Tag Archives: audio post

Human’s opens new Chicago studio

Human, an audio and music company with offices in New York, Los Angeles and Paris has opened a Chicago studio headed up by veteran composer/producer Justin Hori.

As a composer, Hori’s work has appeared in advertising, film and digital projects. “Justin’s artistic output in the commercial space is prolific,” says Human partner Gareth Williams. “There’s equal parts poise and fun behind his vision for Human Chicago. He’s got a strong kinship and connection to the area, and we couldn’t be happier to have him carve out our footprint there.”

From learning to DJ at age 13 to working Gramaphone Records to studying music theory and composition at Columbia College, Hori’s immersion in the Chicago music scene has always influenced his work. He began his career at com/track and Comma Music, before moving to open Comma’s Los Angeles office. From there, Hori joined Squeak E Clean, where he served as creative director for the past five years. He returned to Chicago in 2016.

Hori is known for producing unexpected yet perfectly spot-on pieces of music for advertising, including his track “Da Diddy Da,” which was used in the four-spot summer 2018 Apple iPad campaign. His work has won top industry honors including D&AD Pencils, The One Show, Clio and AICP Awards and the Cannes Gold Lion for Best Use of Original Music.

Meanwhile, Post Human, the audio post sister company run by award-winning sound designer and engineer Sloan Alexander, continues to build momentum with the addition of a second 5.1 mixing suite in NYC. Plans for similar build-outs in both LA and Chicago are currently underway.

With services ranging from composition, sound design and mixing, Human works in advertising, broadcast, digital and film.

Posting director Darren Lynn Bousman’s horror film, St. Agatha

Atlanta’s Moonshine Post helped create a total post production pipeline — from dailies to finishing — for the film St. Agatha, directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Saw II, Saw III, Saw IV, Repo the Genetic Opera). 

The project, from producers Seth and Sara Michaels, was co-edited by Moonshine’s Gerhardt Slawitschka and Patrick Perry and colored by Moonshine’s John Peterson.

St. Agatha is a horror film that shot in the town of Madison, Georgia. “The house we needed for the convent was perfect, as the area was one of the few places that had not burned down during the Civil War,” explains Seth Michaels. “It was our first time shooting in Atlanta, and the number one reason was because of the tax incentive. But we also knew Georgia had an infrastructure that could handle our production.”

What the producers didn’t know during production was that Moonshine Post could handle all aspects of post, and were initially brought in only for dailies. With the opportunity to do a producer’s cut, they returned to Moonshine Post.

Time and budget dictated everything, and Moonshine Post was able to offer two editors working in tandem to edit a final cut. “Why not cut in collaboration?” suggested Drew Sawyer, founder of Moonshine Post and executive producer. “It will cut the time in half, and you can explore different ideas faster.”

“We quite literally split the movie in half,” reports Perry, who, along with Slawitschka, cut on Adobe Premiere “It’s a 90-minute film, and there was a clear break. It’s a little unusual, I will admit, but almost always when we are working on something, we don’t have a lot of time, so splitting it in half works.”

Patrick Perry

Gerhardt Slawitschka

“Since it was a producer’s cut, when it came to us it was in Premiere, and it didn’t make sense to switch over to Avid,” adds Slawitschka. “Patrick and I can use both interchangeably, but prefer Premiere; it offers a lot of flexibility.”

“The editors, Patrick and Gerhardt, were great,” says Sara Michaels. “They watched every single second of footage we had, so when we recut the movie, they knew exactly what we had and how to use it.”

“We have the same sensibilities,” explains Gerhardt. “On long-form projects we take a feature in tandem, maybe split it in half or in reels. Or, on a TV series, each of us take a few episodes, compare notes, and arrive at a ‘group mind,’ which is our language of how a project is working. On St. Agatha, Patrick and I took a bit of a risk and generated a four-page document of proposed thoughts and changes. Some very macro, some very micro.”

Colorist John Peterson, a partner at Moonshine Post, worked closely with the director on final color using Blackmagic’s Resolve. “From day one, the first looks we got from camera raw were beautiful.” Typically, projects shot in Atlanta ship back to a post house in a bigger city, “and maybe you see it and maybe you don’t. This one became a local win, we processed dailies, and it came back to us for a chance to finish it here,” he says.

Peterson liked working directly with the director on this film. “I enjoyed having him in session because he’s an artist. He knew what he was looking for. On the flashbacks, we played with a variety of looks to define which one we liked. We added a certain amount of film grain and stylistically for some scenes, we used heavy vignetting, and heavy keys with isolation windows. Darren is a director, but he also knows the terminology, which gave me the opportunity to take his words and put them on the screen for him. At the end of the week, we had a successful film.”

John Peterson

The recent expansion of Moonshine Post, which included a partnership with the audio company Bare Knuckles Creative and a visual effects company Crafty Apes, “was necessary, so we could take on the kind of movies and series we wanted to work with,” explains Sawyer. “But we were very careful about what we took and how we expanded.”

They recently secured two AMC series, along with projects from Netflix. “We are not trying to do all the post in town, but we want to foster and grow the post production scene here so that we can continue to win people’s trust and solidify the Atlanta market,” he says.

Uncork’d Entertainment’s St. Agatha was in theaters and became available on-demand starting February 8. Look for it on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Vudu, Fandango Now, Xbox, Dish Network and local cable providers.

Sound designer Ash Knowlton joins Silver Sound

Emmy Award-winning NYC sound studio Silver Sound has added sound engineer Ash Knowlton to its roster. Knowlton is both a location sound recordist and sound designer, and on rare and glorious occasions she is DJ Hazyl. Knowlton has worked on film, television, and branded content for clients such as NBC, Cosmopolitan and Vice, among others.

“I know it might sound weird but for me, remixing music and designing sound occupy the same part of my brain. I love music, I love sound design — they are what make me happy. I guess that’s why I’m here,” she says.

Knowlton moved to Brooklyn from Albany when she was 18 years old. To this day, she considers making the move to NYC and surviving as one of her biggest accomplishments. One day, by chance, she ran into filmmaker John Zhao on the street and was cast on the spot as the lead for his feature film Alexandria Leaving. The experience opened Knowlton’s eyes to the wonders and complexity of the filmmaking process. She particularly fell in love with sound mixing and design.

Ten years later, with over seven independent feature films now under her belt, Knowlton is ready for the next 10 years as an industry professional.

Her tools of choice at Silver Sound are Reaper, Reason and Kontakt.

Main Photo Credit: David Choy

Behind the Title: New Math Managing Partner/EP Kala Sherman

Name: Kala Sherman

Company: New Math

Can you describe your company?
We are a bicoastal audio production company, with offices in NYC and LA, specializing in original music, sound design, audio mix and music supervision.

What’s your job title?
Managing Partner/EP

What does that entail?
I do everything from managing our staff to producing projects to sales and development.

What would surprise people the most about what’s underneath that title?
I am an untrained, but really good psychotherapist.

New Math, New York

What have you learned over the years about running a business?
It’s highly competitive and you have to continue to hustle and push the creative product in order to stay relevant. Also, it’s paramount to assemble the best talent and treat them with the utmost respect; without our producers or composers there wouldn’t be a business.

