Tag Archives: Augmented Reality

Apple offers augmented reality with Reality Composer

By Barry Goch

In addition to introducing the new MacPro and the Pro Display XDR, at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC19), Apple had some pretty cool demos. The coolest, in my mind, was the Minecraft augmented reality presentation.

Across the street from the San Jose Convention Center, where the keynote was held, Apple set up “The Studio” in the San Jose Civic. One of the demos there was an AR experience with the new MacPro which in reality, you only saw the space frame of Apple’s tower, but in augmented reality you were able to animate an exploded view. The technology behind this demo is the just-announced ARKit3 and Reality Composer.

Apple had a couple of stations demoing Reality Composer in The Studio. Apple has applied its famous legacy of enabling content creators by making new technology easy to use. Case in point is Reality Composer. I’ve tried building AR experiences in other apps and it’s not very straightforward. You have to learn a new interface and coding as well — and use yet another app for targeting your AR environment into the real world. The demo I saw of Reality Composer made it look easy, working in Motion with drag-and-drop prebuilt behaviors built into the app, along with multiple ways to target your AR experience in the real world.

AR QuickLook technology is part of iOS, and you can even get an AR experience of the new MacPro and Pro Display XDR through Apple’s website. They also mentioned its new file for holding AR elements, usdz. Apple has created a tool to convert other 3D file formats to usdz.

With native AR support across Apple’s ecosystem, there is no better time to experiment and learn about augmented reality.


Barry Goch is a finishing artist at LA’s The Foundation and a UCLA Extension Instructor in post production. You can follow him on Twitter at @Gochya.

Lenovo’s ‘Transform’ event: IT subscriptions and AR

By Claudio Santos

Last week I had the opportunity to attend Lenovo’s “Transform” event, in which the company unveiled its newest releases as well as its plans for the near future. I must say they had quite the lineup ready.

The whole event was divided into two tracks “Datacenters” and “PC and Smart Devices.” Each focused on its own products and markets, but a single idea permeated all announcements in the day. It’s what Lenovo calls the “Fourth Revolution.” That’s what the company calls the next step in integration between devices and the cloud. Their vision is that soon 5G mobile Internet will be available, allowing for devices to seamlessly connect to the cloud on the go and more importantly, always stay connected.

While there were many interesting announcements throughout the day, I will focus on two that seem more closely relatable to most post facilities.

The first is what Lenovo is calling “PC as a service.” They want to sell the bulk of the IT hardware and support needs for companies as subscription-based deals, and that would be awesome! Why? Well, it’s simply a fact of life now that post production happens almost exclusively with the aid of computer software (sorry, if you’re still one of the few cutting film by hand, this article won’t be that interesting for you).

Having to choose, buy and maintain computers for our daily work takes a lot of research and, most notably, time. Between software updates, managing different licenses, subscriptions and hunting down weird quirks of the system, a lot of time is taken away from more important tasks such as editing or client relationship. When you throw a server and a local network in the mix it becomes a hefty job that takes a lot of maintenance.

That’s why bigger facilities employ IT specialists to deal with all that. But many post facilities aren’t big enough to employ a full-time IT person, nor are their needs complex enough to warrant the investment.

Lenovo sees this as an opportunity to simplify the role of the IT department by selling subscriptions that include the hardware, the software and all the necessary support (including a help desk) to keep the systems running without having to invest in a large IT department. More importantly, the subscription would be flexible. So, during periods in which you have need for more stations/support you can increase the scope of the subscription and then shrink it once again when the demands lower, freeing you from absorbing the cost of unused machines/software that would just sit around unused.

I see one big problem in this vision: Lenovo plans to start the service with a minimum of 1,000 seats for a deal. That is far, far more staff than most post facilities have, and at that point it would probably just be worth hiring a specialist that can also help you automate your workflow and develop customized tools for your projects. It is nonetheless an interesting approach, and I hope to see it trickle down to smaller clients as it solidifies as a feasible model.

AR
The other announcement that should interest post facilities is Lenovo’s interest in the AR market. As many of you might know, augmented reality is projected to be an even bigger market than it’s more popular cousin virtual reality, largely due to its more professional application possibilities.

