Tag Archives: audio mixing

Izotope’s Neutron 3 streamlines mix workflows with machine learning

Izotope, makers of the RX audio tools, has introduced Neutron 3, a plug-in that — thanks to advances in machine learning — listens to the entire session and communicates with every track in the mix. Mixers can use Neutron 3’s new Mix Assistant to create a balanced starting point for an initial-level mix built around their chosen focus, saving time and energy when making creative mix decisions. Once a focal point is defined, Neutron 3 automatically set levels before the mixer ever has to touch a fader.

Neutron 3 also has a new module called Sculptor (available in Neutron 3 Standard and Advanced) for sweetening, fixing and creative applications. Using never-before-seen signal processing, Sculptor works like a per-band army of compressors and EQs to shape any track. It also communicates with Track Assistant to understand each instrument and gives realtime feedback to help mixers shape tracks to a target EQ curve or experiment with new sounds.

In addition, Neutron 3 includes many new improvements and enhancements based on feedback from the community, such as the redesigned Masking Meter that automatically flags masking issues and allows them to be fixed from a convenient one-window display. This improvement prevents tracks from stepping on each other and muddying the mix.

Neutron 3 has also had a major overhaul in performance for faster processing and load times and smooth metering. Sessions with multiple Neutrons open much quicker, and refresh rates for visualizations have doubled.

Other Neutron 3 Features
• Visual Mixer and Izotope Relay: Users can launch Mix Assistant directly from Visual Mixer and move tracks in a virtual space, tapping into Izotope-enabled inter-plug-in communication
• Improved interface: Smooth visualizations and a resizable interface
• Improved Track Assistant listens to audio and creates a custom preset based on what it hears
• Eight plug-ins in one: Users can build a signal chain directly within one highly connected, intelligent interface with Sculptor, EQ with Soft Saturation mode, Transient Shaper, 2 Compressors, Gate, Exciter, and Limiter
• Component plug-ins: Users can control Neutron’s eight modules as a single plug-in or as eight individual plug-ins
• Tonal Balance Control: Updated to support Neutron 3
• 7.1 Surround sound support and zero-latency mode in all eight modules for professional, lightweight processing for audio post or surround music mixes

Visual Mixer and Izotope Relay will be Included free with all Neutron 3 Advanced demo downloads. In addition, Music Production Suite 2.1 will now include Neutron 3 Advanced, and iZotope Elements Suite will be updated to include Neutron Elements (v3).

Neutron 3 will be available in three different options — Neutron Elements, Neutron 3 Standard and Neutron 3 Advanced. See the comparison chart for more information on what features are included in each version.

Neutron will be available June 30. Check out the iZotope site for pricing.

Creating audio for the cinematic VR series Delusion: Lies Within

By Jennifer Walden

Delusion: Lies Within is a cinematic VR series from writer/director Jon Braver. It is available on the Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Go and Rift platforms. The story follows a reclusive writer named Elena Fitzgerald who penned a series of popular fantasy novels, but before the final book in the series was released, the author disappeared. Rumors circulated about the author’s insanity and supposed murder, so two avid fans decide to break into her mansion to search for answers. What they find are Elena’s nightmares come to life.

Delusion: Lies Within is based on an interactive play written by Braver and Peter Cameron. Interactive theater isn’t your traditional butts-in-the-seat passive viewing-type theater. Instead, the audience is incorporated into the story. They interact with the actors, search for objects, solve mysteries, choose paths and make decisions that move the story forward.

Like a film, the theater production is meticulously planned out, from the creature effects and stunts to the score and sound design. With all these components already in place, Delusion seemed like the ideal candidate to become a cinematic VR series. “In terms of the visuals and sound, the VR experience is very similar to the theatrical experience. With Delusion, we are doing 360° theater, and that’s what VR is too. It’s a 360° format,” explains Braver.

While the intent was to make the VR series match the theatrical experience as much as possible, there are some important differences. First, immersive theater allows the audience to interact with the actors and objects in the environment, but that’s not the case with the VR series. Second, the live theater show has branching story narratives and an audience member can choose which path he/she would like to follow. But in the VR series there’s one set storyline that follows a group who is exploring the author’s house together. The viewer feels immersed in the environment but can’t manipulate it.

L-R: Hamed_Hokamzadeh and Thomas Ouziel

According to supervising sound editor Thomas Ouziel from Hollywood’s MelodyGun Group, “Unlike many VR experiences where you’re kind of on rails in the midst of the action, this was much more cinematic and nuanced. You’re just sitting in the space with the characters, so it was crucial to bring the characters to life and to design full sonic spaces that felt alive.”