A lot of it must be about trying to keep employees and clients happy. How do you balance that?
We face at least one root challenge: How do you keep both your clients and your creative staff happy? I think how you approach and sell an idea to the composers while still delivering what the client needs is a real art form. It gets tricky with limited music budgets these days, but I’ve found over the years that there are ways to structure the deals where the clients feel like they can get the music and sound design they need while the composers feel well-compensated and creatively fulfilled.

What’s your favorite part of the job?
I love the fact that we are creating music and I get to be part of that process.

What’s your least favorite?
Competitive demoing. Partnering with clients is just way more fun than knowing you are competing with other companies. And not too ironically, it usually results in the best and freshest creative product.

What is your favorite time of the day?
I love the evenings when I get home and hang with my daughter.

If you didn’t have this job, what would you be doing instead?
I always knew I had to work in music, so I would have probably stayed on the label side of the music business.

Can you name some recent clients?
Google, Trojan, Smirnoff, KFC, Chobani, Walmart, Zappos and ESPN.

Name three pieces of technology you can’t live without.
Spotify. Laptop. iPhone.

You recently added final mix capabilities in both of your locations. Can you talk about why now was the time?
We want to be a full-service audio company for our clients. It just makes sense when many of our clients want to work with one company for all audio needs. If we are already providing the music and sound design, why not record the VO and provide mix as well. Plus, it’s really fun to have clients in the studio.

What tools will be used for the mixing rooms?
Focal 5.1 monitor system in both the NY and LA mix rooms. Pro Tools mix system with the latest plugin suites. High-quality analog outboard gear from Neve, API, DW Fearn, Summit and more.

Any recent jobs in these studios you can talk about?
Yes. We just completed Chobani, Acuvue and Yellawood mixes.

Main Image: (L-R) New Math partners David Wittman, Kala Sherman, Raymond Loewy

Review: Audionamix IDC for cleaning dialogue

By Claudio Santos

Sound editing has many different faces. It is part of big-budget blockbuster movies and also an integral part of small hobby podcasting projects. Every project has its own sound needs. Some edit thousands upon thousands of sound effects. Others have to edit hundreds of hours of interviews. What most projects have in common, though, is that they circle around dialogue, whether in the form of character lines, interviews, narrators or any other format by which the spoken word guides the experience.

Now let’s be honest, dialogue is not always well recorded. Archival footage needs to be understood, even if the original recording was made with a microphone that was 20 feet away from the speaker in a basement full of machines. Interviews are often quickly recorded in the five minutes an artist has between two events while driving from point A to point B. And until electric cars are the norm, the engine sound will always be married to that recording.

The fact is, recordings are sometimes a little bit noisier than ideal, and it falls upon the sound editor to make it a little bit clearer.

To help with that endeavor, Audionamix has come out with the newest version of their IDC (Instant Dialogue Cleaner). I have been testing it on different kinds of material and must say that overall I’m very impressed with it.Let’s first get the awkward parts of this conversation out of the way. First, let’s see what the IDC is not.

– It is not a full-featured restoration workstation, such as Izotope RX.
– It does not depend on the cloud like other Audionamix plugins.
– It is not magic.

Honestly, all that is fine because what it does do, it does very well and in a very straightforward manner.

IDC aims to keep it simple. You get three controls plus output level and bypass. This makes trying out the plugin on different samples of audio a very quick task, which means you don’t waste time on clips that are beyond salvation.
The three controls you get are:
– Strength: The aggressiveness of the algorithm
– Background: Level of the separated background noise
– Speech: Level of the separated speech

Like all digital processing tools, things sound a bit techno glitchy toward the extremes of the scales, but within reasonable parameters the plugin makes a very good job of reducing background levels without gargling up the speech too noticeably. I personally had fairly good results with strengths around 40% to 60%, and background reductions of up to -24 dB. Anything more radical than that sounded heavily processed.

Now, it’s important to make a note that not all noise is the same. In fact, there are entirely different kinds of audio muck that obscures dialogue, and the IDC is more effective against some than others.

Noise reduction comparison between original clip (1), Cedar DNS Two VST (2), Audionamix IDC (3) and Izotope RX 7 Voice Denoise (4). The clip presents loud air conditioner noise in the background of close mic’d dialogue. All plugins had their level boosted by +4dB after processing.

– Constant broadband background noise (air conditioners, waterfalls, freezers): Here the IDC does fairly well. I couldn’t notice a lot of pumping at the beginning and end of phrases, and the background didn’t sound crippled either.

– Varying broadband background noise (distant cars passing, engines from inside cars): Here again, the IDC does a good job of increasing the dialogue/background ratio. It does introduce artifacts when the background noise spikes or varies very abruptly, but if the goal is to increase intelligibility then it is definitely a success in that area.

– Wind: On this kind of noise the IDC needs a little helping hand from other processes. I tried to clean up some heavily winded dialogue, and even though the wind was indeed lowered significantly so was the speech under it, resulting in a pumping clip that went up and down following the shadow of the removed wind. I believe with some pre-processing using high pass filters and a little bit of limiting the results could have been better, but if you are emergency buying this to clean up bad wind audio I’d definitely keep that in mind. It does work well on light wind reduction, but in those cases as well it seems it benefits from some pre-processing.

Summing Up
I am happily impressed by the plugin. It does not work miracles, but no one should really expect any tool to do so. It is great at improving the signal-to-noise ratio of your sound and does so in a very easy-to-use interface, which allows you to quickly decide whether you like the results or not. That alone is a plus that should be kept in consideration.


Claudio Santos is a sound mixer and tech aficionado who works at Silver Sound in NYC. He has worked on a wide range of sound projects ranging from traditional shows like I Was Prey for the Animal Planet and VR experiences like The Mile-Long Opera.

Making audio pop for Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns

By Jennifer Walden

As the song says, “It’s a jolly holiday with Mary.” And just in time for the holidays, there’s a new Mary Poppins musical to make the season bright. In theaters now, Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns is directed by Rob Marshall, who with Chicago, Nine and Into the Woods on his resume, has become the master of modern musicals.

Renée Tondelli

In this sequel, Mary Poppins (Emily Blunt) comes back to help the now-grown up Michael (Ben Whishaw) and Jane Banks (Emily Mortimer) by attending to Michael’s three children: Annabel (Pixie Davies), John (Nathanael Saleh) and Georgie (Joel Dawson). It’s a much-needed reunion for the family as Michael is struggling with the loss of his wife.

Mary Poppins Returns is another family reunion of sorts. According to Renée Tondelli, who along with Eugene Gearty, supervised and co-designed the sound, director Marshall likes to use the same crews on all his films. “Rob creates families in each phase of the film, so we all have a shorthand with each other. It’s really the most wonderful experience you can have in a filmmaking process,” says Tondelli, who has worked with Marshall on five films, three of which were his musicals. “In the many years of working in this business, I have never worked with a more collaborative, wonderful, creative team than I have on Mary Poppins Returns. That goes for everyone involved, from the picture editor down to all of our assistants.”

