deep Color.

Epoch 4K Neutron supports Scratch v8 features such as 4K 30fps HDMI monitoring, 8-bit/10-bit/12-bit SDI monitoring, 4K/2K/HD/SD mastering and monitoring, stereoscopic SDI output, 12-bit-precision color-space conversions, and many more. The Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo upgrade path enables previews of 4K 48/50/59/60 fps SDI signals and stereoscopic 2K/HD 60 fps 12-bit SDI signals.

In Related News
Also at NAB, Bluefish444 announced it has added support for greater-than-HD video formats in Avid Media Composer 8.3, enabling advanced SDI/HDMI video output with Epoch 4K Neutron Turbo, the Epoch 4K Neutron range, and the Epoch 4K Supernova/S+ range of video cards. At the same time, the company has developed support for Avid Pro Tools 12, enabling video output with Epoch 4K Neutron, Epoch Neutron, and the Epoch 4K Supernova range of video cards. SDI and HDMI video preview capability will enable audio editing with real-time, synchronized video on pro displays and projectors. A free software upgrade for Avid Media Composer 8.3 users and a free driver upgrade for Avid Pro Tools 12 users will both be available from the Bluefish444 website in the second quarter of 2015.

Finally, Bluefish444 will support the latest updates to Adobe Creative Cloud when it becomes available in spring 2015.

Sound developments at the NAB Show

Spotlighting Pro Sound Effects library, Genelec 7.1.4 Array, Avid Master Joystick Module and Sennheiser AVX wireless mic

By Mel Lambert

With a core theme of ”Crave More,” which is intended to reflect the passion of our media and entertainment communities, and with products from 1,700 exhibitors this year – including over 200 first-time companies – there were plenty of new developments to see and hear at the NAB Show, which continues in Las Vegas until Thursday afternoon.

In addition to unveiling Master Library 2.0, which adds more that 30,000 new sound effects, online access, annual updates and new subscription pricing, Pro Sound Effects demonstrated a Continue reading

Why resolution independence is an illusion

By The Unknown Artist

All professional editorial systems now advertise “resolution independence,” and in some cases “frame-rate independence.” Avid was the last major player to the party around Christmas of 2014, cautiously launching resolution independence through its AMA.

Resolution independence really doesn’t mean much. It’s simply a little bit of code that automatically resizes all your source material to fit the frame size you’re working in. Frame-rate independence is a much bigger issue, however, because of what it means and what each
system does to the material to make it happen.

Continue reading

Behind the Title: Fluid editor John Piccolo

NAME: John Piccolo (@editfishcook)

COMPANY:  New York City’s Fluid (@fluidny), which has offices in Los Angeles as well

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY?
What I love about Fluid is that we are a one-stop shop. If I’m editing a spot that needs graphics, music, sound design or visual effects, I often team up with my co-workers to bring rough cuts and final cuts to new and, sometimes, unexpected levels.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB TITLE?
Editor

WHAT DOES THAT ENTAIL?
Visual storytelling. It’s always exciting when a director or creative sees their vision pieced Continue reading

Cut+Run helps man meet rasta dog in new Dr. Pepper spot

Cut+Run’s Steve Gandolfi recently edited a commercial for Dr. Pepper out of agency Deutsch LA and directed by Imperial Woodpecker’s Simon McQuiod. Mop Dog tells the tale of unlikely love story between a Dr. Pepper delivery driver and a dreadlocked dog in need of a home.

The spot begins by giving viewers a glimpse into this dog’s lonely life on the streets. He wanders over train tracks and through a town, stopping for a minute to look at a mop in a window… something the pooch seems to relate to more than the well-groomed dogs he sees being walked on the street by their owners.

Continue reading

Jonathan Moser shares tips for Media Composer users

Long-time video editor Jonathan Moser, who has worked on such shows as Deadly Sins, American Gladiators, Dateline NBC and Making The Band, was recently kind enough to share some tips that he employs while cutting on Avid’s Media Composer. While also versed on Final Cut Pro, Moser calls Media Composer home.

1) When coloring clips in a bin for identifying, right/alt click on the color icon in the bin (which will open up the full range of the color palette rather than the measly 16 choices you get with the drop down Edit/Set Clip Color.)

2) I use an email folder called Avid to keep various iterations of clip formats with labels with all my tracks given specific names: ie: Audio 1 is NATSOT1, Audio 2 is NATSOT2, Video track 3 might Continue reading

Mark Corbin’s Top Ten list: Why Audio Engineers Deserve Respect

Mark Corbin is a busy man with two full-time jobs. One of which is working for Avid in console systems support for S6, S5, Venue and ICON. “In a nut shell it means I commission new consoles and help diagnose and resolve existing console issues. I get to meet amazing people and see amazing facilities,” he says.

