Tag Archives: Avid Pro Tools

Avid’s new control surfaces for Pro Tools, Media Composer, other apps

By Mel Lambert

During a recent come-and-see MPSE Sound Advice evening at Avid’s West Coast offices in Burbank, MPSE members and industry colleagues were treated to an exclusive look at two new control surfaces for editorial suites and film/TV post stages.

The S1 and S4 controllers join the current S3 and larger S6 control surfaces. Session files from all S Series surfaces are fully compatible with one another, enabling edit and mix session data to move freely from facility to facility. All surfaces provide comprehensive control of Eucon-enabled software, including Pro Tools, Cubase, Nuendo, Logic Pro, Media Composer and other apps to create and record tracks, write automation, control plugins, set up routing and a host of other essential operations via assignable faders, buttons and rotary controls.

S1

S1

Jeff Komar, one of Avid’s pro audio solutions specialists, served as our guide during the evening’s demo sessions of the new surfaces for fully integrated sample-accurate editing and immersive mixing. Expected to ship toward the end of the year, the S1 is said to offer full software integration with Avid’s high-end consoles in a portable, slim-line surface, while the S4 — which reportedly begins shipping in September — is said to bring workstation control to small- to mid-sized post facilities in an ergonomic and compact package.

Pro-user prices start at $24,000 for a three-foot S4 with eight faders; a five-foot configuration with 24 on-surface faders and post-control sections should retail for around $50,000. The S1’s expected end-user price will be approximately $1,200.

The S4 provides extensive visual feedback, including switchable display from channel meters, groups, EQ curves and automation data, in addition to scrolling Pro Tools waveforms that can be edited from the surface. The semi-modular architecture accommodates between eight and 24 assignable faders in eight-fader blocks, with add-on displays, joysticks, PEC/direct paddles and all-knob attention modules. The S4 also features assignable talkback, listen back and speaker sources/levels for Foley/ADR recording plus Dolby Atmos and other formats of immersive audio monitoring. The unit can command two connected playback/record workstations. In essence, the S4 replaces the current S6 M10 system.

Avid’s Jeff Komar

From recording and editing tracks to mixing and monitoring in stereo or surround, the smaller S1 surface provides comprehensive control and visual feedback with full-on Eucon compatibility for Pro Tools and Media Composer. There is also native support for third-party applications, such as Apple Logic Pro, Steinberg Cubase, Adobe Premiere Pro and others. Users can connect up to four units — and also add a Pro Tools|Dock — to create an extended controller. Each S1 has an upper shelf designed to hold an iOS- or Android-compatible tablet running the Pro Tools|Control app. With assignable motorized faders and knobs, as well as fast-access touchscreen workflows and programmable Soft Keys, the S1 is said to offer the speed and versatility needed to accelerate post and video projects.

Reaching deeper into the S4’s semi-modular topology, the surface can be configured with up to three Channel Strip Modules (offering a maximum of 24 faders), four Display Modules to provide visual feedback of each session, and up to three optional modules. The Display Module features a high-resolution TFT screen to show channel names, channel meters, routing, groups, automation data and DAW settings, as well as scrolling waveforms and master meters.

Eucon connectivity can be used to control two different software applications simultaneously, with single key press of editing plugins, writing session automation and other complex tasks. Adding joysticks, PEC/Direct paddles and attention panels enable more functions to be controlled simultaneously from the modular control surface to handle various editing and mixing workflows.

S4

The Master Touch Module (MTM) provides fast access to mix and control parameters through a tilting 12.1-inch multipoint touchscreen, with eight programmable rotary encoders and dedicated knobs and keys. The Master Automation Module (MAM) streamlines session navigation plus project automation and features a comprehensive transport control section with shuttle/jog wheel, a Focus Fader, automation controls and numeric keypad. The Channel Strip Module (CSM) handles control-track levels, plugins and other parameters through eight channel faders, 32 top-lit knobs (four per channel) plus other programmable keys and switches.

For mixing and panning surround and immersive audio projects, including Atmos and Ambisonics, the Joystick Module features a pair of controllers with TFT and OLED displays. The Post Module enables switching between live and recorded tracks/stems through two rows of 10 PEC/direct paddles, while the Attention Knob Module features 32 top-lit knobs — or up to 64 via two modules — to provide extra assignable controls and feedback for plugins, EQ, dynamics, panning and more.

Dependent upon the number of Channel Strip Modules and other options, a customized S4 surface can be housed in either a three-, four- or five -foot pre-assembled frame. As a serving suggestion, the S4-3_CB_Top includes one CSM, one MTM, one MAM and filler panels/plates in a three-foot frame, reaching up to an S4-24-fader, five-foot base system that includes three CSMs, one MTM, one MAM and filler panels/plates in a five-foot frame.