Sound editorial took place in New York at Sixteen 19, the facility where the picture was being edited. Sound mixing was also done in New York, at Warner Bros. Sound.

In his musicals, Marshall weaves songs into scenes in a way that feels organic. The songs are coaxed from the emotional quotient of the story. That’s not only true for how the dialogue transitions into the singing, but also for how the music is derived from what’s happening in the scene. “Everything with Rob is incredibly rhythmic,” she says. “He has an impeccable sense of timing. Every breath, every footstep, every movement has a rhythmic cadence to it that relates to and works within the song. He does this with every artform in the production — with choreography, production design and sound design.”

From a sound perspective, Tondelli and her team worked to integrate the songs by blending the pre-recorded vocals with the production dialogue and the ADR. “We combined all of those in a micro editing process, often syllable by syllable, to create a very seamless approach so that you can’t really tell where they stop talking and start singing,” she says.

The Conversation
For example, near the beginning of the film, Michael is looking through the attic of their home on Cherry Tree Lane as he speaks to the spirit of his deceased wife, telling her how much he misses her in a song called “The Conversation.” Tondelli explains, “It’s a very delicate scene, and it’s a song that Michael was speaking/singing. We constantly cut between his pre-records and his production dialogue. It was an amazing collaboration between me, the supervising music editor Jennifer Dunnington and re-recording mixer Mike Prestwood Smith. We all worked together to create this delicate balance so you really feel that he is singing his song in that scene in that moment.”

Since Michael is moving around the attic as he’s performing the song, the environment affects the quality of the production sound. As he gets closer to the window, the sound bounces off the glass. “Mike [Prestwood Smith] really had his work cut out for him on that song. We were taking impulse responses from the end of the slates and feeding them into Audio Ease’s Altiverb to get the right room reverb on the pre-records. We did a lot of impulse responses and reverbs, and EQs to make that scene all flow, but it was worth it. It was so beautiful.”

The Bowl
They also captured impulse responses for another sequence, which takes place inside a ceramic bowl. The sequence begins with the three Banks children arguing over their mother’s bowl. They accidentally drop it and it breaks. Mary and Jack (Lin-Manuel Miranda) notice the bowl’s painted scenery has changed. The horse-drawn carriage now has a broken wheel that must be fixed. Mary spins the bowl and a gust of wind pulls them into the ceramic bowl’s world, which is presented in 2D animation. According to Tondelli, the sequence was hand-drawn, frame by frame, as an homage to the original Mary Poppins. “They actually brought some animators out of retirement to work on this film,” she says.

Tondelli and co-supervising sound editor/co-sound designer Eugene Gearty placed mics inside porcelain bowls, in a porcelain sink, and near marble tiles, which they thumped with rubber mallets, broken pieces of ceramic and other materials. The resulting ring-out was used to create reverbs that were applied to every element in the ceramic bowl sequence, from the dialogue to the Foley. “Everything they said, every step they took had to have this ceramic feel to it, so as they are speaking and walking it sounds like it’s all happening inside a bowl,” Tondelli says.

She first started working on this hand-drawn animation sequence when it showed little more than the actors against a greenscreen with a few pencil drawings. “The fastest and easiest way to make a scene like that come alive is through sound. The horse, which was possibly the first thing that was drawn, is pullling the carriage. It dances in this syncopated rhythm with the music so it provides a rhythmic base. That was the first thing that we tackled.”

After the carriage is fixed, Mary and her troupe walk to the Royal Doulton Music Hall where, ultimately, Jack and Mary are going to perform. Traditionally, a music hall in London is very rowdy and boisterous. The audience is involved in the show and there’s an air of playfulness. “Rob said to me, ‘I want this to be an English music hall, Renée. You really have to make that happen.’ So I researched what music halls were like and how they sounded.”

Since the animation wasn’t complete, Tondelli consulted with the animators to find out who — or rather what — was going to be in the audience. “There were going to be giraffes dressed up in suits with hats and Indian elephants in beautiful saris, penguins on the stage dancing with Jack and Mary, flamingos, giant moose and rabbits, baby hippos and other animals. The only way I thought I could do this was to go to London and hire actors of all ages who could do animal voices.”

But there were some specific parameters that had to be met. Tondelli defines the world of Mary Poppins Returns as being “magical realism,” so the animals couldn’t sound too cartoony. They had to sound believably like animal versions of British citizens. Also, the actors had to be able to sing in their animal voices.

According to Tondelli, they recorded 15 actors at a time for a period of five days. “I would call out, ‘Who can do an orangutan?’ And then the actors would all do voices and we’d choose one. Then they would do the whole song and sing out and call out. We had all different accents — Cockney, Welsh and Scottish,” she says. “All the British Isles came together on this and, of course, they all loved Mary and knew all the songs so they sang along with her.”

On the Dolby Atmos mix, the music hall scene really comes alive. The audience’s voices are coming from the rafters and all around the walls and the music is reverberating into the space — which, by the way, no longer sounds like it’s in a ceramic bowl even though the music hall is in the ceramic bowl world. In addition to the animal voices, there are hooves and paws for the animals’ clapping. “We had to create the clapping in Foley because it wasn’t normal clapping,” explains Tondelli. “The music hall was possibly the most challenging, but also the funnest scene to do. We just loved it. All of us had a great time on it.”

The Foley
The Foley elements in Mary Poppins Returns often had to be performed in perfect sync with the music. On the big dance numbers, like “Trip the Light Fantastic,” the Foley was an essential musical element since the dances were reconstructed sonically in post. “Everything for this scene was wiped away, even the vocals. We ended up using a lot of the records for this one and a lot less production sound,” says Tondelli.

In “Trip the Light Fantastic,” Jack is bringing the kids back home through the park, and they emerge from a tunnel to see nearly 50 lamplighters on lampposts. Marshall and John DeLuca (choreographer/producer/screen story writer) arranged the dance to happen in multiple layers, with each layer doing something different. “The background dancers were doing hand slaps and leg swipes, and another layer was stepping on and off of these slate surfaces. Every time the dancers would jump up on the lampposts, they’d hit it and each would ring out in a different pitch,” explains Tondelli.

All those complex rhythms were performed in Foley in time to the music. It’s a pretty tall order to ask of any Foley artist but Tondelli has the perfect solution for that dilemma. “I hire the co-choreographers (for this film, Joey Pizzi and Tara Hughes) or dancers that actually worked on the film to do the Foley. It’s something that I always do for Rob’s films. There’s such a difference in the performance,” she says.

Tondelli worked with the Foley team of Marko Costanzo and George Lara at c5 Sound in New York, who helped to build custom surfaces — like a slate-on-sand surface for the lamplighter dance — and arrange multi-surface layouts to optimally suit the Foley performer’s needs.

For instance, in the music hall sequence, the dance on stage incorporates books, so they needed three different surfaces: wood, leather and a papery-sounding surface set up in a logical, easily accessible way. “I wanted the dancer performing the Foley to go through the entire number while jumping off and on these different surfaces so you felt like it was a complete dance and not pieced together,” she says.