When he’s not working for Avid, Corbin is an audio post supervisor at New York City’s Corbin Sound, working on television shows or films. “It keeps me very busy, but very fulfilled. I have a fantastic group of audio editors who often work with me on my projects in various capacities.”

So what does supervising entail? For Corbin it means wearing a lot of hats, keeping the clients happy and helping get their project to where they envision it on time and in budget. He Continue reading

My Top 5 Avid Media Composer shortcuts

By Brady Betzel

During my four years as an assistant editor and my two as a full-time editor, almost all of my work has been on the Avid Media Composer or Symphony.

Over the years I have collected a few shortcuts that I love to use and wanted to share. I hope you find them helpful.

Replacing the default “A” + “S” Go to Next/Previous Edit with Fast Forward and Rewind
When you open the default keyboard settings in Avid Media Composer, “A” and “S” are used as Go to Next and Go to Previous edit. While this serves its purpose of going to the next edit in the timeline and going into Trim Mode, I prefer it to be used to just jump to the next edit Continue reading

Quick Chat: Cut+Run’s Steve Gandolfi on Rogue ‘Imagination’ spot

By Randi Altman

Remember as a kid imagining monsters under your bed and hiding in closets? Well a new spot for Nissan takes that childhood fear out of the bedroom and amps it up a bit.

Nissan Rogue’s Imagination, out of TBWA\Chiat\Day Los Angeles, features parents and their son heading home on a dark, stormy night. The viewer sees all the safety features that the Rogue has to offer — Moving Object Detection with Around View Monitor, Blind Spot Warning and Forward Collision Warning — but the boy’s very active imagination places danger everywhere, thanks to visual effects supplied by BaconX.

There is a scary tree whose branches seem to be reaching out to grab the car, a growling bear Continue reading

Howard Brock on Anger Management’s uncomplicated post

By Randi Altman

Post-production veteran Howard Brock is not sentimental about the past. He has seen the industry change from film to tape to digital to file-based, and he’s embraced each new step along the way.

Brock co-founded the Burbank-based post house Matchframe in 1984. He ran it day to day until his departure in 2002. He took on freelance editing jobs before becoming president of Avid rental house Runway. After four years he went back to freelance editing once more. That’s where an editor friend found him and asked him to come on board the Charlie Sheen sitcom Anger Management… as an assistant editor. “I was under employed and over qualified,” he explains, “So I said, ‘It’s a union gig, right? Sure. Yay, health insurance!'”

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The whirlwind known as NAB

By Randi Altman

Welcome to our NAB-themed weekly newsletter. While this space is typically filled with different types of articles, including artist Q&As, product reviews and user stories, this edition features product news and videos from the recent NAB Show in Las Vegas.

This NAB was postPerspective’s first, and it was a good one. We had a booth in South Hall Upper, where it was just quiet enough for our daily interviews with manufactures such as Avid, AJA, Blackmagic, Autodesk and Silverdraft, and users like as Terry Curren of AlphaDogs, Mark Raudonis of Bunim-Murray Productions, Todd Kilponen of The Colbert Report and Oscar-winning editor of Gravity Mark Sanger.

After our video interviews were done, Chris Fenwick and Alex MacLean of the Digital Cinema Continue reading

NAB: Mark Sanger, Oscar-winning editor of ‘Gravity’

Las Vegas — British editor Mark Sanger, who won an Oscar for his work on Gravity, stopped by the postPerspective booth at NAB to talk about working with director, writer, producer and co-editor Alfonso Cuarón.

Sanger, an Avid editor, got involved very early on with the project. In the beginning, he said, it was Cuarón, himself, the storyboard artist Temple Clark and the visual effects supervisor Tim Webber sitting around a table going through the script, trying to get a gauge from Cuarón on how he wanted to execute the film.

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Review: Nvidia’s Quadro K4000 running on an HP Z420

By Brady Betzel

As far as graphics cards go, Nvidia and AMD are at the head of the pack. Given Apple’s recent inclusion of AMD only on their latest Mac Pro, the competition is heating up.

For the longest time I built my own computers, not really focusing on my graphics card Continue reading

Quick Chat: Larry Jordan on NAB 2014

By Randi Altman

As we approach NAB 2014, postPerspective thought it would be fun to throw a few questions at Larry Jordan (www.larryjordan.biz), who will once again be at the show with his podcast Digital Production Buzz,  (@DPBuZZ).