My sincere thanks to members of Avid’s Burbank crew, including pro audio solutions specialists Tony Joy and Gil Gowing, together with Richard McKernan, professional console sales manager for the western region, for their hospitality and patience with my probing questions.


LA-based Mel Lambert is principal of Content Creators. He can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. Follow him on Twitter @MelLambertLA.

Accusonus intros plugin bundles for sound and video editors

Accusonus is bringing its single-knob audio cleaning and noise reduction technology to its new ERA 4 Bundles for video editors, audio engineers and podcasters.

The ERA 4 Bundles (Enhancement and Repair of Audio) are a collection of single-knob audio cleaning plugins designed to reduce the complexity of the sound design and audio workflow without compromising sound quality or fidelity.

Accusonus says that its patented single-knob design appeals to professional editors, filmmakers and podcasters because it reduces the time-consuming audio repair workflow to a twist of a dial. Additionally, the ERA 4 Standard family of plugins enables aspiring content creators, YouTubers and film and audio students to quickly master audio workflows with minimal effort or expertise.

ERA 4 Bundles are available in two collections: The Standard Bundle and the Pro Bundle.

The ERA 4 Standard Bundle features audio cleaning plugins designed for speed and fidelity with minimal effort, even if users have never edited audio before. The Standard Bundle offers professional sound design and includes: Noise Remover, Reverb Remover, De-esser, Plosive Remover, Voice Leveler and De-clipper.

The ERA 4 Pro Bundle targets professional editors, audio engineers and podcasters in advanced post and music production environments. It includes all of the plugins from the Standard Bundle and adds the sophisticated ERA De-Esser Pro plugin. Except from the large main knob, ERA De-Esser Pro offers extra controls for greater granularity and fine-tuning when fixing an especially rough recording.

The Accusonus ERA Bundle is fully supported by Avid Pro Tools 12.6 (or higher), Audacity 2.2.2, Apple Logic Pro 10.4.3 (or higher), Ableton Live 9 (or higher), Cockos Reaper v5.9, Image Line FL Studio 12, Presonus Studio One 3 (or higher), Steinberg Cubase 8 (or higher), Adobe Audition CC 2017 (or higher) and Apple GarageBand 10.3.2

The ERA Bundle supports Adobe Premiere CC 2017 (or higher), Apple Final Cut Pro X 10.4 (or higher), Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 14 (or higher), Avid Media Composer 2018.12 and Magix Vegas Pro 15 (or higher).

The ERA 4 Standard Bundle is available at a special introductory price of $119 until July 31. After that, the price will be $149. The ERA 4 Pro Bundle is available at a special introductory price of $349 until July 31. After that, the price will be $499.

Emmy Awards: OJ: Made in America composer Gary Lionelli

By Jennifer Walden

The aftermath of a tragic event plays out in front of the eyes of the nation. OJ Simpson, wanted for the gruesome murder of his wife and her friend, fails to turn himself in to the authorities. News helicopters follow the police chase that follows Simpson back to his Rockingham residence where they plan to take him into custody. Decades later, three-time Emmy-winning composer Gary Lionelli is presented with the opportunity to score that iconic Bronco chase.

Here, Lionelli talks about his approach to scoring ESPN’s massive documentary OJ: Made in America. His score on Part 3 is currently up for Emmy consideration for Outstanding Music Composition for a Limited Series. The entire OJ: Made in America score is available digitally through Lakeshore Records.

Gary Lionelli

Scoring OJ: Made in America seems like such a huge undertaking. It’s a five-part series, and each part is over 90 minutes long. How did you tackle this beast?
I’d never scored anything that long within such a short timeframe. Because each part was so long, it wasn’t like doing a TV series but more like scoring five 90-minute films back-to-back. I just focused on one cue at a time, putting one foot in front of the other so I wouldn’t feel overwhelmed by the full scope of the work and could relax enough to write the score! I knew I’d get to the finish line at some point, but it seemed so far away most of the time that I just didn’t want to dwell on that.

When you got this project, did they deliver it as one crazy, long piece? Or did they give it to you in its separate parts?
I got everything at once, which was totally mind-boggling. When you get any project, you need to watch it before you start working on it. For this one, it meant watching a seven-and-a-half-hour film, which was a feat in and of itself. The scale was just huge on this. Looking back, my eyelids still twitch.