In terms of workflow, MelodyGun sound supervisor/studio manager Hamed Hokamzadeh chose to use the Oculus Developers Kit 2 headset with Facebook 360 Spatial Workstation on Avid Pro Tools. “Post supervisor Eric Martin and I decided to keep everything within FB360 because the distribution was to be on a mobile VR platform (although it wasn’t yet clear which platform), and FB360 had worked for us marvelously in the past for mobile and Facebook/YouTube,” says Hokamzadeh. “We initially concentrated on delivering B-format (2nd Order AmbiX) playing back on Gear VR with a Samsung S8. We tried both the Audio-Technica ATH-M50 and Shure SRH840 headphones to make sure it translated. Then we created other deliverables: quad-binaurals, .tbe, 8-channel and a stereo static mix. The non-diegetic music and voiceover was head-locked and delivered in stereo.”

From an aesthetic perspective, the MelodyGun team wanted to have a solid understanding of the audience’s live theater experience and the characters themselves “to make the VR series follow suit with the world Jon had already built. It was also exciting to cross our sound over into more of a cinematic ‘film world’ than was possible in the live theatrical experience,” says Hokamzadeh.

Hokamzadeh and Ouziel assigned specific tasks to their sound team — Xiaodan Li was focused on sound editorial for the hard effects and Foley, and Kennedy Phillips was asked to design specific sound elements, including the fire monster and the alchemist freezing.

Ouziel, meanwhile, had his own challenges of both creating the soundscape and integrating the sounds into the mix. He had to figure out how to make the series sound natural yet cinematic, and how to use sound to draw the viewer’s attention while keeping the surrounding world feeling alive. “You have to cover every movement in VR, so when the characters split up, for example, you want to hear all their footsteps, but we also had to get the audience to focus on a specific character to guide them through. That was one of the biggest challenges we had while mixing it,” says Ouziel.

The Puppets
“Chapter Three: Trial By Fire” provides the best example of how Ouziel tackled those challenges. In the episode, Virginia (Britt Adams) finds herself stuck in Marion’s chamber. Marion (Michael J. Sielaff) is a nefarious puppet master who is clandestinely controlling a room full of people on puppet strings; some are seated at a long dining table and others are suspended from the ceiling. They’re all moving their arms as if dancing to the scratchy song that’s coming from the gramophone.

The sound for the puppet people needed to have a wiry, uncomfortable feel and the space itself needed to feel eerily quiet but also alive with movement. “We used a grating metallic-type texture for the strings so they’d be subconsciously unnerving, and mixed that with wooden creaks to make it feel like you’re surrounded by constant danger,” says Ouziel.

The slow wooden creaks in the ambience reinforce the idea that an unseen Marion is controlling everything that’s happening. Braver says, “Those creaks in Marion’s room make it feel like the space is alive. The house itself is a character in the story. The sound team at MelodyGun did an excellent job of capturing that.”

Once the sound elements were created for that scene, Ouziel then had to space each puppet’s sound appropriately around the room. He also had to fill the room with music while making sure it still felt like it was coming from the gramophone. Ouziel says, “One of the main sound tools that really saved us on this one was Audio Ease’s 360pan suite, specifically the 360reverb function. We used it on the gramophone in Marion’s chamber so that it sounded like the music was coming from across the room. We had to make sure that the reflections felt appropriate for the room, so that we felt surrounded by the music but could clearly hear the directionality of its source. The 360pan suite helped us to create all the environmental spaces in the series. We pretty much ran every element through that reverb.”

L-R: Thomas Ouziel and Jon Braver.

Hokamzadeh adds, “The session got big quickly! Imagine over 200 AmbiX tracks, each with its own 360 spatializer and reverb sends, plus all the other plug-ins and automation you’d normally have on a regular mix. Because things never go out of frame, you have to group stuff to simplify the session. It’s typical to make groups for different layers like footsteps, cloth, etc., but we also made groups for all the sounds coming from a specific direction.”

The 360pan suite reverb was also helpful on the fire monster’s sounds. The monster, called Ember, was sound designed by Phillips. His organic approach was akin to the bear monster in Annihilation, in that it felt half human/half creature. Phillips edited together various bellowing fire elements that sounded like breathing and then manipulated those to match Ember’s tormented movements. Her screams also came from a variety of natural screams mixed with different fire elements so that it felt like there was a scared young girl hidden deep in this walking heap of fire. Ouziel explains, “We gave Ember some loud sounds but we were able to play those in the space using the 360pan suite reverb. That made her feel even bigger and more real.”

The Forest
The opening forest scene was another key moment for sound. The series is set in South Carolina in 1947, and the author’s estate needed to feel like it was in a remote area surrounded by lush, dense forest. “With this location comes so many different sonic elements. We had to communicate that right from the beginning and pull the audience in,” says Braver.

Genevieve Jones, former director of operations at Skybound Entertainment and producer on Delusion: Lies Within, says, “I love the bed of sound that MelodyGun created for the intro. It felt rich. Jon really wanted to go to the south and shoot that sequence but we weren’t able to give that to him. Knowing that I could go to MelodyGun and they could bring that richness was awesome.”