What do you think will be the hot topic at NAB this year?
Clearly, 4K is all the rage. We’ll see 4K everywhere — cameras, monitors, software… What’s interesting to me, though, is that computers are essentially 4K-capable already. The real Continue reading

Aframe names David Frasco as VP of sales, North America

New York — Aframe, makers of a cloud video production system with capabilities in collaboration, review and approval, archive and tagging, has named long-time media and entertainment industry vet David Frasco as its new VP of North American sales, based in New York City.

Formerly with Avid, David Frasco has over 30 years of experience in editing, post production and building out marketing and sales teams for solutions that have transformed content creation and production workflows. For the past 14 years Frasco served as Avid’s director of enterprise accounts, assisting clients to deploy file-based workflow and production systems. He was instrumental in the debut of game-changing solutions for the past four Olympic games.

In earlier positions Frasco also was a product manager with expertise in the company’s graphics and editorial solutions. Prior to joining Avid, he was director of marketing for Chyron, a post production product manager for Sony Broadcast, and a freelance video editor handling both online and offline finishing for broadcast TV, corporate video and advertising spots.

As more broadcasters are looking at cloud solutions, Aframe’s (www.aframe.com) appointment of Frasco will help the company tap into the innovative professional video communities in New York and Los Angeles that are eager to leverage new and smarter ways to create and distribute content.

Aframe will be at NAB next month with the next generation of its cloud video platform, Aframe 3.0, including a new desktop app offering automated media movement workflows, custom transcoding technology, an HTML5 player for precision control ahead of the edit and asset management features that save immense time and hassle in broadcast video production.   Aframe 3.0 makes news and sports as well as media & entertainment professionals more productive and helps them leverage existing on-premise assets more efficiently with the peace of mind that assets are fully under control and secure.

New features include:
– A desktop app with smart upload technology that enables Aframe users to save time and hassle in uploading and distributing files out. The app automatically detects the best connectivity settings before sending the clips to Aframe where it automatically transcodes them to a viewing copy. Users can then configure the app to automatically push the clips to other users’ desktops, for maximum convenience.

– Automatic transcoding features including automatic transcoding to a house format or custom transcoding per clip that mean less effort spent transcoding everything to be used, and less expense on transcoding tools.

–  Expanded access controls and refined permission features that provide a “mission control” administrator view, enabling easier management across cost centers and more fluid asset management. With more adaptable user settings and granular permission structure, Aframe provides added peace of mind against potentially damaging incidents.

–  New HTML5 Player – faster, frame accurate and universally compatible for faster footage review even on smartphones and tablets that expedites the organization of vast amounts of video.

Brady Betzel recently reviewed the Aframe system for postPerspective. Click here to see the piece:  https://postperspective.com/review-aframe-cloud-platform.

Editor Christopher Nelson: Wearing different hats on ‘Bates Motel’

By Randi Altman

Los Angeles — Editor Christopher Nelson, A.C.E., whose credits include the acclaimed dramatic series Lost and Mad Men, is currently editing the second season of A&E’s Bates Motel, which is executive produced by Carlton Cuse (EP/co-showrunner Lost) and Kerry Ehrin (Friday Night Lights/Parenthood). Nelson, who is co-producer on Bates Hotel, also directed this new season’s fifth episode, “The Escape Artist,” which was getting its final mix when we spoke.

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Review: The Aframe cloud platform

By Brady Betzel

The big buzz these days in post production nerd communities seems to be surrounding higher than 4K resolutions and the cloud. Everyone wants to be able to access, organize, and manage all of their media immediately — no one wants to wait.

Over the past 5-10 years, video production has been climbing a steep ladder of evolution in record time. We’ve gone from recording footage on physical film to magical plastic cards that Continue reading

DigitalFilm Tree embraces OpenStack and cloud-based post workflows

The studio is running OpenStack private clouds for TNT’s Perception and ABC’s Mistresses.

By Randi Altman
Los Angeles — Ramy Katrib and the team over at DigitalFilm Tree (www.digitalfilmtree.com) have always set their own path. I first met Ramy at NAB in 2001. He was there looking at tools that would allow him to embrace a data-based workflow, something he thought was the future of post. He thought right.

He has spent over 14 years successfully creating data-based workflows for TV series like Scrubs, Cougar Town, NCIS: Los Angeles and feature films like Her.

