Tag Archives: Autodesk Maya

Autodesk intros Bifrost for Maya at SIGGRAPH

At SIGGRAPH, Autodesk announced a new visual programming environment in Maya called Bifrost, which makes it possible for 3D artists and technical directors to create serious effects quickly and easily.

“Bifrost for Maya represents a major development milestone for Autodesk, giving artists powerful tools for building feature-quality VFX quickly,” says Chris Vienneau, senior director, Maya and Media & Entertainment Collection. “With visual programming at its core, Bifrost makes it possible for TDs to build custom effects that are reusable across shows. We’re also rolling out an array of ready-to-use graphs to make it easy for artists to get 90% of the way to a finished effect fast. Ultimately, we hope Bifrost empowers Maya artists to streamline the creation of anything from smoke, fire and fuzz to high-performance particle systems.”

Bifrost highlights include:

  • Ready-to-Use Graphs: Artists can quickly create state-of-the-art effects that meet today’s quality demands.
  • One Graph: In a single visual programming graph, users can combine nodes ranging from math operations to simulations.
  • Realistic Previews: Artists can see exactly how effects will look after lighting and rendering right in the Arnold Viewport in Maya.
  • Detailed Smoke, Fire and Explosions: New physically-based solvers for aerodynamics and combustion make it easy to create natural-looking fire effects.
  • The Material Point Method: The new MPM solver helps artists tackle realistic granular, cloth and fiber simulations.
  • High-Performance Particle System: A new particle system crafted entirely using visual programming adds power and scalability to particle workflows in Maya.
  • Artistic Effects with Volumes: Bifrost comes loaded with nodes that help artists convert between meshes, points and volumes to create artistic effects.
  • Flexible Instancing: High-performance, rendering-friendly instancing empowers users to create enormous complexity in their scenes.
  • Detailed Hair, Fur and Fuzz: Artists can now model things consisting of multiple fibers (or strands) procedurally.

Bifrost is available for download now and works with any version of Maya 2018 or later. It will also be included in the installer for Maya 2019.2 and later versions. Updates to Bifrost between Maya releases will be available for download from Autodesk AREA.

In addition to the release of Bifrost, Autodesk highlighted the latest versions of Shotgun, Arnold, Flame and 3ds Max. The company gave a tech preview of a new secure enterprise Shotgun that supports network segregation and customer-managed media isolation on AWS, making it possible for the largest studios to collaborate in a closed-network pipeline in the cloud. Shotgun Create, now out of beta, delivers a cloud-connected desktop experience, making it easier for artists and reviewers to see which tasks demand attention while providing a collaborative environment to review media and exchange feedback accurately and efficiently. Arnold 5.4 adds important updates to the GPU renderer, including OSL and OpenVDB support, while Flame 2020.1 introduces more uses of AI with new Sky Extraction tools and specialized image segmentation features. Also on display, the 3ds Max 2020.1 update features modernized procedural tools for 3D modeling.

Autodesk cloud-enabled tools now work with BeBop post platform

Autodesk has enabled use of its software in the cloud — including 3DS Max, Arnold, Flame and Maya — and BeBop Technology will deploy the tools on its cloud-based post platform. The BeBop platform enables processing-heavy post projects, such as visual effects and editing, in the cloud on powerful and highly secure virtualized desktops. Creatives can process, render, manage and deliver media files from anywhere on BeBop using any computer and as small as a 20Mbps Internet connection.

The ongoing deployment of Autodesk software on the BeBop platform mirrors the ways BeBop and Adobe work closely together to optimize the experience of Adobe Creative Cloud subscribers. Adobe applications have been available natively on BeBop since April 2018.

Autodesk software users will now also gain access to BeBop Rocket Uploader, which enables ingestion of large media files at incredibly high speeds for a predictable monthly fee with no volume limits. Additionally, BeBop Over the Shoulder (OTS) enables secure and affordable remote collaboration, review and approval sessions in real-time. BeBop runs on all of the major public clouds, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), and Microsoft Azure.

AMD’s Radeon Pro WX series graphics cards shipping this month

AMD is getting ready to ship the Radeon Pro WX Series of graphics cards, the company’s new workstation graphics solutions targeting creatives pros. The Radeon Pro WX Series are AMD’s answer to the rise of realtime game engines in professional settings, the emergence of virtual reality, the popularity of new low-overhead APIs (such as DirectX 12 and Vulkan) and the rise of open-source tools and applications.