Since the viewer can turn his/her head, the sound of the forest needed to change with those movements. A mix of six different winds spaced into different areas created a bed of textures that shifts with the viewer’s changing perspective. It makes the forest feel real and alive. Ouziel says, “The creative and technical aspects of this series went hand in hand. The spacing of the VR environment really affects the way that you approach ambiences and world-building. The house interior, too, was done in a similar approach, with low winds and tones for the corners of the rooms and the different spaces. It gives you a sense of a three-dimensional experience while also feeling natural and in accordance to the world that Jon made.”

Bringing Live Theater to VR
The sound of the VR series isn’t a direct translation of the live theater experience. Instead, it captures the spirit of the live show in a way that feels natural and immersive, but also cinematic. Ouziel points to the sounds that bring puppet master Marion to life. Here, they had the opportunity to go beyond what was possible with the live theater performance. Ouziel says, “I pitched to Jon the idea that Marion should sound like a big, worn wooden ship, so we built various layers from these huge wooden creaks to match all his movements and really give him the size and gravitas that he deserved. His vocalizations were made from a couple elements including a slowed and pitched version of a raccoon chittering that ended up feeling perfectly like a huge creature chuckling from deep within. There was a lot of creative opportunity here and it was a blast to bring to life.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. Follow her on Twitter @audiojeney.

Review: Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition for audio calibration

By David Hurd

What is a flat monitoring system, and how does it benefit those mixing audio? Well, this is something I’ll be addressing in this review of Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition, but first some background…

Having a flat audio system simply means that whatever signal goes into the speakers comes out sonically pure, exactly as it was meant to. On a graph, it would look like a straight line from 20 cycles on the left to 20,000 cycles on the right.

A straight, flat line with no peaks or valleys would indicate unwanted boosts or cuts at certain frequencies. There is a reason that you want this for your monitoring system. If there are peaks in your speakers at the hundred-cycle mark on down you get boominess. At 250 to 350 cycles you get mud. At around a thousand cycles you get a honkiness as if you were holding your nose when you talked, and too much high-end sounds brittle. You get the idea.

Before

After

If your system is not flat, your monitors are lying to your ears and you can’t trust what you are hearing while you mix.

The problem arises when you try to play your audio on another system and hear the opposite of what you mixed. It works like this: If your speakers have too much bass then you cut some of the bass out of your mix to make it sound good to your ears. But remember, your monitors are lying, so when you play your mix on another system, the bass is missing.

To avoid this problem, professional recording studios calibrate their studio monitors so that they can mix in a flat-sounding environment. They know that what they hear is what they will get in their mixes, so they can happily mix with confidence.

Every room affects what you hear coming out of your speakers. The problem is that the studio monitors that were close to being flat at the factory are not flat once they get put into your room and start bouncing sound off of your desk and walls.

Sonarworks
This is where Sonarwork’s calibration mic and software come in. They give you a way to sonically flatten out your room by getting a speaker measurement. This gives you a response chart based upon the acoustics of your room. You apply this correction using the plugin and your favorite DAW, like Avid Pro Tools. You can also use the system-wide app to correct sound from any source on your computer.

So let’s imagine that you have installed the Sonarworks software, calibrated your speakers and mixed a music project. Since there are over 30,000 locations that use Sonarworks, you can send out your finished mix, minus the Sonarworks plugins since their room will have different acoustics, and use a different calibration setting. Now, the mastering lab you use will be hearing your mix on their Sonarworks acoustically flat system… just as you mixed it.

I use a pair of Genelec studio monitors for both audio projects and audio-for-video work. They were expensive, but I have been using them for over 15 years with great results. If you don’t have studio monitors and just choose to mix on headphones, Sonarworks has you covered.

The software will calibrate your headphones.

There is an online product demo at sonarworks.com that lets you select which headphones you use. You can switch between bypass and the Sonarworks effect. Since they have already done the calibration process for your headphones, you can get a good idea of the advantages of mixing on a flat system. The headphone option is great for those who mix on a laptop or small home studio. It’s less money as well. I used my Sennheiser HD300 Pro series headphones.

I installed Sonarworks on my “Review” system, which is what I use to review audio and video production products. I then tested Sonarworks on both Pro Tools 12 music projects and video editing work, like sound design using a sound FX library and audio from my Blackmagic Ursa 4.6K camera footage. I was impressed at the difference that the Sonarworks software made. It opened my mixes and made it easy to find any problems.

The Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition takes your projects to a whole new level, and finally lets you hear your work in a sonically pure and flat listening environment.

My Review System
The Sonarworks Reference 4 Studio Edition was tested on
my Mac Pro 6-core trash can running High Sierra OSX, 64GB RAM, 12GB of RAM on the D700 video cards; a Blackmagic UltraStudio 4K box; four G-Tech G-Speed 8TB RAID boxes with HighPoint RAID controllers; Lexar SD and Cfast card readers; video output viewed a Boland 32-inch broadcast monitor; a Mackie mixer; a Complete Control S25 keyboard; and a Focusrite Clarett 4 Pre.

Software includes Apple FCPX, Blackmagic Resolve 15 and Pro Tools 12. Cameras used for testing are a Blackmagic 4K Production camera and the Ursa Mini 4.6K Pro, both powered by Blueshape batteries.