Continue reading

EditShare qualifies Mavericks for its shared storage, asset management, archiving tools

Boston — EditShare is now offering Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) compatibility for all its shared storage, Flow media asset management and Ark archiving and back-up products.

EditShare (http://editshare.com) customers using Mavericks with Avid Media Composer 7.0.3 and 6.5.4.1, Final Cut Pro X 10.1, and Pro Tools 11.1 can connect to EditShare shared storage systems via Thursby’s DAVE 11 SMB client, or via AFP for optimal performance. Media Composer 7.0.3 editors who connect to EditShare shared storage via AFP and 10GB Ethernet will see marked performance improvements even when editing multiple streams of 10-bit uncompressed HD.

EditShare integrates high-performance shared storage solutions (XStream, Energy and Field) with video ingest (Geevs and Flow), media asset management (Flow), and archive and back-up (Ark) tools to offer broadcast and post production professionals a productivity-enhancing, tapeless workflow on a highly scalable infrastructure.

 

Avid adds to senior management staff

Burlington, Massachusetts — Avid has added two tech veterans to senior management positions: Rick Lowenstein has been appointed senior VP of customer success and professional services, while Mitch Weaver joins as VP of software development.

Reporting directly to Avid (http://www.avid.com)  president and CEO Louis Hernandez Jr., Lowenstein will be responsible for driving customer engagement and increasing customer service levels.

Weaver will spearhead the company’s software development efforts, reporting to Chris Gahagan, Avid senior VP of products and services.

Lowenstein brings more than 18 years of senior management experience and joins Avid from Adobe Systems where, as VP of consulting. While there he managed the company’s Americas enterprise consulting practice for all digital marketing products.

Weaver brings 34 years’ experience in leading technical operations, specializing in large systems software development, most recently as corporate VP/GM at Cadence Design Systems. He was previously president and CEO of Translogic Technology Incorporate, and a GM at both Mentor Graphics Corporation and HP.

mitch

Mitch Weaver

“These appointments are part of our ongoing efforts to develop deeper customer relationships, and to remain at the forefront of innovation with solutions that solve our customers’ most pressing current and future challenges,” said Hernandez. “We welcome Rick’s experience in leading professional services for a number of premier technology organizations, while Mitch’s track record in leading technical operations will enable us to build on our heritage of building groundbreaking solutions for the most complex workflow environments.”

 

 

Nebraska editor Kevin Tent walks us through the process

By Randi Altman

Editor Kevin Tent, A.C.E., has once again teamed up with director Alexander Payne…. this time on Nebraska, the story of a troubled man and his son making a physical and emotional journey. In addition to a ton of Oscar buzz, the Golden Globes has already shown lead Bruce Dern and director Payne some love with a couple of nominations.

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Review: Maxon Cinema 4D Studio Release 15

CINEMA-4D_R15_Packshot_Prime_left_RGB

Bumin Murray editor Brady Betzel calls this newest version “a beast of a release.”

As we breached the 21 Century, I began my career in post production. I attended California Lutheran University in the little California suburb of Thousand Oaks. I was eager to learn every piece of software, all the tools, and every piece of theory I could get my hands on.

At first I was a Computer Science major, where I quickly learned I did not want to create arrays the rest of my life. However, I did see the power of graphics in a computer science from a graphics course where I learned how hard it was to program a teapot with color and shading using Java. My interests suddenly perked and I realized I wanted to create using the coding, not be the one coding, and become a video editor.

As I was learning all about the difference between scanlines, hard drive platters, After Effects and Photoshop – I found a software program called Maxon Cinema 4D. So I began learning Cinema 4D in school where at the time (2001 – 2004) BodyPaint 3D had made its inaugural debut just one year earlier, Thinking Particles were released, and soon the MoGraph module would be introduced. This was all within the timeframe of Releases 7 through 9.

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Core Post in UK adds cloud video platform FORscene

LONDON — Core Post (http://www.corepost.co.uk), founded by industry veterans and former Sumners department heads Tony Greenwood, Matt Brown, and Kate Mather, opened in October across the road from MediaCityUK and has already attracted clients such as the BBC.

They have incorporated Forbidden Technologies FORscene, a cloud video platform, into its regular workflow to make the post-production process more flexible and efficient, especially for large-scale projects.

“FORscene gives us a cloud-based platform for working with footage both within the facility and off site, adding flexibility that is vital, especially for large-scale productions with large volumes of media,” said Lucy Swann, facility manager at Core Post. “We wanted a system that would eliminate the need to create DVDs of rushes and would offer clients an easy way to view and work with their rushes — and the associated metadata — all in one place, and FORscene does just that. The second a media file hits our storage, it is already transcoding to the cloud, allowing production personnel to view material sooner than ever before.”