It was a pretty nerve-racking time because the schedule was really tight. That was one of the most challenging parts of doing this project. I could have used a year to write this music, because five films are ordinarily what I‘d do in a year, not six months. But all of us who write music for film know that you have to work within extreme deadlines as a matter of course. So you say yes, and you find a way to do it.

So you basically locked yourself up for 14 hours a day, and just plugged away at it?
Right, except it was actually about 15 hours a day, seven days a week, with no breaks. I finished the score 11 days before its theatrical release, which is insane. But, hey, that part is all in the past now, and it’s great to see the film out there getting such attention. One thing that made it worthwhile to me in the end was the quality of the filmmaking — I was riveted by the film the whole time I was working on it.

When composing, you worked only on one part at a time and not with an overall story arc in mind?
I watched all five parts over the course of four days. Once I’d watched the first two parts, I couldn’t wait to start writing so I did that for a bit and then went back to watch the rest.

The director Ezra Edelman wanted me to first score the infamous Bronco chase, which is in Part 3. It’s a 30-minute segment of that particular episode. It was a long sequence of events, all having to do with the chase itself, the events leading up to it and the aftermath of it. So that is what I scored first. It’s kind of strange to dive into a film by first scoring such a pivotal, iconic event. But it worked out — what I wrote for that segment stuck.

It was strange to be writing music for something I had seen on television 20 years before – just to think that there I was, watching the Bronco chase on TV along with everyone else, not having the remotest idea that 20 years down the line I was going to be writing music for this real-life event. It’s just a very odd thing.

The Bronco chase wasn’t a high-speed chase. It was a long police escort back to OJ’s house. The music you wrote for this segment was so brooding and it fit perfectly…
I loved when Zoe Tur, the helicopter pilot, said they were giving OJ a police motorcade. That’s exactly what he got. So I didn’t want to score the sequence by commenting literally on what was happening — what people were doing, or the fact that this was a “chase.” What I tried to do was focus on the subtext, which was the tragedy of the circumstances, and have that direct the course of the music, supplying an overarching musical commentary.

For your instrumentation, did the director let you be carried away by your own muse? Or did he request specific instruments?
He was specific about two things: one, that there would be a trumpet in the score, and two, he wanted an oboe. Other than those two instruments, it was up to me. I have a trumpet player, Jeff Bunnell, who I’ve worked with before. It’s a great partnership because he’s a gifted improviser, and sometimes he knows what I want even when I don’t. He did a fantastic job on the score.

I also had a 40-piece string section recorded at the Eastman Scoring Stage at Warner Bros. Studios. We used players here in town and they added a lot, really bringing the score to life.

Were you conducting the orchestra? Or did you stay close to the engineer in the booth?
I wanted to be next to the recording engineer so I could hear everything as it was being recorded. I had a conductor instead. Besides, I’m a terrible conductor.

What instruments did you choose for the Bronco chase score?
For one of the scenes, I used layers of distorted electric guitars. Another element of the score was musical sound manipulation of acoustic instruments through electronics. It’s a time-consuming way to conjure up sounds, with all the trial and error involved, but the results can sometimes give a film an identity beyond what you can do with an orchestra alone.

So you recorded real instruments and then processed them? Can you share an example of your processing chain?
Sometimes I will get my guitar out and play a phrase. I’ll take that phrase and play it backwards, drop it two octaves, put it through a ring modulator, and then I’ll chop it up into short segments and use that to create a rhythmic pattern. The result is nothing like a real guitar. I didn’t necessarily know what I was going for at the start, but then I’d end up with this cool beat. Then I’d build a cue around that.

The original sound could be anything. I could tap a pencil on a desk and then drop that three octaves, time compress it and do all sorts of other processing. The result is a weird drum sound that no one’s ever heard before. It’s all sorts of experimentation, with the end result being a sound that has some originality and that piques the interest of the person watching the film.

To break that down a little further, what program do you work in?
I work in Pro Tools. I went from Digital Performer to Logic — I think most film composers use Logic or Cubase, but there are a growing number who actually use Pro Tools. I don’t need MIDI to jump through a lot of hoops. I just need to record basic lines because most of that stuff gets replaced by real players anyhow.

When you work in Pro Tools, it’s already the delivery format for the orchestra, so you eliminate a conversion step. I’ve been using Pro Tools for the past four years, and so far it’s been working out great. It has some limitations in MIDI, but not that many and nothing that I can’t work around.

What are some of your favorite processing plug-ins?
For pitching, I use Melodyne by Celemony and Serato’s Pitch ‘n’ Time. There’s a new pitch shifter in Pro Tools called X-Form that’s also good. I also use Waves SoundShifter — whatever seems to do a better job for what I’m working on. I always experiment to see which one works the best to give me the sound I’m looking for.