David Hurd is production and post veteran who owns David Hurd Productions in Tampa. You can reach him at david@dhpvideo.com.

Sound designer Ash Knowlton joins Silver Sound

Emmy Award-winning NYC sound studio Silver Sound has added sound engineer Ash Knowlton to its roster. Knowlton is both a location sound recordist and sound designer, and on rare and glorious occasions she is DJ Hazyl. Knowlton has worked on film, television, and branded content for clients such as NBC, Cosmopolitan and Vice, among others.

“I know it might sound weird but for me, remixing music and designing sound occupy the same part of my brain. I love music, I love sound design — they are what make me happy. I guess that’s why I’m here,” she says.

Knowlton moved to Brooklyn from Albany when she was 18 years old. To this day, she considers making the move to NYC and surviving as one of her biggest accomplishments. One day, by chance, she ran into filmmaker John Zhao on the street and was cast on the spot as the lead for his feature film Alexandria Leaving. The experience opened Knowlton’s eyes to the wonders and complexity of the filmmaking process. She particularly fell in love with sound mixing and design.

Ten years later, with over seven independent feature films now under her belt, Knowlton is ready for the next 10 years as an industry professional.

Her tools of choice at Silver Sound are Reaper, Reason and Kontakt.

Main Photo Credit: David Choy

Karol Urban is president of CAS, others named to board

As a result of the Cinema Audio Society board of Directors election Karol Urban will replace CAS president Mark Ulano, whose term has come to an end.  Steve Venezia with replace treasurer Peter Damski who opted not to run for re-election.

“I am so incredibly honored to have garnered the confidence of our esteemed members,” says Urban. “After years of serving under different presidents and managing the content for the CAS Quarterly I have learned so much about the achievements, interests, talents and concerns of our membership. I am excited to given this new platform to celebrate the achievements and herald new opportunities to serve this incredibly dynamic and talented community.”

For 2019 the Executive Committee with include newly elected Urban and Venezia as well as VP Phillip W. Palmer, CAS, and secretary David J. Bondelevitch, CAS,  who were not up for election.

The incumbent CAS Board of Directors (Production) that were re-elected are  Peter J. Devlin CAS, Lee Orloff CAS, and Jeffrey W. Wexler, CAS. They will be joined by newly elected Amanda Beggs, CAS, and Mary H. Ellis, CAS, who are taking the seats of outgoing  board members Chris Newman CAS and Lisa Pinero, CAS.

Incumbent board members (Post Production) who were reelected are Bob Bronow CAS, and Mathew Waters, CAS, and they will be joined by newly elected Board Members Onnalee Blank, CAS, and Mike Minkler CAS, who will be taking the seats of board members Urban and Steve Venezia, CAS, who are now officers.

Continuing to serve as their terms were not up for reelection are for production Willie Burton, CAS, and Glen Trew, CAS, and for post production Tom Fleischman, CAS, Doc Kane CAS, Sherry Klein, CAS, and Marti Humphrey, CAS.

The new Board will be installed at the 55 Annual CAS Awards Saturday, February 16.

Pixelogic London adds audio mix, digital cinema theaters

Pixelogic has added new theaters and production suites to its London facility, which offers creation and mastering of digital cinema packages and theatrical screening of digital cinema content, as well as feature and episodic audio mixing.

Pixelogic’s London location now features six projector-lit screening rooms: three theaters and three production suites. Purpose-built from the ground up, the theaters offer HDR picture and immersive audio technologies, including Dolby Atmos and DTS:X.

The equipment offered in the three theaters includes Avid S6 and S3 consoles and Pro Tools systems that support a wide range of theatrical mixing services, complemented by two new ADR booths.

Making audio pop for Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns

By Jennifer Walden

As the song says, “It’s a jolly holiday with Mary.” And just in time for the holidays, there’s a new Mary Poppins musical to make the season bright. In theaters now, Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns is directed by Rob Marshall, who with Chicago, Nine and Into the Woods on his resume, has become the master of modern musicals.

Renée Tondelli

In this sequel, Mary Poppins (Emily Blunt) comes back to help the now-grown up Michael (Ben Whishaw) and Jane Banks (Emily Mortimer) by attending to Michael’s three children: Annabel (Pixie Davies), John (Nathanael Saleh) and Georgie (Joel Dawson). It’s a much-needed reunion for the family as Michael is struggling with the loss of his wife.

Mary Poppins Returns is another family reunion of sorts. According to Renée Tondelli, who along with Eugene Gearty, supervised and co-designed the sound, director Marshall likes to use the same crews on all his films. “Rob creates families in each phase of the film, so we all have a shorthand with each other. It’s really the most wonderful experience you can have in a filmmaking process,” says Tondelli, who has worked with Marshall on five films, three of which were his musicals. “In the many years of working in this business, I have never worked with a more collaborative, wonderful, creative team than I have on Mary Poppins Returns. That goes for everyone involved, from the picture editor down to all of our assistants.”