The Radeon Pro WX Series takes advantage of the Polaris architecture-based GPUs featuring fourth-generation Graphics Core Next (GCN) technology and engineered on the 14nm FinFET process. The cards have future-proof monitor support, are able to run a 5K HDR display via DisplayPort 1.4, include state-of-the-art multimedia IP with support for HEVC encoding and decoding and TrueAudio Next for VR, and feature cool and quiet operation with an emphasis on energy efficiency. Each retail Radeon Pro WX graphics card comes with 24/7, VIP customer support, a three-year limited warranty and now features a free, optional seven-year extended limited warranty upon product and customer registration.

Available November 10 for $799, the Radeon Pro WX 7100 graphics card offers 5.7 TFLOPS of single precision floating point performance in a single slot, and is designed for professional VR content creators. Equipped with 8GB GDDR5 memory and 36 compute units (2304 Stream Processors) the Radeon Pro WX 7100 is targeting high-quality visualization workloads.

Also available on November 10, for $399, the Radeon Pro WX 4100 graphics cards targets CAD professionals. The Pro WX 4100 breaks the 2 TFLOPS single precision compute performance barrier. With 4GB of GDDR5 memory and 16 compute units (1024 stream processors), users can drive four 4K monitors or a single 5K monitor at 60Hz, a feature which competing low-profile CAD focused cards in its class can’t touch.radeon

Available November 18 for $499, the Radeon Pro WX 5100 graphics card (pictured right) offers 3.9 TFLOPS of single precision compute performance while using just 75 watts of power. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 graphics card features 8GB of GDDR5 memory and 28 compute units (1792 stream processors) suited for high-resolution realtime visualization for industries such as automotive and architecture.

In addition, AMD recently introduced Radeon Pro Software Enterprise drivers, designed to combine AMD’s next-gen graphics with the specific needs of pro enterprise users. Radeon Pro Software Enterprise drivers offer predictable software release dates, with updates issued on the fourth Thursday of each calendar quarter, and feature prioritized support with AMD working with customers, ISVs and OEMs. The drivers are certified in numerous workstation applications covering the leading professional use cases.

AMD says it’s also committed to furthering open source software for content creators. Following news that later this year AMD plans to open source its physically-based rendering engine Radeon ProRender, the company recently announced that a future release of Maxon’s Cinema 4D application for 3D modeling, animation and rendering will support Radeon ProRender. Radeon ProRender plug-ins are available today for many popular 3D content creation apps, including Autodesk 3ds Max and Maya, and as beta plug-ins for Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks and Rhino. Radeon ProRender works across Windows, MacOS and Linux and supports AMD GPUs, CPUs and APUs as well as those of other vendors.

Thinkbox particle plug-in for Max upped to V2, beta version for Maya available

Thinkbox Software has updated Frost MX, its meshing particles and fluid simulations plug-in for Autodesk 3ds Max, to version 2.0. Thinkbox has also launched the beta for Frost MY 2.0, the Autodesk Maya version of the plug-in.

Frost MX 2.0 now offers twice the speed in particle meshing modes than previous versions. Its integration with V-Ray V.3.1 and higher enables customizable particle scattering for distributing and rendering millions of mesh instances in Custom Geometry meshing mode.

The new V-Ray Instancing mode leverages dynamic memory allocation to render millions of high-resolution meshes with low memory overhead. Frost MX 2.0 continues to support all Custom Geometry features in V-Ray Instancing mode, including particle channel propagation, material and shape ID controls, animation timing offsets and motion blur from particle velocity. Coupled with the advanced particle generation and Magma data channel manipulation capabilities offered by Thinkbox’s Krakatoa MX, which is available at no extra cost via the License-Free mode, the V-Ray Instancing feature offers a whole new world of power and flexibility to Frost users.

“The latest version of Frost is a massive leap forward in terms of speed. By stripping away much of the computational burden traditionally associated with data-heavy particle meshes and fluid simulations, we’re enabling artists to work more dynamically and see their work come to life more quickly,” reports Chris Bond, founder of Thinkbox Software.

Additionally, the new Region of Interest option in Frost MX 2.0 lets users easily define a custom bounding box region that can be applied to Viewport meshing for faster previews while adjusting settings of complex particle data sets, to remove unwanted areas in Render-time meshing, or both. A dedicated Frost menu bar has been added to 3ds Max’s main menu for faster access to major features such as creating Frost objects, auto-adding new sources to a Frost object, accessing the Log window, and mass-changing the meshing mode of selected Frost objects.

Frost MX 2.0 is available for 64-bit versions of 3ds Max from 2012 to 2017, and requires an updated license.