For the lamplighter dance, they had a big, thick pig iron pipe next to the slate floor so that the dancer performing the Foley could hit it every time the dancers on-screen jumped up on the lampposts. “So the performer would dance on the slate floor, then hit the pipe and then jump over to the wood floor. It was an amazingly syncopated rhythmic soundtrack,” says Tondelli.

“It was an orchestration, a beautiful sound orchestra, a Foley orchestra that we created and it had to be impeccably in sync. If there was a step out of place you’d hear it,” she continues. “It was really a process to keep it in sync through all the edit conforms and the changes in the movie. We had to be very careful doing the conforms and making the adjustments because even one small mistake and you would hear it.”

The Wind
Wind plays a prominent role in the story. Mary Poppins descends into London on a gust of wind. Later, they’re transported into the ceramic bowl world via a whirlwind. “It’s everywhere, from a tiny leaf blowing across the sidewalk to the huge gale in the park,” attests Tondelli. “Each one of those winds has a personality that Eugene [Gearty] spent a lot of time working on. He did amazing work.”

As far as the on-set fans and wind machines wreaking havoc on the production dialogue, Tondelli says there were two huge saving graces. First was production sound mixer Simon Hayes, who did a great job of capturing the dialogue despite the practical effects obstacles. Second was dialogue editor Alexa Zimmerman, who was a master at iZotope RX. All told, about 85% of the production dialogue made it into the film.

“My goal — and my unspoken order from Rob — was to not replace anything that we didn’t have to. He’s so performance-oriented. He arduously goes over every single take to make sure it’s perfect,” says Tondelli, who also points out that Marshall isn’t afraid of using ADR. “He will pick words from a take and he doesn’t care if it’s coming from a pre-record and then back to ADR and then back to production. Whichever has the best performance is what wins. Our job then is to make all of that happen for him.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. You can follow her on Twitter @audiojeny

Quick Chat: Westwind Media president Doug Kent

By Dayna McCallum

Doug Kent has joined Westwind Media as president. The move is a homecoming of sorts for the audio post vet, who worked as a sound editor and supervisor at the facility when they opened their doors in 1997 (with Miles O’ Fun). He comes to Westwind after a long-tenured position at Technicolor.

While primarily known as an audio post facility, Burbank-based Westwind has grown into a three-acre campus comprised of 10 buildings, which also house outposts for NBCUniversal and Technicolor, as well as media focused companies Keywords Headquarters and Film Solutions.

We reached out to Kent to find out a little bit more about what is happening over at Westwind, why he made the move and changes he has seen in the industry.

Why was now the right time to make this change, especially after being at one place for so long?
Well, 17 years is a really long time to stay at one place in this day and age! I worked with an amazing team, but Westwind presented a very unique opportunity for me. John Bidasio (managing partner) and Sunder Ramani (president of Westwind Properties) approached me with the role of heading up Westwind and teaming with them in shaping the growth of their media campus. It was literally an offer I couldn’t refuse. Because of the campus size and versatility of the buildings, I have always considered Westwind to have amazing potential to be one of the premier post production boutique destinations in the LA area. I’m very excited to be part of that growth.

You’ve worked at studios and facilities of all sizes in your career. What do you see as the benefit of a boutique facility like Westwind?
After 30 years in the post audio business — which seems crazy to say out loud — moving to a boutique facility allows me more flexibility. It also lets me be personally involved with the delivery of all work to our customers. Because of our relationships with other facilities, we are able to offer services to our customers all over the Los Angeles area. It’s all about drive time on Waze!

What does your new position at Westwind involve?
The size of our business allows me to actively participate with every service we offer, from business development to capital expenditures, while also working with our management team’s growth strategy for the campus. Our value proposition, as a nimble post audio provider, focuses on our high-quality brick and motor facility, while we continue to expand our editorial and mix talent working with many of the best mix facilities and sound designers in the LA area. Luckily, I now get to have a hand in all of it.

Westwind recently renovated two stages. Did Dolby Atmos certification drive that decision?
Netflix, Apple and Amazon all use Atmos materials for their original programming. It was time to move forward. These immersive technologies have changed the way filmmakers shape the overall experience for the consumer. These new object-based technologies enhance our ability to embellish and manipulate the soundscape of each production, creating a visceral experience for the audience that is more exciting and dynamic.

How to Get Away With Murder

Can you talk specifically about the gear you are using on the stages?
Currently, Westwind runs entirely on a Dante network design. We have four dub stages, including both of the Atmos stages, outfitted with Dante interfaces. The signal path from our Avid Pro Tools source machines — all the way to the speakers — is entirely in Dante and the BSS Blu link network. The monitor switching and stage are controlled through custom made panels designed in Harman’s Audio Architect. The Dante network allows us to route signals with complete flexibility across our network.

What about some of the projects you are currently working on?
We provide post sound services to the team at ShondaLand for all their productions, including Grey’s Anatomy, which is now in its 15th year, Station 19, How to Get Away With Murder and For the People. We are also involved in the streaming content market, working on titles for Amazon, YouTube Red and Netflix.

Looking forward, what changes in technology and the industry do you see having the most impact on audio post?
The role of post production sound has greatly increased as technology has advanced.  We have become an active part of the filmmaking process and have developed closer partnerships with the executive producers, showrunners and creative executives. Delivering great soundscapes to these filmmakers has become more critical as technology advances and audiences become more sophisticated.

The Atmos system creates an immersive audio experience for the listener and has become a foundation for future technology. The Atmos master contains all of the uncompressed audio and panning metadata, and can be updated by re-encoding whenever a new process is released. With streaming speeds becoming faster and storage becoming more easily available, home viewers will most likely soon be experiencing Atmos technology in their living room.

What haven’t I asked that is important?
Relationships are the most important part of any business and my favorite part of being in post production sound. I truly value my connections and deep friendships with film executives and studio owners all over the Los Angeles area, not to mention the incredible artists I’ve had the great pleasure of working with and claiming as friends. The technology is amazing, but the people are what make being in this business fulfilling and engaging.

We are in a remarkable time in film, but really an amazing time in what we still call “television.” There is growth and expansion and foundational change in every aspect of this industry. Being at Westwind gives me the flexibility and opportunity to be part of that change and to keep growing.

The Meg: What does a giant shark sound like?

By Jennifer Walden

Warner Bros. Pictures’ The Meg has everything you’d want in a fun summer blockbuster. There are explosions, submarines, gargantuan prehistoric sharks and beaches full of unsuspecting swimmers. Along with the mayhem, there is comedy and suspense and jump-scares. Best of all, it sounds amazing in Dolby Atmos.

The team at E² Sound, led by supervising sound editors Erik Aadahl, Ethan Van der Ryn and Jason Jennings, created a soundscape that wraps around the audience like a giant squid around a submersible. (By the way, that squid vs. submersible scene is so fun for sound!)

L-R: Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl.

We spoke to the E² Sound team about the details of their recording sessions for the film. They talk about how they approached the sound for the megalodons, how they used the Atmos surround field to put the audience underwater and much more.