Besides pitch shifters, I use GRM Tools by Ina-GRM. They make weird plug-ins, like one called Shift, that really convolute sound to the point where you can take a drum or rhythmic guitar and turn it into a high-hat sound. It doesn’t sound like a real high-hat. It sounds like a weird high-hat, not a real one. You never know what you’re going to get from this plug-in, and that’s why I like it so much.

I also use a lot of Soundtoys plug-ins, like Crystallizer, which can really change sounds in unexpected ways. Soundtoys has great distortion plug-ins too. I’m always on the hunt for something new.

A lot of times I use hardware, like guitar pedals. It’s great to turn real knobs and get results and ideas from that. Sometimes the hardware will have a punchier sound, and maybe you can do more extreme things with it. It’s all about experimentation.

You’ve talked before about using a Guitarviol. Was that how you created the long, suspended bass notes in the Bronco chase score?
Yes, I did use the Guitarviol in that and in other places in the score, too. It’s a very weird instrument, because it looks like a cello but doesn’t sound like one, and it definitely doesn’t sound like a guitar. It has a weird, almost Middle Eastern sound to it, and that makes you want to play in that scale sometimes. Sometimes I’ll use it to write an idea, and then I’ll have my cellist play the same thing on cello.

The Guitarviol is built by Jonathan Wilson, who lives in Los Angeles. He had no idea when he invented this thing that it was going to get adopted by the film composer community here in town. But it has, and he can’t make them fast enough.

Do you end up layering the Guitarviol and the cello in the mix? Or do you just go with straight cello?
It’s usually just straight cello. There are a couple of cellists I use who are great. I don’t want to dilute their performance by having mine in the background. The Guitarviol is an inspiration to write something for the cellists to hear, and then I’ll just have them take over from there.

The overall sound of Part 3 is very brooding, and the percussion choices have complementary deep tones. Can you tell me about some of the choices you made there?
Those are all real drums. I don’t use any samples. I love playing real drums. I have a real timpani, a big Brazilian Surdo drum, a gigantic steel bass drum that sounds like a Caribbean steel drum but only two octaves lower (it has a really odd sound), and I have a classic Ludwig Beatles drum kit. I have a marimba and a collection of small percussion instruments. I use them all.

Sometimes I will pitch the recordings down to make them sound bigger. The Surdo by itself sounds huge, and when you pitch that down half an octave it’s even bigger. So I used all of those instruments and I played them. I don’t think I used a single drum sample on the entire score.

When you use percussion samples, you have to hunt around in your entire hard drive for a great tom-tom or a Taiko drum. It’s so much easier to run over to one in your studio and just play it. You never know how it’s going to sound, depending on how you mic it that day. And it’s more inspiring to play the real thing. You get great variation. Every time you hit the drum it sounds different, but a sample sound pretty much sounds the same every time you trigger it.

For striking, did you choose mallets, brushes, sticks, your hands, or other objects?
For the Surdo, I used my hands. I use marimba mallets and timpani mallets for the other instruments. For example, I’ll use timpani mallets for the big steel bass drum. Sometimes I’ll use timpani mallets on my drum kit’s bass drum, because it gives a different sound. It has a more orchestral sound, not like a kick drum from a rock band.

I’m always experimenting. I use brushes a lot on cymbals, and I use the brushes on the steel drum because it gives it a weird sound. You can even use brushes on the timpani, and that creates a strange sound. There are definitely no rules. Whatever you think or can imagine having an effect on the drum, you just try it out. You never know what you’ll get — it’s always good to give it a chance.

In addition to the Bronco chase scene, are there any other tracks that stood out for you in Part 3?
When you score something this long, at a certain point everything starts to run together in your mind. You don’t remember what cue belongs to what scene. But there are many that I can remember. During the jury section of that episode, I used an oboe for Johnny Cochran speaking to the jury. That was an interesting pairing, the oboe and Johnny Cochran. In a way, the oboe became an extension of his voice during his closing argument. I can’t really explain why it worked, but somehow it was the right match.

For the beginning of Part 3, when the police arrive because there was a phone call from Nicole Brown Simpson saying she was afraid of OJ, the cue there was very understated. It had a lot of strange, low sounds to it. That one comes to mind.

At the end of Part 3, they go to OJ’s Rockingham residence, and his lawyers had staged the setting. I did a cue there that was sort of quizzical in a way, just to show the ridiculousness of the whole thing. It was like a farce, the way they set up his residence. So I made the score take a right turn into a different area for that part. It gets away from the dark, brooding undercurrent that the rest of Part 3’s score had.