For beta access to Frost MY 2.0, email beta@thinkboxsoftware.com.

Pixar open sources Universal Scene Description for CG workflows

Pixar Animation Studios has released Universal Scene Description (USD) as an open source technology in order to help drive innovation in the industry. Used for the interchange of 3D graphics data through various digital content creation tools, USD provides a scalable solution for the complex workflows of CG film and game studios. 

With this initial release, Pixar is opening up its development process and providing code used internally at the studio.

“USD synthesizes years of engineering aimed at integrating collaborative production workflows that demand a constantly growing number of software packages,” says Guido Quaroni, VP of software research and development at Pixar.

 USD provides a toolset for reading, writing, editing and rapidly previewing 3D scene data. With many of its features geared toward performance and large-scale collaboration among many artists, USD is ideal for the complexities of the modern pipeline. One such feature is Hydra, a high-performance preview renderer capable of interactively displaying large data sets.

“With USD, Hydra, and OpenSubdiv, we’re sharing core technologies that can be used in filmmaking tools across the industry,” says George ElKoura, supervising lead software engineer at Pixar. “Our focus in developing these libraries is to provide high-quality, high-performance software that can be used reliably in demanding production scenarios.”

Along with USD and Hydra, the distribution ships with USD plug-ins for some common DCCs, such as Autodesk’s Maya and The Foundry’s Katana.

 To prepare for open-sourcing its code, Pixar gathered feedback from various studios and vendors who conducted early testing. Studios such as MPC, Double Negative, ILM and Animal Logic were among those who provided valuable feedback in preparation for this release.

AMD offering FireRender plug-in for 3ds Max

AMD, makers of the line of FirePro graphics cards and engines, has released a free software–based rendering plug-in, the FireRender for Autodesk 3ds Max, which is designed for content creators with 4K workflows and who are looking for photorealistic rendering. FireRender for Max offers physically accurate raytracing and comes with an extensive material library.

AMD FireRender is built on OpenCL 1.2, which means it can run on any hardware. It also provides a CPU backend, which means that FireRender can run on GPU, CPU, CPU+GPU, or a variety of combinations of multiple CPUs and GPUs. Within the FireRender, integrated materials are editable in the 3ds Max Material Slate Editor as nodes. There is also Active Shade Viewport Integration, which means you can work with FireRender in realtime and see your changes as you make them. Physically Correct materials and lighting help with true design decisions via global illumination — including caustics. Emissive and Photometric Lighting, as well as lights from HDRI environments, enable artists to blend a scene in with its surroundings.

AMD says to keep an eye out for other upcoming free software plug-ins for other animation software, including Autodesk Maya and Rhino.

 

In other AMD news, at the NAB show last month, the company introduced the AMD FirePro W9100 32GB workstation graphics card designed for large asset workflows with creative applications. It will be available in Q2 of this year. The FirePro W9100 16GB is currently available.

Brickyard VFX creates a chocolate world for Ghirardelli

Brickyard VFX’s Santa Monica studio worked with production company Mercy Brothers and ad agency FCB West on a new two-spot Ghirardelli campaign. Brickyard provided complete creative solutions for the campaign from start to finish, including production, edit, motion design, VFX, and finishing.

Chocolate Carving brings viewers into a completely chocolate world with detailed animated drawings that come to life in chocolate, carving out iconic San Francisco hallmarks, such as the Golden Gate Bridge, a cable car and, of course, Ghirardelli Square. Brickyard motion designer Anton Thallner created the illustrations of each element in Adobe After Effects, which CG supervisor/creative director David Blumenfeld then animated in Autodesk Maya to appear as if they were embossed within a 3D chocolate canvas.

Chocolate Carving

“They presented us with a carved chocolate tour of San Francisco with Ghirardelli Square as the destination.  We created the visual palate, ” explains Brickyard managing partner Steve Michaels. “Anton Thallner designed the chocolate story and created all the iconic elements of San Francisco, while David Blumenfeld turned Anton’s line animation into chocolate carved images and timed the piece to tell the story.

As far as the TimeLapse spot, the agency afforded Brickyard a great amount of creative freedom. “We decided to bring Chachi Ramirez of Mercy Brothers in to direct the spot and take on the construction of the entire Ghirardelli Square,” explains Michaels. “They presented the concept of a Ghirardelli fan so enamored with the product that he creates an homage to the factory entirely using only the mini chocolates. The design and execution was a labor of love between the forces of Brickyard VFX, Mercy Brothers and Bix Pix Entertainment.”