The ability to view and manipulate rushes both inside and outside the facility was a key requirement for Core Post. Producers can log in to FORscene from anywhere to view rushes before the edit starts, which makes for much more efficient edit prep. Uploading the material to FORscene during the ingest process allows producers to view, log, and even edit sequences before arriving in the edit suite. Rough cuts that were created off site can easily be imported into Core Post’s Avid editing environment.

Core Post also chose FORscene was because of its logging feature since it’s available from anywhere. Loggers can work on the footage as it is ingested, no matter where they are, thus ensuring clients and staff have immediate access to metadata such as timecode, clip naming, and disk labeling.

Core Post has already begun using FORscene for a large BBC production called “Junior Paramedics — Your Life in Their Hands,” which follows a group of paramedic science students at different stages of their course, and the logging feature is particularly helpful on that project.

Core Post also appreciated FORscene’s ability to integrate into Avid Unity, ISIS, and EditShare storage environments, making it a versatile option should Core Post make changes to its storage systems within the facility.

FilmLight offers Windows version of Baselight for Avid

 

LONDON — FilmLight has launched its Windows version of Baselight for Avid. This is part of the Baselight Editions range, which delivers the key elements the Baselight color grading software as a plug-in for existing post tools.

Baselight Editions puts the Baselight user interface, along with its color processing, into a standard AVX plug-in. It provides unlimited primary and secondary grades in a single layer, including mattes, automatic object tracking and full keyframe animation.

Baselight for Avid supports AAF-based round-tripping with full Baselight systems, meaning that no rendering time is needed to export grade metadata back into Media Composer. That includes carrying over sophisticated grading data including secondary color correction, shapes and tracked objects. Since the exported grades are fully modifiable, workflow efficiency is improved, as corrections and last-minute changes can be made directly in Media Composer, with no need to return to the full Baselight suite.

Color information can also be exported in the FilmLight BLG file format, for seamless exchange with any other FilmLight (http://www.filmlight.ltd.uk) system including other Baselight Editions.

The software includes FilmLight’s Truelight color management system so that editors know that what they see on their monitor is what they will get.
To complement Baselight Editions, FilmLight offers the Slate control panel. This offers the same configurability, precision, ergonomic convenience and reliability as the full-sized panel, but in a smaller form factor.

“We know that the production and post industry is moving away from the idea of color grading as a single step in the process towards collaborative workflows, where a number of people contribute to the look of a project,” said Wolfgang Lempp, co-founder of FilmLight. “To meet the trend, we now offer ‘Baselight everywhere,’ with the appropriate tools – and the same uncompromised color precision – on devices from on-set ingest to the final deliverables.

“We have had Baselight for Avid on Mac for some time,” FilmLight’s Lempp added. “What our customers told us was that they also needed to access it in their Media Composer and Symphony suites, with full render-free grading and a simple workflow. The new Baselight for Windows delivers this.”

 

IBC Blog: Audio Day

Simon-Ray-2

look at Avid’s S6, Dolby Atmos and more

By Simon Ray

Head of Operations & Engineering

Goldcrest London

www.goldcrestfilms.com/post

Sound day started a bit later than picture day, but it was the day we got to look at the new S6 console from Avid.  I booked an afternoon appointment to make sure my judgment was not clouded by an HHB sponsored hangover. We were met by the usual suspects and given an excellent demo by Dave Tyler, which was nowhere near long enough, but there was still time to get an overview of the hardware and its integration with Pro Tools. Continue reading

Meet The Artist: Meetal Gokul

Behind the Title….

image

Dark rooms, polorized glasses and making 3D visions a reality

NAME: Meetal Gokul

COMPANY: Park Road Post Production (www.parkroadpost.co.nz) in Wellington, New Zealand

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY:

Park Road Post Production is a post production facility located five minutes from Stone Street Studios. Park Road was established as a one-stop shop and offers all post services for a feature from digital rushes, stereoscopic alignment, digital intermediate, Foley, ADR and sound mixing through to the final completion of all film and digital deliverables for distribution. Continue reading

Meet The Artist: Brady Betzel

Behind the title….

Brady Drinking Margarita

This post pro enjoys pressure, early mornings and getting home in time to hang with his son.

NAME: Brady Betzel

COMPANY: Bunim/Murray Productions in Van Nuys, California.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR COMPANY? 

We are a production and post facility wrapped in a family of professionals. Continue reading