Of all the parts you could have submitted for Emmy consideration, why did you choose Part 3?
It was a toss-up between Part 2 and Part 3. Part 2 had some of the more major trumpet themes, more of the signature sound with the trumpet and the orchestra. But there were a few examples of that in Part 3, too.

I just felt the Bronco chase, score-wise, had a lot of variation to it, and that it moved in a way that was unpredictable. I ultimately thought that was the way to go, though it was a close race between Part 2 and Part 3.

I found out later that ESPN had submitted Part 3 for Emmy consideration in other categories, so there is a bit of synergy there.

—————-

Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer.

AES: Avid intros Pro Tools 12.6 and new MRTX audio interface

Avid was at AES in LA with several new tools and updates for audio post pros. New releases include Pro Tools 12.6 software and Pro Tools MTRX, an audio interface for Pro Tools, HDX and HD Native.

Avid Pro Tools 12.6 delivers new editing capabilities, including Clip Effects and layered editing features, making it possible to edit and prepare mixes faster. Production can also be accelerated using automatic playlist creation and selection using shortcut keys. Enhanced “in-the-box” dubber workflows have also been included.

Pro Tools MTRX, developed by Digital Audio Denmark, gives Pro Tools users the superior sonic quality of DAD’s A to D and D to A converters, along with flexible monitoring, I/O and routing capabilities, all in one unit. MTRX will let users gain extended monitor control and flexible routing with Pro Tools S6, S3 and other EUCON surfaces, use the converter as a high-performance 64-channel Pro Tools HD interface, and get automatic sample rate conversion on AES inputs. MTRX (our main photo) will be available later this year.

Tony Cariddi

During AES LA, we caught up with Tony Cariddi, director of product and solutions marketing for Avid, to see what he had to say about where Avid is going next. “What we have seen in the industry is that there is no shortage of innovation and there are new solutions for problems that are always emerging,” says Cariddi. “But what happens when you have all of these different solutions is it puts a lot of pressure on the user to make sure everything works together seamlessly. So what you’ll see from Avid Everywhere going forward is a continuation of trying to connect our own products closer together on the MediaCentral Platform, so it’s really fluid for our users, but also for people to be able to integrate other solutions into that platform just as easily.

“We also have to be responsive to how people want to access our tools,” he continued. “What kind of packages are they looking for? Do they want to subscribe? Do they want to buy? Enterprise licensing? Floating license? So you’ll probably see bundles and new ways to access licensing and new flexible ways to maybe rent the software when you need it. We’re trying to be very responsive to the multifaceted needs of the industry, and part of that is workflow, part of that is financial and part of that is the integration of everything.”

Benchmark Post opening in Todd-Soundelux Burbank location

Benchmark Post, a new and independent audio post production company targeting film and television work, has set plans for a fall 2015 opening of its newly acquired Burbank facility, previously occupied by Todd-Soundelux.

“We are thrilled to re-open the doors of one of the industry’s most iconic sound studios and look forward to welcoming fellow talent and clients with a new audio destination in the city of Burbank,” says Pedro Jimenez, re-recording mixer and founder of Benchmark Post. “Our facility will offer a fresh and innovative approach to post production sound with an environment that supports the talent and enhances the creative process.”

Pedro Jimenez

Pedro Jimenez

Prior to this move, Jimenez owned Benchmark Sound Services, a full-service audio facility specializing in theatrical trailer mixing and editorial for motion picture marketing, located on the Universal Studios lot. This move allows him to take on additional types of work. The facility will offer audio post services for feature films, television, documentaries, movie trailers and foreign markets, including Spanish-language Latin entertainment.

Renovation plans for the Burbank location include remodeling two mix stages, adding a third mix stage and converting the current 3,000-square-feet vault into client editorial suites, bringing the total space to nearly 20,000 square feet.

Benchmark Post will also implement industry-leading technology including Dolby Atmos, Barco Auro, IMAX, 4K video projection with 3D capabilities and the latest Avid hardware and software, including dual-operator System 5 mix consoles.

IBC Blog: supporting technology for Pro Tools

By Simon Ray

At the IBC show, I have seen three exciting things that work in and alongside Avid Pro Tools.

One
First, I had a great demo from Dave Tyler and Simon Sherbourne from Avid of a new collaboration technology potentially being built into Pro Tools (“Audio Collaboration in the Cloud”). This is still currently in development and was an early beta version that was shown at NAB, but I was really excited by the possibilities. It reminded me a lot of a fantastic technology from about 2001 called Rocket Network that failed because it needed the Internet connectivity of 2014.

Very simply, the collaboration tool allows Pro Tools users in different locations to share media Continue reading