Lenovo has been investing in AR and has partnered up with Metavision to experiment and start working towards real work-environment offerings of the technology. Besides the hand gestures that are always emphasized in AR promo videos, one very simple use-case seems to be in Lenovo’s sights, and that’s one I hope to see being marketable very soon: workspace expansion. Instead of needing three or four different monitors to accommodate our ever-growing number of windows and displays while working, with AR we will be able to place windows anywhere around us, essentially giving us a giant spherical display. A very simple problem with a very simple solution, but one that I believe would increase the productivity of editors by a considerable amount.

We should definitely keep an eye on Lenovo as they embark one this new quest for high-efficiency solutions for businesses, because that’s exactly what the post production industry finds itself in need of right now.


Claudio Santos is a sound editor and spatial audio mixer at Silver Sound. Slightly too interested in technology and workflow hacks, he spends most of his waking hours tweaking, fiddling and tinkering away on his computer.

AR/VR audio conference taking place with AES show in fall


The AES is tackling the augmented reality and virtual reality creative process, applications workflow and product development for the first time with a dedicated conference that will take place on 9/30-10/1 during the 141st AES Convention at the LA Convention Center’s West Hall.

The two-day program of technical papers, workshops, tutorials and manufacturer’s expo will highlight the creative and technical challenges of providing immersive spatial audio to accompany virtual reality and augmented reality media.

The conference will attract content developers, researchers, manufacturers, consultants and students, in addition to audio engineers seeking to expand their knowledge about sound production for virtual and augmented reality. The companion expo will feature displays from leading-edge manufacturers and service providers looking to secure industry metrics for this emerging field.

“Film director George Lucas once stated that sound represents 50 percent of the motion picture experience,” shares conference co-chair Andres Mayo. “This conference will demonstrate that VR and AR productions, using a variety of playback devices, require audio that follows the motions of the subject, and produces a realistic immersive experience. Our program will spotlight the work of leading proponents in this exciting field of endeavor, and how realistic spatial audio can be produced from existing game console and DSP engines.”

Proposed topics include object-based audio mixing for VR/AR, immersive audio in VR/AR broadcast, live VR audio production, developing audio standards for VR/AR, cross platform audio considerations in VR and streaming immersive audio content.

Costs range from $195 for a one-day pass for AES members ($295 for a two-day pass) and $125 for accredited students, to $280/$435 for non-members; Early-bird discounts also are available.

Conference registrants can also attend the 141st AES Convention’s companion exhibition, select educational sessions and special events free of charge with an exhibits-plus badge.

IKinema at SIGGRAPH with tech preview of natural language interface

IKinema, a provider of realtime animation software for motion capture, games and virtual reality using inverse kinematics, has launched a new natural language interface designed to enable users to produce animation using descriptive commands based on everyday language. The technology, code-named Intimate, is currently in prototype as part of a two-year project with backing by the UK government’s Innovate UK program.

The new interface supplements virtual reality technology such as Magic Leap and Microsoft HoloLens, offering new methods for creating animation that are suitable for professionals but also simple enough for a mass audience. The user can bring in a character and then animate the character from an extensive library of cloud animation, simply by describing what the character is supposed to do.

Intimate is targeted to many applications including pre-production, games, virtual production, virtual and augmented reality and more. The technology is expected to become commercially available in 2016 and the aim is to make an SDK available to any animation package. Currently, the company has a working prototype and has engaged with top studios for the purpose of technology validation and development.

Deluxe latest studio to get into VR, immersive entertainment offerings

Deluxe is the second studio this week to put their hat in the growing VR ring — Lucasfilm and ILM also announced ILMxLAB. Deluxe is now offering a new slate of technology and services to develop content for immersive entertainment and virtual reality experiences.

Drawing on talent at Deluxe companies including Method Studios and Company 3, the new suite of virtual reality services extends Deluxe’s digital post capabilities into this new, high-growth content arena and establishes a workflow for building high-res 360 content.

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The company’s first VR project, Neuro (above), was developed with creative VR studio Kite & Lightning for GE, and it debuted on June 16 at the E3 Expo in Los Angeles. Developed using AMD graphics technology, Neuro is a computer-generated five-minute immersive film shown on the latest VR headsets.

The video’s main character is a detailed photoreal digital model of Ladytron DJ/band member Reuben Wu, whose facial performance was captured and animated to match the narrated voiceover. Deluxe’s audio post department also provided ADR for the project. The Neuro VR experience will be featured again during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, June 21-27 in Cannes, France.

Main Image: Kite & Lightning working on Neuro.