Real sharks can’t make sounds, but Hollywood sharks do. How did director Jon Turteltaub want to approach the sound of the megalodon in his film?
Erik Aadahl: Before the film was even shot, we were chatting with producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura, and he said the most important thing in terms of sound for the megalodon was to sell the speed and power. Sharks don’t have any organs for making sound, but they are very large and powerful and are able to displace water. We used some artistic sonic license to create the quick sound of them moving around and displacing water. Of course, when they breach the surface, they have this giant mouth cavity that you can have a lot of fun with in terms of surging water and creating terrifying, guttural sounds out of that.

Jason Jennings: At one point, director Turteltaub did ask the question, “Would it be appropriate for The Meg to make a growl or roar?”

That opened up the door for us to explore that avenue. The megalodon shouldn’t make a growling or roaring sound, but there’s a lot that you can do with the sound of water being forced through the mouth or gills, whether you are above or below the water. We explored sounds that the megalodon could be making with its body. We were able to play with sounds that aren’t animal sounds but could sound animalistic with the right amount of twisting. For example, if you have the sound of a rock being moved slowly through the mud, and you process that a certain way, you can get a sound that’s almost vocal but isn’t an animal. It’s another type of organic sound that can evoke that idea.

Aadahl: One of my favorite things about the original Jaws was that when you didn’t see or hear Jaws it was more terrifying. It’s the unknown that’s so scary. One of my favorite scenes in The Meg was when you do not see or hear it, but because of this tracking device that they shot into its fin, they are able to track it using sonar pings. In that scene, one of the main characters is in this unbreakable shark enclosure just waiting out in the water for The Meg to show up. All you hear are these little pings that slowly start to speed up. To me, that’s one of the scariest scenes because it’s really playing with the unknown. Sharks are these very swift, silent, deadly killers, and the megalodon is this silent killer on steroids. So it’s this wonderful, cinematic moment that plays on the tension of the unknown — where is this megalodon? It’s really gratifying.

Since sharks are like the ninjas of the ocean (physically, they’re built for stealth), how do you use sound to help express the threat of the megalodon? How were you able to build the tension of an impending attack, or to enhance an attack?
Ethan Van der Ryn: It’s important to feel the power of this creature, so there was a lot of work put into feeling the effect that The Meg had on whatever it’s coming into contact with. It’s not so much about the sounds that are emitting directly from it (like vocalizations) but more about what it’s doing to the environment around it. So, if it’s passing by, you feel the weight and power of it passing by. When it attacks — like when it bites down on the window — you feel the incredible strength of its jaws. Or when it attacks the shark cage, it feels incredibly shocking because that sound is so terrifying and powerful. It becomes more about feeling the strength and power and aggressiveness of this creature through its movements and attacks.

Jennings: In terms of building tension leading up to an attack, it’s all about paring back all the elements beforehand. Before the attack, you’ll find that things get quiet and calmer and a little sparse. Then, all of a sudden, there’s this huge explosion of power. It’s all about clearing a space for the attack so that it means something.

The attack on the window in the underwater research station, how did you build that sequence? What were some of the ways you were able to express the awesomeness of this shark?
Aadahl: That’s a fun scene because you have the young daughter of a scientist on board this marine research facility located in the South China Sea and she’s wandered onto this observation deck. It’s sort of under construction and no one else is there. The girl is playing with this little toy — an iPad-controlled gyroscopic ball that’s rolling across the floor. That’s the featured sound of the scene.

You just hear this little ball skittering and rolling across the floor. It kind of reminds me of Danny’s tricycle from The Shining. It’s just so simple and quiet. The rhythm creates this atmosphere and lulls you into a solitary mood. When the shark shows up, you’re coming out of this trance. It’s definitely one of the big shock-scares of the movie.

Jennings: We pared back the sounds there so that when the attack happened it was powerful. Before the attack, the rolling of the ball and the tickety-tick of it going over the seams in the floor really does lull you into a sense of calm. Then, when you do see the shark, there’s this cool moment where the shark and the girl are having a staring contest. You don’t know who’s going to make the first move.

There’s also a perfect handshake there between sound design and music. The music is very sparse, just a little bit of violins to give you that shiver up your spine. Then, WHAM!, the sound of the attack just shakes the whole facility.

What about the sub-bass sounds in that scene?
Aadahl: You have the mass of this multi-ton creature slamming into the window, and you want to feel that in your gut. It has to be this visceral body experience. By the way, effects re-recording mixer Doug Hemphill is a master at using the subwoofer. So during the attack, in addition to the glass cracking and these giant teeth chomping into this thick plexiglass, there’s this low-end “whoomph” that just shakes the theater. It’s one of those moments where you want everyone in the theater to just jump out of their seats and fling their popcorn around.

To create that sound, we used a number of elements, including some recordings that we had done awhile ago of glass breaking. My parents were replacing this 8’ x 12’ glass window in their house and before they demolished the old one, I told them to not throw it out because I wanted to record it first.

So I mic’d it up with my “hammer mic,” which I’m very willing to beat up. It’s an Audio-Technica AT825, which has a fixed stereo polar pattern of 110-degrees, and it has a large diaphragm so it captures a really nice low-end response. I did several bangs on the glass before finally smashing it with a sledgehammer. When you have a surface that big, you can get a super low-end response because the surface acts like a membrane. So that was one of the many elements that comprised that attack.

Jennings: Another custom-recorded element for that sound came from a recording session where we tried to simulate the sound of The Meg’s teeth on a plastic cylinder for the shark cage sequence later in the film. We found a good-sized plastic container that we filled with water and we put a hydrophone inside the container and put a contact mic on the outside. From that point, we proceeded to abuse that thing with handsaws and a hand rake — all sorts of objects that had sharp points, even sharp rocks. We got some great material from that session, sounds where you can feel the cracking nature of something sharp on plastic.

For another cool recording session, in the editorial building where we work, we set up all the sound systems to play the same material through all of the subwoofers at once. Then we placed microphones throughout the facility to record the response of the building to all of this low-end energy. So for that moment where the shark bites the window, we have this really great punching sound we recorded from the sound of all the subwoofers hitting the building at once. Then after the bite, the scene cuts to the rest of the crew who are up in a conference room. They start to hear these distant rumbling sounds of the facility as it’s shaking and rattling. We were able to generate a lot of material from that recording session to feel like it’s the actual sound of the building being shaken by extreme low-end.

L-R: Emma Present, Matt Cavanaugh and Jason (Jay) Jennings.

The film spends a fair amount of time underwater. How did you handle the sound of the underwater world?
Aadahl: Jay [Jennings] just put a new pool in his yard and that became the underwater Foley stage for the movie, so we had the hydrophones out there. In the film, there are these submersible vehicles that Jay did a lot of experimentation for, particularly for their underwater propeller swishes.

The thing about hydrophones is that you can’t just put them in water and expect there to be sound. Even if you are agitating the water, you often need air displacement underwater pushing over the mics to create that surge sound that we associate with being underwater. Over the years, we’ve done a lot of underwater sessions and we found that you need waves, or agitation, or you need to take a high-powered hose into the water and have it near the surface with the hydrophones to really get that classic, powerful water rush or water surge sound.