Sound editorial took place in New York at Sixteen 19, the facility where the picture was being edited. Sound mixing was also done in New York, at Warner Bros. Sound.

In his musicals, Marshall weaves songs into scenes in a way that feels organic. The songs are coaxed from the emotional quotient of the story. That’s not only true for how the dialogue transitions into the singing, but also for how the music is derived from what’s happening in the scene. “Everything with Rob is incredibly rhythmic,” she says. “He has an impeccable sense of timing. Every breath, every footstep, every movement has a rhythmic cadence to it that relates to and works within the song. He does this with every artform in the production — with choreography, production design and sound design.”

From a sound perspective, Tondelli and her team worked to integrate the songs by blending the pre-recorded vocals with the production dialogue and the ADR. “We combined all of those in a micro editing process, often syllable by syllable, to create a very seamless approach so that you can’t really tell where they stop talking and start singing,” she says.

The Conversation
For example, near the beginning of the film, Michael is looking through the attic of their home on Cherry Tree Lane as he speaks to the spirit of his deceased wife, telling her how much he misses her in a song called “The Conversation.” Tondelli explains, “It’s a very delicate scene, and it’s a song that Michael was speaking/singing. We constantly cut between his pre-records and his production dialogue. It was an amazing collaboration between me, the supervising music editor Jennifer Dunnington and re-recording mixer Mike Prestwood Smith. We all worked together to create this delicate balance so you really feel that he is singing his song in that scene in that moment.”

Since Michael is moving around the attic as he’s performing the song, the environment affects the quality of the production sound. As he gets closer to the window, the sound bounces off the glass. “Mike [Prestwood Smith] really had his work cut out for him on that song. We were taking impulse responses from the end of the slates and feeding them into Audio Ease’s Altiverb to get the right room reverb on the pre-records. We did a lot of impulse responses and reverbs, and EQs to make that scene all flow, but it was worth it. It was so beautiful.”

The Bowl
They also captured impulse responses for another sequence, which takes place inside a ceramic bowl. The sequence begins with the three Banks children arguing over their mother’s bowl. They accidentally drop it and it breaks. Mary and Jack (Lin-Manuel Miranda) notice the bowl’s painted scenery has changed. The horse-drawn carriage now has a broken wheel that must be fixed. Mary spins the bowl and a gust of wind pulls them into the ceramic bowl’s world, which is presented in 2D animation. According to Tondelli, the sequence was hand-drawn, frame by frame, as an homage to the original Mary Poppins. “They actually brought some animators out of retirement to work on this film,” she says.

Tondelli and co-supervising sound editor/co-sound designer Eugene Gearty placed mics inside porcelain bowls, in a porcelain sink, and near marble tiles, which they thumped with rubber mallets, broken pieces of ceramic and other materials. The resulting ring-out was used to create reverbs that were applied to every element in the ceramic bowl sequence, from the dialogue to the Foley. “Everything they said, every step they took had to have this ceramic feel to it, so as they are speaking and walking it sounds like it’s all happening inside a bowl,” Tondelli says.

She first started working on this hand-drawn animation sequence when it showed little more than the actors against a greenscreen with a few pencil drawings. “The fastest and easiest way to make a scene like that come alive is through sound. The horse, which was possibly the first thing that was drawn, is pullling the carriage. It dances in this syncopated rhythm with the music so it provides a rhythmic base. That was the first thing that we tackled.”

After the carriage is fixed, Mary and her troupe walk to the Royal Doulton Music Hall where, ultimately, Jack and Mary are going to perform. Traditionally, a music hall in London is very rowdy and boisterous. The audience is involved in the show and there’s an air of playfulness. “Rob said to me, ‘I want this to be an English music hall, Renée. You really have to make that happen.’ So I researched what music halls were like and how they sounded.”

Since the animation wasn’t complete, Tondelli consulted with the animators to find out who — or rather what — was going to be in the audience. “There were going to be giraffes dressed up in suits with hats and Indian elephants in beautiful saris, penguins on the stage dancing with Jack and Mary, flamingos, giant moose and rabbits, baby hippos and other animals. The only way I thought I could do this was to go to London and hire actors of all ages who could do animal voices.”

But there were some specific parameters that had to be met. Tondelli defines the world of Mary Poppins Returns as being “magical realism,” so the animals couldn’t sound too cartoony. They had to sound believably like animal versions of British citizens. Also, the actors had to be able to sing in their animal voices.

According to Tondelli, they recorded 15 actors at a time for a period of five days. “I would call out, ‘Who can do an orangutan?’ And then the actors would all do voices and we’d choose one. Then they would do the whole song and sing out and call out. We had all different accents — Cockney, Welsh and Scottish,” she says. “All the British Isles came together on this and, of course, they all loved Mary and knew all the songs so they sang along with her.”

On the Dolby Atmos mix, the music hall scene really comes alive. The audience’s voices are coming from the rafters and all around the walls and the music is reverberating into the space — which, by the way, no longer sounds like it’s in a ceramic bowl even though the music hall is in the ceramic bowl world. In addition to the animal voices, there are hooves and paws for the animals’ clapping. “We had to create the clapping in Foley because it wasn’t normal clapping,” explains Tondelli. “The music hall was possibly the most challenging, but also the funnest scene to do. We just loved it. All of us had a great time on it.”

The Foley
The Foley elements in Mary Poppins Returns often had to be performed in perfect sync with the music. On the big dance numbers, like “Trip the Light Fantastic,” the Foley was an essential musical element since the dances were reconstructed sonically in post. “Everything for this scene was wiped away, even the vocals. We ended up using a lot of the records for this one and a lot less production sound,” says Tondelli.

In “Trip the Light Fantastic,” Jack is bringing the kids back home through the park, and they emerge from a tunnel to see nearly 50 lamplighters on lampposts. Marshall and John DeLuca (choreographer/producer/screen story writer) arranged the dance to happen in multiple layers, with each layer doing something different. “The background dancers were doing hand slaps and leg swipes, and another layer was stepping on and off of these slate surfaces. Every time the dancers would jump up on the lampposts, they’d hit it and each would ring out in a different pitch,” explains Tondelli.

All those complex rhythms were performed in Foley in time to the music. It’s a pretty tall order to ask of any Foley artist but Tondelli has the perfect solution for that dilemma. “I hire the co-choreographers (for this film, Joey Pizzi and Tara Hughes) or dancers that actually worked on the film to do the Foley. It’s something that I always do for Rob’s films. There’s such a difference in the performance,” she says.

Tondelli worked with the Foley team of Marko Costanzo and George Lara at c5 Sound in New York, who helped to build custom surfaces — like a slate-on-sand surface for the lamplighter dance — and arrange multi-surface layouts to optimally suit the Foley performer’s needs.

For instance, in the music hall sequence, the dance on stage incorporates books, so they needed three different surfaces: wood, leather and a papery-sounding surface set up in a logical, easily accessible way. “I wanted the dancer performing the Foley to go through the entire number while jumping off and on these different surfaces so you felt like it was a complete dance and not pieced together,” she says.

For the lamplighter dance, they had a big, thick pig iron pipe next to the slate floor so that the dancer performing the Foley could hit it every time the dancers on-screen jumped up on the lampposts. “So the performer would dance on the slate floor, then hit the pipe and then jump over to the wood floor. It was an amazingly syncopated rhythmic soundtrack,” says Tondelli.

“It was an orchestration, a beautiful sound orchestra, a Foley orchestra that we created and it had to be impeccably in sync. If there was a step out of place you’d hear it,” she continues. “It was really a process to keep it in sync through all the edit conforms and the changes in the movie. We had to be very careful doing the conforms and making the adjustments because even one small mistake and you would hear it.”

The Wind
Wind plays a prominent role in the story. Mary Poppins descends into London on a gust of wind. Later, they’re transported into the ceramic bowl world via a whirlwind. “It’s everywhere, from a tiny leaf blowing across the sidewalk to the huge gale in the park,” attests Tondelli. “Each one of those winds has a personality that Eugene [Gearty] spent a lot of time working on. He did amazing work.”

As far as the on-set fans and wind machines wreaking havoc on the production dialogue, Tondelli says there were two huge saving graces. First was production sound mixer Simon Hayes, who did a great job of capturing the dialogue despite the practical effects obstacles. Second was dialogue editor Alexa Zimmerman, who was a master at iZotope RX. All told, about 85% of the production dialogue made it into the film.

“My goal — and my unspoken order from Rob — was to not replace anything that we didn’t have to. He’s so performance-oriented. He arduously goes over every single take to make sure it’s perfect,” says Tondelli, who also points out that Marshall isn’t afraid of using ADR. “He will pick words from a take and he doesn’t care if it’s coming from a pre-record and then back to ADR and then back to production. Whichever has the best performance is what wins. Our job then is to make all of that happen for him.”


Jennifer Walden is a New Jersey-based audio engineer and writer. You can follow her on Twitter @audiojeny

Full-service creative agency Carousel opens in NYC

Carousel, a new creative agency helmed by Pete Kasko and Bernadette Quinn, has opened its doors in New York City. Billing itself as “a collaborative collective of creative talent,” Carousel is positioned to handle projects from television series to ad campaigns for brands, media companies and advertising agencies.

Clients such as PepsiCo’s Pepsi, Quaker and Lays brands; Victoria’s Secret; Interscope Records; A&E Network and The Skimm have all worked with the company.

Designed to provide full 360 capabilities, Carousel allows its brand partners to partake of all its services or pick and choose specific offerings including strategy, creative development, brand development, production, editorial, VFX/GFX, color, music and mix. Along with its client relationships, Carousel has also been the post production partner for agencies such as McGarryBowen, McCann, Publicis and Virtue.