Jennings: We had six different hydrophones for this particular recording session. We had a pair of Aquarian Audio H2a hydrophones, a pair of JrF hydrophones and a pair of Ambient Recording ASF-1 hydrophones. These are all different quality mics — some are less expensive and some are extremely expensive, and you get a different frequency response from each pair.

Once we had the mics set up, we had several different props available to record. One of the most interesting was a high-powered drill that you would use to mix paint or sheetrock compound. Connected to the drill, we had a variety of paddle attachments because we were trying to create new source for all the underwater propellers for the submersibles, ships and jet skis — all of which we view from underneath the water. We recorded the sounds of these different attachments in the water churning back and forth. We recorded them above the water, below the water, close to the mic and further from the mic. We came up with an amazing palette of sounds that didn’t need any additional processing. We used them just as they were recorded.

We got a lot of use out of these recordings, particularly for the glider vehicles, which are these high-tech, electrically-propelled vehicles with two turbine cyclone propellers on the back. We had a lot of fun designing the sound of those vehicles using our custom recordings from the pool.

Aadahl: There was another hydrophone recording mission that the crew, including Jay, went on. They set out to capture the migration of humpback whales. One of our hydrophones got tangled up in the boat’s propeller because we had a captain who was overly enthusiastic to move to the next location. So there was one casualty in our artistic process.

Jennings: Actually, it was two hydrophones. But the best part is that we got the recording of that happening, so it wasn’t a total loss.

Aadahl: “Underwater” is a character in this movie. One of the early things that the director and the picture editor Steven Kemper mentioned was that they wanted to make a character out of the underwater environment. They really wanted to feel the difference between being underwater and above the water. There is a great scene with Jonas (Jason Statham) where he’s out in the water with a harpoon and he’s trying to shoot a tracking device into The Meg.

He’s floating on the water and it’s purely environmental sounds, with the gentle lap of water against his body. Then he ducks his head underwater to see what’s down there. We switch perspectives there and it’s really extreme. We have this deep underwater rumble, like a conch shell feeling. You really feel the contrast between above and below the water.

Van der Ryn: Whenever we go underwater in the movie, Turteltaub wanted the audience to feel extremely uncomfortable, like that was an alien place and you didn’t want to be down there. So anytime we are underwater the sound had to do that sonic shift to make the audience feel like something bad could happen at any time.

How did you make being underwater feel uncomfortable?
Aadahl: That’s an interesting question, because it’s very subjective. To me, the power of sound is that it can play with emotions in very subconscious and subliminal ways. In terms of underwater, we had many different flavors for what that underwater sound was.

In that scene with Jonas going above and below the water, it’s really about that frequency shift. You go into a deep rumble under the water, but it’s not loud. It’s quiet. But sometimes the scariest sounds are the quiet ones. We learned this from A Quiet Place recently and the same applies to The Meg for sure.

Van der Ryn: Whenever you go quiet, people get uneasy. It’s a cool shift because when you are above the water you see the ripples of the ocean all over the place. When working in 7.1 or the Dolby Atmos mix, you can take these little rolling waves and pan them from center to left or from the right front wall to the back speakers. You have all of this motion and it’s calming and peaceful. But as soon as you go under, all of that goes away and you don’t hear anything. It gets really quiet and that makes people uneasy. There’s this constant low-end tone and it sells pressure and it sells fear. It is very different from above the water.

Aadahl: Turteltaub described this feeling of pressure, so it’s something that’s almost below the threshold of hearing. It’s something you feel; this pressure pushing against you, and that’s something we can do with the subwoofer. In Atmos, all of the speakers around the theater are extended-frequency range so we can put those super-low frequencies into every speaker (including the overheads) and it translates in a way that it doesn’t in 7.1. In Atmos, you feel that pressure that Turteltaub talked a lot about.

The Meg is an action film, so there’s shootings, explosions, ships getting smashed up, and other mayhem. What was the most fun action scene for sound? Why?
Jennings: I like the scene in the submersible shark cage where Suyin (Bingbing Li) is waiting for the shark to arrive. This turns into a whole adventure of her getting thrashed around inside the cage. The boat that is holding the cable starts to get pulled along. That was fun to work on.

Also, I enjoyed the end of the film where Jonas and Suyin are in their underwater gliders and they are trying to lure The Meg to a place where they can trap and kill it. The gliders were very musical in nature. They had some great tonal qualities that made them fun to play with using Doppler shifts. The propeller sounds we recorded in the pool… we used those for when the gliders go by the camera. We hit them with these churning sounds, and there’s the sound of the bubbles shooting by the camera.

Aadahl: There’s a climactic scene in the film with hundreds of people on a beach and a megalodon in the water. What could go wrong? There’s one character inside a “zorb” ball — an inflatable hamster ball for humans that’s used for scrambling around on top of the water. At a certain point, this “zorb” ball pops and that was a sound that Turteltaub was obsessed with getting right.

We went through so many iterations of that sound. We wound up doing this extensive balloon popping session on Stage 10 at Warner Bros. where we had enough room to inflate a 16-foot weather balloon. We popped a bunch of different balloons there, and we accidentally popped the weather balloon, but fortunately we were rolling and we got it. So a combination of those sounds created the”‘zorb” ball pop.

That scene was one of my favorites in the film because that’s where the shit hits the fan.

Van der Ryn: That’s a great moment. I revisited that to do something else in the scene, and when the zorb popped it made me jump back because I forgot how powerful a moment that is. It was a really fun, and funny moment.

Aadahl: That’s what’s great about this movie. It has some serious action and really scary moments, but it’s also fun. There are some tongue-in-cheek moments that made it a pleasure to work on. We all had so much fun working on this film. Jon Turteltaub is also one of the funniest people that I’ve ever worked with. He’s totally obsessed with sound, and that made for an amazing sound design and sound mix experience. We’re so grateful to have worked on a movie that let us have so much fun.

What was the most challenging scene for sound? Was there one scene that evolved a lot?
Aadahl: There’s a rescue scene that takes place in the deepest part of the ocean, and the rescue is happening from this nuclear submarine. They’re trying to extract the survivors, and at one point there’s this sound from inside the submarine, and you don’t know what it is but it could be the teeth of a giant megalodon scraping against the hull. That sound, which takes place over this one long tracking shot, was one that the director focused on the most. We kept going back and forth and trying new things. Massaging this and swapping that out… it was a tricky sound.

Ultimately, it ended up being a combination of sounds. Jay and sound effects editor Matt Cavanaugh went out and recorded this huge, metal cargo crate container. They set up mics inside and took all sorts of different metal tools and did some scraping, stuttering, chittering and other friction sounds. We got all sorts of material from that session and that’s one of the main featured sounds there.

Jennings: Turteltaub at one point said he wanted it to sound like a shovel being dragged across the top of the submarine, and so we took him quite literally. We went to record that container on one of the hottest days of the year. We had to put Matt (Cavanaugh) inside and shut the door! So we did short takes.

I was on the roof dragging shovels, rakes, a garden hoe and other tools across the top. We generated a ton of great material from that.