“The industry is shifting in how the work is getting done. Everyone has to be faster and more adaptable to change without sacrificing the things that matter,” says Quinn. “Our goal is to combine brilliant, high-caliber people, seasoned in all aspects of the business, under one roof together with a shared vision of how to create better content in a more efficient way.”

According to managing director Dee Tagert comments, “The name Carousel describes having a full set of capabilities from ideation to delivery so that agencies or brands can jump on at any point in their process. By having a small but complete agency team that can manage and execute everything from strategy, creative development and brand development to production and post, we can prove more effective and efficient than a traditional agency model.”

Danielle Russo, Dee Tagert, AnaLiza Alba Leen

AnaLiza Alba Leen comes on board Carousel as creative director with 15 years of global agency experience, and executive producer Danielle Russo brings 12 years of agency experience.
Tagert adds, “The industry has been drastically changing over the last few years. As clients’ hunger for content is driving everything at a much faster pace, it was completely logical to us to create a fully integrative company to be able to respond to our clients in a highly productive, successful manner.”

Carousel is currently working on several upcoming projects for clients including Victoria’s Secret, DNTL, Subway, US Army, Tazo Tea and Range Rover.

Main Image: Bernadette Quinn and Pete Kasko

Capturing realistic dialogue for The Front Runner

By Mel Lambert

Early on in his process, The Front Runner director Jason Reitman asked frequent collaborator and production sound mixer Steve Morrow, CAS, to join the production. “It was maybe inevitable that Jason would ask me to join the crew,” says Morrow, who has worked with the director on Labor Day, Up in the Air and Thank You for Smoking. “I have been part of Jason’s extended family for at least 10 years — having worked with his father Ivan Reitman on Draft Day — and know how he likes to work.”

Steve Morrow

This Sony Pictures film was co-written by Reitman, Matt Bai and Jay Carson, and based on Bai’s book, “All the Truth Is Out.” The Front Runner follows the rise and fall of Senator Gary Hart, set during his unsuccessful presidential campaign in 1988 when he was famously caught having an affair with the much younger Donna Rice. Despite capturing the imagination of young voters, and being considered the overwhelming front runner for the Democratic nomination, Hart’s campaign was sidelined by the affair.

It stars Hugh Jackman as Gary Hart, Vera Farmiga as his wife Lee, J.K. Simmons as campaign manager Bill Dixon and Alfred Molina as the Washington Post’s managing editor, Ben Bradlee.

“From the first read-through of the script, I knew that we would be faced with some production challenges,” recalls Morrow, a 20-year industry veteran. “There were a lot of ensemble scenes with the cast talking over one another, and I knew from previous experience that Jason doesn’t like to rely on ADR. Not only is he really concerned about the quality of the sound we secure from the set — and gives the actors space to prepare — but Jason’s scripts are always so well-written that they shouldn’t need replacement lines in post.”

Ear Candy Post’s Perry Robertson and Scott Sanders, MPSE, served as co-supervising sound editors on the project, which was re-recorded on Deluxe Stage 2 — the former Glen Glenn Sound facility — by Chris Jenkins handling dialogue and music and Jeremy Peirson, CAS, overseeing sound effects. Sebastian Sheehan Visconti was sound effects editor.

With as many as two dozen actors in a busy scene, Morrow soon realized that he would have to mic all of the key campaign team members. “I knew that we were shooting a political film like Robert Altman’s All the President’s Men or [Michael Ritchie’s] The Candidate, so I referred back to the multichannel techniques pioneered by Jim Webb and his high-quality dialogue recordings. I elected to use up to 18 radio mics for those ensemble scenes,” including Reitman’s long opening sequence in which the audience learns who the key participants are on the campaign trail. I did this “while recording each actor on a separate track, together with a guide mono mix of the key participants for the picture editor Stefan Grube.”

Reitman is well known for his films’ elaborate opening title sequences and often highly subjective narration from a main character. His motion pictures typically revolve around characters that are brashly self-confident, but then begin to rethink their lives and responsibilities. He is also reported to be a fan of ‘70s-style cinema verite, which uses a meandering camera and overlapping dialogue to draw the audience into an immersive reality. The Front Runner’s soundtrack is layered with dialogue, together with a constant hum of conversation — from the principals to the press and campaign staff. Since Bai and Carson have written political speeches, Reitman had them on set to ensure that conversations sounded authentic.

Even though there might be four or so key participants speaking in a scene, “Jason wants to capture all of the background dialogue between working press and campaign staff, for example,” Morrow continues.

“He briefed all of the other actors on what the scene was about so they could develop appropriate conversations and background dialogue while the camera roamed around the room. In other words, if somebody was on set they got a mic — one track per actor. In addition to capturing everything, Jason wanted me to have fun with the scene; he likes a solid mix for the crew, dailies and picture editorial, so I gave him the best I could get. And we always had the ability to modify it later in post production from the iso mic channels.”

Morrow recorded the pre-fader individual tracks at between 10dB and 15dB lower than the main mix, “which I rode hot, knowing that we could go back and correct it in post. Levels on that main mix were within ±5 dB most of the time,” he says. Assisting Morrow during the 40-day shoot, which took place in and around Atlanta and Savannah, were Collin Heath and Craig Dollinger, who also served as the boom operator on a handful of scenes.

The mono production mix was also useful for the camera crew, says Morrow. “They sometimes had problems understanding the dramatic focus of a particular scene. In other words, ‘Where does my eye go?’ When I fed my mix to their headphones they came to understand which actors we were spotlighting from the script. This allowed them to follow that overview.”

Production Tools
Morrow used a Behringer Midas Model M32R digital console that features 16 rear-channel inputs and 16 more inputs via a stage box that connects to the M32R via a Cat-5 cable. The console provided pre-fader and mixed outputs to Morrow’s pair of 64-track Sound Devices 970 hard-disk recorders — a main and a parallel backup — via Audinate Dante digital ports. “I also carried my second M32R mixer as a spare,” Morrow says. “I turned over the Compact Flash media at the end of each day’s shooting and retained the contents of the 970’s internal 1TB SSDs and external back-up drives until the end of post, just in case. We created maybe 30GB of data per recorder per day.”

Color coding helps Morrow mix dialogue more accurately.

For easy level checking, the two recorders with front-panel displays were mounted on Morrow’s production sound cart directly above his mixing console. “When I can, I color code the script to highlight the dialogue of key characters in specific scenes,” he says. “It helps me mix more accurately.”

RF transmitters comprised two dozen Lectrosonics SSM Micro belt-pack units — Morrow bought six or seven more for the film — linked to a bank of Lectrosonics Venue2 modular four-channel and three-channel VR receivers. “I used my collection of Sanken COS-11D miniature lavalier microphones for the belt packs. They are my go-to lavs with clean audio output and excellent performance. I also have some DPA lavaliers, if needed.”

With 20+ RF channels simultaneously in use within metropolitan centers, frequency coordination was an essential chore to ensure consistent operation for all radio systems. “The Lectrosonics Venue receivers can auto-assign radio-mic frequencies,” Morrow explains. “The best way to do this is to have everything turned off, and then one by one let the system scan the frequency spectrum. When it finds a good channel, you assign it to the first microphone and then repeat that process for the next radio transmitters. I try to keep up with FCC deliberations [on diminishing RF spectrum space], but realize that companies who manufacture this equipment also need to be more involved. So, together, I feel good that we’ll have the separation we all need for successful shoots.”

Morrow’s setup.

Morrow also made several location recordings on set. “I mounted a couple of lavaliers on bumpers to secure car-byes and other sounds for supervising sound editor Perry Robertson, as well as backgrounds in the house during a Labor Day gathering. We also recorded Vera Farmiga playing the piano during one scene — she is actually a classically-trained pianist — using a DPA Model 5099 microphone (which I also used while working on A Star is Born). But we didn’t record much room tone, because we didn’t find it necessary.”

During scenes at a campaign rally, Morrow provided a small PA system that comprised a couple of loudspeakers mounted on a balcony and a vocal microphone on the podium. “We ran the system at medium-levels, simply to capture the reverb and ambiance of the auditorium,” he explains, “but not so much that it caused problems in post production.”

Summarizing his experience on The Front Runner, Morrow offers that Reitman, and his production partner Helen Estabrook, bring a team spirit to their films. “The set is a highly collaborative environment. We all hang out with one another and share birthdays together. In my experience, Jason’s films are always from the heart. We love working with him 120%. The low point of the shoot is going home!”


Mel Lambert has been involved with production and post on both sides of the Atlantic for more years than he cares to remember. He is principal of Content Creators, a Los Angeles-based copywriting and editorial service, and can be reached at mel.lambert@content-creators.com. He is also a long-time member of the UK’s National Union of Journalists.

Sound Lounge Film+Television adds Atmos mixing, Evan Benjamin

Sound Lounge’s Film + Television division, which provides sound editorial, ADR and mixing services for episodic television, features and documentaries is upgrading its main mix stage to support editing and mixing in the Dolby Atmos format.

Sound Lounge Film + Television division EP Rob Browning says that the studio expects to begin mixing in Dolby Atmos by the beginning of next year and that will allow it to target more high-end studio features. Sound Lounge is also installing a Dolby Atmos Mastering Suite, a custom hardware/software solution for preparing Dolby Atmos content for Blu-ray and streaming release.

It has also added veteran supervising sound editor, designer and re-recording mixer Evan Benjamin to its team. Benjamin is best known for his work in documentaries, including the feature doc RBG, about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as well as documentary series for Netflix, Paramount Network, HBO and PBS.

Benjamin is a 20-year industry veteran with credits on more than 130 film, television and documentary projects, including Paramount Network’s Rest in Power: The Trayvon Martin Story and HBO’s Baltimore Rising. Additionally, his credits include Time: The Kalief Browder Story, Welcome to Leith, Joseph Pulitzer: Man of the People and Moynihan.