As with every film we do, we don’t want to rely on stock sounds. Everything we put together for these movies is custom made for them.

What about the giant squid? How did you create its’ sounds?
Aadahl: I love the sound that Jay came up with for the suction cups on the squid’s tentacles as they’re popping on and off of the submersible.

Jennings: Yet another glorious recording session that we did for this movie. We parked a car in a quiet location here at WB, and we put microphones inside of the car — some stereo mics and some contact mics attached to the windshield. Then, we went outside the car with two or three different types of plungers and started plunging the windshield. Sometimes we used a dry plunger and sometimes we used a wet plunger. We had a wet plunger with dish soap on it to make it slippery and slurpie. We came up with some really cool material for the cups of this giant squid. So we would do a hard plunge onto the glass, and then pull it off. You can stutter the plunger across the glass to get a different flavor. Thankfully, we didn’t break any windows, although I wasn’t sure that we wouldn’t.

Aadahl: I didn’t donate my car for that recording session because I have broken my windshield recording water in the past!

Van der Ryn: In regards to perspective in that scene, when you’re outside the submersible, it’s a wide shot and you can see the arms of the squid flailing around. There we’re using the sound of water motion but when we go inside the submersible it’s like this sphere of plastic. In there, we used Atmos to make the audience really feel like those squid tentacles are wrapping around the theater. The little suction cup sounds are sticking and stuttering. When the squid pulls away, we could pinpoint each of those suction cups to a specific speaker in the theater and be very discrete about it.

Any final thoughts you’d like to share on the sound of The Meg?
Van der Ryn: I want to call out Ron Bartlett, the dialogue/music re-recording mixer and Doug Hemphill, the re-recording mixer on the effects. They did an amazing job of taking all the work done by all of the departments and forming it into this great-sounding track.

Aadahl: Our music composer, Harry Gregson-Williams, was pretty amazing too.

Crafting sound for Emmy-winning Atlanta

By Jennifer Walden

FX Network’s dramedy series Atlanta, which recently won an Emmy for Outstanding Sound Editing For A Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour)tells the story of three friends from, well, Atlanta — a local rapper named Paper Boi whose star is on the rise (although the universe seems to be holding him down), his cousin/manager Earn and their head-in-the-clouds friend Darius.

Trevor Gates

Told through vignettes, each episode shows their lives from different perspectives instead of through a running narrative. This provides endless possibilities for creativity. One episode flows through different rooms at a swanky New Year’s party at Drake’s house; another ventures deep into the creepy woods where real animals (not party animals) make things tense.

It’s a playground for sound each week, and MPSE-award-winning supervising sound editor Trevor Gates of Formosa Group and his sound editorial team on Season 2 (aka, Robbin’ Season) got their 2018 Emmy based on the work they did on Episode 6 “Teddy Perkins,” in which Darius goes to pick up a piano from the home of an eccentric recluse but finds there’s more to the transaction than he bargained for.

Here, Gates discusses the episode’s precise use of sound and how the quiet environment was meticulously crafted to reinforce the tension in the story and to add to the awkwardness of the interactions between Darius and Teddy.

There’s very little music in “Teddy Perkins.” The soundtrack is mainly different ambiences and practical effects and Foley. Since the backgrounds play such an important role, can you tell me about the creation of these different ambiences?
Overall, Atlanta doesn’t really have a score. Music is pretty minimal and the only music that you hear is mainly source music — music coming from radios, cell phones or laptops. I think it’s an interesting creative choice by producers Hiro Murai and Donald Glover. In cases like the “Teddy Perkins” episode, we have to be careful with the sounds we choose because we don’t have a big score to hide behind. We have to be articulate with those ambient sounds and with the production dialogue.

Going into “Teddy Perkins,” Hiro (who directed the episode) and I talked about his goals for the sound. We wanted a quiet soundscape and for the house to feel cold and open. So, when we were crafting the sounds that most audience members will perceive as silence or quietness, we had very specific choices to make. We had to craft this moody air inside the house. We had to craft a few sounds for the outside world too because the house is located in a rural area.

There are a few birds but nothing overt, so that it’s not intrusive to the relationship between Darius (Lakeith Stanfield) and Teddy (Donald Glover). We had to be very careful in articulating our sound choices, to hold that quietness that was void of any music while also supporting the creepy, weird, tense dialogue between the two.

Inside the Perkins residence, the first ambience felt cold and almost oppressive. How did you create that tone?
That rumbly, oppressive air was the cold tone we were going for. It wasn’t a layer of tones; it was actually just one sound that I manipulated to be the exact frequency that I wanted for that space. There was a vastness and a claustrophobia to that space, although that sounds contradictory. That cold tone was kind of the hero sound of this episode. It was just one sound, articulately crafted, and supported by sounds from the environment.

There’s a tonal shift from the entryway into the parlor, where Darius and Teddy sit down to discuss the piano (and Teddy is eating that huge, weird egg). In there we have the sound of a clock ticking. I really enjoy using clocks. I like the meter that clocks add to a room.

In Ouija: Origin of Evil, we used the sound of a clock to hold the pace of some scenes. I slowed the clock down to just a tad over a second, and it really makes you lean in to the scene and hold what you perceive as silence. I took a page from that book for Atlanta. As you leave the cold air of the entryway, you enter into this room with a clock ticking and Teddy and Darius are sitting there looking at each other awkwardly over this weird/gross ostrich egg. The sound isn’t distracting or obtrusive; it just makes you lean into the awkwardness.

It was important for us to get the mix for the episode right, to get the right level for the ambiences and tones, so that they are present but not distracting. It had to feel natural. It’s our responsibility to craft things that show the audience what we want them to see, and at the same time we have to suspend their disbelief. That’s what we do as filmmakers; we present the sonic spaces and visual images that traverse that fine line between creativity and realism.

That cold tone plays a more prominent role near the end of the episode, during the murder-suicide scene. It builds the tension until right before Benny pulls the trigger. But there’s another element too there, a musical stinger. Why did you choose to use music at that moment?
What’s important about this season of Atlanta is that Hiro and Donald have a real talent for surrounding themselves with exceptional people — from the picture department to the sound department to the music department and everyone on-set. Through the season it was apparent that this team of exceptional people functioned with extreme togetherness. We had a homogeny about us. It was a bunch of really creative and smart people getting together in a room, creating something amazing.

We had a music department and although there isn’t much music and score, every once in a while we would break a rule that we set for ourselves on Season 2. The picture editor will be in the room with the music department and Hiro, and we’ll all make decisions together. That musical stinger wasn’t my idea exactly; it was a collective decision to use a stinger to drive the moment, to have it build and release at a specific time. I can’t attribute that sound to me only, but to this exceptional team on the show. We would bounce creative ideas off of each other and make decisions as a collective.

The effects in the murder-suicide scene do a great job of tension building. For example, when Teddy leans in on Darius, there’s that great, long floor creak.
Yeah, that was a good creak. It was important for us, throughout this episode, to make specific sound choices in many different areas. There are other episodes in the season that have a lot more sound than this episode, like “Woods,” where Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry) is getting chased through the woods after he was robbed. Or “Alligator Man,” with the shootout in the cold open. But that wasn’t the case with “Teddy Perkins.”

On this one, we had to make specific choices, like when Teddy leans over and there’s that long, slow creak. We tried to encompass the pace of the scene in one very specific sound, like the sound of the shackles being tightened onto Darius or the movement of the shotgun.

There’s another scene when Darius goes down into the basement, and he’s traveling through this area that he hasn’t been in before. We decided to create a world where he would hear sounds traveling through the space. He walks past a fan and then a water heater kicks on and there is some water gurgling through pipes and the clinking sound of the water heater cooling down. Then we hear Benny’s wheelchair squeak. For me, it’s about finding that one perfect sound that makes that moment. That’s hard to do because it’s not a composition of many sounds. You have one choice to make, and that’s what is going to make that moment special. It’s exciting to find that one sound. Sometimes you go through many choices until you find the right one.

There were great diegetic effects, like Darius spinning the globe, and the sound of the piano going onto the elevator, and the floor needle and the buttons and dings. Did those come from Foley? Custom recordings? Library sounds?
I had a great Foley team on this entire season, led by Foley supervisor Geordy Sincavage. The sounds like the globe spinning came from the Foley team, so that was all custom recorded. The elevator needle moving down was a custom recording from Foley. All of the shackles and handcuffs and gun movements were from Foley.

The piano moving onto the elevator was something that we created from a combination of library effects and Foley sounds. I had sound effects editor David Barbee helping me out on this episode. He gave me some library sounds for the piano and I went in and gave it a little extra love. I accentuated the movement of the piano strings. It was like piano string vocalizations as Darius is moving the piano into the elevator and it goes over the little bumps. I wanted to play up the movements that would add some realism to that moment.

Creating a precise soundtrack is harder than creating a big action soundtrack. Well, there are different sets of challenges for both, but it’s all about being able to tell a story by subtraction. When there’s too much going on, people can feel the details if you start taking things away. “Teddy Perkins” is the case of having an extremely precise soundtrack, and that was successful thanks to the work of the Foley team, my effects editor, and the dialogue editor.

The dialogue editor Jason Dotts is the unsung hero in this because we had to be so careful with the production dialogue track. When you have a big set — this old, creaky house and lots of equipment and crew noise — you have to remove all the extraneous noise that can take you out of the tension between Darius and Teddy. Jason had to go in with a fine-tooth comb and do surgery on the production dialogue just to remove every single small sound in order to get the track super quiet. That production track had to be razor-sharp and presented with extreme care. Then, with extreme care, we had to build the ambiences around it and add great Foley sounds for all the little nuances. Then we had to bake the cake together and have a great mix, a very articulate balance of sounds.

When we were all done, I remember Hiro saying to us that we realized his dream 100%. He alluded to the fact that this was an important episode going into it. I feel like I am a man of my craft and my fingerprint is very important to me, so I am always mindful of how I show my craft to the world. I will always take extreme care and go the extra mile no matter what, but it felt good to have something that was important to Hiro have such a great outcome for our team. The world responded. There were lots of Emmy nominations this year for Atlanta and that was an incredible thing.

Did you have a favorite scene for sound? Why?
It was cool to have something that we needed to craft and present in its entirety. We had to build a motif and there had to be consistency within that motif. It was awesome to build the episode as a whole. Some scenes were a bit different, like down in the basement. That had a different vibe. Then there were fun scenes like moving the piano onto the elevator. Some scenes had production challenges, like the scene with the film projector. Hiro had to shoot that scene with the projector running and that created a lot of extra noise on the production dialogue. So that was challenging from a dialogue editing standpoint and a mix standpoint.

Another challenging scene was when Darius and Teddy are in the “Father Room” of the museum. That was shot early on in the process and Donald wasn’t quite happy with his voice performance in that scene. Overall, Atlanta uses very minimal ADR because we feel that re-recorded performances can really take the magic out of a scene, but Donald wanted to redo that whole scene, and it came out great. It felt natural and I don’t think people realize that Donald’s voice was re-recorded in its entirety for that scene. That was a fun ADR session.

Donald came into the studio and once he got into the recording booth and got into the Teddy Perkins voice he didn’t get out of it until we were completely finished. So as Hiro and Donald are interacting about ideas on the performance, Donald stayed in the Teddy voice completely. He didn’t get out of it for three hours. That was an interesting experience to see Donald’s face as himself and hear Teddy’s voice.

Where there any audio tools that you couldn’t have lived without on this episode?
Not necessarily. This was an organic build and the tools that we used in this were really basic. We used some library sounds and recorded some custom sounds. We just wanted to make sure that we could make this as real and organic as possible. Our tool was to pick the best organic sounds that we could, whether we used source recordings or new recordings.

Of all the episodes in Season 2 of Atlanta, why did you choose “Teddy Perkins” for Emmy consideration?
Each episode had its different challenges. There were lots of different ways to tell the stories since each episode is different. I think that is something that is magical about Atlanta. Some of the episodes that stood out from a sound standpoint were Episode 1 “Alligator Man” with the shootout, and Episode 8 “Woods.” I had considered submitting “Woods” because it’s so surreal once Paper Boi gets into the woods. We created this submergence of sound, like the woods were alive. We took it to another level with the wildlife and used specific wildlife sounds to draw some feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.

Even an episode like “Champagne Papi,” which seems like one of the most basic from a sound editorial perspective, was actually quite varied. They’re going between different rooms at a party and we had to build spaces of people that felt different but the same in each room. It had to feel like a real space with lots of people, and the different spaces had to feel like it belonged at the same party.

But when it came down to it, I feel like “Teddy Perkins” was special because there wasn’t music to hide behind. We had to do specific and articulate work, and make sharp choices. So it’s not the episode with the most sound but it’s the episode that has the most articulate sound. And we are very proud of how it turned out.


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. You can follow her on Twitter at @audiojeney.com.

Pixelogic adds d-cinema, Dolby audio mixing theaters to Burbank facility

Pixelogic, which provides localization and distribution services, has opened post production content review and audio mixing theaters within its facility in Burbank. The new theaters extend the company’s end-to-end services to include theatrical screening of digital cinema packages as well as feature and episodic audio mixing in support of its foreign language dubbing business.

Pixelogic now operates a total of six projector-lit screening rooms within its facility. Each room was purpose-built from the ground up to include HDR picture and immersive sound technologies, including support for Dolby Atmos and DTS:X audio. The main theater is equipped with a Dolby Vision projection system and supports Dolby Atmos immersive audio. The facility will enable the creation of more theatrical content in Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos, which consumers can experience at Dolby Cinema theaters, as well as in their homes and on the go. The four larger theaters are equipped with Avid S6 consoles in support of the company’s audio services. The latest 4D motion chairs are also available for testing and verification of 4D capabilities.

“The overall facility design enables rapid and seamless turnover of production environments that support Digital Cinema Package (DCP) screening, audio recording, audio mixing and a range of mastering and quality control services,” notes Andy Scade, SVP/GM of Pixelogic’s worldwide digital cinema services.